PRESENTATION ON

●OPTIMAL STORAGE ON TAPES
●OPTIMAL MERGE PATTERNS

PRESENTED TO ■
DR. VINAY PATHAK
RESPENTED BYSUNIL KUMAR
III rd
C.S.E.
S.R.No. – 108/07

PROBLEM

Tapes

Optimal Storage on

ALL SIX PERMUTATIONS

1

2

3

1

3

2

2

3

1

2

1

3

3

1

2

3

2

1

FOR

n=3

MRT ( Mean Retrival Time )
v Let there are n programs namely
i1,i2,i3,i4.......................in on tape

then time tj required to retrive program ij

tj ∝ ∑

li

k


v If all program are retrived equally and every time head
point to the front , then expected MRT is given by

MRT =(1/n)∑

tj

∑ ∑ li

v Minimizing the MRT
to minimizing
D (isI )equivalent
=

1≤ j ≤ n 1≤ k ≤ j

k

Example
Let n = 3 and (l1,l2,l3) = (5,10,3)
Ordering I
1 ,2 , 3
5 + 5 +
1 ,3 , 2
5 + 5 +
2 ,1 , 3
10 + 10
2 ,3 , 1
10 + 10
3 ,1 , 2
3 + 3 +
3 ,2 , 1
3 + 3 +

D(I)
10 + 5 + 10 + 3 =
3 + 5 + 3 + 10 =
+ 5 + 10 + 5 + 3=
+ 3 + 10 + 3 + 5=
5 + 3 + 5 + 10 =
10 + 3 + 10 + 5 =

38
31
43
41
29
34

The Greedy Solution
Make tape empty
vfor i := 1 to n do

Øgrab the next shortest file
Øput it next on tape

vThe algorithm takes the best short term choice
without checking to see weather it is the best
long term decision.

Example
Le t n = 5 , a n d l1 = 5 , l2= 7 , l3= 10 ,
l4 = 2 0 , l5 = 3 0
TA P E -

SORTED ORDER IS
5,7,10,20,30

Insert 5
5

Insert 7

5

7

Insert

10
5

7

10

Insert 20

5

7

10

20

Insert 30
5

7

10

20

30

ALGO FOR MORE THAN ONE TAPE
1. Algorithm Store(n,m)
2. //n is the no of programs and m the no of
tapes
3. {

j:=1;//Next tape to store on
for i:=1 to n do
{
write(“append program”,i,”to permutation
for tape”,j);
8.
j:=(j+1)mod m;
9.
}
10. }
4.
5.
6.
7.

Example
vWe want to store files of lengths (in MB) {12 34
56 73 24 11 34 56 78 91 34 45} on three tapes.
How should we store them on the three tapes
so that the mean retrieval time is minimized?
vSOLUTION: STORE FILES BY
NONDECREASING LENGTH
vFirst sort the files in increasing order of length.
For this we can use heapsort, meregesort or
quicksort algorithms.

S o rte d E le 4 m e n ts a re
11 12 24 34 34 34 45 56 56 73 78 91

N o w d istrib u te th e file s:
First e le m e n t 1 1

In se rtin g 1 1
Tape 1
Tape 2
Tape 3

11

In se rtin g 1 2
Tape 1
Tape 2
Tape 3

11
12

In se rtin g 2 4
Tape 1
Tape 2
Tape 3

11
12
24

In se rtin g 3 4
Tape
Tape 12
Tape 3

11
12
24

34

In se rtin g 3 4
Tape
Tape 12
Tape 3

11
12
24

34
34

In se rtin g 4 5
Tape
Tape 12
Tape 3

11
12
24

34
34
34

45

In se rtin g 5 6

Tape
Tape 12
Tape 3

11
12
24

34
34
34

45
56

In se rtin g 5 6
Tape
Tape 12
Tape 3

11
12
24

34
34
34

45
56
56

In se rtin g 7 3
Tape
Tape 12
Tape 3

11
12
24

34
34
34

45
56
56

73

In se rtin g 7 8
Tape
Tape 12
Tape 3

11
12
24

34
34
34

45
56
56

73
78

In se rtin g 9 1
Tape
Tape 12
Tape 3

11
12
24

34
34
34

45
56
56

73
78
91

TIME
COMPLEXITY

The time is consumed only in shorting becoz in
writting and finding the tape on which we have
to write the time consumed is constant.So
time consumed is equal to time taken by any
sorting algo



T(n)=O(n ln n)+θ(1)
=O(n ln n)

