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Lecture 18 - Eulerian Flow Modeling


Applied Computational Fluid Dynamics
Instructor: Andr Bakker
http://www.bakker.org
Andr Bakker (2002-2006)
Fluent Inc. (2002)
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Contents
Overview of Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase model.
Spatial averaging.
Conservation equations and constitutive laws.
Interphase forces.
Heat and mass transfer.
Discretization.
Solver basics.
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Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase - overview
Used to model droplets or bubbles of secondary phase(s)
dispersed in continuous fluid phase (primary phase).
Allows for mixing and separation of phases.
Solves momentum, enthalpy, and continuity equations for each
phase and tracks volume fractions.
Uses a single pressure field for all phases.
Uses interphase drag coefficient.
Allows for virtual mass effect and lift forces.
Multiple species and homogeneous reactions in each phase.
Allows for heat and mass transfer between phases.
Can solve turbulence equations for each phase.
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Methodology
A general multiphase system consists of interacting phases
dispersed randomly in space and time. Interpenetrating continua.
Methods:
Use of continuum theory and thermodynamical principles to
formulate the constitutive equations (ASMM).
Use of microstructural model in which macroscopic behavior is
inferred from particle interaction: Eulerian-Granular.
Use of averaging techniques and closure assumptions to model the
unknown quantities:
Space averaging with no time averaging.
Time averaging with no space averaging.
Ensemble averaging with no space averaging.
space/time or ensemble/space averaging: Eulerian-Eulerian.
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Two-fluid model (interpenetrating continua)
Deductive approach:
Assume equations for each pure phase.
Average (homogenize) these equations.
Model the closure terms.
Inductive approach:
Assume equations for interacting phases.
Model the closure terms.
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Application of the general transport theorem to a property
k
gives the general balance law and its jump condition:
Continuity equation:
Momentum equation:
0 , 0 , = = =
k k k k
J
&
r
k k k k k k k k k
F I P J u
r
&
r
= = = , ,
k k k k
k
J u
t

&
r
r
= + +

0 ) ) ( (
, 1
= +
=
k ki ki i k
n
i k i
k
J n n u u
r
r r

Spatial averaging: basic equations


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Consider an elementary control volume d bounded by the
surface dS.
Length scales:
Volumes:
Averaging volume and coordinate system:
t k
l d l L ~ >> >>

=
=
n
i
i
t d d
1
) (
2
x
1
x
3
x
p
x
r
i
k
ki
n
r
d
k
d
n
r
1
y
2
y
3
y
Spatial averaging
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Definitions:
Volume average Intrinsic phasic average.
Volume phase fraction:

>= <
i
d
d t y x f
d
f
'
) , (
1 r r

= > <
k
d
k
k
d t y x f
d
f
'
) , (
1 r r

=
d
t x d
p k
k
) , (
r

1
1
=

=
n
k
k

k k
f f > < >= <
Space averaging: basic equations
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For all k-volumes that are differentiables, (Gray and Lee (1977),
Howes and Whitaker (1985)).
Temporal derivative:
Spatial derivative:
Next, apply averaging to the conservation equations.
S d n u f
d
f
t t
f
ki
dS
ki
ki
'
1 r r

> <

>=

<

S d n f
d
f f
ki
dS
ki
'
1

+ > < >= <


v
> <

>

< f
t t
f
> < > < f f
Space averaging: averaging theorems
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k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k k
F P u u u
t
> < + > < + > < = > < + > <


r r r
{ } S d n P u u u
d
ki
dS
k k k ki k k
ki
'
) (
1 r r r r
+

= > < + > <

ki
dS
k ki k k k k k k k k k
S d n u u
d
u
t
'
) (
1 r r r r

Space averaging: conservation equations
Continuity equation:
Momentum equation:
mass transfer term
interaction term
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Drag is caused by relative motion between phases.
Commonly used drag models (fluid-fluid multiphase).
Schuh et al. (1989).
Schiller and Naumann (1935).
Morsi and Alexander (1972).
Schwarz and Turner (1988; for bubble columns).
Symmetric law.
Many researchers devise and implement their own drag models
for their specific systems.
, 0 ) (
1
=

=
n
i
k i ik
u u K
r r
ik
drag
k k ik
f
K

=
i
k
k
ik
d

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2
=
Interphase forces
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Interphase forces: drag force models
Fluid-fluid drag functions
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
1.4
10 100 1000 10000 100000
Re
Cd
Schiller and
Naumann
Schuh et al.
Morsi et Alexander
( )

>
+
=
1000 Re 44 . 0
1000 Re Re 15 . 0 1 24
687 . 0
D
C
(Re) are , , where
Re Re
3 2 1
2
3 2
1
f a a a
a a
a C
D
+ + =
Schiller and Naumann
Schuh et al.
Morsi and Alexander
( )
( )

>
> +
< +
=
2500 Re 4008 . 0
2500 Re 200 Re / Re 0135 . 0 Re 914 . 0 24
200 Re 0 Re 15 . 0 1 24
282 . 0
687 . 0
D
C
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Virtual mass effect: caused by relative acceleration between
phases Drew and Lahey (1990).
Virtual mass effect is significant when the second phase density is
much smaller than the primary phase density (i.e., bubble column).
Lift force: caused by the shearing effect of the fluid onto the
particle Drew and Lahey (1990).
Lift force usually insignificant compared to drag force except when
the phases separate quickly and near boundaries.
|

