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Multiplicity

Hannah Steenson

Vegetation

Ecosystems

Multiplicity
7 RESEARCH 15 FORMAL INVESTIGATION 37 SITE & PROGRAM 53 DESIGN PROPOSAL

PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Located on the outskirts of the proposed condensed CBD, bordered by the Avon River and the Christchurch Art Gallery, the proposal is for a mixed use building that facilitates a connection between the public and small businesses involved in the rebuild. The project aims to integrate several urban environments, office spaces, artist studios, retail, cafes, public space and native vegetation, encouraging the symbiotic relationships which allow these programs to bring life into urban spaces, while maintaining their individual identities. Through early investigations

into the native vegetation of Christchurch the network of ecosystems highlighted the importance of interdependent structures and systems in the natural environment. This notion influenced the building concept from form to program focusing on the connections between the multiplicity of structures and environments.

The project attempts to allow the notion of a garden city to reemerge through creating an environment where nature and architecture are intrinsically connected. Seeing a frame as a restrictive boundary the proposal incorporates green spaces into its built fabric providing a way to extend the garden city notion beyond the restraints of the CBD. Alongside Swarm Housing and The Plant Science Park these proposals create the opportunity for a green axis to extend the garden city without bounds.

Conceptually a drawing, derived from a study of the manuka ecosystem, informed the buildings programmatic layout, circulation and massing assessing each structures inherent qualities to derive its placement and interpretation. Through the differences in kind and organization new environments emerge allowing programs to interact and influence each other. The multiplicity of programs and structures establishes diversity, while their dependencies allow for a fusion between each instead of a collage of isolated unconnected events. This process recognizes how a city works as a collective and interprets it at the smaller scale of a single site.

RESEARCH

CHRISTCHURCH ECOSYSTEMS

DRY PLAINS ECOSYSTEM


Houhere Ti Kouka Tussock Kowhai

mid age plains ecosystem moist and deep waimakariri soils

mid age plains ecosystem droughty and shallow waimakariri soils

young plains ecosystem droughty and shallow selwyn soils

young plains ecosystem moist and deep selwyn soils

Hoheria augustifolia

Houhere

Pittosporum tenuifolium
Small evergreen tree with coloured foliage

Kohuhu

DRY PLAINS

The dry plains are part of the alluvial floodplain built up by braided rivers of Canterbury. Prior to European settlement the plains were covered with silver tussock grassland with localized woodland areas of Kowhai, Cabbage trees and Kanuka. Very few of these areas remain within the citys boundaries, with only a few shrubs, patches of kowhai and areas of grassland surviving. The grassland areas are cable of supporting an extensive number of indigenous plant, bird and insect species.

The Wet plains have changed drastically since human occupation and the effects of human activity has seen a severe loss of original plant and animal species. The Wet Plains historically supported expansive podocarp (Kahikatea), wetland and swamp forest. Riccarton bush is the only significant podocarp wetland forest currently remaining. The honey eaters, tui and bellbird were important species for pollination and were all abundant in Canterbury in the past.

WET PLAINS

COASTAL PLAINS

Coastal plains are divided into two broad ecosystems: the estuarine and the dunes. Estuaries contain complex ecological conditions due it being the point where freshwater meets the sea. Cycles of tides and freshwater inflow produce much variations of water levels and salinities which the vegetation must tolerate in order to survive. Dune vegetation similarly are exposed to varying salinities and water levels, but also to extended durations of drought of which Pingao has especially adapted to.

Tall trees or large shrubs endemic to NZ.

Leptospermum scoparium
Small shrub found mainly in the drier areas of NZ

Manuka

Kanuka
Kunzea ericodes

Ti Kouka
The Cabbage tree is endemic to NZ and attracts many insects and birds

Cordyline australis

A tree or shrub native to NZ and SE Australia

Tree native to NZ growing throughout the country. Distinctive yellow

Saphora microphylla

Kowhai

Coprosma Crassifolia
Stiff bushy shrub

Thick leaved mikimiki

Coprosma propinqua
Small leaved shrub of tree common in scrub

Mikimiki

Fantail
houhere tussock ti kouka totara akeake pingao oioi kahikatea pukio
Small native insectivorous bird widely distributed in New Zealand.

