www.smdailyjournal.

com
Monday • April 29, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 218
DID THEY TRAIN?
NATION PAGE 6
WILLIE
HITS 80
PAGE 32
WARRIORS
GO UP 3-1
SPORTS PAGE 11
FBI CHECKING ON WHETHER BROTHERS
GOT HELP WITH BOMBINGS
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Visitors to John Muir Elementary
School in San Bruno must visit the office.
That’s when anyone stopping in has a
chance to meet the school’s office manag-
er, Kathy Peckham. Peckham, an 18-year
veteran of the position at the San Bruno
school, has a happy corner filled with pho-
tos, stuffed animals and other knickknacks
given to her by students and families over
the years. The collection doesn’t change
annually just grows to a point that now
Peckham is running out of space.
On Friday, she got a few more items to
add to her collection when Peckham was
celebrated by her school. Peckham was
recently selected as the San Mateo County
Employee of the Year for Support
Services.
Peckham was overwhelmed by the
attention.
“Honored; humbled; I have no words,”
she said Friday morning. “I appreciate so
much that people thought of me. We’re all
just trying to do the best at our jobs.”
To get the celebration of Peckham start-
ed on Friday, student Lucas Esqueda
announced that the day was “Mrs.
Peckham’s Giants’ Day.” Peckham was
honored with a personalized T-shirt and
glitzy San Francisco Giants flip flops.
Coworkers celebrated Peckham all week
with personalized badges with fun sayings
like “Got Peckham?” or “Never fear,
Peckham’s here.”
“John Muir School is a great place. It
makes me who I am,” said Peckham who
started working with the district as a par-
ent volunteer at Allen Elementary School.
Peckham helped in a variety of roles
like noon duty, instructional aide, substi-
tuting as a cook and office manager. She’s
been with the district since 1988 and as
John Muir’s office manager for 18.
“I love my job,” she said, adding that not
many people can wake up in the morning
excited to go to work.
Big honor for school’s ‘mama bear’
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
Office manager Kathy Peckham shares a hug with Prin-
cipal Fran Dunleavy during the morning roundup Friday
at John Muir Elementary School in San Bruno.
John Muir School’s Kathy Peckham named ‘employee of the year’
See KATHY, Page 22
Hiller gets
amphibious
contribution
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It took three hours longer to get around the
world than Reid Dennis
had thought.
Not bad for a trip that
included more than 190
hours of flight time.
Dennis, now 86, hadn’t
actually dreamed about
circumnavigating the
globe when he began
rebuilding an Albatross
plane in the late ’80s. The
Bay Area native and cur-
rent Woodside resident had grown up watch-
ing PanAmerican Clippers come and go from
Children with cancer
assist in developing
video game’s sequel
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Sometimes all one needs is a little hope.
Redwood City-based HopeLab is looking to
offer just that for young cancer patients. The
nonprofit released Re-Mission, a PC-based
video game allowing kids to fight cancer, in
2006. Now it’s offering the sequel, Re-
Mission 2 — which includes a collection of
online games created by HopeLab with the
help of young people with cancer. The success
of the original showcased the power such a
game could give those battling cancer. Each
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
While Tim Draper is looking to create
heroes at his new university for entrepreneurs
in downtown San Mateo, he is starting to be
looked at as a hero himself by some of his stu-
dents, many who have traveled across the
world to learn from the venture capitalist who
first funded Hotmail and Skype here and
Baidu in China.
His school for entrepreneurs, The Draper
University of Heroes, is in full swing now and
its current class has attracted a slew of stu-
dents from the Middle East.
Amr Sobhy and Ahmed Essam, from Egypt,
and Ali Chehade, from Lebanon, are embrac-
ing the Draper experience and are looking for-
ward to bringing new ideas and new jobs to
Heroes create heroes
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
NBC Bay Area’s Raj Mathai interviews venture capitalist Tim Draper at his school for entrepreneurs in downtown San Mateo Thursday.
San Mateo’s Draper University of Heroes in full swing
See DRAPER, Page 30
See HILLER, Page 22
See GAME, Page 30
Reid Dennis
Rolling Stones rock
small club ahead of tour
LOS ANGELES — For one night
only, the Rolling Stones were an up-
and-coming band again.
The legendary group rocked a small
club in Los Angeles on Saturday night
for a miniscule crowd compared to
the thousands set to see them
launch their “50 and
Counting” anniversary tour a
week later on May 3 at the
Staples Center.
The band kicked off
Saturday’s hush-hush 90-
minute concert at the
Echoplex in the hip Echo Park
neighborhood with “You Got Me
Rocking” before catapulting into a mix
of new and old material, as well as their
blusey covers of classics from Otis
Redding (”That’s How Strong My Love
Is”), Chuck Berry (”Little Queenie”)
and The Temptations (”Just My
Imagination”).
“Welcome to Echo Park, a neighbor-
hood that’s always coming up — and
I’m glad you’re here to welcome an up-
and-coming band,” lead singer Mick
Jagger joked after the second song of the
evening, “Respectable.”
Despite clocking in several decades as
band, Jagger, drummer Charlie Watts
and guitarists Keith Richards and
Ronnie Wood showed no signs of slow-
ing down Saturday.
Jagger, who promptly ditched a black-
and-white track jacket emblazoned with
the band’s logo after the first few songs,
worked the crowd into a sing-a-long
frenzy with “Miss You,” complete with a
harmonica solo from the strutting front-
man.
Tickets to the Echoplex concert were
sold earlier in the day for $20 each — a
fraction of what tickets to the tour
cost.
Hundreds of fans lined up
outside the El Rey Theatre
across town earlier
Saturday for a chance to
attend the spontaneous
show. Buyers were limited
to one ticket, and they were
required to pay with cash,
show a government-issued ID,
wear a wristband with their name on it
and be photographed. Their names were
verified at the venue, which has a capac-
ity of about 700.
Cameras and smartphones weren’t
allowed inside the Echoplex, which usu-
ally plays host to hipster bands and
mash-up dance parties. The lack of per-
sonal recording devices made the
Stones’ performance feel even more
exclusive and old school, freeing con-
certgoers’ hands of the gizmos that have
become commonplace at concerts nowa-
days, and further bonding the crowd,
many of whom built up camaraderie
during the confusing ticket lottery earli-
er in the day.
Toward the end of Saturday’s show,
the band was joined by former Stones
guitarist Mick Taylor for their version of
Robert Johnson’s “Love in Vain,” as
well as “Midnight Rambler.”
The band, which was backed by
Darryll Jones on bass, Chuck Leavell
on keys, Bobby Keys on sax and
Bernard Fowler and Lisa Fischer as
back-up singers, encored with the hits
“Brown Sugar” and “Jumpin’ Jack
Flash.”
“(This is) the first show of the tour,
probably the best one,” Jagger said at
the end of the 90-minute set.
Bruce Willis, Gwen Stefani and
Skrillex were among the famous faces in
the sold-out crowd.
Rumors of the surprise show spread
across social networks last week after
the band teased the appearance on their
Twitter accounts. The dance-pop band
New Build, which was originally sched-
uled to play the Echoplex on Saturday,
was first to leak details about the per-
formance.
“Our gig got shifted b/c the Rolling
Stones are playing Echoplex,” the band
posted Friday on Twitter. They joked
that they were looking forward to “hav-
ing it out” with the Stones.
The Rolling Stones performed a few
dates together in London, Brooklyn,
N.Y., and Newark, N.J., last winter, but
didn’t announce a tour until earlier this
month. They will play 17 dates in the
United States but said they may add
more down the line. The lowest price for
tickets to the show at the Staples Center,
which has a capacity of about 20,000, is
$250.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Comedian Jerry
Seinfeld is 59.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1913
Swedish-born engineer Gideon
Sundback of Hoboken, N.J., received a
U.S. patent for a “separable fastener”
— later known as the zipper.
“Human beings are perhaps never more
frightening than when they are convinced
beyond doubt that they are right.”
— Sir Laurens van der Post, South African author (1906-1996).
Bluesman Otis
Rush is 79.
Actress Uma
Thurman is 43.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A Jewish worshipper prays during a pilgrimage to the El Ghriba synagogue in Djerba Sunday. Africa’s oldest synagogue is
playing host to that rarity in the Arab world — a religious gathering of hundreds of Jews drawn from Europe and Israel.
Monday: Sunny. Highs in the 60s.
Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph increasing to
10 to 20 mph in the afternoon.
Monday night: Clear in the evening then
becoming mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after
midnight. Lows in the upper 40s. Northwest
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the
upper 60s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tuesday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 50s. North
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s to lower 70s.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear. Lows near 50.
Thursday through Friday night: Clear. Highs in the lower to
mid 70s. Lows in the upper 40s to mid 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
(Answers tomorrow)
JOIST ABACK DOCKET CHOPPY
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: He hoped that becoming the circus tightrope
walker would be a STEADY JOB
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
HALSS
SIRYK
ROSDUH
TIKNET
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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4 5 9
3 23 48 54 55 5
Powerball
April 27 Powerball
21 32 36 39 40
April 27 Super Lotto Plus
Daily Four
22 11 28 29
Fantasy Five
5 4 5
Daily three midday
On this date:
In 1429, Joan of Arc entered the besieged city of Orleans to
lead a French victory over the English.
In 1861, the Maryland House of Delegates voted 53-13 against
seceding from the Union. In Montgomery, Ala., President
Jefferson Davis asked the Confederate Congress for the author-
ity to wage war.
In 1863, newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst was
born in San Francisco.
In 1945, during World War II, American soldiers liberated the
Dachau (DAH’-khow) concentration camp. Adolf Hitler mar-
ried Eva Braun and designated Adm. Karl Doenitz (DUHR’-
nihtz) president.
In 1946, 28 former Japanese officials went on trial in Tokyo as
war criminals; seven ended up being sentenced to death.
In 1968, the counterculture musical “Hair” opened on
Broadway following limited engagements off-Broadway.
In 1974, President Richard M. Nixon announced he was
releasing edited transcripts of some secretly made White
House tape recordings related to Watergate.
In 1983, Harold Washington was sworn in as the first black
mayor of Chicago.
In 1992, rioting resulting in 55 deaths erupted in Los Angeles
after a jury in Simi Valley, Calif., acquitted four Los Angeles
police officers of almost all state charges in the videotaped
beating of Rodney King.
In 1993, Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II announced that for the
first time, Buckingham Palace would be opened to tourists to
help raise money for repairs at fire-damaged Windsor Castle.
In 2011, Britain’s Prince William and Kate Middleton were mar-
ried in an opulent ceremony at London’s Westminster Abbey.
Ten years ago: The Palestinian parliament approved
Mahmoud Abbas as prime minister.
Actor Keith Baxter is 80. Conductor Zubin Mehta is 77.
Disgraced financier Bernard Madoff is 75. Singer Tommy
James is 66. Country musician Wayne Secrest (Confederate
Railroad) is 63. Actor Leslie Jordan is 58. Actress Kate
Mulgrew is 58. Actor Daniel Day-Lewis is 56. Actress
Michelle Pfeiffer is 55. Actress Eve Plumb is 55. Country
singer Stephanie Bentley is 50. Actor Vincent Ventresca is 47.
Singer Carnie Wilson (Wilson Phillips) is 45. Actor Paul
Adelstein is 44. Tennis player Andre Agassi is 43. Rapper
Master P is 43. Country singer James Bonamy is 41. Actor
Tyler Labine is 35. Actress-model Taylor Cole is 29.
17 42 49 54 55 31
Mega number
April 26 Mega Millions
6 8 5
Daily three evening
1
9
25
Mega number
In other news ...
The Daily Derby race winners are No.10 Solid Gold
in first place; No. 04 Big Ben in second place; and
No. 02 Money Bags in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:44.99.
T
here were two things that really excit-
ed me when I was a youngster —
food and Sunday morning newspa-
pers. We didn’t get the newspaper, but my
grandmother did. She lived about a half an
hour from our house but, regardless of the
weather, I would walk over to her house to
read the newspaper.
In the relatively small Midwestern town in
which I grew up, there wasn’t a lot of new
activity happening — but the newspaper was
always new. I also read comic books I had col-
lected after my buddies had gotten full of its
adventure. After I finished reading it, I stacked
it with the dozens of other ones I had collect-
ed. I remember having two stacks of comic
books, about a yard high, and my mother
never understood that that was my “treasure.”
One day I came home and my mother had
thrown them all away. “Kept getting in my
way.” She explained.
I never collected newspapers though. I just
read them. The first thing I did when I got her
newspaper was find the comic strips. They
were usually a couple of pages of “strips” that
were in color. Sunday “strips” were in color
whereas during the week they were in black
and white. Comic strips in newspapers had
developed into an art form that everyone
understood — but there were favorites and
some which I never understood the humor.
The comics as we called them, had some-
what of a natural development over the ages.
Cavemen communicated by drawings they put
on the walls of caves. After religion had devel-
oped, the church facade developed into a
“strip” mentality due to the lack of education
of the peasants. The only people who could
read were monks and priests but pictures peo-
ple could understand so the church became
the newspaper for the scriptures.
By the time the 20th century arrived, news-
papers had made a tradition of putting single
pictures in horizontal stripes, printed in black
and white with short developed stories or
political tones. As the name implies, comic
strips can be humorous, a “gag a day” (such as
Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Marmaduke and
Pearls Before Swine) but, in the 1920s, they
featured adventure stories such as Popeye,
Captain Easy, Buck Rogers, Tarzan, etc. For
most of the 20th century, there were some 200
strips being published in newspapers. Readers
began to understand the shorthand the author
conveyed to the characters in the publication,
such as stars for pain, sawing logs for snoring
and special balloons for speech and thought.
The cartoonist, Chester Gould, created a
character for the Detroit Mirror on Oct. 4,
1931 that would become so popular that it
appeared for 45 years on the front page of the
New York Daily News. Dick Tracy was a
3
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
ACS Courier • Home Care
Assistance • Peninsula Executives
Association • Retirement Administration,
Inc. • Technology Credit Union •
LegalShield • Ambassador Services•
Three Sixty HR, Inc. • TeamLogic IT
Small Business Owners
Self-Employed Professionals
Join us for a free business resource event to help you thrive in 2013
Small Business
Resource Fair
ATTENTION:
Tuesday, April 30
9am to 1pm
FOR COMPLETE SEMINAR INFORMATION
PLEASE VIEW THIS CODE OR VISIT:
SmallBusinessResourceFair.eventbrite.com
N
etw
ork w
ith other business
professionals in various industries
M
eet representatives from
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panies that
cater to your business and personal needs
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If you would like to be a presenter or vendor at this event,
please call 650-344-5200 x 121 or email info@smdailyjournal.com
Attend a schedule of helpful,
inform
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inars on various
topics that will help you grow your business
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Or call 650-344-5200 x 121
for more information
Continental breakfast will be provided
Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto
Police reports
Flowers in her hair?
A woman stole flowers from a store on
the 1400 block of Howard Avenue in
Burlingame before 12:55 p.m. Tuesday,
April 23.
BURLINGAME
Arrest. A man was arrested for driving under
the influence on Burlingame Avenue and El
Camino Real before 7:17 p.m. Saturday, April
20.
Suspicious circumstances. Police responded
to a call of an unattended backpack that turned
out to contain school books on the 700 block
of Paloma Avenue before 5:37 p.m. Saturday,
April 20.
Suspicious activity. Three juveniles were seen
smoking marijuana in a car on the 2800 block
of Frontera Way before 2:51 p.m. Saturday,
April 20.
BELMONT
Arrest. A woman was arrested for public
intoxication on Continentals Way before 6:44
p.m. Monday, April 22.
Suspicious persons. Two men were seen
stealing fruit from people’s trees on
Chesterton Avenue before 4:16 p.m. Monday,
April 22.
Suspicious person. A man knocked on a per-
son’s door requesting money for gas and then
sped off in a Ford Mustang on Fifth Avenue
before 1:24 p.m. Monday, April 22.
FOSTER CITY
Arrest. A man was arrested for shoplifting at
Costco on Metro Center Boulevard before
1:18 p.m. Thursday, April 18.
Dick Tracy and the newspapers
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM
See HISTORY, Page 20
4
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Daily Journal reporter
wins John Swett Award
Daily Journal education reporter
H e a t h e r
Murtagh won
the John Swett
Award for
M e d i a
Excellence for
her 2012 series
“Stress of
Success: Ready-
m a d e
f ami l i es ,”t he
C a l i f o r n i a
Teachers Association announced last
week.
The award was in the category of
community daily and was selected
by colleagues in the news media. It is
the highest honor the California
Teachers Association can bestow
upon media professionals for excel-
lence in education reporting, accord-
ing to the association.
The series shed light on San Mateo
County school districts’ struggle
with enrollment growth caused by
new families who move to the area
because of the reputation of its
schools.
John Swett, the state superintend-
ent of public instruction from 1863-
67, was considered the father of the
California public school system and
founded the CTA in 1863. This is the
54th year of the award. Murtagh pre-
viously won it in 2006 for her “Great
Grads” series, now in its eighth year.
Shooting leaves one dead
Police in East Palo Alto are inves-
tigating a shooting that left one man
injured and another dead early
Sunday morning.
Officers responded to gunshots
detected by the Shot Spotter system
at the corner of Runnymede and
Euclid avenues at about 12:30 a.m.,
according to East Palo Alto police.
Arriving officers found two men
suffering from gunshot wounds,
police said.
Paramedics responded and provid-
ed medical aid at the scene before
transporting the two victims to a hos-
pital.
One of the victims, who was later
identified as Jose Caballero-Diaz,
21, of Menlo Park, was pronounced
dead at about 5:15 a.m., police said.
The second victim remains in sta-
ble condition.
Police were continuing to search
for potential suspects and a motive.
Several bullet shell casings were
found at the scene of the shooting.
Anyone with information about
the case is asked to contact East Palo
Alto police at (650) 321-1112.
Escaped domestic
violence suspect captured
A domestic violence suspect who
escaped from a patrol car in unincor-
porated San Mateo County Thursday
night was captured Saturday evening
in Mountain View, according to the
San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office.
Juan Carlos Valencia, 27, was
taken into custody around 5:14 p.m.
Saturday after having escaped two
days earlier in the North Fair Oaks
area, Sheriff’s Deputy Rebecca
Rosenblatt said Saturday.
Valencia was first arrested
Thursday after citizens in the 2700
block of Devonshire Avenue in unin-
corporated San Mateo County
reported a domestic violence assault
in progress.
Deputies found Valencia and a
female victim on the sidewalk, and
after conducting interviews, arrested
Valencia for allegedly assaulting and
injuring his girlfriend.
He was handcuffed and placed in
the back seat of a patrol car, but
escaped on foot.
Deputies pursued on foot and
searched the area, but were unable to
locate him.
Valencia’s escape is under investi-
gation.
He was booked into San Mateo
County Jail Saturday evening on a
$135,000 warrant on charges includ-
ing domestic violence, false impris-
onment with violence, violation of a
protective order and terrorist threats.
Belmont bank robbed
Police investigators are working
with Citibank officials in Belmont to
gather surveillance footage of an
armed robbery that happened at the
bank Friday night.
Belmont police responded to a
robbery at the bank at 1888 Ralston
Ave. at about 5:50 p.m.
Bank employees described the
suspect as a thin, light-skinned man
wearing a black ski mask, black
jacket, dark jeans and black and
white shoes.
The man had a black semi-auto-
matic pistol when he demanded
money, according to Belmont police.
After receiving an undisclosed
amount of cash, the suspect ran out-
side into a parking lot. The suspect
may have been associated with a
light blue car.
Heather
Murtagh
Local briefs
5
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By John S. Marshall
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Residents
of a rural Northern California coun-
ty were being told Sunday to keep
their doors locked and report any-
one considered suspicious as
authorities continued the search for
the killer of an 8-year-old girl.
Calaveras County deputies and
law enforcement officials from
nearby agencies were looking for a
suspect after Leila Fowler was
found stabbed in her Valley Springs
home around noon Saturday.
The girl was found by her brother
— reported by local media to be 12-
years-old — after he encountered a
male intruder in the home. When
the intruder ran away, the boy found
his sister stabbed. She was pro-
nounced dead at a local hospital,
officials said.