\
|
+

= ) ( ) (
, s s
s
f f
f
f s vm fs vm
u u
t
u
u u
t
u
C K
r r
r
r r
r

) ( ) (
, f s f f s L fs k
u u u C K
r r r
=
Interphase forces: virtual mass and lift
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Modeling heat transfer
Conservation equation of phase enthalpy.
k k k k k
k
k k k k k k k k
R u S P u
t
P
h u h
t
+ + +

= +

r r r
: ) ( ) ( ) (
) ( ) (
1
ik k ki k i
n
k
ki k
h h m T T q + +

=
&
r

Viscous dissipation
term
Originates from
work term for
volume fraction
changes
Energy sources
e.g., radiation
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k k k k k
k
k k k k k k k k
R u S P u
t
P
h u h
t
+ + +

= +

r r r
: ) ( ) ( ) (
) ( ) (
1
ik k ki k i
n
k
ki k
h h m T T q + +

=
&
r

Interphase heat
transfer term
Heat conduction
Energy transfer with
mass transfer
Modeling heat transfer
Conservation equation of phase enthalpy.
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Assume Fouriers law:
For granular flows
k
is obtained from packed bed conductivity
expression, Kuipers, Prins and Swaaij (1992).
Near wall heat transfer is calculated as in single phase.
All standard boundary conditions for temperature can be
implemented for multiphase.
k k k
T q =
r
Heat conduction
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The interphase heat transfer coefficient is given by.
Granular Model (Gunn, 1978).
Fluid-fluid model.
2
6
i
i i k
ik
d
Nu
=
) Pr Re 7 . 0 1 )( 5 10 7 (
3
1
2 . 0 2
+ + =
f f s
Nu
3
1
7 . 0 2
Pr Re ) 2 . 1 4 . 2 33 . 1 (
f f
+ +
3 . 0 5 . 0
Pr Re 6 . 0 2 + =
i
Nu
k
i k i k k
d u u


= Re
k
k k p
C

,
Pr =
Interphase heat transfer
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Conservation equation for the mass fraction of the species i
in the phase k:
Here is the diffusivity of the species in the mixture of the
respective phase, is the rate of production/destruction of the
species.
Thermodynamic relations an state equations for the phase k are
needed.
When calculating mass transfer the shadow technique from
Spalding is used to update diameter of the dispersed phase.
i
k
i
k
i
k k k
i
k k k k
i
k k k
m m D m u m
t
&
r
+ = +

) ( ) ( ) (
i
k
m
i
k
D
i
k
m&
Conservation of species
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Evaporation and condensation:
For liquid temperatures saturation temperature, evaporation rate:
For vapor temperatures saturation temperature, condensation rate:
User specifies saturation temperature and, if desired, time relaxation
parameters r
l
and r
v
(Wen Ho Lee (1979)).
Unidirectional mass transfer, r is constant:
( )
sat
sat l l l v
v
T
T T r
m

=

&
( )
sat
v sat v v l
l
T
T T r
m

=

&
1 2 12
r m = &
Modeling mass transfer
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Coupled solver algorithms (more coupling between phases).
Faster turn around and more stable numerics.
High order discretization schemes for all phases.
More accurate results.
Implicit/Full Elimination
Algorithm v4.5
TDMA Coupled
Algorithm v4.5
Multiphase Flow Solution
Algorithms
Only Eulerian/Eulerian
model
Solution algorithms for multiphase flows
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Momentum equation for primary and secondary phase:
Elimination of secondary phase gives primary phase:
Secondary phase has similar form.
Applicable to N phases.
( )
s p p p nb p nb p eff p
s s nb s nb
s
p p nb p nb p s
s
p
b b u a u a
b u a
k a
k
b u a u a
k a
k
a
, , , ,
, , , ,
+ + =
+
+
+ + =
|
|

\
|
+
+


( )
( )
s s nb s nb s s p
p p nb p nb s p p
b u a u k a u k
b u a u k u k a
+ = + +
+ = +

, ,
, ,
Full elimination algorithm
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Discretized equations of primary and secondary phase are in
matrix form:
Results in a tri-diagonal matrix consisting of submatrices
Closer coupling in each iteration gives faster convergence
B U U
b
b
u
u
a
a
u
u
k a k
k k a
nb nb
s
p
s nb
p nb
s nb
p nb
s
p
s
p
r r r
+ =
|
|

\
|
+
|
|

\
|
|
|

\
|
=
|
|

\
|
|
|

\
|
+
+

A A
,
,
,
,
0
0
|
|
|
|
|

\
|
=
|
|
|
|
|

\
|
|
|
|
|
|

\
|
n n
nn
C
C
C
C
U
U
U
U
A
A A
A A A
A A
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
3
2
1
3
2
1
33 32
23 22 21
12 11
0 0 0
0 0
0
0 0
Coupled TDMA-algorithm
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Solution algorithm for multiphase
Typical algorithm:
Get initial and boundary conditions.
Perform time-step iteration.
Calculate primary and secondary phase velocities.
Calculate pressure correction and correct phase velocities, pressure
and phase fluxes. Pressure is shared by all phases.
Calculate volume fraction.
Calculate other scalars. If not converged go to step three.
Advance time step and go to step two.
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Solution guidelines
All multiphase calculations:
Start with a single-phase calculation to establish broad flow patterns.
Eulerian multiphase calculations:
Copy primary phase velocities to secondary phases.
Patch secondary volume fraction(s) as an initial condition.
Set normalizing density equal to physical density.
Compute a transient solution.
Use multigrid for pressure.
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Summary
Eulerian-Eulerian is the most general multiphase flow model.
Separate flow field for each phase.
Applicable to all particle relaxation time scales.
Includes heat/mass exchange between phases.
Available in both structured and unstructured formulations.