Insects

Kakariki
Native small forest birds. Orange-fronted parakeet critically endangered

Silvereye
Native but not endemic bird of NZ which eats fruit of Karamu and disperses seed.

Lizard
Native geckos and skinks endemic to NZ.

Insects
Caterpillars, aphids, leaf miners

Tui
Native but not endemic bird of NZ

Bellbird
Korimako Endemic passerine bird of NZ. Pollinators of many native plants

Keruru
Native but not endemic bird of NZ

Banded dotterel
Endemic bird protected in NZ. Breed in a variety of habitats

Lizard
Native geckos and skinks endemic to NZ.

Silvereye
Native but not endemic bird of NZ which eats fruit of Karamu and disperses seed

kowhai

te kakahi

Native Fuchsia
Tussock, Green Skink, Ti Kouka, Kowhai, Pipit, Mikimiki, Young Plains Ecosystems, Ti Kouka, Kotare, Kanuka, Houhere, Piwakawaka, Kohuhu, Mid Age Plains Ecosystems Kahikatea, Kereru, Manatu, Lush, Totara, Bellbird, Matai, Older Plains Ecosystems, Pukio, Pukeko, Karamu, Peat Plains Ecosystem Akeake, Riroriro, Ngaio,Old Dune Ecosystem, Pingao, Kuaka, Tauhinu, Young Dune Ecosystem, Oioi, Tuturiwhatu, Marsh Ribbonwood, Estuarine Ecosystem Native tree found commonly throughout NZ with sweet berry

Insects
Caterpillars, aphids, leaf miners

Related Native Plants


Cabbage trees, miro, flax, kowhai, NZ fuchsia

Insects
Flies, moths

Related Native Plants


fuchsia, kowhai, flax Insect: Aphids

tall trees

small trees/shrub tussock/grass bird species other

WOOMIN ANGELA HANNAH

WOOMIN ANGELA HANNAH

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FOCUS STREAM

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WET PLAINS ECOSYSTEM
Totara Kahikatea Te Kakahi Pukio

Houhere

mid age plains ecosystem moist and deep waimakariri soils


Silt Sand Minor clay Sand Silt Greywacke stones Sand Greywacke stones

older plains ecosystem moist and deep kaiapoi soils

older plains ecosystem wet taitapu soils

dry or stoney wet taitapu soils

peat plains ecosystem wet and peaty waimairi and aranui soils

MANUKA
Leptospermum scorparium Manuka and kanuka were once common shrubland plants of the canterbury plains but numbers have significantly decreased as Christchurch city has developed. However, Maori and Pakeha settlement did cause a shortlived increase in their numbers. Manuka is a bushy shrub seldom growing taller than 5m. Its bark sheds in long papery strips ideal for many insect species, while after flowering it also produces small woody seeds. Historically the bark was used by Maori and European settlers as a poultice for colds, flus and stomache ache due to its antibiotic properties. Its small pointed leaves have also been used to make tea. Manuka flowers have an over represented pollen type that has a higher than normal conductivity about 4 times that of normal flower pollen. This high conductivity indicates the high mineral content of the pollen.

KAKARIKI
Orange-fronted, yellow-fronted and red-fronted Kakariki parrots have become increasingly rare in canterbury with the orange-crowned parakeet (exclusive to canterbury) now highly endangered with less than 200 remaining. They prefer tall unbroken forrest such as the lowfoot hill beech forrests of the southern alps and the dwindling podocarp forrests of Christchurch. However, they are know to fly great distances to reach manuka and kanuka trees for there antibiotic qualities. By using the bark and leaves of Manuka trees these rare parrots were able to rid themselves of parasites, and improve the condition of their feathers. They feed largely on berries such as fuchsia, mahoe and tutu, as well as the seeds of plants like karo, toe-toe and flax.