Initially Leila was reported as
being 9-years-old, but Coroner
Kevin Raggio said Sunday that she
would have turned 9 in June.
Authorities spent Saturday night
and into Sunday conducting a door-
to-door sweep of homes scattered
across hilly terrain, checking stor-
age sheds and horse stables, and
even searching attics.
“It is a difficult area to search, it’s
rural, remote,” sheriff’s Capt. Jim
Macedo said.
Reverse 911 calls and Nixle mass
notifications alerted area residents
about the incident and the search for
the suspect, officials said.
“I was working on my tractor and
a CHP copter kept flying over my
house,” area resident Roger Ballew,
35, told The Associated Press on
Sunday, referring to the California
Highway Patrol.
A SWAT team showed up at his
house Saturday night and told him
to stay inside, Ballew said.
“It was nerve-wracking, I didn’t
sleep well,” he said.
Investigators on Sunday were
interviewing several people, but no
suspects have been named.
“It’s just terrible,” area resident
Paul Gschweng told Sacramento
television station KCRA. “What
can I say about it, it’s just a
tragedy.”
The station reported that a neigh-
bor told police that a man was run-
ning from the girl’s home after the
incident.
The suspect was seen wearing a
black shirt and blue pants.
Authorities considered him armed
and dangerous.
Investigators were asking area
residents to call authorities if they
had any information, or knew of
anyone who may have unexplained
injuries, or may have left the area
unexpectedly after the girl was
killed.
Valley Springs is a community of
about 2,500 people in an unincorpo-
rated area of Calaveras County,
about 60 miles southeast of
Sacramento.
Fatal stabbing of girl, 8, prompts manhunt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — A news-
paper is reporting that the new
eastern span of the San Francisco-
Oakland Bay Bridge has more
than 1,200 bolts made from galva-
nized steel that is virtually identi-
cal to a high-strength alloy that a
nationwide group of transporta-
tion officials banned for use on
bridges because the bolts can
crack.
Caltrans said last week that it was
testing 192 bolts on the bridge that
are similar to 32 galvanized bolts
that cracked when workers tight-
ened them in March.
The failed bolts were among 96
supplied in 2008 by Ohio-based
Dyson Corp., the same firm that
delivered the batch of 192 bolts two
years later.
Documents examined by
Chronicle reporters show that state
has purchased 932 other fasteners
for the bridge in the past five years
that — like the failed bolts — were
made of high-strength, galvanized
steel.
Bridge has bolts similar to banned bolts
By Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California
lawmakers are attempting to address
privacy concerns as pilotless aircraft
are being considered for a wide
range of uses.
Drones make it faster and cheaper
to gather information, like when
tracking fleeing suspects or moni-
toring crowds. But some lawmakers
say the
increased access
they provide
could be exploit-
ed without prop-
er regulations.
Several bills
in the
L e g i s l a t u r e
would set penal-
ties for privacy violations and
require law enforcement agencies to
obtain a warrant in non-emergency
situations before deploying drone
aircraft. One bill is scheduled for a
Senate Public Safety Committee
hearing on Tuesday.
FAA officials estimate that as
many as 30,000 unmanned aircraft
could be buzzing through the coun-
try’s sky by 2030.
Law enforcement officials and
other supporters say demand for the
aircraft has been misunderstood.
Bills aim to protect privacy as drone age dawns
Drone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — A newspaper
investigation has found continuing
neglect and abuse of children and
dubious financial practices at a pri-
vate foster care agency, a decade
after it was singled out for similar
problems by Los Angeles County
auditors.
Between October 2008 and
September 2011 there were 240
allegations of abuse or neglect filed
on behalf of youths placed with
families by Teens Happy Homes,
according to documents cited by the
Los Angeles Times.
The agency’s rate of nearly two
allegations for each home during
that period was more than two times
the average for the state and two-
thirds higher than that of the rest of
LA County, the newspaper said.
About half of Teens’ 131 facilities
had no complaints during the period
covered by the data. But four of them
had 10 or more complaints, landing
them among the top 40 in the county.
Between 2008 and 2011, 1,154
children lived in its homes.
During that time state investiga-
tors found one foster parent who had
a child stay with a registered sex
offender. In another home, they dis-
covered a foster parent shoving a
girl’s face into her brother’s potty-
training bowl. A premature baby
just a few days old arrived at Teens
from the county Department of
Children and Family Services with
traces of PCP in his blood.
The problems were similar to
those outlined in a 2003 report,
which also found agency workers
bought beer and cigarettes with pub-
lic funds and billed the state and
county more than $100,000 for care
that was never provided.
Report: problems continue
at SoCal foster care agency
6
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The chairman
of the House Homeland Security
Committee said Sunday that the FBI
is investigating in the United States
and overseas to determine whether
the suspects in the Boston Marathon
bombing received training that
helped them carry out the attack.
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, is
charged with joining with his older
brother, Tamerlan, who’s now dead,
in setting off the shrapnel-packed
pressure-cooker bombs. The bombs
were triggered by a remote detona-
tor of the kind used in remote-con-
trol toys, U.S. officials have said.
U.S. officials investigating the
bombings have told the Associated
Press that so far there is no evidence
to date of a wider plot, including
training, direction or funding for the
attacks.
A criminal complaint outlining
federal charges against Dzhokhar
Tsarnaev described him as holding
a cellphone in his hand minutes
before the first explosion.
The brothers are ethnic Chechens
from Russia who came to the
United States about a decade ago
with their parents.
“I think given the level of sophis-
tication of this device, the fact that
the pressure cooker is a signature
device that goes back to Pakistan,
Afghanistan, leads me to believe —
and the way they handled these
devices and the tradecraft — ... that
there was a trainer and the question
is where is that trainer or trainers,”
said Rep. Michael McCaul, R-
Texas, on “Fox News Sunday.”
“Are they overseas in the Chechen
region or are they in the United
States?” McCaul said. “In my con-
versations with the FBI, that’s the
big question. They’ve casted a wide
net both overseas and in the United
States to find out where this person
is. But I think the experts all agree
that there is someone who did train
these two individuals.”
Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., a
member of the House Intelligence
Committee, said he thought it’s
“probably true” that the attack was
not linked to a major group. But, he
told CNN’s “State of the Union,”
that there “may have been radicaliz-
ing influences” in the U.S. or
abroad. “It does look like a lot of
radicalization was self-radicaliza-
tion online, but we don’t know the
full answers yet.”
On ABC’s “This Week,” modera-
tor George Stephanopoulos raised
the question to the chairman of the
House Intelligence Committee
about FBI suspicions that the broth-
ers had help in getting the bombs
together.
“Absolutely, and not only that, but in
the self-radicalization process, you still
need outside affirmation,” responded
Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich.
“We still have persons of interest
that we’re working to find and iden-
tify and have conversations with,”
he added.
At this point in the investigation,
however, Sen. Claire McCaskill
said there was no evidence that the
brothers “were part of a larger
organization, that they were, in fact,
part of some kind of terror cell or
any kind of direction.”
The Missouri Democrat, who’s on
the Senate Homeland Security and
Governmental Affairs Committee,
told CBS’ “Face the Nation” that “it
appears, at this point, based on the
evidence, that it’s the two of them.”
Homemade bombs built from
pressure cookers have been a fre-
quent weapon of militants in
Afghanistan, India and Pakistan. Al-
Qaida’s branch in Yemen once pub-
lished an online manual on how to
make one.
FBI checking training angle in Boston bombing
Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev
By Elliot Spagat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Carlos Gonzalez has lived
nearly all his 29 years in a country he considers
home but now finds himself on the wrong side
of the border — and the wrong side of a pro-
posed overhaul of the U.S. immigration system
that would grant legal status to millions of peo-
ple.
Gonzalez was deported to Tijuana, Mexico,
from Santa Barbara in December, one of near-
ly 2 million removals from the United States
since Barack Obama was first elected president.
“I have nobody here,” said Gonzalez, who
serves breakfasts in a Tijuana migrant shelter
while nursing a foot that fractured in 10 places
when he jumped the border fence in a failed
attempt to rejoin his mother, two brothers and
extended family in California. “The United
States is all I know.”
While a Senate bill introduced earlier this
month would bring many of the estimated 11
million people living in the U.S. illegally out of
the shadows, not everyone would benefit. They
include anyone who arrived after Dec. 31,
2011, those with gay partners legally in the
U.S., siblings of U.S. citizens and many depor-
tees such as Gonzalez.
With net immigration from Mexico near
zero, the number who came to the U.S. since
January 2012 is believed to be relatively
small, possibly a few hundred thousand. They
include Isaac Jimenez, 45, who paid a smug-
gler $4,800 to guide him across the California
desert in August to reunite with his wife and
children in Fresno.
“My children are here, everything is here for
me,” Jimenez said from Fresno. He lived in the
U.S. illegally since 1998 and returned voluntar-
ily to southern Mexico last year to see his
mother before she died.
So far, advocates on the left have shown lim-
ited appetite to fight for expanded coverage as
they brace for a tough battle in Congress. Some
take aim at other provisions of the sweeping
legislation, like a 13-year track to citizenship
they consider too long and $4.5 billion for
increased border security.
“It’s not going to include everybody,” said
Laura Lichter, president of the American
Immigration Lawyers Association. “It’s not
perfect. I think you hear a lot of people saying,
‘Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the
good,’ and this is good.”
Peter Nunez, who supports restrictive poli-
cies as chairman of the Center for Immigration
Studies in Washington, rates the bill an 8 or 9
on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 being the most
inclusive. He criticizes a measure that allows
deportees without criminal histories to apply
for permission to return if they have spouses or
children in the U.S. legally, a step that support-
ers say would reunite families.
“I just don’t understand why we are going to
basically undo a deportation,” said Nunez, a
former U.S. attorney in San Diego.
Senate negotiators were more forgiving of
criminal records than the Obama administra-
tion was when it granted temporary work per-
mits last year to many who came to the U.S. as
children.
Some are overlooked in
immigration overhaul
By Philip Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Syria’s stockpile of
chemical weapons could be a greater threat
after that nation’s president leaves power and
could end up targeting Americans at home,
lawmakers warned Sunday as they considered
a U.S. response that stops short of sending
military forces there.
U.S. officials last week declared that the
Syrian government probably had used chemical
weapons twice in March, newly provocative
acts in the 2-year civil war that has killed more
than 70,000 people and displaced hundreds of
thousands more. The U.S. assessment followed
similar conclusions from Britain, France, Israel
and Qatar — key allies eager for a more aggres-
sive response to the Syrian conflict.
President Barack Obama has said Syria’s
likely action — or the transfer of President
Bashar Assad’s stockpiles to terrorists —
would cross a “red line” that would compel
the United States to act. Lawmakers sought to
remind viewers on Sunday news programs of
Obama’s declaration while discouraging a
U.S. foothold on the ground there.
“The president has laid down the line, and it
can’t be a dotted line. It can’t be anything
other than a red line,” said House Intelligence
Committee Chairman Rep. Mike Rogers, R-
Mich. “And more than just Syria, Iran is pay-
ing attention to this. North Korea is paying
attention to this.”
Added Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga.: “For
America to sit on the sidelines and do nothing
is a huge mistake.”
Obama has insisted that any use of chemical
weapons would change his thinking about the
United States’ role in Syria but said he didn’t
have enough information to order aggressive
action.
Syria’s chemical weapons a concern
7
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
]
WORLD/NATION 8
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAVAR, Bangladesh —
Bangladesh rescuers on Sunday
located nine people alive inside the
rubble of a multi-story building that
collapsed five days ago, as authori-
ties announced they will now use
heavy equipment to drill a central
hole from the top to find survivors
and dead bodies.
At least 362 people are confirmed
dead in the collapse of the 8-story
building that housed five garment
factories. The death toll is expected
to rise further, but it is already the
deadliest tragedy to hit
Bangladesh’s garment industry,
which is worth $20 billion annually
and is one of the mainstays of the
economy.
Wednesday’s collapse and previ-
ous disasters in garment factories
have focused attention on the poor
working conditions of workers who
toil for as little as $38 a month to
produce clothing for top interna-
tional brands.
Army Maj. Gen. Chowdhury
Hasan Suhrawardy, the coordinator
of the rescue operations, said they
will try to save the nine people first
by manually shifting concrete
blocks with the help of light equip-
ment such as pick axes and shovels.
“But if we fail we will start our
next phase within hours,” which
would involve manual efforts as
well as heavy equipment, including
hydraulic cranes and cutters to bore
a hole from the top of the collapsed
building, he told reporters.
The purpose is to “continue the
operation to recover both survivors
and dead bodies. In this stage, we
have no other choice but to use
some heavy equipment. We will
start it within a few hours. Manual
operation and use of small equip-
ment is not enough,” he said.
The work will be carried out care-
fully so as not to mutilate bodies, he
said. All the equipment is in place,
“from a small blade to everything.
We have engaged many private sec-
tor companies which supplied us
equipment, even some heavy one.”
In rare good news, a woman
worker was pulled out alive on
Sunday. Hasan Akbari, a rescuer,
said when he tried to extricate a
man next to the woman, “he said his
body was being torn apart. So I had
to let go. But God willing, we will
be able to rescue him with more
help very soon.”
On Saturday, police took six peo-
ple into custody, including three
owners of two buildings who were
placed under arrest. Also under
detention are the wife of the build-
ing owner.
Building collapse death toll hits 362
REUTERS
Relatives mourn as they show pictures of garment workers, who are be-
lieved to be trapped under the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building,
in Savar Sunday.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
XALAPA, Mexico — Officials in
Veracruz state say they know who
killed Regina Martinez. The muck-
raking reporter, found beaten and
suffocated in her house, was just the
victim of a robbery, according to
prosecutors and a local court.
But many of her colleagues don’t
believe it. The man convicted of the
crime was tortured into a confes-
sion, they allege. And the magazine
she works for says state officials dis-
cussed sending police across the
country in an attempt to hunt down
and seize another reporter who
raised questions about the death,
which is one of a growing list of
killings that have put Mexico among
the most dangerous places in the
world to be a journalist.
Some 400 people gathered Sunday
in the center of Veracruz’s state capi-
tal, Xalapa, for a march to demand
justice in the Martinez case and an
end to attacks on the press. Many held
up posters suggesting the government
had a hand in the case, some describ-
ing it as “a state killing.” Dozens also
protested in Mexico City.
The New York-based Committee
to Protect Journalists said in a
February report that 12 Mexican
journalists went missing in 2006-
2012 and 14 were killed because of
their work. Mexico’s federal
Human Rights Commission lists 81
journalists killed since 2000.
Journalists march against attacks on press
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — One of the
architects of failed gun control leg-
islation says he’s bringing it back.
Sen. Joe Manchin on Sunday said
he would re-introduce a measure
that would require criminal and
mental health background checks
for gun buyers at shows and online.
The West Virginia Democrat says
that if lawmakers read the bill, they
will support it.
Manchin sponsored a previous
version of the measure with
Republican Sen. Pat Toomey. It
failed. Manchin says there was con-
fusion over what was in the bill.
Manchin: Gun bill
to be reintroduced
OPINION 9
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Practical question
Editor,
With an overwhelming amount of
restaurants and building projects com-
ing into San Mateo, I have a practical
question (“What’s happening in San
Mateo” column by Sue Lempert in the
April 22 edition of the Daily Journal).
With our long periods of dry weather,
when is the Hillsdale Car Wash going
to reopen so they can wash my dirty
car?
Scotty Paterson
San Mateo
Trillions, not just billions, hidden
Editor,
Trillions, not just billions of dollars
are stashed away in so-called “tax
havens.” That’s the latest story by
whistleblowers and tell-all journalists
who are uncovering the dirty little
secrets of the super rich. Even our
buddy Mitt Romney has a story to tell
as far as why he has millions in anony-
mous bank accounts in the Cayman
Islands.
We may actually save ourselves from
the liquidity crisis of the various gov-
ernments around the world if the UN
and other agencies with a global reach
can actually start pressuring those
places where they think they can profit
by helping the rich hide from taxes. We
really need to work with all other
nations to plug these loopholes to make
some sense of how so much of this tax-
able liquidity escapes the needed recy-
cling that taxation provides. It might
even control the massive money laun-
dering of organized crime. You can also
toss in the occasional terrorist organiza-
tion which naturally wants to operate
under everyone’s radar. The
International Consortium of
Investigative Journalists and folks like
Australian Gerard Ryle have taken it
upon themselves to spill the beans
much like Bradley Manning and Julian
Assange have in the realm of war crime
coverups in international relations.
We may actually end up with some
real reform in international finance and
the recovery of untold riches, hidden
much like pirates who ravaged the
seven seas and then spirited their booty
away in many of the same remote spots
around the globe.
Mike Caggiano
San Mateo
Time for county to
join the 21st century
Editor,
I beg to differ with Mr. Christopher
P. Conway’s (Daily Journal, April 22)
and Ms. Donna Bischoff’s (Daily
Journal, April 25) characterization in
their letters of the lawsuit filed against
San Mateo County by the Lawyers
Committee for Civil Rights. This suit
resulted in the victory of Measure B
last November, propelling San Mateo
County to the 21st century. Here is a
very brief summary of the facts:
Plaintiff’s lead attorney Robert Rubin
filed the complaint against the county
because it was in violation of the
California Voting Rights Act.
Of California’s 58 counties, San
Mateo was the only county to rely upon
an at-large election system for electing
candidates to the Board of Supervisor
countywide.
After the lawsuit was filed in April
2011, the Board of Supervisors’ strate-
gy was to continue the status quo, at
least until after the November 2012
elections. However, after succeeding a
few times, their efforts to postpone the
trial were forced to offer putting
Measure B on the ballot.
Except Dave Pine, all county super-
visors campaigned against Measure B,
including big Democratic Party contrib-
utors, the labor unions and developers
led by U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San
Mateo.
The Daily Journal recommended a
“Yes” vote on Measure B, and the
majority’s will prevailed. That’s the
way democracy works.
Mr. Conway and Ms. Bischoff, relax.
The county is not the Alamo; it’s not
under siege. Don’t call for the cavalry.
General Santa Ana is not out there to
reclaim Mexico’s lands.
Guy M. Guerrero
Burlingame
Boston bombing
Editor,
Everyone seems to agree that the per-
petrators of the Boston Marathon
bombings are despicable people.
Killing innocent women and children
and wounding and maiming of many
more is horrendous. Everyone from the
president on down has condemned this
act.
Why then are Bill Ayers and
Bernardine Dohrn considered pillars of
our society? Bill Ayers was professor
of education at the University of
Illinois. Can someone explain that to
me?
Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose
Letters to the editor
The Japan Times, Tokyo
A
new strain of bird flu has sur-
faced in China and it has
health officials alarmed.
While the death toll has reached double
digits, the real cause of concern is the
fact that it was previously not known to
affect humans. Health officials in China
and elsewhere are closely monitoring
hospitals and clinics, as well as the
close contacts of confirmed cases.
Surveillance is critical, not only of
people, but also of poultry to trace the
source of the outbreak and identify its
vectors, as well as isolate the strain and
prepare a vaccine.
The new flu comes from the H7N9
virus, a variant that has long been in
pigeons but has never been found in
humans.
Several had visited poultry markets
before they got sick, but the actual
source of the infection remains uncer-
tain. Chinese experts believe that the
virus originated in migratory birds that
mixed with domestic fowl in China’s
heavily populated Yangtze River delta.
As a result, many bird markets in
eastern China have been shut down and
culls are under way. Shanghai has
banned the sale of all live poultry. It
was reported Tuesday that the virus was
detected in a wild pigeon caught in
Nanjing.
Officials are also monitoring the
close contacts of confirmed patients to
ensure that they are not carrying the
disease. ...
Many questions still swirl around the
outbreak, not least of which is its
extent. China seems to be responding
quickly to the appearance of the dis-
ease, with health officials stepping up
surveillance and sharing results with
international counterparts. Four of the
viruses have been sequenced and posted
on websites for international scrutiny.
People’s Daily, the mouthpiece of the
Chinese Communist Party’s Central
Committee, has called on officials to
publicize information to avoid panic. In
Shanghai a microblog is providing real-
time updates. Daily email updates are
also being sent.