Optimal Merge Patterns
P R O B LE M

Example.
Suppose there are 3 sorted lists L1, L2, and L3, of sizes
30, 20, and 10, respectively, which need to be merged
into a combined sorted list, but we can merge only
two at a time. We intend to find an optimal merge
pattern which minimizes the total number of
comparisons. For example, we can merge L1 and L2,
which uses 30 + 20 = 50 comparisons resulting in a list
of size 50. We can then merge this list with list L3,
using another 50 + 10 = 60 comparisons, so the total
number of comparisons is 50 + 60 = 110.
Alternatively, we can merge lists L2 and L3, using 20 +
10 = 30 comparisons, the resulting list (size 30) can
then be merged with list L1, for another 30 + 30 = 60
comparisons. So the total number of comparisons is 30
+ 60 = 90. It doesn’t take long to see that this latter

Binary Merge Trees : W e ca n d e p ict th e m e rg e p a tte rn s u sin g a
binary tree, built from the leaf nodes (the initial lists) towards
the root in which each merge of two nodes creates a parent node
whose size is the sum of the sizes of the two children. For
example, the two previous merge patterns are depicted in the
following two figures:
Cost = 30*2
+ 20*2 +
10*1 = 110

60

10

50
30

20

Cost = 30*1
+ 20*2 +
10*2 = 90

60
30

30
20

10

Merge L2 and L3, then with
Merge L1 and L2, then
L1
with L3
merge cost = sum of all weighted external path
lengths

ALGORITH
M

treenode = record{

treenode* lchild;

treenode*rchild;

integer weight;};
1. Algorithm Tree(n)
2. // list is a global list of n single node
3. //binary trees as described above
4. {
5.
for i:= 1 to n-1 do
6.
{
7.
pt:= new treenode;//Get a new treevnode
8.
(pt->lchild):=Least(list);
9.
(pt->rchild):=Least(list);
10.
(pt->wieght):= ((pt->lchild)->wieght)+((pt->rchild)->
wieght);
11.
Insert (list,pt);//Merge 2 trees with smallest length
12.
}
13.
return Least(list) //tree left in list is merged tree
14.}

E xa m p le o f th e o p tim a lm e rg e tre e
a lg o rith m :
2

3

5

7

Initially, 5 leaf nodes
with sizes

9

5
2

3

5

7

Iteration 1: merge 2 and 3
into 5

9

10

Iteration
2: merge 5
and 5 into
10

5

5
2

16

3

7

9

Iteration 3: merge 7
and 9 (chosen among
7, 9, and 10) into 16

26
16

10
5

5
2

3

Iteration 4:
merge 10 and 16
into 26

7

9

Cost = 2*3 + 3*3 + 5*2 +
7*2 + 9*2 = 57.

TIME COMPLEXITY
§ The main for loop executed n-1 times
§ If list is kept in nondecreasing order of the
weights of roots then Least (list) take only
O(1)time & Insert(list,pt) will take O(n)
time .

Hence the total time taken will be

O(n2)

Greedy
Solution

vThe solution is greedy becoz at each step we are
merging smallest files without caring of final
result
v
vThe cost is directly proportional tothe sum of
productof depth of external leaves to their
weights

∑1≤i≤n diqi
path length

called as weighted external

Proof of optimality of the
tree algorithm
We use induction on n  1 to show that the tree algo is
optimalin that it gives the minimum total weighted
external path lengths (among all possible ways to
merge the given leaf nodes into a binary tree).
Ø (Basis) When n= 1. There is no internal nodes so tree
is optimal.
Ø (Induction Hypothesis) Suppose the merge tree is
optimal when there are k leaf nodes, for some k  1

Ø (Induction) Consider (k+ 1) leaf nodes. Call them a1,
a2, …, and ak+1 . We may assume nodes a1, a2 are of
the smallest values, which are merged in the first
step of the merge algorithm into node b. We call the
merge tree T, the part excluding a1, a2 T’ (see
figure). Suppose an optimal binary merge tree is S.
We make two observations.

. ( 1 ) Ifnode x of S is a deepest internal node , we may
sw a p its tw o ch ild re n w ith n o d e s a 1 , a 2 in S w ith o u t
in cre a sin g th e to ta lw e ig h te d exte rn a lp a th le n g th s.
T h u s, w e m a y a ssu m e tre e S has a subtree S ’ with
le a f n o d e s x , a 3 , …, and a k +1 .
( 2 ) The tree S ’
m u st b e a n o p tim a ltre e fo r k nodes x , a 3 , …, and a k +1
B y in d u ctio n h yp o th e sis, tre e S ’ has a total weighted
exte rn a l p a th le n g th s e q u a lto th a t o f tre e T ’.
T h e re fo re , th e to ta l w e ig h te d exte rn a lp a th le n g th s o f
T equals to that of tree S , proving the optimality of T .
T
b

a1

T’
a2

S

S’

x

a1

a2

THANK
!

YOU