Totara Podocarpus totara


Tall, slow growing trees which provide fruit for native birds

Matai Prumnopitys taxifolia


Endemic NZ tree dispersed by Keruru

Kahikatea Dacrycarpus dacrydioides


Tall native tree which provides fruit for native birds

Kanuka Kunzea ericodes


A tree or shrub native to NZ and SE Australia

Manuka Leptospermum scoparium


A small tree or shrub native to NZ and SE Australia

Pukio Carex secta


Tussock edge useful for reestablishing or enhancing wetland areas

Karamu Coprosma robusta


Bushy shrub/ small tree, widespread native species

Keruru
New Zealand pigeon. Endemic to NZ, play important ecological role

Tui
Endemic passerine bird of NZ. Main pollinators of many native plants

Bellbird
Korimako Endemic passerine bird of NZ. Pollinators of many native plants

Kakariki
Native small forest birds. Orange-fronted parakeet critically endangered

Grey Warbler
Riroriro is a common insectivorous bird endemic to NZ

Kuruwhengi
New Zealand Shoveler which eats primarily the seeds of aquatic plants

Silvereye
Native but not endemic bird of NZ which eats fruit of Karamu and disperses seed

appropriate ecosystems

Endemic birds of NZ which disperse the seeds of Karamu

Keruru, Tui, Bellbird

Fantail
Small native insectivorous bird widely distributed in New Zealand.

MANUKA HONEY
Manuka honey is produced in New Zealand from both manuka and kanuka flowers. The honey is dark coloured and strongly flavoured with a herb and woody characteristic. Manuka honeys antibacterial properties are almost exclusively caused by its hydrogen peroxide content.

BEES
Bees create honey from the pollen of the Manuka and Kanuka tree flowers

FUCHSIA
Kotukutuku Fuchsia is a tree native to New Zealand and part of the Onagraceae family. It is one of few deciduous trees native to New Zealand bush and is common in damp forest margins and regenerating areas. It produces large bell shaped flowers changing colour from blue to red as they mature, while also producing large egg shaped berries.

TUI, BELLBIRD AND KERERU


Tui, Bellbirds and Kereru are all birds native to New Zealand known primarily as honey eaters due to there preferred diet of flower nectar. However, they have a very diverse diet including the berries of fuchsia, coprosma and cabbage trees. They are considered to be the most important seed distributors of native new zealand trees due to there abilities to eat the largest berries and fruit as well as various smaller varieties.

Common plum tree


The Keruru prefers to eat the leaves of the introduced plum tree plant.

Related Native Plants


Cabbage trees, miro, flax, kowhai, NZ fuchsia

Insects
Caterpillars, aphids, leaf miners

Related Native Plants


Beech, Manuka, Kanuka, flax seed, grass seed

Insects
Spiders, insects and their larvae

Related Native Plants


fuchsia, kowhai, flax Insect: Aphids

WOOMIN ANGELA HANNAH

tall trees small trees/shrub tussock/grass bird species other

WOOMIN ANGELA HANNAH

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COASTAL PLAINS ECOSYSTEM
Akeake Pingao Oioi

old dune ecosystem droughty waikuku soils

young dune ecosystem droughty and raw kairaki soils

esturine ecosystem wet and salty motukarara soils

Bracken Fern Pteridium esculentum


Bracken, ground cover

Ngaio Myoporum laetum


Native tree to NZ. Fast growing evergreen tree

Akeake Dodonaea viscosa


Widespread distribution. Wood is tough and durable

Nationally endangered native shrub located near coastal areas

Tauhinu Pomaderris ericifolia

A type of sand binding grass native to NZ.

Pingao Desmoschoenus spiralis

Native coastal groundcover with bright green foliage.

Remuremu Selliera Radicans

Shrub which is tolerant to salty conditions.

Marsh Ribbonwood Plagianthus divaricatus

OiOi Apodasmia similis


A tall reed growing on NZ salt marshes.