China should be applauded for its
about-face in responding to this out-
break, but the test is not over. The chal-
lenges will intensify if the disease
spreads. China should be encouraged to
maintain its transparency and its neigh-
bors, along with relevant international
institutions, should be vigilant and pre-
pared to cooperate to contain, control
and ultimately defeat this disease.
Better response to bird flu
The New
World Order
By Charlie Bronitsky
T
hrough a process more complicated than nuclear fis-
sion, state law and regional agencies determine how
much housing each city must be prepared to provide
in the coming years. That determination is called the RHNA
(Regional Housing Needs Allocation). The allocation is
based in large part on something called the Job-Housing
Connection Strategy. While much more complicated than it
seems from its title, job growth is a significant factor in the
amount of housing allocated to any par-
ticular city. Thus, while cities look to
increase their business base, doing so
increases the amount of housing for
which they must also have room. Cities
like Menlo Park, with its relatively recent
inflow of Facebook, can end up in a pre-
carious situation with a large employer
and insufficient room for residential
growth.
Business growth and then the requisite housing growth, in
turn impacts on the resources of the locality. There is more
traffic, more strain on the water and wastewater systems,
more strain on the municipal infrastructure and more strain
on the municipal employees having to service a larger popu-
lation of both residents and commuters coming into the city
for work.
Compounding this problem further is that not only are
cities required to plan for additional housing, they are also
required to make a significant portion of that housing avail-
able at below-market prices, what is known today as “afford-
able housing.” Affordable housing is not free, government-
paid housing, but housing at below-market rates, offered to
people and families with below-market incomes for the area.
In Foster City, most affordable housing is not cheap and
most people receiving affordable housing are fully
employed.
While some might say that the solution is not to move for-
ward with business growth, the fact is that in modern-day
California it is all but impossible not to grow. Since the pas-
sage of Proposition 13, the majority of our city’s income is
relatively fixed and increases by less than the increase in the
annual cost of living. Thus, without growth, we would even-
tually run out of money.
Nonetheless, for many years, cities have borne the impact
of this growth in stride using the additional revenue from
business growth to offset the impact to their city. However,
this was only possible when the law allowed cities to have
redevelopment agencies that could raise funds to pay for the
affordable housing that the state required. With the state
killing off redevelopment agencies, there is a new world
order for cities, one that is antagonistic to growth for the
simple reason that it makes growth more expensive when
businesses and developers pass these costs along to their cus-
tomers.
Today, cities look toward businesses and real estate devel-
opers to pay fees to offset the impact they have on the city’s
economy. Our staff recently studied some of these new busi-
ness deals and the fees are often pretty significant, some-
times as high as seven figures. The businesses, however, do
get something for their money; they get a guarantee that the
city will reserve capacity for them as they grow. Once a city
commits to a development, the city commits to having the
capacity to provide all the municipal services to the business
as it grows.
While this seems like a win-win, the problem is that
capacity is not infinite and reserving capacity is a risk for a
city in that if the developer or business does not grow, the
city will not realize the revenue from that growth. In addi-
tion, the city cannot use the reserved capacity to allow
another business or developer to build because it is required
to keep it reserved for the prior business. Thus, since the
future is not certain, the city takes a significant risk when it
reserves capacity. It is with that justification that it charges
significantly, in the form of impact fees, for taking that risk.
Unfortunately, charging businesses and developers impact
fees changes the relationship from one in which they are
working together toward a common goal of growth to one in
which the business and developer feel as if they are being
held to pay an unfair share of the financial burden of state
government decisions. This can create problems with a city’s
ability to grow and through growth continue to offer the
services that its residents and businesses have come to know
and appreciate.
As you can see, this is a very complicated issue but it is
one that the City Council will be looking at as we enter into
the new world order created by our state government. This is
something that our residents and businesses should also
weigh in on. I urge you all to stay aware of this issue as it
could be critical to the future of not only Foster City but of
all California cities as we move forward.
Charlie Bronitsky is the vice mayor of Foster City. He can be
reached at cbronitsky@fostercity.org or at 286-3504.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Mattjew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Procter & Gamble had
been on a tear.
The company’s stock had climbed 22 per-
cent since the start of the year as the maker of
Tide detergent and Crest toothpaste turned in
better profits for two quarters in a row. Last
Thursday, P&G reported even higher earn-
ings. And its stock immediately dropped 6
percent.
What happened? Like so many other big
companies reporting results recently, P&G hit
its target for earnings but missed on revenue.
Nearly halfway through the first-quarter earn-
ings season, Corporate America is still report-
ing solid profits, with seven of every ten big
companies hurdling over Wall Street’s expec-
tations. Sales, however, are another story.
Nearly the same proportion of big compa-
nies — six out of ten — have fallen short of
revenue targets, according to S&P Capital IQ.
The tally so far looks grim: Revenue has
shrunk 2.4 percent compared with last year.
“The norm is becoming, beat your earnings,
but miss on revenue,” says Scott Freeze, pres-
ident of Street One Financial.
Two problems persist: Europe’s ongoing
recession and slower economic growth in
China. Because nearly half of revenue for
Standard & Poor’s 500 companies comes
from abroad, it would seem logical to think
the problem is just overseas. But many com-
panies with a U.S. focus have also reported
disappointing revenue.
Freeze says that revenue presents a more
accurate picture of Corporate America’s
health. “You can play with the earnings num-
bers and have them skewed,” he says. “But
you can’t mess with the revenue numbers —
they are what they are. If people are not com-
ing in droves to buy your products, your rev-
enue’s going to miss even if your earnings
beat.”
Aside from Apple’s falling profit and some
other high-profile flops, the headline numbers
for first-quarter earnings appear solid. So far,
271 companies in the S&P 500 have said
earnings are up 5 percent over the year before.
And 189 of them have cleared Wall Street’s
estimates.
Investors say that’s no surprise. They
believe companies set the bar so low that it’s
easy to jump over it. The 3.6 percent earn-
ings growth analysts expect to see after all
the results are tallied works out to $26.36.
That’s just $1 more than the same period last
year.
As one company after another turned in
weak revenue results last week, analysts,
investors and economists started raising con-
cerns about the prospect for future profits.
Some of the biggest names in Corporate
America have disappointed, including
Google, JP Morgan Chase and IBM, which
posted its first drop in revenue in three years.
In the past week, AT&T, Xerox and Safeway
joined their ranks.
Of the 22 corporate giants in the Dow Jones
industrial average that have reported results,
15 have missed their revenue targets, accord-
ing to the data provider FactSet.
If the trend continues, experts see a number
of consequences:
• Earnings estimates for the coming months
will have to come down. Revenues drive prof-
its. And if revenues start to sag, it’s going to
be difficult for companies in the S&P 500 to
have average earnings growth of 8 percent for
the rest of the year, which is what analysts
currently expect.
• To maintain their profit margins, compa-
nies will look for ways to trim expenses even
more. That often means cutting jobs or scal-
ing back spending. Earlier this month, for
instance, Caterpillar announced plans to lay
off workers in Milwaukee, Decatur, Ill. and
Brussels. The reason? Sales of Caterpillar’s
large trucks and bulldozers had slumped.
• If either earnings estimates come down or
layoffs pick up, it could easily upend the stock
market’s four-year surge.
To be sure, many of the companies missing
their revenue targets are grappling with their
own unique problems, says John Butters, sen-
ior earnings analyst at FactSet. AT&T report-
ed that fewer people signed up for phone
plans. Boeing delivered just one 787 before
the planes were grounded in January because
of overheating batteries.
But the recurring theme is weak demand,
says Tom Porcelli, chief U.S. economist at
RBC Capital Markets. Businesses and indi-
viduals just aren’t spending enough to push
sales up quarter after quarter.
Earnings report: good profits, bad revenues
By Richard Lardner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Built to dom-
inate the enemy in combat, the
Army’s hulking Abrams tank is
proving equally hard to beat in a
budget battle.
Lawmakers from both parties have
devoted nearly half a billion dollars
in taxpayer money over the past two
years to build improved versions of
the 70-ton Abrams.
But senior Army officials have
said repeatedly, “No thanks.”
It’s the inverse of the federal budg-
et world these days, in which auto-
matic spending cuts are leaving
sought-after pet programs struggling
or unpaid altogether. Republicans
and Democrats for years have fought
so bitterly that lawmaking in
Washington ground to a near-halt.
Yet in the case of the Abrams tank,
there’s a bipartisan push to spend an
extra $436 million on a weapon the
experts explicitly say is not needed.
“If we had our choice, we would
use that money in a different way,”
Gen. Ray Odierno, the Army’s chief
of staff, told The Associated Press
this past week.
Why are the tank dollars still flow-
ing? Politics.
Keeping the Abrams production
line rolling protects businesses and
good paying jobs in congressional
districts where the tank’s many sup-
pliers are located.
If there’s a home of the Abrams,
it’s politically important Ohio. The
nation’s only tank plant is in Lima.
So it’s no coincidence that the cham-
pions for more tanks are Rep. Jim
Jordan and Sen. Rob Portman, two
of Capitol’s Hill most prominent
deficit hawks, as well as Democratic
Sen. Sherrod Brown. They said their
support is rooted in protecting
national security, not in pork-barrel
politics.
“The one area where we are sup-
posed to spend taxpayer money is in
defense of the country,” said Jordan,
whose district in the northwest part
of the state includes the tank plant.
The Abrams dilemma underscores
the challenge that Defense Secretary
Chuck Hagel faces as he seeks to
purge programs that the military
considers unnecessary or too expen-
sive in order to ensure there’s
enough money for essential opera-
tions, training and equipment.
Hagel, a former Republican sena-
tor from Nebraska, faces a daunting
task in persuading members of
Congress to eliminate or scale back
projects favored by constituents.
Army says no to more tanks, but Congress insists
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILWAUKEE — Dozens of air
shows that draw tens of thousands
of people and generate millions of
dollars for local economies have
been cancelled this year after the
military grounded its jet and demon-
stration teams because of automatic
federal budget cuts.
For years, the biggest draws at air
shows have been the military’s two
elite jet teams, the U.S. Navy’s Blue
Angels and the U.S. Air Force’s
Thunderbirds, and their intricate
stunts. The armed services also have
provided F-16, F-18 and F-22 fight-
er jets and the U.S. Army Parachute
Team, known as the Golden
Knights. All the teams were ground-
ed as of April 1 to save money, and
the military also dramatically cur-
tailed its help with ground displays
of various aircraft.
Those cutbacks have affected
more than 200 of the approximately
300 air shows held in the United
States each year, said John Cudahy,
president of the International
Council of Air Shows. About 60
shows have been cancelled, and he
expects more cancellations as the
season progresses and hope for
restoration of the budget cuts fades.
He predicted 15 percent to 20 per-
cent of the shows won’t return next
year, even if the military begins par-
ticipating again.
Air shows to cancel
without military jets
<< Celtics avoid sweep, page 14
• Heat sweep the Bucks in round 1, page 13
Monday, April 29, 2013
LAKERS DONE: WITHOUT KOBE, SPURS SWEEP LOS ANGELES >>> PAGE 16
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Another season, another handful
of state medals for the College of
San Mateo swim team.
For the fourth straight season, the
Bulldogs traveled to the California
Community Colleges Athletic
Association swim championships
and returned to San Mateo with
hardware to show off from the trip.
“You always want to win,” said
College of San Mateo head coach
Randy Wright, “but it always feels
great to be in the pool on the final
day and swim your best.”
The Bulldog men and women
combined for a total of 14 state
qualifying races and finished the
CCCAA champions with medals in
four of those events.
On Day 1, CSM won their first
two medals at states as superstar,
all-American and now Bulldogs
legend, Miya Oto placed third in the
200-freestyle with a time of
1:54.68. Also medaling was former
Sequoia Cherokee Alvaro Andaluz
who came in fifth in the 100- breast-
stroke with a time of 58.08.
“The team had a great day,”
Wright said. “We definitely came to
race. Best times are great, but this
meet is really about fighting for a
state title. Miya did just that. She
took her 200 out a second faster
than she's used to, she was up with
the top two until the final 50 yards.
She raced. It was a great event. It
was a definite highlight of the sea-
son.”
Oto went to place ninth in the 50-
freestyle with a 24.66.
Erin Harris, the first CSM diver to
qualify for states ever, had a strong
showing competing in both the 1-
meter and 3-meter dives. She placed
12th and 15th respectively in those
events.
Kellsey Mercado, racing in the
50-meter breaststroke, finished in
12th with a 31.89.
On Day 2, Oto and Andaluz raced
well enough to bring home another
pair of medals.
Oto took eighth in the 100-
freestyle with a 53.09 — a person-
CSM swimmers take hardware at championships
See SWIM, Page 12
Padres
sweep
Giants
By Bernie Wilson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Chase Headley, Nick
Hundley and Alexi Amarista homered off
Ryan Vogelsong and the San Diego Padres
beat San Francisco 6-4 Sunday for their first
three-game sweep of the Giants since May
2010.
Headley had three hits and Amarista scored
three runs for the Padres, who’ve won four
straight.
Pablo Sandoval had an RBI single among
his career high-tying four hits for the defend-
ing World Series champion Giants lost their
season-high fifth straight game. They’ve lost
eight of 12 following a 9-4 start.
Buster Posey extended his hitting streak to
nine games with a two-run homer to pull the
Giants to 6-4 in the eighth. Sandoval was
aboard after his third single. With runners on
second and third and two outs, San Diego
right fielder Chris Denorfia made a nice div-
A’s rally late,
beat Orioles in
10th on error
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — His face full of dirt and his
body atop the third base bag, Eric Sogard was
more concerned with being safe than watch-
ing the throw from Baltimore’s Manny
Machado sail into left field.
For a few moments, it even looked as if
Sogard would stay put on the ground.
Sogard eventually got to his feet and scram-
bled home, making a headfirst dive with the
winning run in the 10th inning that lifted the
Oakland Athletics over the Orioles 9-8
Sunday.
“I was trying to read the crowd whether I
was safe or out,” said Sogard, who singled
leading off the inning. “Everyone was scream-
ing at me to go and I didn’t know what was
See GIANTS, Page 12
See A’S, Page 12
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Stephen Curry shook off a
sore left ankle to score 22 of his 31 points in
the third quarter, leading the Golden State
Warriors past the Denver Nuggets 115-101 on
Sunday night for a commanding 3-1 series
lead.
Curry shot 10 of 16 from the floor and
added seven assists in a dominant and daz-
zling display that rivaled his days in the
NCAA tournament for tiny Davidson. His five
3-pointers in the third quarter lifted Golden
State to a 20-point lead and its third straight
victory in this frenetic and flashy series.
Jarrett Jack added 21 points and nine assists
and Andrew Bogut broke out in the first half
with 12 points and five rebounds for the sixth-
seeded Warriors, who can close out the
Nuggets in Game 5 on Tuesday night in
Denver.
Ty Lawson scored 26 points and Andre
Iguodala had 19 for the third-seeded Nuggets.
The Warriors lost All-Star forward David
Lee to a season-ending hip injury in Game 1,
and Curry sprained his left ankle late in Game
2. With Curry carrying the load anyway, none
of it has seemed to matter.
The quick-shooting point guard hit 5 of 8
from beyond the arc in a spectacular third
quarter, when nearly every gold-shirt wearing
fan in the sellout crowd of 19,596 stood and
cheered. Curry scored all 22 points in the final
6:22 of the quarter, showing the kind of range
that helped him make 272 3-pointers in the
regular season — three more than Ray Allen’s
record set in 2005-06 with Seattle.
Curry capped his remarkable run with two
of his most highlight-reel plays.
He stole the ball from Lawson, stopped in
heavy traffic and dropped in a 27-footer
before sprinting all the way to the bench high-
fiving and chest-bumping teammates.
Following a timeout, Curry sprung free near
Denver’s bench for a corner 3 that gave
Golden State a 91-72 lead entering the fourth.
Curry’s five 3s in the quarter were a
Warriors record for a half.
Curry, wearing heavy tape around his nag-
ging ankle, gave fans a scare when Corey
Brewer poked Curry in the eye going for a
rebound early in the fourth. Curry returned
about 4 1/2 minutes later, receiving another
standing ovation from the home fans.
While Curry scored only seven points in the
first half, Bogut broke out in a big way to pro-
vide the one-two punch Golden State had long
envisioned.
The 7-footer from Australia sliced down a
wide open lane off a pick-and-roll with Curry
in the first quarter, took one dribble and
dunked over JaVale McGee with a thunderous
right-handed slam. Bogut, who received a
technical foul in Game 3 for daring Denver’s
big man to punch him on the chin during a
face-to-face altercation, stared back at McGee
Warriors up 3-1 over Nuggets
REUTERS
Golden State Warriors Andrew Bogut (C) reacts after dunking against the Denver Nuggets during Game 4 of their NBA Western Division quar-
terfinal basketball playoff game in Oakland Sunday.
See WARRIORS, Page 12
SPORTS 12
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – Our
country’s economic
roller-coaster ride
has been interesting
and historic for
sure, but also very
troubling for many
families who’ve not
been as financially stable as others.
Recently though I’ve been observing a
phenomenon with those we serve at the
CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS. It may
be too early to confirm, but it appears that
there is a general state of confidence with
many families, along with the decisions and
choices they make during funeral
arrangements. Yes, I know you are thinking
that “confidence” is not a term you would
use to coincide with “funeral arrangements”,
but it appears to me that people I see are
tending to be more financially assured than
during the deepest years of “The Great
Recession”.
They say that the two things you can’t
avoid are “death and taxes”. With that in
mind, during the economic downturn I saw a
very noticeable sense of “thrift” and
“prudence” with a lot of families who
experienced a death during that period.
Still, those who tended to “cost shop” at
various funeral homes selected CHAPEL
OF THE HIGHLANDS to handle funeral or
cremation arrangements. These families
found comfort with our service, and notably
with our more economic cost structure.
Now, lately the trend with families and
their funeral choices reminds me of the days
way before the recession hit. It’s not that
people are utilizing their funds differently,
spending more or spending less, but that
they are more assertive and confident when
using their wallet. Seeing this over and over
gives me a good indication that something in
the economic climate is changing compared
to not that long ago.
Even though many of our honorable
elected officials in Sacramento and
Washington D.C. appear to be as inflexible
with economic issues as always, the air of
confidence with the families I’ve been
dealing with means to me that these people
are feeling less pressured financially.
It is well known that when businesses do
well they hire more employees, and when
those employees are confident they will
spend their money on goods and services.
In turn, the companies that provide goods
and services will need competent employees
to create more goods, give more services,
and so on…making a positive circle for a
healthy economy. In relation to that, after a
long period of U.S. manufacturing jobs
being sent over-seas there is news of a
growing number of companies bringing this
work back to the United States. Real Estate
values on the Peninsula remained in a good
state during the recession, but houses here
are now in demand more than ever.
“Encouraging” “Hopeful” and “Positive”
are words to describe the optimistic
vibrations that people are giving off. If the
community is becoming more comfortable
with spending, that indicates good health for
business and the enrichment of our
economic atmosphere. I hope I’m right, so
let’s all keep our fingers crossed.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
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call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
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Funeral Trends Indicate
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al best.
Andaluz followed his 200-breaststroke with
an equally impressive 100-breast. The sopho-
more’s 2:06.50 was good for a sixth place fin-
ish.
Mercado took 15th in her other event, the
100-breaststroke.
WOMEN’S SOFTBALL
Having conquered the Coast Conference
North for a second straight season, the
College of San Mateo was given exactly what
was expected: The No. 1 seed in the NorCal
regional playoffs.
With a 36-4 record, for the second straight
season, the Bulldogs held off Shasta College
and will host Feather River College to start off
the postseason.
Riverside City College in the No. 1 in the
South California portion of the CCCAA’s
bracket.
And in award-winning news following the
coaches’ meetings, CSM’s Nicole Borg
emerged as the Coast Conference North’s
Coach of the Year — marking the second year
in a row the former Bulldog has earned that
award.
