P. 1
Propagation Sample Lesson

Propagation Sample Lesson

|Views: 1,173|Likes:
Published by missus1

More info:

Published by: missus1 on Jul 13, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/11/2013

pdf

text

original

The degree of water stress in plants or cuttings is influenced by relative humidity
(please refer to the section on transpiration in lesson 2).

In the propagation phase, plant material without roots (cuttings) are particularly
vulnerable to water stress.  Water loss continues but the lack of root systems
prevents water replacement.

The higher the water content of air adjacent to the leaves, the lower the amount of
water loss.

Techniques have evolved to address this problem.

· In commercial operations, intermittent mist and fog systems are the
primary ways to maintain moisture content on the leaf surface approaching 95
percent relative humidity during the day, when potential transpiration is
highest.

· Another technique used by the commercial growers is to keep a layer of
polythene film in direct contact with the moistened leaves.  This reduces
moisture loss from the leaf by transpiration.

· The home gardener may use something as simple as a polythene bag,
misted by a hand mister and then sealed to keep the moisture levels around
the leaf as high as possible.  This is comparable to a humid chamber
technique.

This procedure involves confining the crop to a smaller volume of air in which
the humidity can be more easily controlled.  Disadvantages of this technique
include the possible encouragement of disease development by reduced air
circulation.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450

87

· Plastic propagation units or clear plastic domes may also help keep the
moisture levels up around the plant – but these require careful monitoring to
ensure that the moisture level does remain high.  An inexpensive plastic
dome may be created using the bottom of a clear plastic drinks bottle (a 2 litre
bottle is a good size to use).

Figure 47 An Inexpensive Home Propagation Unit

It is important to remember that any technique to keep humidity levels up may reduce
the amount of light reaching the plant material.  This will reduce any photosynthesis
that is occurring – the result is slower growth of roots and new shoots.  However,
desiccated cuttings will not photosynthesise at all, so the loss of some photosynthetic
potential is more than offset by the increased turgidity of the plant material.

Some commercial operations use a porous material that is kept moist – a structure
called a wet tent is the result. This could allow some air circulation while adding
moisture to the environment around the plants during propagation.

The quality of the water applied during propagation is important. The soluble salt
levels should be well within the acceptable range. Higher concentration of calcium
and/or iron in the water applied through a mist system result in deposits on the
leaves. These deposits may not be obvious while the leaves are wet, but a white
calcium deposit or a reddish iron deposit is seen when leaves dry.

Light

Both the quality and quantity of light need to be optimum for growth and
development of propagules.  This is important when rooting leafy cuttings.  For
example, hardwood cuttings with no need to photosynthesise are not sensitive to day
length.

Propagation “unit” for a
single African Violet leaf

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450

88

Some plants are sensitive to day length.  During rooting, vegetative growth is
desired and an appropriate day length should be provided.  For short day plants (like
chrysanthemums), cuttings respond to long days (usually between 14 and 16 hours
of light per day).  For long day plants (like sedum), short days may be best so that
vegetative growth is encouraged. For most woody plants, the longer the day length,
the greater the opportunity for growth (and root development).

In general, only commercial growers would consider manipulating day length.  These
growers may extend the day length artificially through the use of lighting equipment
or use night break lighting (as described in lesson 2).

An appropriate light intensity is species dependent.  Matching the light requirement
of any given species may be desirable.  Insufficient light intensity will result in
etiolated plants with weak stems that are sparsely foliated.  Excessive light will stress
the plant, resulting in a short, stubby, weakened plant with light green or yellowish
foliage.

It is important to maximise photosynthesis during propagation, since the products
of photosynthesis are used for growth and development.  The light level may have to
be a compromise between optimum light for photosynthesis and reduction of water
stress and transpiration, depending upon air temperatures and the ventilation
capabilities.

In the home garden, maintaining moisture levels in the cuttings is usually a priority
and cuttings (within polythene bags or other propagation structures) must be kept out
of direct sunlight.  Bright but indirect light is often best and some shading may be
desirable – for example, beneath the laths of a shade house, or in the shade of a
deciduous tree or large shrub.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->