Grey Warbler
Riroriro is a common insectivorous bird endemic to NZ

A tussock which grows with Pingao.

Sand fescue Austrofestuca littoralis

Fernbird
Insectivorous bird native to NZ, prefering ground dwelling than flying.

Mingimingi Coprosma propinqua


Grows alongside marsh ribbonwood.

Banded Dotterel
Native bird feeding on molluscs, crustaceans and insects

Inanga
Known more commonly as whitebait, it is a scale-less fish with a silvery belly.

Insects
The grey warbler will feed on spiders, insects and their larvae

tall trees small trees/shrub tussock/grass bird species other WOOMIN ANGELA HANNAH

A bird native to both NZ and Australia, it has a fondness for fruits.

Silver Eye bird

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FORMAL INVESTIGATION

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MANUKA SYSTEM
The manuka tree, Leptospermum Scoparium, is a prominant tree in the canterbury landscape due to its ability to thrive in volatile conditions. It will thrive in soils lacking nutrients, wind swept area, can tolerate water logging and will survive frosts. These conditions may alter the trees growth and appearance however it will thrive in these conditions while struggling in rich soils and entirely sheltered areas. Consequently the manuka tree has developed, and helps to sustain, two important ecosystems in New Zealand, especially the south island. Its heart root system enables it to stablise loose soil and prevent erosion on sloped sites unsuitable for farmland. As it grows it developes lanceolate shaped leaves containing numerous oil glands. The oil contained within these leaves has an antibiotic quality due to its high triketone, sesquiterpene hydrocarbon and monoterpene hydrocarbon contents. This antibiotic ability was discovered by the endangered Kakariki parakeet who is able to rid itslef of parasites and improve the condition of its plumage by rubbing against and eating the leaves. Due to the shape of its beak the kakariki parakeet predominately eats seeds and fruit, one seed type in its diet is the native New Zealand flax seed. Due to its size and speed the parakeet is able to perch easily on flax stems to eat its chosen food. The flax bush also produces long bellshaped flowers which produce a very sweet honey dew pollen. This bellshaped flower is perfectly suited to the tongue of the native New Zealand Bellbird whose paint brushlike tongue extends down into the flower to extract the flower nectar. Despite the Tuis favourite food type of nectar during the winter months where this is very scarse it fills its diet with small insects such as the Eriococcus Orariensis, commonly known as Manuka Blight. This small scale insect eats away at the bark and trunk of the manuka tree causing a sooty black fungus to form, as it sucks nutrients from the tree. The removal of plant nutrients by the scale insect weakens the plant and reduces its photosynthesis ability, which intern reduces the amount of carbon dioxide the tree is able to absorb.

Manuka Tree

Kakariki

Flax

Tui

Insects

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SYSTEM STRUCTURES

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Honeycomb

Honey Bee Hair

Honey

Manuka Pollen

People

Manuka Tree Roots

Leaf Structure/Oil Glands

Antibiotic

Kakariki Parrot Feathers

Kakariki Parrot Beak

Eriococcus Orariensis (Manuka Blight)

Tui Tongue

Flax Nectar

Flax Stem
Each of these structures can be morphed into each other to form an image of this ecosystem. Numerous variations can be created based on where in the system the drawing begins, whether it follows the system in a clockwise or anti clock wise direction. Another variable includes how many of the structures are morphed into the image with a minimum of 2 required. The following pages include a series of these morphed images.

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OBJECTIVE SPACE FACIALITY CONNECTION COMPOSITION ORIENTATION VARIATION

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(enclosed open)
This first division separates the drawings into two major lineages. If the composition of appears open and continuous it corresponds to a project whose primary function is to create a connective ground. If the drawing composition appears to enclose space or have a definitive edge it correlates to a structure whose principal function is to develop an enclosing surface or structure.