CSM actually swept the three major post-
season awards. Borg is the Coach of the Year
while Michele Pilster was named Pitcher of
the Year and her battery mate, Jamie Navarro
earned Player of the Year honors. The two are
former Central Coast Section champions at
Capuchino High School in San Bruno.
Three of the four members of CSM’s infield
made the Coast Conference’s First Team.
Second baseman Talisa Fiame, formerly of
Terra Nova, Kaylin Stewart, a former
Hillsdale Knight and Selina Rodriguez, an El
Camino Colt, took up three spots on the All-
North first team — that trio was also named
Coast Conference North All-Americans.
Amelia Shales, Jenn Davidson, Katie Tan,
Mikayla Conlin and Natalie Saucedo made
their way onto the Second Team of the Coast
Conference.
MEN’S BASEBALL
After finishing second in the Coast
Conference Golden Gate Division by a game,
the College of San Mateo baseball team
learned their playoff fate on Sunday, drawing
a No. 9 seed and a trip to Cabrillo College,
who is No. 8 in the playoff seeding and No. 20
in the latest CCCBCA poll.
Cabrillo finished second in the Coast’s
Pacific Division — in a sense knocking
Cañada College out of the playoffs.
The two schools will compete in a best-of-
three series starting Friday, May 3.
CSM and Cabrillo do have some recent his-
tory. On March 9, the Bulldogs traveled to
Cabrillo and lost 6-5.
CSM pounded out 13 hits in that game and
scored three runs late, but could not overcome
an early deficit.
BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL
The Serra Padres learned their fate over the
weekend in what will be a tough through the
West Catholic Athletic League boys’ volley-
ball tournament.
After earning the No. 7 seed. the Padres will
travel south to San Jose and take on
Bellarmine College Prep.
The first ball gets served at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday, April 30.
Serra went 0-12 in the WCAL this season
and are 5-21 overall.
BOYS’ DIVING
Another bit of Serra news: Sophomore Erik
Clark’s 303.90 at the WCAL diving champi-
onships was more than enough to crown him
the league’s newest champion.
Another Padre, Callum Syme, finished fifth
with a 249.85.
Continued from page 11
SWIM
ing catch of Andres Torres’ fly ball.
San Diego’s Jason Marquis (2-2) bounced
back from a 7-1 loss to Milwaukee on
Monday night in which he allowed a season-
high seven runs, including first-inning homers
to Ryan Braun and Yuniesky Betancourt.
Marquis pitched out of trouble after loading
the bases in both the second and third innings.
He allowed two runs and six hits in 6 2-3
innings, walked four and struck out three.
Headley and Hundley each hit their second
homer of the year while Amarista had his first.
The Padres are the only team in the majors
that doesn’t have a player with at least three
homers.
Headley homered to straightaway center
field with two outs in the first.
After Brandon Crawford hit a sacrifice fly
to tie it in the second, Hundley hit a two-run
shot into the balcony on the second level of
the Western Metal Supply Co. brick ware-
house in the left-field corner with two outs in
the second to give San Diego a 3-1 lead.
Amarista was aboard on a single.
With rookie Jedd Gyorko aboard on a lead-
off double, Amarista hit a two-run homer in
the fourth that landed on top of the new right
field fence and bounced over the Jack Daniel’s
Old No. 7 Deck and into the seats. It was the
first time the Padres benefited from the new
fence, which was moved in 11 feet in an
attempt to make the spacious downtown ball-
yard play fairer.
Opponents have hit four homers that would-
n’t have gone out last year, including Posey’s
shot in the eighth that ticked off the glove of
leaping right fielder Chris Denorfia. It was
Posey’s third.
Amarista walked leading off the sixth.
Hundley singled to chase Vogelsong and the
runners advanced on Marquis’ sac bunt.
Amarista scored on Posey’s passed ball to
make it 6-2.
The Giants loaded the bases with one out in
the second before Brandon Crawford hit a
sacrifice fly. Marquis struck out Vogelsong to
get out of the jam.
San Francisco loaded the bases again with
one out in the third before Marquis got Hunter
Pence to hit into a double play.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
going on. I was just trying to figure out what
the play was, where the ball ended up (and)
whether I was just safe.”
Down 5-0 in the sixth, the A’s tied it at 8 on
Yoenis Cespedes’ two-run homer with one out
in the ninth. He was activated from the dis-
abled list before the game after being out with
a strained muscle in his left hand.
The Athletics ended a four-game losing
streak and prevented Baltimore from a four-
game sweep.
Sogard hit a leadoff single in the 10th and
moved to second when reliever Pedro Strop
(0-1) made a wide throw to second on Adam
Rosales’ bunt. Coco Crisp followed with a
sacrifice bunt and Machado threw wildly past
to shortstop J.J. Hardy covering third.
“I’m proud that they went for it. I would
have too,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter
said of his defense. “You have to take a pop at
it or they have too many things set up.”
Cespedes also singled and scored during
Oakland’s four-run sixth inning. The A’s are
9-2 with the Cuban slugger in their lineup this
season and 5-10 without him.
“He’s very impactful, obviously,” A’s man-
ager Bob Melvin said. “That home run was
kind of what he’s all about. We need him in
the lineup and he showed today why.”
Seth Smith also homered for Oakland. Coco
Crisp had two hits and scored twice and Josh
Donaldson drove in two runs.
Chris Davis hit his team-leading ninth home
run, a solo shot in the eighth that put
Baltimore ahead 7-6. Machado added an RBI
double in the ninth.
Nate McLouth, who scored four times, and
Machado each had four hits for the Orioles.
Continued from page 11
A’S
while backpedalling down court.
In the second quarter, Bogut backed down
Kosta Koufos before hammering home anoth-
er dunk. He also soared high for a backdoor
alley-oop from Curry to help the Warriors go
ahead 45-37, and chants of “Bogut! Bogut!”
echoed around the arena while the video
board kept replaying his dunks.
Bogut sat out the final 4:37 of the first half
with three fouls, and Andre Miller almost sin-
gle-handily brought Denver back within a
point. Then Curry hit his first 3-pointer of the
game — officially a 27-footer that seemed
closer to the scorer’s table than the arc — as
Golden State scored the last 11 points before
the break to go ahead 56-44.
After falling behind by 15 early in the third
quarter, the Nuggets started to rally behind
their point guard.
Lawson, who scored a career-playoff high
35 points in the Game 3 loss, shook off a slow
start to highlight a 14-4 run that sliced Golden
State’s lead to 62-58 midway through the
third quarter. Just when it seemed they might
crawl back, Curry countered with a devastat-
ing blow to Denver’s playoff hopes.
NOTES: For the third straight game,
Warriors coach Mark Jackson listed Carl
Landry at power forward in his starting lineup
submitted before the game, even though
Harrison Barnes started at power forward and
Landry came off the bench. Jackson said
beforehand that he’d do it again because “it
worked.”
Continued from page 11
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SPORTS 13
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Nancy Armour
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILWAUKEE — LeBron James
can cross another item off his to-do
list.
James scored 30 points, Ray
Allen had another big game against
his old team and the Miami Heat got
their first playoff sweep in the Big
Three era, advancing to the Eastern
Conference semifinals with an 88-
77 victory over the Milwaukee
Bucks on Sunday.
“It was our next big step as far as
our growth,” James said. “It’s so
hard to win on the road in the play-
offs, in someone’s building — espe-
cially when someone is playing for
their last life. It’s a big step for us.”
And now the Heat have some
much-needed time to rest. Dwyane
Wade sat out Sunday’s game, only
the second postseason game he’s
missed in his career, because of his
aching right knee. But with Miami
not playing until next Saturday, at
the earliest, he’ll have plenty of
time to treat the three bone bruises
that caused him to miss six games
near the end of the regular season.
Miami plays the winner of the
Brooklyn-Chicago series. The Bulls
lead that series 3-1, with Game 5 on
Monday night in New York.
“It’s big,” Wade said of the time
off. “Obviously, we’re one of the
oldest teams in the league, maybe
the oldest team in terms of rotation
players. Guys have some bumps and
bruises coming out of this series, so
it’s going to be great to get some
rest. But also we have to take this
time to continue to stay sharp, to
continue to stay in shape as well.”
Judging by the clinical way in
which the Heat dissected the Bucks
in this series, that isn’t likely to be a
problem.
The defending NBA champions
won each game by double digits,
getting contributions from their
stars and subs alike. Allen finished
with 16 points, the third time in the
series he scored in double figures,
and was 4 of 7 from 3-point range.
Udonis Haslem added 13 points
and five rebounds, and Mario
Chalmers kicked in eight rebounds
and six assists for Miami, which
never trailed Sunday.
“They had the whole package,”
Bucks coach Jim Boylan said.
“When you can afford to sit guy like
Dwyane Wade and perform at the
level they performed at, that’s a
championship-caliber team.”
Monta Ellis led the Bucks with 21
points, and Larry Sanders had 11
rebounds to go with seven points.
But Milwaukee got almost noth-
ing again from Brandon Jennings,
who didn’t even play in the fourth
quarter. Jennings, who had guaran-
teed the Bucks would win the series
in six games, finished with three
points on 1-of-7 shooting.
After scoring 26 points in Game
1, Jennings had 27 total in the final
three.
“Frustrated, a little down because
I came into this season with so
much confidence,” he said. “I
thought we had a chance to steal a
game in Game 1, Game 2. We let
that slip away from us. Game 3, we
came back home. Had a 10-point
lead, lost that. I mean it’s frustration
all around.”
James leads Heat over Bucks and into next round
REUTERS
Miami Heat small forward LeBron James goes in for a dunk during the first
half of Game 4 of his NBA first round playoff series against the Bucks Sunday.
SPORTS 14
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Howard Ulman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Carmelo Anthony
missed 25 shots and the New York
Knicks still almost completed a
sweep of the Boston Celtics.
So with J.R. Smith coming back to
provide scoring punch off the bench,
the Knicks are confident they can
improve on their performance in
Sunday’s 97-90 overtime loss to the
Boston Celtics.
“I missed a lot, a ton, of shots,”
Anthony said. “Defensively, we were
still there. We look forward to
Wednesday.”
That’s when the Knicks get their
next chance to win their first playoff
series in 13 years. They’ll be at home
and they’ll have Smith, who was sus-
pended by the NBA for Sunday’s
game after he elbowed Jason Terry in
the face in Game 3 on Friday night.
“J.R. is a big piece of what we do,
but he wasn’t here,” Knicks coach
Mike Woodson said, “so I’m not
using that as an excuse.”
The Celtics still have a huge deficit
in trying to become the first team to
win after trailing a series 3-0 in the
NBA playoffs.
“We have to be confident going
back home,” Anthony said. “We
were confident here today.”
Terry scored Boston’s last nine
points and kept the Celtics’ season
going. He was angry after being
smacked by Smith two days earlier,
but avoiding elimination was all the
motivation he needed.
“It wasn’t really the elbow,” he
said. “It was more (like) this is it. I
mean, the season’s over. You can
leave it all out here tonight and go
home for a long summer or you can
live to play another day.”
But, he conceded, his nose “still
hurts right now. As long as I feel that,
I guess I’ll be thinking about it.”
Anthony scored 36 points and
Raymond Felton added 27, but New
York made just 28.9 percent of its
shots in the first half as Boston took
a 54-35 lead.
New York had tied the game 84-84
after trailing by 20 points early in the
third quarter. It was 88-all before the
Celtics regained control and took the
lead for good on a 3-pointer by Terry.
Anthony hit a short jumper, but Terry
connected on a 15-footer with 50
seconds remaining for a 93-90 lead.
After Anthony missed a 3-pointer
with 21 seconds to go, Terry was
fouled by Steve Novak and made
both free throws. He added a layup
to close out the game.
Paul Pierce led the Celtics with 29
points, Jeff Green added 26 and
Terry finished with 18.
With leaders such as Pierce and
Kevin Garnett, the Celtics have
“tremendous” pride, Terry said.
“Getting swept is something that no
man that’s been in this league that
long wants to do. It’s disheartening.
“Now we have to go into a hostile
environment and they’re going to be
trying to get it over with. They don’t
want to come back here, but we do.”
The Celtics showed renewed ener-
gy early after being held below 80
points in each of the first three
games. They led 59-39 three min-
utes into the third quarter before
their recent second-half woes
returned.
In previous first halves, they
scored just 25 points in Game 1 and
23 in Game 2. On Sunday, they were
outscored 30-14 in the third quarter
and led just 68-65 heading into the
fourth.
“Good teams are going to make
those runs,” said Garnett, who had
13 points, 17 rebounds and six
assists. “It’s deflating, but we kept
fighting. We found a way to get over
the hump.”
Boston held a 65-51 lead when
Anthony went to the bench with
3:35 remaining. The Knicks
outscored the Celtics 14-3 the rest of
the way behind 11 points from
Felton and a 3-pointer from Iman
Shumpert. Felton finished with 16
points in the quarter.
“He was huge in this game for us,”
Kenyon Martin said. “Especially
missing J.R., we needed someone
else to make shots for us and he did
that.”
The Knicks played the first half as
if they had taken shooting lessons
from the Celtics. New York hit just
11 of 38 shots in the half after
Boston made only 39.5 percent of its
total attempts in the first three
games.
Celts top Knicks 97-90 in OT, avoid playoff sweep
REUTERS
Boston Celtics Paul Pierce gets tangled up with New York Knicks Carmelo
Anthony during the first half of Game 4 of their NBA Eastern Conference
playoff basketball series in Boston Sunday.
SPORTS 15
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Stephen Hawkins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
IRVING, Texas — Inbee Park
was already preparing to congratu-
late Carlota Ciganda for winning
the inaugural North Texas LPGA
Shootout.
Park, the top-ranked woman in
the world, was in the middle of a
solid final round and still trailed by
two strokes after the playing part-
ners both had birdies at the par-5
10th.
Everything changed in a two-hole
stretch, when Park went ahead with
consecutive pars. The 24-year-old
South Korean went on to a bogey-
free 4-under 67 that put her one
stroke ahead of Ciganda, good
enough for her third victory this
season and fifth in her last 18 starts.
“She was hitting fairways and
greens and making putts,” said Park,
who finished at 13 under. “And I
thought I played really great today,
but I just missed a lot of birdie
opportunities, so I thought this tour-
nament might not be mine because I
missed that many opportunities and
Carlota was playing great golf. But
she made a couple mistakes on the
back nine.”
Ciganda’s drive at the 416-yard
14th hole settled in the right rough
with a tree between her and the
green, and her shot from about 130
yards clipped a branch and came up
short. She had a chance to save par
but her 6-foot putt was short, and
Park’s par had her within a stroke of
the lead.
After stepping away from her
approach at No. 15, to a green sur-
rounded by water on three sides,
Ciganda hit a shot that went to the
right and then rolled down into the
water. Ciganda had to go back to a
drop zone, where the 22-year-old
Spaniard had a decent pitch before
her first putt rolled over the left edge
of the green for a double bogey 6.
Park had another par and never
trailed again.
“I’m very happy with my round
and with my week. ... I had two bad
holes on the back nine,” Ciganda said.
With the $195,000 check for first
place, Inbee exceeded $6 million in
career earnings and will be No. 1 for
the third week in a row. It was her
sixth career LPGA victory, along
with four more wins in Japan.
Fifth-ranked Suzann Pettersen
from Norway, the winner in Hawaii
last week, had a closing 66 to get to
10 under and finish third. Hee
Young Park (64) and So Yeon Ryu
(68) tied for fourth at 275.
Ciganda played last season on the
Ladies European Tour, where she
was the top rookie and the top
money winner — the first player
since Laura Davies in 1985 to
accomplish that feat. She won twice
in Europe last year and now has her
best LPGA finish.
At the 403-yard 8th hole, Park
made a birdie before Ciganda fol-
lowed with one of her own and
responded with a slight fist pump
when her ball dropped into the cup.
They both had pars at No. 9, where
Park was closer to the hole even
though she was missed the green to
the left, and they traded birdies
again at the par-5 10th.
“I was happy and playing good
and having fun and enjoying the
day,” said Ciganda, who had a clos-
ing 70. “And then I think, let me
see, the hole it bounced to the right,
but I had a bogey there and then hit
it to the water on 15.”
Caroline Masson had a 75 and
finished eight shots back. The
LPGA Tour rookie from Germany
led after each of the first two rounds
and started the final round tied for
second with Park.
Hee Young Park’s 64 was the best
round of the day on the 6,439-yard
course with plenty of sloping fair-
ways and raised greens.
Stacy Lewis, the Texas native and
No. 2 player in the world, had a
closing 66 when all six birdies and
her only bogey came between Nos.
7-17. She tied for seventh for her
sixth top-10 finish this season.
At the end of her round, Lewis
signed the back brace of a 6-year-
old Dallas girl who was diagnosed
with scoliosis at 18 months old.
Lewis wore a similar brace 18 hours
a day for seven years after being
diagnosed with scoliosis at age 11
and missed her first collegiate sea-
son after a spinal fusion.
Third-ranked Na Yeon Choi,
among the four players tied for sev-
enth, had 44 consecutive bogey-free
holes and was 9 under before con-
secutive bogeys at Nos. 10-12. She
went on to a 72.
Inbee Park sank a 4-foot birdie
putt on the par-5 18th after Ciganda
also birdied even after her final
drive went into the right rough. But
they had an unusual wait after hit-
ting their drives, when Jee Young
Lee, playing two groups ahead of
them, had to replay the hole.
Before Lee signed her scorecard,
officials determined she took an
improper drop after her drive at No.
18 went out of bounds. Lee carded a
10 before Ciganda and Park got to
play out the hole.
“It was all right. I mean it was
actually really good, it ended up
really good for me because I made a
birdie,” Park said of the delay.
“Maybe if I hit it in the water maybe
I could have blamed it on them.”
Inbee Park wins 3rd LPGA title this year
By Brett Martel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AVONDALE, La. — Billy
Horschel sensed the time had come
for him to win his first PGA Tour
event. This could explain the com-
posure he displayed in the face of
two final-round weather delays and
a 27-foot putt he had to make on the
final hole to avert a playoff.
Horschel tied a course record at
the TPC Louisiana with an 8-under
64 in the final round of the Zurich
Classic on Sunday, which was good
enough to win by one stroke over
D.A. Points.
Points put pressure on Horschel
by hitting out of a bunker to set up a
5-foot birdie
putt on the par-5
18th. Then
Horschel rolled
in his long victo-
ry-sealing putt,
pumping his
arms and letting
out a triumphant
yell before sink-
ing into a
crouch and briefly pulling his cap
over his face as the crowd roared.
“I hadn’t made a long one all
week and I said, ‘I’m due,”’
Horschel said. “I was like, ‘If it’s
my time, this putt needs to go in.’
Soon after, he saw a video replay
of his celebration.
“I know it was pretty intense,” he
said. “There was a lot going on. It’s
celebration time now.”
The 26-year-old former Florida
Gator began the day two shots
behind third-round leader Lucas
Glover and surged into the lead with
six straight birdies after the first
weather delay. He finished at 20
under, narrowly holding off Points,
who won the Shell Houston Open
last month by a stroke over
Horschel and Henrik Stenson.
“When a player goes out and
shoots 8 under and birdies the last
hole to win, hats off to Billy,” said
Points, who had a 65. “He’s played
great all year. He was one shot shy
of me at Houston and I’m a shot shy
of him here. It’s just the way it
goes.”
The second delay, for lightning,
happened before Horschel could
take his second shot on the 18th
hole, giving him 52 minutes to
reflect on what was at stake —
$1.19 million and a two-year
exemption.
It didn’t really faze him. He said
he tends to relax during delays, and
almost always plays well after them.
“For some reason it puts me at
ease a little bit,” Horschel said.
“You don’t know how long your
delay is going to be so you’ve just
got to go with it and just wait it out.
... It wasn’t easy, but it wasn’t as
hard as it could have been.”
Kyle Stanley shot a 5-under 67 to
finish third, while 14-year-old ama-
teur Guan Tianlang of China fin-
ished 71st after making his second
cut in two PGA events, the first
coming at the Masters.
Although Horschel had never
won on the Tour, he had been play-
ing the best golf of his young career
lately, with three top-10 finishes in
his past three tournaments — tying
for second in Houston, tying for
third in San Antonio and tying for
ninth in Hilton Head Island, S.C., a
week ago.
