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BOAT TEST

BOAT TEST

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Published by: urgayfagman on Feb 21, 2012
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12/11/2013

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Safe operation in restricted visibility

Right-of-way and navigation rules are the same whether operating during the day or at night.
However, while operating at night or during periods of restricted visibility (such as fog or
heavy rain), you must determine the speed, position, and size of other boats according to
the navigation lights they exhibit.

Sound signals should also be used when visibility is poor. Operators of sailboats should sound
one long blast, followed by two short blasts, every two minutes. Power boat operators should
sound one long blast every two minutes when underway and two long blasts every two minutes
when stopped.
Remember: If you are operating a pleasure craft and you are not in sight of other vessels due to
poor visibility, you are required to proceed at a safe speed that is appropriate for the prevailing
circumstances and visibility conditions (as described in the Collision Regulations Rule 19).
BACK TO TOP

Navigating at night

Right-of-way and navigation rules are the same whether operating during the day or at night.
However, while operating at night or during periods of restricted visibility, you must
determine the speed, position, and size of other boats according to the navigation lights
they exhibit.

Navigation lights must be used on any pleasure craft that operates from sunset to sunrise or
during periods of restricted visibility.
The navigation lights you are required to display depend
on the following:
•The size of your craft

•Whether it is sail-driven or power-driven

•Whether it is underway or at anchor
BACK TO TOP

Navigation lights

Power-driven pleasure crafts must exhibit a forward masthead light, sidelights and a
sternlight.

Many small boats (such as bow riders and runabouts) typically have a white light affixed to the
top of a light pole that can be placed at the stern of the craft. When underway, this all-round light
functions as a combined masthead and sternlight, and must be visible in all directions, mounted
higher than the boat structure, cockpit or any other obstruction.

Safe Boating Tip

Many boaters mistakenly exhibit all of their navigation lights, including their sidelights, when
anchored. This is incorrect. Your green and red sidelights indicate to other boaters that you are
underway. Your sidelights should NOT be displayed when anchored.

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