(single - multiple: connected or separated)


Enclosed areas can occur in isolation identifying an individual structure. In contrast a series of unconnected spaces may be established, relating to series of individual structures within a combined area. Alternatively they may form in clusters creating a juxtaposition of several structures.

(single face multi face)


Similarly each line can be viewed predominantly from one side or from several. Where this constitutes a surface a line primarily viewed from one side is likely a ground surface. On the other hand where a line divides space within the composition it may constitue a surface that can be occupied in more than one layer, e.g. inside and outside or level 1 and 2.

(smooth disjointed)
The connection component refers to the fluidity of the transition between structures. It classifies the images into those with smooth transitions, continuous multiplicities, and those which are juxtaposed, discrete multiplcities.

(constant shifting)
This differentiation classifies the flow of the compostion, defining whether it is in one direction or shifts erratically across the page.

(oriented: linear or radial non oriented)


This attribute divides the drawings based on the overarching direction of the composition. If the drawing has a definite direction it can be separated into a primarily radial or linear class, alternatively it may spread relatively evenly across the page without any apparent orientation. Where the composition appears to follow a linear axis it indicates that a project will follow a preexisting structure or apparent natural direction. While a radial axis causes a project to respond to specific nodes. Comparatively where a composition lacks any major orientation a project will arrange itself somewhat sporadically.

(patterned irregular)
This final classification defines the drawings discontinuities. If a system of discontinuities, orientation shifts or quirks appear on a regular basis throughout, the composition it will have an apparent rhythm. In comparison if the overall composition provides no predominant patterning this will correspond to a drawing more responsive to structural specificities.

CLASSIFICATION

The classification system intends to dissect the ecosystem drawings helping to develop a series of overarching types within the drawing set. This classification system includes seven converging categories where the drawing species are formed.

Enclosed Connected Single face Smooth

Constant

Oriented

Linear Radial

patterned

Seperated Open

Multi face

Disjointed

Shifting

Non-oriented

irregular

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OBJECTIVE SPACE FACIALITY CONNECTION COMPOSITION ORIENTATION VARIATION DRAWING NO.

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3 DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURES

Single face Connected Multi face Multiple Single face Seperated Enclosed Multi face

Smooth

Shifting Constant Constant Shifting Shifting Constant Constant Shifting Shifting

Oriented Non-oriented Oriented Non-oriented Oriented Oriented

Linear Radial Linear Linear Linear Radial Radial Radial Radial

patterned patterned patterned patterned

irregular

01 14 20 03 18 10 13 09 15 11 08 19
series of threads originating at one source, branching out to disperse. Collection of cores that share sides to create an angular net. Central spine with thinner aligned threads extending from it. fluid liquid/string stretches to connect solid frames. Series of fine threads randomly intersecting originating from various points around a frame. Network of points with occasional clusters. Large series of fine threads, varying in length, originate at a source and disperse towards a slightly larger destination.

Smooth Disjointed Disjointed Smooth Disjointed Smooth Disjointed Smooth

irregular irregular irregular patterned irregular irregular patterned

Oriented Oriented Oriented Oriented Non-oriented Oriented Oriented

Single face

CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM

Single Multi face

Shifting Constant

Radial

patterned

02 12 07 17 06 05 04 16

Smooth Single face Disjointed Open Smooth Multi face Disjointed

Constant Shifting Constant Shifting

Non-oriented Oriented Non-oriented

Oriented

Linear Linear

patterned irregular irregular

patterned

Constant Shifting Shifting

Oriented Oriented

Non-oriented

Linear Linear

patterned irregular irregular

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DRAWING 5

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DRAWING 20

2D

3D Translation

2D

3D Translation

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SITE & PROGRAM

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TRAFFIC CONCENTRATION POST EARTHQUAKE

8:30 am

11:30 am

5:00 pm

8:00 pm

Tuam Street Montreal Street

Large amounts of traffic on the four main avenues throughout the day especially around 5 oclock when workers return home. Also fluctuating amounts of traffic along Montreal Street and Tuam Steet during the day providing these streets with maximum public exposure. This helps to highlight areas within the CBD which remain lively and continue to provide through routes and access to public amenties. Offering areas with potencial to draw people back into the heart of Christchurch.