“I played well. It just wasn’t my
time,” Horschel said of his recent
top-three finishes. “It was nice that
today was my time.”
Horschel takes first PGA win at Zurich Classic
REUTERS
Inbee Park of South Korea (rear L) jumps into Poppie’s Pond with her fiance
Gi Hyeob Nam (C) surrounding the 18th green to celebrate winning the
Kraft Nabisco Championship LPGA golf tournament in Rancho Mirage
April 7.Yesterday, Park won her third title of the season in Texas.
Billy Horschel
16
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — For four
straight games, the San Antonio
Spurs showed off all the teamwork
and tenacity that the Los Angeles
Lakers lacked all season long.
And when the Lakers’ tumultuous
season finally collapsed Sunday
night, the smooth Spurs rolled right
past them to the second round.
Tony Parker scored 23 points, and
San Antonio completed its first-
round sweep of the injury-plagued
Lakers with a 103-82 victory in
Game 4.
Tim Duncan had 11 points and six
rebounds for the second-seeded
Spurs, who will face the winner of
Denver’s series with Golden State in
the second round. They’ll get plenty
of rest after flattening the Lakers,
who staggered through back-to-
back blowout losses at home with-
out three regular starters in their
first opening-round exit since 2007.
“Obviously, it wasn’t a fair fight,”
Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said.
San Antonio never trailed in the
clincher, leading by 25 points in one
more businesslike effort against the
seventh-seeded Lakers, who provid-
ed their usual drama.
In his final game before unre-
stricted free agency, Dwight
Howard scored seven points before
getting ejected early in the third
quarter for arguing. Pau Gasol had
16 points for the Lakers, who were
swept from the postseason for the
second time in three years despite a
late courtside appearance by Kobe
Bryant on crutches.
Howard said the season was “like
a nightmare. It’s like a bad dream,
and we just couldn’t wake up from
it. That’s what it felt like.”
The Los Angeles Lakers gave
away thousands of white towels to
their fans Sunday, and they acquired
an unfortunate symbolism: In the
final game of a season that began
with championship aspirations, the
Lakers couldn’t keep up without
injured starters Bryant, Steve Nash
and Metta World Peace. They had
just nine available players in uni-
form for the final minutes.
“I’m proud of them, because
they fought,” Lakers coach Mike
D’Antoni said. “It was kind of a
year that was all upside-down, but
I appreciate the effort to get us into
the playoffs. We just didn’t have
it.”
After Duncan led the Spurs’
blowout in Game 3, Parker took the
lead in the clincher, scoring 15
points in the first half while exploit-
ing the Lakers’ hastily assembled
backcourt. Los Angeles’ top four
guards are out with injuries, includ-
ing backups Steve Blake and Jodie
Meeks, and Parker was merciless
against third-stringers.
“What I was pleased about our
team is the way we focused every
night,” Popovich said. “Sometimes
that’s hard to do when your oppo-
nent is wounded.”
Spurs finish 4-game sweep, routing Lakers 103-82
REUTERS
Los Angeles Lakers power forward Pau Gasol (16) fights for position against
San Antonio Spurs power forward Tim Duncan (21) during Game 4 of their
NBA Western Conference basketball playoff series in Los Angeles,Sunday.
By Gary Graves
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Back at
Churchill Downs for the first time
since winning the Kentucky Derby
with I’ll Have Another, trainer Doug
O’Neill is thinking about winning
another one.
And why not?
This time around, the trainer has
Goldencents, who like I’ll Have
Another, comes into the Saturday’s
Derby off a victory in the Santa
Anita Derby.
“It’s great to be back,” O’Neill
said. “It’s wonderful looking at the
twin spires and dreaming of what
could be coming on May 4.”
Goldencents has O’Neill looking
forward to Saturday, especially after
the 3-year-old colt took his first jog
around the track. A day after mak-
ing the cross-country flight from
California, the colt co-owned by
Louisville basketball coach Rick
Pitino jogged a leisurely mile with
exercise rider Jonny Garcia aboard.
Jockey Kevin Krigger looked on.
“He looked great,” O’Neill said
before showers passed over the
track following the jog. “We just
had an easy day with him, but I was
real happy with the way he looked,
Jonny was happy with the way he
felt. If all goes well, we’ll gallop
him tomorrow.”
Goldencents had his last workout
Thursday at Santa Anita, covering
six furlongs in 1:16.20 at Santa
Anita. Most notable about the work-
out was covering the final three fur-
longs in 36.00, boosting O’Neill’s
Derby outlook.
Goldencents has won two of three
starts this year and totals four wins
in six career races. After a fourth-
place finish in the San Felipe
Stakes, the colt rebounded with a 1
1/4 -length win over Flashback in
the Santa Anita Derby.
Krigger has been the regular rider
and will have a chance on Saturday
to become the first African-
American jockey to win the Derby
since 1902.
Though Krigger wasn’t sure if
he’d get aboard Goldencents before
Saturday, O’Neill has about 10
mounts planned for him so the jock-
ey becomes familiar with the track
and its surface.
“I’m happy either way how we do
it, so it doesn’t really matter to me if
I do or not,” Krigger said. “I would
like to, though.”
Also, Florida Derby runner-up
Itsmyluckyday jogged just over a
mile following his van trip from
Florida.
The Holy Bull winner had his last
workout Thursday at Calder Race
Course, clocking 53:00 over four
furlongs before making an 18-hour
van trip to Kentucky.
Exercise rider Peter Shelton said
Itsmyluckyday was bouncing and
eager to keep going during his jog,
just the kind of enthusiasm trainer
Eddie Plesa Jr. was looking for.
Goldencents gives O’Neill good feeling for Derby
Kershaw dominates Brewers,
Crawford homers twice
LOS ANGELES — Clayton Kershaw made
a nifty return to form.
Kershaw retired 18 consecutive batters and
struck out 12 in eight dominant innings as the
Los Angeles Dodgers, boosted by Carl
Crawford’s two home runs, beat the
Milwaukee Brewers 2-0 Sunday.
The 2011 NL Cy Young winner began the
season with a shutout over San Francisco, and
soon extended his scoreless streak to 16
innings.
Kershaw (3-2) failed to get through the
sixth inning in each of his last two starts.
“It was good to see Kershaw back to his old
self,” Crawford said. “He struggled his last
two outings, so to get him back on track is a
plus for us.”
Kershaw left the clubhouse before reporters
were allowed in after the game to tend to a
personal matter.
“He’s a great pitcher,” said Ramon
Hernandez, who joined the Dodgers this sea-
son and hadn’t caught the All-Star in a game.
Sports brief
SPORTS 17
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Genaro C. Armas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa.
— The decades-long rift that sepa-
rated Little League Baseball’s
founder from his beloved program
once seemed as wide as the distance
from home plate to straightaway
center field.
Those differences appear to have
finally been put to rest.
More than 20 years after the death
of founder Carl Stotz, his family has
loaned artifacts to Little League’s
museum that tell stories of how the
most well-known youth sports
organizations in the world came to
be.
The first home plate, hand-carved
by Stotz out of a piece of black rub-
ber, used in the first Little League in
1939. The first catcher’s mask. The
first first-base bag, sewn by Stotz’s
sister.
“I don’t know if you can ever fully
say that you’re healed from some-
thing that has lasted so long,” Little
League president Stephen Keener
said last week at a news conference
announcing the new additions at the
museum in South Williamsport.
“What I would say is that we have a
terrific relationship today with the
Stotz family.”
A relationship slowly repaired
especially over the last 15 years. A
statue of Stotz was dedicated in
2001 on the grounds of the sprawl-
ing Little League complex, which is
home to the World Series each
August.
Keener called the family’s loan of
memorabilia, and the museum
exhibit, an important step.
“We’ve certainly come a long
way,” he said.
Stotz’s daughter, Karen Stotz
Myers, represented the family in
announcing the exhibit at the reno-
vated museum, which is scheduled
to re-open in June. “I know that my
father was really not bitter,” she said.
“His main goal in his whole life was
that boys get a chance to play base-
ball, and that happened.”
It certainly did.
According to Little League, more
than 30 million people in more than
100 countries have played small
ball. More than 170,000 teams just
started swinging the bats this sea-
son.
It began with an idea by Stotz 75
years ago. The first pitch for the very
first league was thrown the follow-
ing summer on June 6, 1939, on a
dusty diamond in Williamsport. Out
of that first game, Little League
grew in popularity.
With that popularity grew a need
for financing. Little League became
incorporated in the late 1940s, with
a board of directors, legally taking it
out of Stotz’s hands.
Simmering differences about the
direction of the program came to a
boil after Peter J. McGovern, a U.S.
Rubber executive from Detroit, took
over as the organization’s president
in 1952.
A messy split spilled into the
courts. Stotz severed ties with Little
League in 1956, returning to his
very first league — though a court
order prohibited him from using the
term “Little League” anymore. In
the book, “Play Ball!” written by
now-Little League vice president
Lance Van Auken, Stotz Myers said
her father settled out of court
because he didn’t
want to drag his
friends into the
legal entangle-
ment.
Stotz, who later
went on to serve
as a tax collector,
stayed in
Wi l l i a ms por t ,
where he raised
his family. He
had many loyal,
local supporters
and hard feelings
in the community
lingered for
decades.
While Stotz
Myers said the
rift did affect the
family.
“For many
years, Little
League didn’t
acknowledge that
he was the
founder,” Stotz
Myers said after
the museum news
c o n f e r e n c e .
“When my chil-
dren started to play Little League
(locally) their friends told them they
were liars when they said (Stotz)
started Little League.”
Stotz died in 1992. A new era of
goodwill seemingly started in the
late 1990s after current president
Keener struck up a relationship with
the family. At about the same time,
Little League, which was now head-
quartered across the Susquehanna
River in South Williamsport, was
considering doubling its field for the
World Series from eight to 16 teams,
and building a second stadium.
Plans were made to erect a statue
to honor Stotz. Though he never vis-
ited the current home of the World
Series in South Williamsport, his
wife, Grayce Stotz, dedicated the
statue at the complex in 2001. Mrs.
Stotz died in 2006.
Then, Little League decided to
renovate its museum two years ago.
In talking with Little League, Stotz
Myers thought it was an appropriate
time to share items in her father’s
collection with the museum.
The room where Stotz’s memora-
bilia will be on display includes a
black-and-white picture of Stotz, in
front of a microphone at an on-field
ceremony, with the caption: “The
sole founder of Little League shapes
the program.”
Grayce Stotz is honored too for
her contributions to Little League.
Among other items to be displayed
include a whistle used by Stotz to
call the first tryouts, and an early
drawing of Little League’s keystone
emblem.
Stotz Myers credited Keener and
Van Auken with taking proactive
roles in promoting her father’s lega-
cy.
“Seeing the home plate, the base,”
she said, “reminds me of how much
Little League was, and still is, a fam-
ily affair.”
Rift repaired, Little League honors founder Stotz
18
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 18 7 .720 —
New York 15 9 .625 2 1/2
Baltimore 15 10 .600 3
Tampa Bay 12 13 .480 6
Toronto 9 17 .346 9 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Kansas City 13 8 .619 —
Detroit 12 10 .545 1 1/2
Minnesota 11 10 .524 2
Chicago 10 14 .417 4 1/2
Cleveland 8 13 .381 5
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 16 9 .640 —
Oakland 14 12 .538 2 1/2
Seattle 11 16 .407 6
Los Angeles 9 15 .375 6 1/2
Houston 7 18 .280 9
Saturday’sGames
Detroit 7, Atlanta 4
Baltimore 7, Oakland 3
N.Y.Yankees 5,Toronto 4
Minnesota 7,Texas 2
Kansas City 3, Cleveland 2
Boston 8, Houston 4
Tampa Bay 10, Chicago White Sox 4
Seattle 3, L.A. Angels 2
Sunday’sGames
N.Y.Yankees 3,Toronto 2
Boston 6, Houston 1
Kansas City 9, Cleveland 0, 1st game
Tampa Bay 8, Chicago White Sox 3
Minnesota 5,Texas 0
Oakland 9, Baltimore 8, 10 innings
Seattle 2, L.A. Angels 1
Atlanta at Detroit, 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m., 2nd game
Monday’sGames
Houston (Harrell 2-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 3-1),
7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Pelfrey 2-2) at Detroit (Scherzer 2-0),
7:08 p.m.
Cleveland (U.Jimenez 0-2) at Kansas City (W.Davis
2-1), 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Hanson 2-1) at Oakland (Straily 1-0),
10:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Britton 0-0) at Seattle (J.Saunders 1-3),
10:10 p.m.
Tuesday’sGames
Houston at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. All times Eastern.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 15 8 .652 —
Washington 13 12 .520 3
Philadelphia 12 14 .462 4 1/2
New York 10 13 .435 5
Miami 6 19 .240 10
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 15 10 .600 —
St. Louis 14 10 .583 1/2
Cincinnati 14 12 .538 1 1/2
Milwaukee 12 11 .522 2
Chicago 9 15 .375 5 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 15 10 .600 —
Colorado 15 10 .600 —
San Francisco 13 12 .520 2
Los Angeles 12 12 .500 2 1/2
San Diego 9 15 .375 5 1/2
———
Saturday’s Games
Detroit 7, Atlanta 4
Washington 6, Cincinnati 3
Philadelphia 9, N.Y. Mets 4
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 3
Chicago Cubs 3, Miami 2
Arizona 3, Colorado 2, 10 innings
San Diego 8, San Francisco 7, 12 innings
Milwaukee 6, L.A. Dodgers 4
Sunday’s Games
Miami 6, Chicago Cubs 4
Philadelphia 5, N.Y. Mets 1
Cincinnati 5, Washington 2
Pittsburgh 9, St. Louis 0
Arizona 4, Colorado 2
L.A. Dodgers 2, Milwaukee 0
San Diego 6, San Francisco 4
Atlanta at Detroit, 8:05 p.m.
Monday’s Games
N.Y. Mets (Harvey 4-0) at Miami (Fernandez 0-2),
7:10 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 1-4) at Atlanta (Teheran
1-0), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Richard 0-2) at Chicago Cubs
(Samardzija 1-4), 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 2-0) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 2-1), 8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 1-0) at St. Louis (Wainwright 4-
1), 8:15 p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 0-2) at Arizona (Kennedy
1-2), 9:40 p.m.
Colorado (Chatwood 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 0-
0), 10:10 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. All times Eastern.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
z-Pittsburgh 48 36 12 0 72 165 119
x-N.Y. Rangers 48 26 18 4 56 130 112
x-N.Y. Islanders 48 24 17 7 55 139 139
Philadelphia 48 23 22 3 49 133 141
New Jersey 48 19 19 10 48 112 129
Northeast Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Montreal 48 29 14 5 63 149 126
x-Boston 48 28 14 6 62 131 109
x-Toronto 48 26 17 5 57 145 133
x-Ottawa 48 25 17 6 56 116 104
Buffalo 48 21 21 6 48 125 143
Southeast Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Washington 48 27 18 3 57 149 130
Winnipeg 48 24 21 3 51 128 144
Carolina 48 19 25 4 42 128 160
Tampa Bay 48 18 26 4 40 148 150
Florida 48 15 27 6 36 112 171
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
z-Chicago 48 36 7 5 77 155 102
x-St. Louis 48 29 17 2 60 129 115
x-Detroit 48 24 16 8 56 124 115
Columbus 48 24 17 7 55 120 119
Nashville 48 16 23 9 41 111 139
Northwest Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Vancouver 48 26 15 7 59 127 121
x-Minnesota 48 26 19 3 55 122 127
Edmonton 48 19 22 7 45 125 134
Calgary 48 19 25 4 42 128 160
Colorado 48 16 25 7 39 116 152
PacificDivision
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Anaheim 48 30 12 6 66 140 118
x-Los Angeles 48 27 16 5 59 133 118
x-San Jose 48 25 16 7 57 124 116
Phoenix 48 21 18 9 51 125 131
Dallas 48 22 22 4 48 130 142
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Saturday’sGames
N.Y. Rangers 4, New Jersey 0
Detroit 3, Dallas 0
Columbus 3, Nashville 1
Florida 5,Tampa Bay 3
Washington 3, Boston 2, OT
Philadelphia 2, Ottawa 1
Montreal 4,Toronto 1
Minnesota 3, Colorado 1
Pittsburgh 8, Carolina 3
St. Louis 3, Chicago 1
Phoenix 5, Anaheim 3
Edmonton 7,Vancouver 2
Los Angeles 3, San Jose 2
Sunday’sGames
Ottawa 4, Boston 2
NHL GLANCE
vs. Denver
TBA
if necessary
4/23
Endof
Regular
Season
4/24 4/27
@Denver
TBA
if necessary
4/28
4/28
Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/29
4/27
at D-backs
6:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/30
at D-backs
6:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/29
vs. Dodgers
7:15p.m.
NBC
5/3
@D’backs
6:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/1
vs.Dodgers
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
5/4
vs. Angels
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/1
vs. Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/30
@NewYork
10:05a.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
@NewYork
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/3 4/27
4/27
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
vs. Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
@Seattle
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/11
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
5/18
4/28
4/30 5/2
@Denver
TBA
if necessary
5/4
@Dallas
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/25
@RSL
6:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/1
Sunday’sSportsTransactions
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Placed C Taylor Teagar-
denonthe15-dayDL.RecalledCLuisExpositofrom
Norfolk (IL).
BOSTON RED SOX — Optioned C Ryan Lavarn-
way to Pawtucket (IL).Reinstated RHP John Lackey
from the 15-day DL.
CHICAGOWHITESOX— Placed RHP Gavin Floyd
onthe15-dayDL.RecalledRHPDeunteHeathfrom
Charlotte (IL). Optioned OF Blake Tekotte to Char-
lotte.
CLEVELANDINDIANS— Placed C Lou Marson on
the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 25. Recalled C
Yan Gomes and LHP Scott Barnes from Columbus
(IL).
KANSASCITYROYALS— Recalled LHP Will Smith
from Omaha (PCL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Reinstated OF Yoenis
Cespedes from the 15-day DL. Designated OF
Casper Wells for assignment.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Reinstated OF
Jason Kubel from the 15-day DL. Placed INF Didi
Gregorius on the 7-day DL, retroactive to April 27.
COLORADO ROCKIES — Designated INF Chris
Nelsonfor assignment.Selectedthecontract of INF
Nolan Arenado from Colorado Springs (PCL).
PHILADELPHIAPHILLIES — Reinstated C Carlos
Ruiz from the restricted list. Designated C Hum-
berto Quintero for assignment.
Midwest League
QUAD CITIES BANDITS — Transferred OF Ariel
Ovando to extended spring training and LHP
Colton Cain from extended spring training.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
GOLDENSTATE WARRIORS — Recalled G Scott
Machado from Santa Cruz (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS — Agreed to terms with WR
Da’Rick Rogers.
CHICAGO BEARS — Agreed to terms with RB
Michael Ford, WRs Mark Harrison, Josh Lenz and
Marcus Rucker, CBs Demontre Hurst and C.J. Wil-
son, C P.J. Lonergan, DTs Zach Minter and Brent
Russell and P Tress Way.
DENVERBRONCOS— Agreed to terms with DEs
Gary Mason Jr., John Youboty,WRs Kemonte’Bate-
man,Quincy McDuffie and Lamaar Thomas,RB C.J.
Anderson, LBs Uona Kaveinga, Lerentee McCray
and Doug Rippy, P Ryan Doerr, G Manase Foketi,
CB Aaron Hester, QB Ryan Katz, S Ross Rasner and
TE Lucas Reed.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Agreed to terms
with QB Jordan Rodgers, QB Matt Scott, DT T.J.
Barnes, LB Maalik Bomar, CB Marcus Burley, OT R.J.
Dill, LB Jeremiah Green, DE Paul Hazel, DT Arby
Jones, WR Cole McKenzie, WR Jamal Miles, G
Stephane Milhim, OT Jeff Nady,TE Ryan Otten.