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PROPOSED SITE
Christchurch boundary CBD Proposal site scale 1:10000 N

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VEGETATION GROUP SITES

Hannahs Site Angelas Site Woomins Site Green Axis

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PROPOSED SITE
The high office density proposed for the core will restrict the design variation within this central area. This proposed site is on the outskirts of the core linking it out and across the avon river to the Christchurch art gallery, where there is slightly less design and building constraints. This area is also still currently active and used by the public due to its close proximity to other minor art gallerys and institutions, eg. the arts centre and Coca gallery, aswell as schools, restaurants and cafes. This provides an opportunity to draw people across both into the core and out towards the art galleries. Along with this position it also lies in line with both Woomin and Angelas sites allowing us to create a green axis through the city, extending the notion of a garden city outside the constraints of the proposed frame.

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SURROUNDING AREA

Exsisting and proposed built environment

Proposed situation with existing buildings to be retained

Gloucester Street

Worcester Boulevard

Cambridge Terrace

Montreal Street

Total site area = 23,500 m^2


Proposed site Existing buildings to be retained Proposed buildings Public grassed areas

Oxford Terrace

Public facilities Commercial Education Housing Offices Carpark

art galleries, convention centre, performing arts space, art centre

restaurants, cafes, retail schools, school facilities

residential houses, hotels, apartments,units

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Proposed Site
Pre Earthquake Post Earthquake Maximum building Envelope

Gloucester Street Pre Earthquake

max. 28m

Cambridge Terrace Pre Earthquake

Cambridge Terrace Pre Earthquake

Pre Earthquake

Post Earthquake

Gloucester Street

Cambridge Terrace

Built Area 15.7% Built Area 36.1% Road Area 11.2%

Road Area 11.2%

Space 73.1% Space 52.7%

Worchester Boulevard Pre Earthquake

Worchester Boulevard

Demolished buildings

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PEOPLE

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PROPOSED PROGRAM

Motive -

Due to the large amount of both small and large offices destroyed in the earthquakes new work spaces are required particularly for smaller firms, and the large number of design and construction firms required to effectively create a new Christchurch. To successfully bring life, creativity and diversity back into the city center, new infrastructure needs to establish communities of social typologies. By creating a symbiotic system of spaces for work, interaction, relaxation and circulation new vibrant, productive communities will emerge throughout the skeleton of Christchurch.

Public Green Space

Public 40%

Recreational space 32% Commercial 8% Studios 15%

Native Vegetation 5% Open Space/Rest area 19% Retail 2%

Throughway

8%

Offices

Services (cafe/retail)

Studios

Cafe/Coffee shops Groups Individual 12% 3% Executive/Cells

6%

Private 60%

9%

Offices 45%

Design/Group

27%

Clercal/Open plan

9%

vibrant city community

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PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Office SPACE PER PERSON

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PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Studio SPACE PER PERSON

Meeting Room

designated area for internal and external meetings.

Work space

2m^2

Semi enclosed-open plan, allows for rearrangement, level of privacy, high interaction

6m^2

Club -

open plan, allows group fluctuation and high interaction, Clerical offices

Work Space

Amenities

Den -

Advertising and design offices group space/landscaped, creates group space with potencial for furniture rearrangement. 2.5m^2

cleaning, kitchen and bathroom areas

1.7m^2

Cell -

cellular, permits confidentiality and reception of visitors. Executive offices

Hive -

individual work interaction.

TOTAL

7.7M^2

Amenities

rest, kitchen and bathroom areas

1.7m^2

Meeting Room

32%

Work Space

78%

TOTAL

6.2M^2

Work Space

40% Amenities 22%

Amenities

28%

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Program requirements
Service-cafe, restaurant, small retail

Space cafe

store

Kitchen

8m^2

Display

1m^2

2m^2

Storage

3m^2

3m^2

Customer space

10m^2
Kitchen Display Storage 36% 5% 14%

8m^2
Display Storage 15% 23%

Customer Space 45%

Customer Space 62%

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DESIGN PROPOSAL

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CONCEPT THEME OPTIONS

using an existing ecosystem drawing

creating new framework through developed formal language

Wrapping

Abstracting

structural system created through structural multiplicity

programatic organisation through intensional structure placement

combining relevant attributes of structural systems to create system exchange and interplay

a field condition creating a formal spatial matrix unifying diverse elements while respecting the individual elements of each

Reiser + Umemoto, Atlas of novel tectonics. New York; Princeton Architectural Press 2006

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SITE DRAWINGS

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Following on from my investigation and group research the following conceptual scheme was choosen. By creating a series of site ecosystem drawings morphing one structure into the next a multiplicity of structures fill the site informing program organisation, circulation and form. The following pages show these conceptual experiments.

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SITE DRAWINGS SITE DRAWING J
Selected final conceptual drawing. Selection based on possible circulation, structure, space and massing potential due to ecosystem structure placement and morphology.

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native planting artist studios cafe/retail public seating

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offices public space

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3D TRANSLATION
SITE PLAN
1:2000
Armargh Street

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N

Cambridge Terrace

Proposed Convention Centre

Gloucester Street

Christchurch Art Gallery

Worchester

Street

Cathedral Square

Montreal Street

Christchurch City Council offices

Hereford Street

Casual Street

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SITE CIRCULATION

PROGRAM ORGANISATION

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Offices Public Open Space

Seating
level 1 and 2

Studios

ground level

Cafe/retail

pedestrian routes scale 1:2000

private access routes

MASSING

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Offices

OFFICE TYPES

Club

group + individual work high interaction Changeable workspaces with multiple different setting able to be easily rearranged eg. creative firms, information technology

Den conceptual massing

group work high interaction group orientated office layout eg. insurance, media, advertising

studios and cafe/retail Hive

individual work interaction Uniform open plan space, with a highly controled office layout eg. data entry, administration, information services

Cell

individual work low interaction Highly autonomous spaces for concentrated work eg. management, accountants, lawyers

conceptual massing

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BUILDING 1
B

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1 3 2

BUILDING 2
3

Club

Club

Den Hive

Den Hive

Cell

Cell

SECOND LEVEL

5M
N

10M

SECOND LEVEL

5M
N

10M

D
C

FIRST LEVEL

FIRST LEVEL

GROUND LEVEL

GROUND LEVEL

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BUILDING 3
3
artist studios

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1 2

artist studios

5M
artist studios

10M

elevated public space

Retail

Retail

Kitchen

artist studios

Retail Retail Cafe seating

FIRST LEVEL

Kitchen

Cafe seating

Approach from Cathedral Square, the Avon River and proposed convention centre precinct.
GROUND LEVEL

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STRUCTURAL SYSTEM
exterior timber columns Section through structure

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Circular timber columns

Glass panels

SECTION

Ground connection details

footpiece with rocker bearing allowing for movement on each column into specific angle

By breaking down the smooth masses of the proposal into triangulated sections each level can be treated as a truss. More memberers are added on differeing levels based on the structural integrity of the timber species used on that level. The truss system then allows the office building to bridge areas of the public space without reducing the continuity of the facade appearance. Each levels roof contains, though hidden from view, the horizontal members of the trusses allowing for minimal column placement and creating primarily open plan office spaces.

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OTHER STRUCTURES
Exterior Tensile Wire Structure Roof

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Curved roof plane

grid drawn across with increased grid lines where roof curves to change slope

Glulam rafters extruded down from derived grid lines

INTERIOR VIEW
Tensile wires drawn down to the ground from the roof plane . Each fixied into a below ground concrete beam. Wires established for vegetation to grow up, helping to encorpourate nature into all levels of the building and creating a more dynsmic space at ground level

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Gathering area semi enclosed by office buildings