TRANSACTIONS
DATEBOOK 19
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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April 3
rd
-
June 14
th
, 2013
Y
ou may not like seagulls. You may
curse them. If you’ve been to a
game at AT&T Park or watched
one on television, you’ve seen them descend
on the ballpark at the end of every Giants
game. Someone asked a member of our
Behavior & Training team to explain this
behavior. We know seagulls (California
gulls, to be more accurate), are scavengers,
but how do they know the game is ending?
They are in tune to a sequence of events, not
unlike your pets at home. Murray, my four-
legged friend, gets excited if I put on my
shoes and go into the closet for my jacket.
Even though he hasn’t seen me grab his
leash, he knows this sequence leads to a dog
walk. Our pets know the sequence that leads
to their meals, too. Opening the drawer for a
can opener might be part of it. They also
know the sequence of events tied to unpleas-
ant experiences. When Murray sees me get
his shampoo and a towel and head outside,
he never follows — it’s bath time! I bet
there are quite a few owners whose cats run
when they see the carrier; to them, it could
mean a trip to the vet. Our pets are really
good at recognizing the actions and events
that lead to things that matter to them. For
those gulls, it’s all about easy access to bits
of hot dog, bread and greasy fries. And, you
can guess the sequence that tells them the
smorgasbord is open: fans filing from their
seats, the expanse of green grass with no
players on it and possibly even the playing
of post-game music. At AT&T, they play
Tony Bennett’s “I Left My Heart in San
Francisco” after every Giants victory. I’ve
seen this in person many times. Always
happy for a win; and, happy not to get
pooped on.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Customer
Service, Behavior and Training, Education,
Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty
Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR pro-
gram areas and staff. His companion,
Murray, oversees him.
By David Germain
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — “Iron Man 3”
was the heavy-lifter at theaters with
a colossal overseas debut that over-
shadowed a gang of mercenary
bodybuilders in a sleepy pre-sum-
mer weekend at the domestic box
office.
The Marvel Studios superhero
sequel starring Robert Downey Jr. got
a head-start on its domestic launch
next Friday with a $195.3 million
opening in 42 overseas markets, dis-
tributor Disney reported Sunday.
That topped the $185.1 million
start for Marvel’s “The Avengers,”
which opened in 39 markets over
the same weekend last year a week
ahead of its record-breaking domes-
tic debut of $207.4 million.
“You don’t know that you could
ever repeat the kind of experience
we had a year ago, and here the
Marvel team brought together
another incredible movie,” said
Dave Hollis, head of distribution for
Disney. “We’ve had this as a pattern
for Marvel films to kind of let
momentum internationally help sig-
nal to the domestic audience that the
film is coming, something big is
coming.”
Director Michael Bay’s “Pain &
Gain,” a true-crime tale of body-
builders on the make, muscled into
first-place domestically with a $20
million debut.
The Paramount release starring
Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson
and Anthony Mackie knocked off
Tom Cruise’s sci-fi adventure
“Oblivion” after a week in the No. 1
spot. Universal’s “Oblivion” slipped
to second-place with $17.4 million,
raising its domestic total to $64.7
million.
Lionsgate’s all-star nuptial come-
dy “The Big Wedding” tanked at
No. 4 with just $7.5 million. The
ensemble cast includes Robert De
Niro, Diane Keaton, Robin
Williams, Susan Sarandon and
Katherine Heigl, but the movie was
almost universally trashed by critics
and held little interest for audiences.
Paramount, which distributed the
earlier “Iron Man” movies and still
has a financial stake in the comic-
book flicks after Disney bought
Marvel, had a small-scale success
with “Pain & Gain.”
A passion project for Bay, who
has made Paramount a fortune with
his “Transformers” franchise, “Pain
& Gain” was shot for a modest $26
million, spare change compared to
the director’s usual budgets.
The movie has the director taking
a breather from his usual sci-fi
action spectacles for a story based
on a kidnapping-extortion caper
carried out by bodybuilders in the
1990s. Yet “Pain & Gain” still has
Bay’s usual visual flair, and the
reviews generally were better than
what he’s used to.
“With that kind of budget, to open
to $20 million the first weekend is a
very strong opening,” said Don
Harris, Paramount’s head of distribu-
tion. “You see what a director really
in his prime, at the top of his game,
can do with a small budget, what he
can make a movie look like.”
“Oblivion” was down a fairly
steep 53 percent from the movie’s
$37.1 million domestic debut the
previous weekend.
Overseas, “Oblivion” took in
$12.8 million to lift its international
haul to $134.1 million and world-
wide total to just under $200 million.
Hollywood’s domestic downturn
continued, with revenues totaling
$90 million, off 18.5 percent from
the same weekend last year, when
“Think Like a Man” led with $17.6
million, according to box-office
tracker Hollywood.com.
Receipts have trailed 2012’s for
most of the year, with 2013 domestic
ticket sales running at $2.9 billion,
nearly 12 percent behind last year’s.
That pattern could continue as
Hollywood opens its summer sea-
son domestically this coming week-
end. Despite a huge haul expected
for “Iron Man 3,” the film will be
competing against that gigantic start
over the same weekend last year for
“The Avengers,” the only movie to
open with more than $200 million
domestically.
“Iron Man 2” debuted with
$128.1 million over the first week-
end in May 2010. Hollywood.com
analyst Paul Dergarabedian has
been pegging the “Iron Man 3”
potential at $125 million-plus,
though the mammoth international
start could fire up domestic
prospects even higher.
“This ups the ante in a big way for
“Iron Man 3,” Dergarabedian said. “It
just raises the profile of the film. It
raises expectations. But to expect
something in the realm of $207.4 mil-
lion? Well, the fact that we’re even
talking about it is really amazing.”
‘Iron Man 3’ rules world,‘Pain & Gain’ takes U.S.
1.“Pain & Gain,”$20 million.
2.“Oblivion,”$17.4 million
($12.8 million international).
3.“42,”$10.7 million.
4.“The Big Wedding,”$7.5 million.
5. “The Croods,” $6.6 million
($13.1 million international).
6.“G.I. Joe: Retaliation,” $3.6 mil-
lion ($10.2 million international).
7.“Scary Movie 5,”$3.5 million.
8.“Olympus Has Fallen,”
$2.8 million.
9.“The Place Beyond the Pines,”
$2.7 million.
10.“Jurassic Park”in 3-D,$2.3 mil-
lion ($410,000 international).
Top 10 movies
“Iron Man 3”opened strong overseas with $185.1 million in receipts.
20
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
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SALES
crime fighter who used the newest techniques
to capture or put out of business the most var-
ied group of criminals ever heard of before.
His sharp jaw, clean-shaven face, dark-black
suit and light topcoat, along with his ever-
present hat became universally recognized
almost overnight.
Tracy’s first villain was “Big Boy,” pat-
terned after Al Capone. After, the cartoonist
reached into his imagination and presented his
own unique “villains.” Dick Tracy’s gallery of
criminals included Prune Face (a Nazi spy and
machine design engineer who dabbles with
chemical nerve gas), Shoulders (who thought
every girl fell in love with him), Flattop Jones
(a hit man hired to murder Tracy — he failed),
and innumerably more. In 1947, Tracy mar-
ried his sweetheart Tes Truhart after 17 years
of courtship and this union produced a daugh-
ter Bonnie Braids. Tracy and his wife adopted
an orphaned boy, Tracy Jr. or Junior, and he
became included in the crime fighting strip.
Many gadgets were used by Tracy but the
most brilliant gadget was presented in the
strip on Jan. 13, 1946. It was the 2-way wrist
radio that became one of the strip’s immedi-
ately recognized icon. The world thought it
was cool but knew that it would never exist —
until now. The 2-way wrist watch was upgrad-
ed to a 2-Way Wrist TV in 1964.
Dick Tracy’s sidekick, Pat Patton, was
unstoppable until a botched-up security detail
resulted in blind inventor, Brilliant, being
killed. Police Chief Brandon resigned because
of this and Pat Patton was promoted to police
chief. Sam Catchum became Tracy’s new
sidekick.
One notable goofy redneck yokel was Bob
Oscar “B.O.” Plenty. His wife was Gertrude
(Gravel Gertie) Plenty. Their daughter,
Sparkly Plenty, became a fashion model and
their second child, a boy named Attitude, born
on April 24, 2011, was so ugly his face was
never shown.
Case after case was presented by Gould
until his health forced him to retire in 1977.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
Annie Huacho from the Peninsula Humane Society and Buttercup take part in Half Moon
Bay Brewing Company’s “Going to the Dogs”fundraiser for PHS April 7. Four-legged guests
were treated to house-made Mavericks Bones and professional pet photography while their
human counterparts partook in pet adoptions and enjoyed live music by Patrick Maier Duo
along with the Brewing Company’s Coastal cuisine and house-brewed beers.The Brewing Com-
pany has been named best Dog-Friendly Restaurant and second-best Dog-Friendly Bar in
the Bay Area for the second year in a row in Bay Woof’s 2013 Beast of the Bay Competition.
A DAY FOR THE DOGS
South San Francisco
High School Key
Club members,Tora
Ng, Jeremy Jimenez,
Eliza Loke, Lorenzo
Azcueta, and Mary
Kim Delemos (L to
R), along with Kiwa-
nis Division 34 Lt.
Governor, Brian
Dahlquist, clean up
the playground
equipment at West-
borough Park in
South San Francisco
for Kiwanis One Day
on April 6.
KIWANIS CLEANUP
Pat and Ed Schoenstein, of Belmont, will
celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary
May 4, 2013. And they are celebrating by
going back to the church where they were
married this Sunday.
“I hope the two of you will have many
more anniversaries to celebrate!” — Mary
Ann Haidinger.
21
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ALEXANDER M. KALLIS
The Assistance League of San Mateo County began its 60th Year Anniversary Celebration by honoring Les
Williams,Tuskegee Airman Pilot and Congressional Gold Medal Recipient,with the unveiling of a plaque on the
site of the former dance studio that Mr. Williams owned and operated for 22 years. The building, at 528 N. San
Mateo Drive, San Mateo, is now the headquarters of the Assistance League. Among those present at the April
13 event were (seated) Mr. Les Williams and Mrs. Elsie Williams and (standing, left to right) Nancy McFarland; As-
sistance League President Linda Catalano; Lou Tassone; Karen Mead; Jan Vanders, Assistance League Public
Relations; Judie Davis; Nancy Owen; Ginny Engberg; and Nan Scarpino.
TUSKEGEE AIRMAN HONORED
ALEX FURUYA
Youth Advisory Council Member Virah Singh serves pasta to Lynn Brown
during the YAC Spaghetti Feed at the Foster City Recreation Center on
April 17. The entertainment filled evening benefited Samaritan House’s Safe
Harbor Shelter.
SPAGHETTI FEED
LOCAL
22
Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, APRIL 29
Empower Yourself to Self-Heal. 7:30
a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Wedgewood Banquet
Center at Crystal Springs Gold Course,
6650 Golf Course Drive, Burlingame.
Lecture by Christine Owen on soul mind
body medicine. $15, includes breakfast.
For mor information go to
www.rotaryclubsanmateosunrise.org
TV Studio Production Workshop. 6
p.m. Media Center, 800 San Antonio
Road, Palo Alto. Students will learn all
the crew positions necessary to
produce a TV show. Classes will be held
throughout April and May. For more
information call 494-8686, ext. 18 or go
to midpenmedia.org.
WesternBallet Presents‘Coppella.’7
p.m. Atherton Library, 2 Dinkelspiel
Station Lane, Atherton. Free. For more
information contact visser-
knoth@smcl.org.
TUESDAY, APRIL 30
Small Business Resource Fair. 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m., Oshman Family Jewish
Community Center, Cultural Arts Hall,
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Small
business owners and self-employed
professionals are welcome to a
schedule of helpful, informative
business seminars on various topics to
help grow business.Network with other
business professionals. Continental
breakfast will be served. Sponsored by
the Daily Journal. Free. For more
information and to register visit
SmallBusinessResourceFair.eventbrite.c
om or call 344-5200.
Just Dance.3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. Get ready to dance with
Just Dance games. For more
information call 591-8286.
Día de los Niños/Día de los Libros —
Children’s Day/Book Day. 4 p.m. to
5:30 p.m. San Mateo Public Library, Oak
Room, 55 West 3rd Ave., San Mateo.
There will be bilingual storytime, arts
and crafts,and free books.Free.For more
information call 522-7838.
Community Action Agency Public
Hearing. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. EPA
Municipal Building,2415 University Ave.,
Community Room, East Palo Alto. All
concerned citizens are urged to attend
to provide their comments on the
needs of low income households in San
Mateo County. Public comment will be
heard on the Community Agency’s
proposed Community Action Plan.
Refreshments will be served and a raffle
will be held. Please be sure to include
any needs in the special
accommodations request. Free. For
more information and to RSVP call 802-
5083 or contact
smc-caa@co.sanmateo.ca.us.
WEDNESDAY, MAY1
San Mateo Job Fair. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Skyline College, College Dining Hall,
Building 6, 330 College Dr., San Bruno.
Free. For more information call 415-749-
7534.
PortolaArtGalleryPresents‘Carving
Magic.’ 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Portola Art
Gallery at Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor
Road, Menlo Park. Come enjoy carved
ceramic creations by Misako Kambe of
Menlo Park. For more information visit
portolaartgallery.com.
California Relay Service Seminar. 11
a.m. Atria Daly City, 501 King Drive, Daly
City.There will be a presentation on free
telecommunications services available
to people in California who have
difficulty hearing. Free. For more
information call 878-5111 or go to
www.atriadalycity.com.
OsteoporosisSupportGroup.11 a.m.
to noon. Mills Health Center, 100 S. San
Mateo Drive, San Mateo. Drop-in. Free.
For more information call 800-654-9966.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Speido Ristorante, 223 East 4th
Avenue, San Mateo.Lunch $17.For more
information call 430-6500.
MayDayfor the Cureat TGI Friday’s.
5 p.m. to 9 p.m. TGI Friday’s, 3101 S. El
Camino, San Mateo. Eat up at the bar at
TGI Friday's to raise money for Leukemia
and Lymphoma Society's Woman of the
Year candidate, Karen Routt. For more
information call 570-4684.
Karen King Book Talk. 6:30 p.m. 301
Castro St., Mountain View.Free.For more
information 428-1234.
Live in Concert — Walter Strauss. 7
p.m. Fireplace Room, Redwood City
Public Library, 1044 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City. Free. For more
information go to redwoodcity.org.
Alzheimer’s support group. 7 p.m. to
9 p.m. Senior Focus Center, 1720 El
Camino Real, Suite 10, Burlingame. For
families and friends of Alzheimer’s
patients. Drop-in. Free. For more
information call 800-654-9966.
THURSDAY, MAY2
Psychedelic Experience: Healing,
Growth and Discovery. 7 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. Sofia University, 1069 E. Meadow
Circle, Palo Alto. The event will reflect
on surprising current results of
psychedelic research and will also
preview new research opportunities,
discoveries and more. Free. For more
information go to sofia.edu.
Knights Moves XV: ADance Concert
presented by the Hillsdale High
School Dance Ensemble. 7:30 p.m.
Hillsdale High School Little Theater, 31st
Avenue, San Mateo. $10 for students
and seniors, $12 for general admission
and free for children 6 years old and
under. For more information call 558-
2623.
FRIDAY, MAY3
Alzheimer’ssupport group.10 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. Magnolia Center, 601 Grand
Ave., Third floor, South San Francisco.
Drop-in. Free. For more information call
800-654-9966.
San Mateo County History Museum
continues ‘Free First Fridays’
program. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo
County Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Admission is free the
entire day.At 11 a.m., preschool children
will be invited to learn about Japanese
traditions. At 2 p.m., museum docents
will lead tours of the Museum for adults.
Free admission. For more information
call 299-0104.
Eric Van James Trio. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. Sam’s Chowder House, 4210 N.
Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay. Jazz,
blues and adult contemporary.For more
information and reservations call 712-
0245.
QuiltingandBonsai Exhibit.6:30 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. Municipal Services Building,
33 Arroyo Drive, South San Francisco.
The Cultural Arts Commission presents
HOME+QUILT=FAMILY, a Quilt and
Bonsai Exhibit art gallery program!
Enjoy lovely artistic quilts and
enchanting bonsai on exhibit. Unique
gifts available for purchase. Free
admission. For more information 829-
3800.
Knights Moves XV: ADance Concert
presented by the Hillsdale High
School Dance Ensemble. 7:30 p.m.
Hillsdale High School Little Theater, 31st
Avenue, San Mateo. $10 for students
and seniors, $12 for general admission
and free for children 6 years old and
under. For more information call 558-
2623.
SATURDAY, MAY4
Streets Alive! Parks Alive! In San
Mateo County. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Belmont, Burlingame, Cañada Rd.
between Edgewood Rd. & HIghway 92,
Colma, Daly City, El Granada, Foster City,
Menlo Park, Millbrae, North Fair Oaks,
Pacifica, Redwood City, San Bruno, San
Mateo, and South San Francisco. Streets
Alive! Parks Alive! is a coordinated effort
among cities in San Mateo County to
promote healthy communities by
providing safe, accessible, public spaces
for recreation. Streets and parks
throughout San Mateo County are
opened up for free activities including
sports, exercise classes, dancing,
strolling, cycling, picnicking and play.
For more information go to
www.streetsalivesmc.org.
Vintage Vehicle and Family Festival.
9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Museum of
American Heritage, 352 Homer Ave.,
Palo Alto.Free.For more information call
321-1004.
OpenHouseatPeninsula Volunteers
Rosener House Adult Day Services.
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 500 Arbor Road, Menlo
Park. Professional activity staff will lead
a variety of activities---music, art,
exercise, cooking, brain games,
therapies, and more. Social work staff,
nursing staff, and therapists will be
available to answer questions. Free. For
more information call 322-0126.
Bike Rodeo. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Barrett
Community Center, 1870 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Learn bicycle skills, make sure
your helmet is fitted properly and
participate in a slalom course. Free. For
more information go to belmont.gov.
Seaplane Adventure. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Hiller Aviation Museum, 601 Skyway
Road, San Carlos. Float planes and boat
planes on display. Presentations. Event
included with museum admission. For
more information call 654-0200.
Peninsula Volunteers Decorator
Show House 2013. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The Horse Park, 3674 San Hill Road,
Woodside. $35.The decorator show will
be open from May 4 to May 24,
Tuesdays through Sundays. For more
information contact
nancy_tubbs@fullcalendar.com.
TenthAnnual Foster CityPolynesian
Festival. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Leo Ryan Park
Amphitheatre, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster
City. Free. There will be colorful and
spectacular cultural performances, arts
and crafts, canoe rides, food and more.
For more information call 286-3380.
A La Carte and Art. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Castro Street between Church Street
and Evelyn Avenue, Mountain View.This
two-day festival of art will include live
music, an arts and crafts show, artisan
specialty food, home and garden
exhibits, festive food and drink, a
farmer’s market, a classic car show and
amusement for kids. Free. For more
information call 964-3395.
Seton Medical Center Hosts
CommunityHealthandWellnessFair.
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 1900 Sullivan Ave., Daly
City. Free. For more information call 991-
6814.
SixAward-WinningPeninsulaArtists
Exhibit Paintings, Jewelry, Textiles
and Fine Art Photography. 11 a.m. to
5 p.m. 856 Partridge Ave., Menlo Park.
Free. For more information contact
frances.freyberg@gmail.com.
BenefitConcertfortheCollegeof San
Mateo’s Child Development Center.
Noon.College of San Mateo, Main Quad,
1700 West Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo.
Come enjoy the Reggae sounds of the
Bay Area band Native Elements and the
Afro-Cuban beat of Zanzibar. $12 for
adults.$10 for students.Free for children
under the age of 13.To purchase tickets
in advance or for more information call
574-6279.
PeninsulaVolunteersRosener House
Adult Day Services. 1 p.m. Peninsula
Volunteers Rosener House Adult Day
Services, 500 Arbor Road, Menlo Park.
There will be social workers, nurses and
therapists on site. Free. For more
information go to
www.peninsulavolunteers.org/rosenerh
ouse.
College of San Mateo Hosts Asian
pacificAmericanFilm Festival. 1 p.m.
to 7 p.m. College of San Mateo, 1700 W.
Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo.A $5 donation
is requested for each program attended,
but no one will be turned away due to
lack of funds. For more information
contact anderson@smccd.edu.
Peninsula Choruses Present ‘How
Can I Keep From Singing?’ 3 p.m.
Transfiguration Episcopal Church, 3900
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. $20
general admission and $10 admission
for students. For more information call
513-5522.
School of Rock San Mateo presents
aTribute toNewWave/Punk Rock. 4
p.m. 711 S. B St., San Mateo. School of
Rock San Mateo offers performance-
based music programs and camps for
kids ages 7 to 18.Students of the School
of Rock will perform. $8 at the door. For
more information call 347-3474.
The Sherlock Holmes Mystery Ball.
6:30 p.m. to midnight. San Mateo
Masonic Lodge, 100 N. Ellsworth Ave.,
San Mateo. Victorian evening dress
(1870-1895), dress uniform, or modern
evening dress is admired but not
required.There will be a light buffet and
of course, a mystery. $15 in advance, $20
at the door. For more information call
(510) 522-1731 or go to
www.peers.org/holmes.html.
Knights Moves XV: ADance Concert
presented by the Hillsdale High
School Dance Ensemble. 7:30 p.m.
Hillsdale High School Little Theater, 31st
Avenue, San Mateo. $10 for students
and seniors, $12 for general admission
and free for children 6 years old and
under. For more information call 558-
2623.
In My Life — A Musical Theatre
TributetotheBeatles.8 p.m.Redwood
City Fox Theatre, 2219 Broadway,
Redwood City. An award-winning
musical biography of the Beatles
through the eyes of manager Brian
Epstein and features live music from
renowned tribute band, Abbey Road.
Tickets start at $25. For more
information call 369-7770 or go to
www.foxrwc.com.
SUNDAY, MAY5
Streets Alive! Parks Alive! In San
MateoCounty.9 a.m.to 4 p.m.Belmont,
Burlingame, Cañada Rd. between
Edgewood Rd. & HIghway 92, Colma,
Daly City, El Granada, Foster City, Menlo
Park, Millbrae, North Fair Oaks, Pacifica,
Redwood City, San Bruno, San Mateo,
and South San Francisco. Streets Alive!
Parks Alive! is a coordinated effort
among cities in San Mateo County to
promote healthy communities by
providing safe, accessible, public spaces
for recreation. Streets and parks
throughout San Mateo County are
opened up for free activities including
sports, exercise classes, dancing,
strolling, cycling, picnicking and play.
For more information go to
www.streetsalivesmc.org.
Burlingame Mother’s Club Flea
Market.9a.m.tonoon.BurlingameHigh
School Gym,1Mangini Way,Burlingame.
Admission is $3 per person and $5 per
family.All proceeds from admission fees
and tables benefit local charities. New
and slightly used strollers, high chairs,
wheel toys, books, baby and toddler
clothing, small furniture, decorative
items, jewelry, toys, home furnishings
and much more will be sold. For more
information contact
helpinghands@burlingamemothers.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Her excitement shows. Described as the
“mama bear” to all the kids at the school,
Peckham was also recognized in the recom-
mendation with a top 10 list put together by
Principal Fran Dunleavy.
Among the reasons Dunleavy thought
Peckham is noteworthy are skills ranging
from her professional abilities to reading the
mind of others and anticipating their needs.
“Kathy Peckham cares,” wrote Dunleavy.
“She will give you the shirt off her back, the
car in her parking space, the Tylenol in her
purse. She is a shining example of what every
school office manager should be.”
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
KATHY
San Francisco. He had never made a trip on
one of those planes, but he wanted to experi-
ence one of its famous flight paths. That’s
when Dennis decided to invest in a plane to
make his dream come true. The Albatross is a
twin-radial engine amphibious flying boat
developed for and used by the military.
Dennis’ plane took 13 years to renovate and
is one of the newest planes to be on display at
the Hiller Aviation Museum. This weekend,
the museum will celebrate these water-landing
birds with “Seaplane Adventure,” taking place
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 4 at 601
Skyway Road, San Carlos. The day will fea-
ture many seaplanes and a number of special
presentations, including a talk with Dennis
about the globe-crossing trip he took in 1997.
After Dennis donated the plane to Hiller,
getting it in place for the debut took lots of
work. Many parts of the plane were taken off
— such as the wings and tail — and the air
was taken out of the tires to allow the
Albatross to be slowly brought into the muse-
um. Getting it rebuilt and in place took two
weeks, said Willie Turner, vice president of
operations at Hiller.
Dennis said many people don’t think about
planes with the ability to land on water. But,
before World War II, landing strips weren’t
built in many countries. Water landings were
necessary for exploring the world. Before
Dennis could focus on rebuilding planes or
water landings, he had to learn how to fly.
Dennis’ interest in planes started at a young
age but his time as a pilot began in 1960. After
the war, he married a nice woman who was
afraid of flying, Peggy — to whom he’s still
married today. The couple had a home in
Reno they enjoyed visiting with their children.
One weekend, they invited another family to
join. Their friends took a small plane up to
make the trip. When the family left, Peggy
noted that flying looked like fun. Dennis took
that as being told he could get his pilot’s
license, which he quickly secured flying out of
the San Carlos Airport.
Professionally, Dennis was involved in
investments. He had a steady job but person-
ally took an interest in investing in Peninsula
startups — which is how he made the money
to renovate a plane. The beautiful Albatross
that sits in the San Carlos museum is much
like an RV with seats that recline to allow peo-
ple to sleep, a small table and kitchen, a rest
room that allows one to shower, and even the
ability to cruise with the windows open.
During the 13-year rebuild process, Andy
Macfie, who was the crew chief for the trip,
learned of plans for someone to recreate
Amelia Earhart’s last flight. The sponsored
trip required a plane to follow the solo pilot.
Pratt & Whitney, who made the engine in
Earhart’s plane, offered to cover the cost of
the trip for Dennis — everything but food. It
was the chance of a lifetime.
From March 17 to May 29, 1997, the team
left from Oakland and traveled east until
returning to the Bay Area. Only Dennis and
Macfie did the entire trip. Others were put on
commercial flights for particularly long legs
when much gas was required, often pushing
the plane’s weight over recommended limits.
The Albatross can’t fly as high as many
planes. Often the team found themselves to be
cruising only a few thousand feet above the
ocean with windows open. Stopping in remote
places meant experiencing different cultures
but also shipping in aviation gasoline to be
sure it was available — Pratt & Whitney took
care of that, Dennis said.
Looking back, Dennis recognizes how
lucky he was to take the trip. Many of the air
spaces they traveled in couldn’t be accessed
easily today. Also, aviation fuel is harder to
come by. But he’s happy to share his experi-
ences with those who visit this weekend. And,
Dennis hopes people come with questions. He
likes questions.
“Seaplane Adventure,” will be held from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 4 at the Hiller
Aviation Museum, 601 Skyway Road, San
Carlos. Admission is $12 for adults, $8 for
seniors and children, and kids 4 and under are
free. For more information visit
http://www.hiller.org/. Inside the museum will
be the grand opening of the new centerpiece
exhibit, a Grumman HU-16 Albatross — last
and largest of the famed Grumman amphib-
ians. The Museum’s aircraft, N44RD, partici-
pated in an around-the-world flight following
the path originally flown by Amelia Earhart in
1937.
Continued from page 1
HILLER
Dennis with his amphibious plane.
COMICS/GAMES
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18 Rehearsal (2 wds.)
20 Quaint oath
21 Harry’s successor
22 Lunch counter buy
24 Ceasefre
27 Gloomy
30 Take fve
31 Arthur and Lillie
32 Swell! (hyph.)
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35 Mighty trees
36 Nature walk
37 Belgium neighbor
39 Bishop’s rule
40 Utmost degree
41 Moo goo -- pan
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55 Chess piece
56 Honolulu’s island
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19 Small music maker
22 Bikini halves
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28 April forecast
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41 Secluded valleys
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46 OPEC member
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MOndaY, aPriL 29, 2013
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Your optimistic
disposition makes you a dominating force to be
reckoned with. Anybody who dares try to upstage
you is destined for second place.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- Your detective abilities
will be unusually sharp. If you happen to be working
on something that calls for fact-fnding, success is
inevitable.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- The secret to dealing
with others successfully is to make each and every
person feel special, regardless of whether that
person has done anything for you.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- As long as your goals
are well defned, you shouldn’t have any problems
fulflling them. Knowing what you want goes a long
way to helping you get it.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You are apt to do
better than most in matters that involve pronounced
elements of chance. Your luck will be running high,
so put it to use.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Make a goal you’ve
been striving hard to attain your primary focus.
It can easily become a reality if you relegate
everything else to secondary status.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- This could be an
unusually productive day for you, as long as you
don’t put limits on your activities. You’re even
capable of juggling several jobs simultaneously.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Because
conditions are exceptionally favorable, you’re likely
to be lucky, especially in your fnancial affairs. Focus
on money matters.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Let the adage
“If you want something done right, do it yourself,”
govern your actions. If you delegate work, the
results will be inferior.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Something you want
badly is much closer than you think. Don’t allow any
kind of setback to discourage you, because things
will ultimately work out.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Your friends will
have an enormous infuence over your outlook and
attitude. If possible, choose companions who have
lots of positive mental and physical energy.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- You shouldn’t have
trouble advancing your prestige and profts. Strike
while the stars are in alignment and things are going
your way.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • Apr. 29, 2013 23
THE DAILY JOURNAL
24
Monday • Apr. 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SOFTWARE QUALITY Assurance Engi-
neer. MS & 1 yr; or BS & 5 yr exp reqd.
Redwood City, CA job. Send resume to
Endurance Intl Group-West, 8100 NE
Parkway Dr, #300, Vancouver, WA
98662.
LEAD COOK, CASHIERS, Avanti Pizza.
Menlo Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
GENENTECH, INC. in
South San Francisco seeks:
- Research Associate.
Use biophysical, biochemi-
cal and molecular biology
techniques to characterize
the cascade of protein inter-
actions and molecular
events occurring in areas of
therapeutic interest. Reqs
MS or foreign equiv in Bio-
chem, Chem, Molecular Bio,
or rel + 2 yrs academic
training. (00413138)
- Finance Manager.
Support projects across vari-
ous finance groups to assist
management in investment
decisions. Reqs Master’s
deg or its foreign equiv in
Business Administration, Fi-
nance or rel + 5 yrs exp.
(00413392)
Please mail your resume
specifying the position requi-
sition number to Genentech,
Inc., c/o SB MS-829A, 1
DNA Way, South San Fran-
cisco, CA 94080.
Genentech, Inc. is an Equal
Opportunity Employer
110 Employment
HELP WANTED: FOSTER CITY REC-
REATION FACILITY - part-time staff po-
sition open. Evening and weekend shifts
required. Must live locally. For a full job
description, please email:
Rob@themanorassn.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SOFTWARE ENGINEER. MS & 1 yr; or
BS & 5 yr exp reqd. Redwood City, CA
job. Resume to Endurance Intl Group-
West, 8100 NE Parkway Dr, #300, Van-
couver, WA 98662
SUBWAY IS Hiring FT/PT in various po-
sitions apply in person only at 969 Edge-
water Blvd., #F, Foster City, 94404 Be-
tween 10:30 & 3:00 Bring Lic. & SS
Card.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255344
The following person is doing business
as: Sharetea, 60 E. 3rd Ave., Ste. 108,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Tamp Tea.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Qi Feng Lei /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/15/13, 04/22/13, 04/29/13, 05/06/13).
IN ACCORDANCE with the
provisions of commercial
code 7209, with these being
unpaid storage charges, no-
tice is hereby given that the
household and personal ef-
fects and/or business effects
of: Ariel Levy, Janet Kramer,
Tim Hardy, Jerome Weiner,
and Bill Johnson will be sold
at Auction on May 21, 2013
at 10:00 a.m. at AMS Relo-
cation Inc., 1873 Rollins
Road, Burlingame, CA
94010.
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-247988
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Sen-
sible Online Solutions, LLC, 405 Piccadil-
ly Pl., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. The ficti-
tious business name referred to above
was filed in County on 12/19/2011. The
business was conducted by: Darrick
Emil, same address.
/s/ Darrick Emil /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 04/12/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 03/15/13,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 05/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255461
The following person is doing business
as: Darrick Emil, 405 Piccadilly pl. #28,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Darrick
Emil, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 08/01/2011 .
/s/ Darrick Emil /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/15/13, 04/22/13, 04/29/13, 05/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255349
The following person is doing business
as: Elite Pro Home Cleaning, 821 Cassia
St. #1, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Elite Partners, LLC., NV. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Derek Rowley /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/22/13, 04/29/13, 05/06/13, 05/13/13).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
TS No. 12-0022638
Title Order No. 12-0038285
APN No. 035-096-140
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 12/13/2005.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PRO-
TECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE
SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby giv-
en that RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant
to the Deed of Trust executed by KAMI-
PELI FINAU, AND ATELIANA FINAU,
HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TEN-
ANTS, dated 12/13/2005 and recorded
12/21/2005, as Instrument No. 2005-
221800, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Offi-
cial Records in the office of the County
Recorder of San Mateo County, State of
California, will sell on 05/14/2013 at
1:00PM, San Mateo Events Center, 2495
S. Delaware Street, San Mateo, CA
94403 at public auction, to the highest
bidder for cash or check as described
below, payable in full at time of sale, all
right, title, and interest conveyed to and
now held by it under said Deed of Trust,
in the property situated in said County
and State and as more fully described in
the above referenced Deed of Trust.
The street address and other common
designation, if any, of the real property
described above is purported to be:
1303 COBB STREET, SAN MATEO, CA,
944013617. The undersigned Trustee
disclaims any liability for any incorrect-
ness of the street address and other
common designation, if any, shown here-
in. The total amount of the unpaid bal-
ance with interest thereon of the obliga-
tion secured by the property to be sold
plus reasonable estimated costs, ex-
penses and advances at the time of the
initial publication of the Notice of Sale is
$662,272.29. It is possible that at the
time of sale the opening bid may be less
than the total indebtedness due. In addi-
tion to cash, the Trustee will accept
cashier's checks drawn on a state or na-
tional bank, a check drawn by a state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by
a state or federal savings and loan asso-
ciation, savings association, or savings
bank specified in Section 5102 of the Fi-
nancial Code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state. Said sale will be made,
in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without cove-
nant or warranty, express or implied, re-
garding title, possession or encumbran-
ces, to satisfy the indebtedness secured
by said Deed of Trust, advances there-
under, with interest as provided, and the
unpaid principal of the Note secured by
said Deed of Trust with interest thereon
as provided in said Note, plus fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BID-
DERS If you are considering bidding on
this property lien, you should understand
that there are risks involved in bidding at
a trustee auction. You will be bidding on
a lien, not on a property itself. Placing
the highest bid at a trustee auction does
not automatically entitle you to free and
clear ownership of the property. You
should also be aware that the lien being
auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you
are the highest bidder at the auction, you
are or may be responsible for paying off
all liens senior to the lien being auctioned
off, before you can receive clear title to
the property. You are encouraged to in-
vestigate the existence, priority, and size
of outstanding liens that may exist on this
property by contacting the county record-
er's office or a title insurance company,
either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware
that the lender may hold more than one
mortgage or deed of trust on the proper-
ty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER
The sale date shown on this notice of
sale may be postponed one or more
times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section
2924g of the California Civil Code. The
law requires that information about trust-
ee sale postponements be made availa-
ble to you and to the public, as a courte-
sy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has
25 Monday • Apr. 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Department of Public
Works of the County of San Mateo, State of California, will re-
ceive sealed bids for the construction contract titled
Loop Road
Security Project
Youth Services Center
222 Paul Scannell Drive
San Mateo, CA 94402
PROJECT NO. P7T17
Bids shall be received in accordance with the Contract Docu-
ments. The Contract Documents may be examined at the De-
partment of Public Works, 555 County Center, 5th Floor,
Redwood City, California, 94063-1665. Contract Documents
may be obtained for a NON-REFUNDABLE FEE OF $75.00
PER SET
A mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit is scheduled
for May 7, 2013 at 9:00AM. The conference will meet at the
Youth Services Center Main Entrance.
Questions regarding this project should be directed to Mi-
chael Ramirez, Project Manager, Department of Public
Works, 555 County Center, 5th Floor, Redwood City, Califor-
nia, 94063, Phone (650) 312-8948
Bids shall be submitted using forms furnished and bound in
the Project Manual and in accordance with Instructions to
Bidders, and shall be accompanied by a Certified or Cash-
ier's Check or Bid Bond for ten percent (10%) of the bid
amount.
Bids shall be sealed and filed with the Clerk of the Board of
Supervisors of the County of San Mateo at the Hall of Justice
and Records, 400 County Center, (formerly 401 Marshall
Street) 1st Floor, Redwood City, California, on or before the
day of May 23, 2013, at 2:30 p.m. and will be opened in pub-
lic in the Chambers of said Board of Supervisors or at anoth-
er location as designated by Owner shortly thereafter.
The Board of Supervisors of the County of San Mateo, State
of California, reserves the right to reject any and all bids, al-
ternate bids, or unit prices and waive any irregularities in any
bid received.
No bidder may withdraw his bid for a period of ninety (90)
days after the date set for the opening thereof.
Pursuant to Labor Code Sections 1770, et seq., the Director
of the Department of Industrial Relations has determined the
general prevailing rate of wages in the County of San Mateo
for each craft, classification, or type of workman needed to
execute the contract. The prevailing rates so determined are
based on an 8-hour day, 40-hour week, except as otherwise
noted. Existing agreements between the Building Trades and
the Construction Industry groups relative to overtime, holi-
days and other special provisions shall be recognized. It shall
be mandatory upon the Contractor and upon any sub-con-
tractors under him, to pay not less than the said specific rates
to all laborers, workmen or mechanics employed by them in
the execution of this contract.
A bond will be required for the faithful performance of the
contract in amount of not less than one hundred percent
(100%) of the amount of the bid, and a bond will be required
to guarantee the payment of wages for services engaged and
for materials used in the performance of the contract in an
amount of not less than one hundred percent (100%) of the
bid.
The work to be done consists, in general, of providing all la-
bor, materials, tools, appurtenances, and equipment required
for perimeter security upgrades along Loop Road of the
Youth Services Center which will incorporate security fencing
and associated accessed control gates, vehicular turnaround
for vehicles denied entry, and an enhanced surveillance sys-
tem as well as any other items and details not mentioned
above but required by the Contract Documents and as direct-
ed by the Director of Public Works. The contract amount is
estimated between $625,000 and $631,000.
Contract time is specified at one hundred and twenty (120)
calendar days. Liquidated damages are $1,000 per calendar
day.
4/26, 4/29/13
CNS-2477220#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL
203 Public Notices
been postponed, and, if applicable, the
rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call 1-800-281-
8219 or visit this Internet Web site
www.recontrustco.com, using the file
number assigned to this case 12-
0022638. Information about postpone-
ments that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled
sale may not immediately be reflected in
the telephone information or on the Inter-
net Web site. The best way to verify
postponement information is to attend
the scheduled sale. DATED:
06/22/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-
01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063
Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281-8219
By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECON-
TRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt col-
lector attempting to collect a debt. Any
information obtained will be used for that
purpose. FEI # 1006.166293 4/15, 4/22,
4/29/2013
210 Lost & Found
FOUND YOUNG female Rottweiler 85lbs
ish on Skyline Blvd in Woodside call
(813)418-2884
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
210 Lost & Found
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., SOLD!
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, SOLD!
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
298 Collectibles
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
298 Collectibles
STAINED GLASS WINDOW - 30” x 18”,
diamond pattern, multi-colored, $95.,
(650)375-8021
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
302 Antiques
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo SOLD!
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 SOLD!
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ANTIQUE BANKER'S floor lamp Adj.
Height with angled shade: anodyzed
bronze $75 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET for TV or Books, etc;
mahogany, double doors, divided
storage, excellent condition, 24"D,
14"Hx36"W, on casters $20
(650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, SOLD!
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
26
Monday • Apr. 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Under-the-table
money
6 Teamster’s rig
10 Tight-lipped
13 Dubuque natives
15 “Once __ a
time ...”
16 Chowed down
17 Lacking a strong
foundation,
metaphorically
19 Corp. board
member
20 __ over backward
21 “That feels good!”
22 Florence’s
country
24 Snoopy’s WWI
plane
28 Prize on the
mantel
31 Hors d’oeuvre
cracker
32 Northwestern
Canadian territory
33 Naval hoosegow
35 Brew in a bag
38 Shutterbug
42 Mork’s planet
43 Senate staffer
44 Lusterless finish
45 Windy day toy
47 Put the blame on
48 Farina-based hot
cereal
53 Egypt neighbor
54 Subway whose
first line had a
terminus at
NYC’s City Hall
55 Suffix with wagon
59 Before today
60 Ideal toast color,
and a hint to the
ends of 17-, 24-,
38- and 48-
Across
64 Hamlet, to
Gertrude
65 Change a
manuscript
66 “I, Robot” author
67 Butt in
68 2013 Oscars host
MacFarlane
69 Pert
DOWN
1 Light-green
lettuce
2 Disreputable
fellow
3 “Heads __, tails
you lose”
4 Rogaine target
5 Dr. who treats
snorers
6 Bite-size raw
Asian dish
7 Water quality org.
8 Start of a wk.,
workwise
9 Formally charge,
in court
10 Sir’s counterpart
11 More than
decorative
12 Streep of “The
Iron Lady”
14 All lathered up
18 Folksy negative
23 Whirling toon
devil, for short
25 “How awful!”
26 Hogwash
27 “__ Noon”: Gary
Cooper Western
28 Printing error,
perhaps
29 German mining
region
30 “Quit nagging! I’ll
do it!”
33 To the point
34 “Way cool!”
35 “Black Swan” skirt
36 Immature newts
37 Set __: name the
price
39 Ratón chaser
40 Org. that usually
has a community
pool
41 Neosporin target
45 Mary __
cosmetics
46 Publicists’
concerns
47 Blue Cross rival
48 Anklet fastener
49 Strictness
50 Dense black wood
51 Boot spec
52 Otto I’s realm:
Abbr.
56 Male turkeys
57 What Noah
counted by
58 Covet
61 “__ to Joy”
62 Set ablaze
63 Undergrad tech
degs.
By Patti Varol
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/29/13
04/29/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
KING PLATFORM BED WITH TWO
BOX SPRINGS - no mattresses, like
new, Foster City, $100., SOLD!
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
304 Furniture
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER - Leather, beige chair with
ottoman, excellent condition, $50.,
(954)940-0277 Foster City
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA TABLE good condition top 42"/36"
15" deep 30" tall $60 (650)393-5711
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TALL OUTSIDE BISTRO TABLE -
glass top with 2 chairs $75 (firm)
(650)871-7200
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, good condi-
tion, ht 50", with 30", deep 20". carry it
away for $75 (650)393-5711
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
306 Housewares
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BREVILLE JUICER - Like new, $99.,
(650)375-8021
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
308 Tools
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DEWALT 18 volt battery drill with 2 bat-
tery & charger $45 OBO (650)315-5902
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" chop saw (new) 100 tooth
carbine metal/wood blades $60 OBO
(650)315-5902
MILLWAUKEE SAWSALL in case with
blades (like new) $50 OBO
(650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00
(650)591-0063
SKIL 18 VOLT CORDLESS DRILL with
two batteries, 1 hour charger, with hard
shell case and instruction booklet. Used
once. Perfect condition. $60., (650)591-
0063
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TOOL BOX - custom made for long
saws, $75., (650)375-8021
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 MATCHING LIGHT SCONES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , good working condition, $12. both,
(650)347-5104
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
310 Misc. For Sale
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, excellent
condition, $43., (650)347-5104
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
SOLD!
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KING SIZE BEDSPREAD - floral, beauti-
ful, like new, $30., (954)940-0277 Foster
City
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LUGGAGE - Carry-on with wheels,
brand new, Kensington, $30., (954)940-
0277 Foster City
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PANAMA HAT; Tequilla Reed (Ecuador)
superb. Traditlional, New. Was $250
asking $25 SOLD!
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOP LIGHT FIXTURE - unused, flores-
cent, brand Mark Finelite, 48” x 9” x 3”,
white finish, two working bulbs, 14’ cord,
excellent condition, $47., (650)347-5104
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SOLID METAL STAND - 3 tiers, strong,
non skid support, 20” x 30” x 36” tall, has
potential for many uses, $17., (650)347-
5104
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VIDEO POKER MACHINE - from Las
Vegas, $450., (650)592-3545
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
27 Monday • Apr. 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES CLOTHES - Tops & pants (20)
Size S-M, each under $10., (954)940-
0277 Foster City
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
316 Clothes
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AIR RIFLE, Crossman, 2200 Magnum,
vintage perfect condition. Must be 18 or
over to purchase. $65.00 SOLD!
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50., SOLD!
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MEN'S PEUGOT 10 speed bike; Good
Condition. $70.00 OBO call:
(650)342-8510
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call SOLD!
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5’ high by 10’ long . SOLD!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
VOLUNTEER WITH
Habitat for Humanity and help us
build homes and communities in
East Palo Alto.
Volunteers welcome
Wed-Sat from 8:30-4pm.
415-625-1022
www.habitatgsf.org
435 Rental Needed
SEEKING:
Granny Unit /
Guest House /
Studio
Harvard Masters Degree
Graduate
CEO of a Local Start-Up
Responsible, Healthy, Single,
Pet Free, Non-Smoker looking
for a Granny Unit / Guest Home
in San Mateo/Burlingame.
Ready to move in 01 July
2013.
Please e-mail or call me at:
oliverpmj@gmail.com
Phone: 408.234.1572.
Excellent References
available upon request.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. 650 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. RENTED!
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
620 Automobiles
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
625 Classic Cars
CHEVY 1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop,
390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consid-
er $2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
JEEP TJ 2004-2006 (1) ALUMINUM
WHEEL & TIRE, brand new condition,
$90., (650)200-9665
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Building/Remodeling
CONSIDERING A
HOME REMODEL
OR ADDITION?
Call (650)343-4340
for Drafting Services at
Reasonable Rates
Cabinetry
Cleaning Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
28
Monday • Apr. 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
ART'S MARTIN DOORS
Sales Installation Service
Call (650) 878 1555
for all your garage door
needs.
BEST PRICE GUARANTEE:
$100 off
any other company's
written proposal on a
garage door-and-opener
package. Bring this ad to
our showroom and get $50
more on the above offer!
1000 King Drive, Suite 200
Daly City, CA 94015
BBB Rating: A+
www.arts-martindoors.com
State License #436114
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
FAMILY HOUSE SERVICE
Green products
Residential & Commerical
Monthly, Weekly, Bi-Weekly
Free Estimates
(650)315-6681
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AL’S HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST
HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Handy Help
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and
Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 • Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Craig’s
Painting
Residential
Interior
Exterior
10 years
of Experience
FREE ESTIMATES
(650) 553-9653
Lic# 857741
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING & STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray (650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.soleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
29 Monday • Apr. 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA
HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
AMAZING MASSAGE
Foot Massage $25/hr
Foot/Back $40/hr
Open 10:00 AM to 9:00 PM
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
(650)261-9200
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
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LOCAL 30 Monday • April 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
their home countries.
“Ever since the revolution, we have seen big com-
panies pull out of Egypt. Some seed funders are
starting to take the risk and a new economy is start-
ing to be created,” said Sobhy, 24.
Chehade, 21, heard about the university through
LinkedIn and even heard there were scholarships
available to attend. The economies in both countries
are not doing well and they hope to help change that.
Thursday, the three and about 35 other students
got to sit in as Draper was being interviewed by
news anchor Raj Mathai with NBC Bay Area for a
segment called “The Interview.”
Mathai asked the man known as “The Riskmaster”
whether his school was the real deal or just some
“goofy” idea. After all, the students have their own
oath they recite every morning before the school day
begins.
Draper laughed at the question and told Mathai he
plans to open up similar schools all over the world.
Having the students recite the credo could be ben-
eficial down the road, he said.
The oath starts with the line, “I will promote free-
dom at all costs” with another line reading “I will fail
and fail again until I succeed.”
These type of entrepreneurial schools, Draper
said, will completely redefine the business of venture
capitalism.
“The goal is to have the students come out better
people,” Draper said.
He plans on funding his own students’ ideas, too,
he told Mathai as the students lounged on bean bags
on the ground floor of the old Benjamin Franklin
Hotel on Fourth Avenue. The Collective building,
across from the hotel, will open in June as about 80
students are scheduled to attend the summer session,
said Carol Lo, the university’s chief operating offi-
cer. The university campus will eventually be housed
in three buildings downtown.
In Egypt, a group called
Flat6Labs has started to invest in
technology startups, providing
support for young entrepreneurs.
Sobhy and Essam know the
group well but it is one of only
two funds in the country that sup-
port startups, they told the Daily
Journal.
The government is the issue,
they said, because it supports
larger corporations greater than it does small- and-
medium-sized businesses.
They are hoping that will change over time.
While the university’s current class has lots of
international students, it also attracted Palo Alto res-
ident Alton Sun, who never applied for any college
before finding Draper. He is affiliated with a compa-
ny called Somaxis, which makes wireless, wearable
sensors to measure the relationship between the
heart and muscles.
One of Sun’s main interests is to build success spi-
rals, helping people become competent in a skill set
so that it gives them confidence to achieve even
greater things in life.
“So much of life is momentum,” Sun said after he
watched Mathai interview Draper.
Half of the university’s students this session are
international and another half receive financial aid,
Lo said.
In the university’s pilot program last summer, one
of its first students, Surbhi Sarna, was able to secure
up to $2.4 million in venture capital funding for her
medical device company called nVision.
Although entrepreneurship and creating your own
business can be stressful and hard work, Draper likes
to keep it light.
When Mathai asked Draper to describe himself in
three words, he responded, “really, really fun.”
To learn more about the university go to:
www.draperuniversity.com
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
DRAPER
game in Re-Mission 2, offered for free,
puts the payers inside the body to fight
weapons like chemotherapy, antibiotics
and the body’s natural defenses.
The original game was designed to be
like games of that day, said Richard
Tate, vice president of communications
and marketing for HopeLab, adding it
was offered for free and packaged for
someone who might buy or rent it. It
was available online but needed to be
downloaded onto a PC.
In the short time since the first
release, things have changed to be more
of a mobile, digital world. Re-Mission 2
is a collection of games designed with
the help of different companies that
can be played online from most
mobile devices and computers. Later
this year, HopeLab plans to offer the
game through smartphones, said Tate.
Accessibility was an important detail
with the new release as hospitals have
noted an increase in families bringing
mobile devices during their stay, he
said.
Nineteen-year-old Jose Guevara, a
college student in Los Angeles, first
learned about Re-Mission at 16 while
in the hospital for his own cancer
treatment. A poster for the game said
consultants were needed. Guevara
sent an email.
“It’s important that people give
more funding to programs like this,”
said Guevara.
He said the game is not only fun,
but a great way to help others under-
stand treatment. Adding the game to
part of the care package for patients
when they start treatment could be a
great way to support the emotional
side of treatment, he said.
By researching Re-Mission,
HopeLab learned it can positively
impact the health behaviors in young
people with chronic illness. Not only
did it increase a patient’s cancer-relat-
ed knowledge, but it also improved
treatment adherence and produced
increases in self-efficacy, according to
the data. It was also shown to be a
positive motivator for players. Re-
Mission 2, tested before release, was
found to have results that were similar
or better than the original release, said
Tate.
A number of changes were made in
the design this time around. Rather
than having one game designed in the
same manner throughout, HopeLab
worked with four developers —
Nerdook Productions, Tinime Games,
Borne Games and Novaleaf Game
Studios. The six games put the player
in different treatment situations with-
in the body. More than 120 young
people with cancer participated in the
research and development of the
game. The young people wanted the
game to focus inside the body and have
bigger reactions when “blasting” a bad
cell, said Tate. Also, many of the
weapons are inspired by real prescrip-
tions a young person with cancer may
have, like ChemoBlast6MP.
The original game was also set up in
a third-person shooter style. Working
with different designers went along with
giving causal players different styles of
games to enjoy.
To play, visit re-mission2.org.
Continued from page 1
GAME
Tim Draper
WORLD 31
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By Esam Mohamed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRIPOLI, Libya — Libya’s prime
minister warned of a perilous security
situation Sunday after armed men
stormed the Interior Ministry and a
state-owned television station after
blocking access to the Foreign
Ministry.
Two years after the country’s civil
war, Libya is struggling to maintain
security, build a unified army and reign
in militias, which include rebels who
fought to oust longtime dictator
Moammar Gadhafi in 2011.
About 200 armed men surrounded the
Foreign Ministry building in Tripoli,
demanding the ministry hire former
fighters who helped overthrow Gadhafi.
The men allege that many supporters of
the old regime are still holding senior
positions in the ministry and its mis-
sions abroad.
About 38 trucks, some with machine
guns, surrounded the ministry all day.
After sundown, gunmen were still
blocking access to the building.
Some in Libya are calling for a polit-
ical isolation law that would ban mem-
bers of the former regime from political
roles. Others counter that such a law
would oust experienced technocrats,
including the current prime minister,
who served in government under
Gadhafi years ago.
In another bold move Sunday, gun-
men stormed the Interior Ministry,
which oversees police, and forced
employees out. The men charge that the
ministry is not paying them their
salaries, according to an official in the
ministry who spoke anonymously for
fear of reprisal.
Also, armed men stormed the main
state-run al-Wataniya TV channel, forc-
ing its employees out. Live shows were
cancelled, and al-Wataniya was airing
only archive video on Sunday. Similar
to those outside the Foreign Ministry,
the men were demanding the removal of
Gadhafi-era officials from the station.
The station was temporarily shut down
recently when employees protested
against militias providing security for
the building instead of regular forces.
It was not immediately clear if the
armed men coordinated their moves
Sunday.
Prime Minister Ali Zidan told
reporters in Tripoli that the security sit-
uation continues to be perilous. He
stopped short of saying which militias
or armed groups might be behind the
incidents.
“If the situation persists, it will give
Libya a bad reputation and lead to for-
eign companies pulling out and
embassies closing down,” he warned.
Zidan was himself besieged in his
office last month by militiamen over
remarks he made threatening to sum-
mon outside help to confront the armed
groups.
Sunday’s unrest prompted the coun-
try’s parliament to put off discussing
protests by military officers who are
demanding the dismissal of the army
chief of staff, Maj. Gen. Youssef al-
Mangoush. Some militias are believed
to favor al-Mangoush remaining in his
post, because he has been unable to
replace militias with a strong unified
force.
Gunmen surround Libya Foreign Ministry
Iraq suspends Al-Jazeera
and 9 Iraqi TV channels
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Iraqi authorities suspended the operating
licenses of pan-Arab broadcaster Al-Jazeera and nine Iraqi TV
channels on Sunday after accusing them of escalating sectari-
an tension. The move signaled the Shiite-led government’s
mounting worries over deteriorating security amid Sunni
unrest and clashes that have left more than 180 people dead in
less than a week.
The suspensions, which took effect immediately, appeared to
target mainly Sunni channels known for criticizing Prime
Minister Nouri al-Malik’s government. Apart from Al-Jazeera,
the decision affected eight Sunni and one Shiite channels.
The government’s action comes as Baghdad tries to quell
rising unrest in the country that erupted last week after Iraqi
security forces launched a deadly crackdown on a Sunni
protest site in the central city of Hawija, killing 23 people,
including three soldiers.
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By Chris Talbott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — America
loves its outlaws, and few are as
admired and lionized as Willie
Nelson.
As the enduring American icon’s
80th birthday has approached, he’s
been honored with lifetime achieve-
ment awards, serenaded at special
performances and saluted by musi-
cians from every genre of music.
And Nelson has taken it all in with
a bemused smile.
“It’s a nice thing to do for some-
one on their birthday and I appreci-
ate it,” Nelson said in a recent inter-
view aboard his bus. “Usually I like
to forget my birthdays as much as
possible.”
The hubbub is as much about cel-
ebrating Nelson as it has been cele-
brating with Nelson.
The singer whose birthday is
Monday or Tuesday — Nelson says
April 29, the state of Texas claims
April 30 — occupies a unique space
in America’s cultural memory. A
walking bag of contradictions, he
wears his hair long in braids and has
a penchant for pot smoking, yet
remains arguably conservative
country music’s greatest songwriter.
He’s accepted by left and right,
black and white and is instantly rec-
ognizable to a majority of
Americans.
Like few other music stars, his
image has grown to represent more
than the notes he’s played or the
lyrics he’s written. Like Elvis
Presley, Johnny Cash or Frank
Sinatra, he’s become a figurehead
for a uniquely American way of
thinking. He represents the outlaw
and the maverick. If Elvis was all
about the pelvis and the sexual rev-
olution, Nelson is American inde-
pendence: the raised middle finger
tossed with a twinkle in the eye.
“America is a bizarre place and
Willie is our captain,” said Jamey
Johnson, Nelson’s good friend and
sometimes opener. “Willie in every
way represents all the greatest
things about America to me.”
Nelson didn’t set out to be a folk
hero, as Charles Kelley of Lady
Antebellum calls him. He spends
something like 200 days on the road
still, a pace that challenges men a
quarter his age.
In a series of interviews over the
last year, Nelson explained he just
came to Nashville wanting someone
to buy his songs. That young man
never imagined he’d be on the road
for more than 50 years. His first real
songwriting job paid $50 a week.
He played — and sometimes slept
— at Tootsie’s on Lower Broadway
in Nashville, just a few miles — but
really a million miles — away from
Music Row.
Nelson thinks that young man
wouldn’t know what to make of the
spectacle he’s become.
“He’d probably wonder what’s
that old man doing out there,”
Nelson said with a chuckle. “He’s
got a house. He’s not homeless.
Why don’t he go home?”
The truth is Nelson is home as he
sits at the pleasantly cluttered
kitchen table of his bus. With its
portrait of an American Indian on
the side and its reputation for mel-
low encounters, the bus is as much a
part of Nelson’s mythos as his
braids and battered old guitar.
An invitation to join Nelson on
the bus is coveted.
“I’ve never smoked weed ever in
my entire life,” Lady A’s Hillary
Scott joked. “But if I got invited on
the bus I might have to make a con-
cession just because of purely what
it is, what it represents.”
For Nelson, it’s a refuge, office,
songwriting room and parlor where
he hosts friends and band members
for morning coffee.
“I’ve lived in this house longer
than I’ve lived in any of the others,
all combined,” Nelson said glanc-
ing around. “I feel at home here. It
moves around. I have a mobile
home. That’s about the size of it,
and I enjoy it.”
Nelson has pursued this nomadic
lifestyle for more than four decades,
almost unchanged. The personnel in
the band has remained the same.
Until recently, harmonica player
Mickey Raphael was pretty much
the new guy. He recently celebrated
his 40th anniversary with Nelson,
though he’s not exactly sure when
that date fell.
“I was never officially hired,”
Raphael says with a grin, “but I was
never asked to leave.”
Nelson hangs onto his buses till
they’re over a million miles, still
wears a black T-shirt and that red,
white and blue guitar strap. His
children grew up on the bus and
now they play in his band from time
to time.
So, to paraphrase Waylon
Jennings, the outlaw thing’s been
overdone. All he wanted to do was
play his own music the way he
chose. In Nashville, that idea was
sacrilegious. And while Nelson was
something of a known quantity in
town — he had written hits and was
a member of the Grand Ole Opry —
conventional wis-
dom said he was
never going to
amount to
much if
he insisted
on singing his
own songs in
a manner
that didn’t fit Music City’s country-
politan ways.
“You ever heard the song me and
Waylon did back in the old days
called ‘Write Your Own Songs?”’
Nelson says with a laugh. “I still do
that one occasionally. I get a kick out
of doing it because it takes you back
to the days when me and Waylon
were fighting the outlaw wars here in
Nashville and losing. I enjoyed those
times. I even enjoyed being the out-
law and the outcast. I thought, ‘All
right, that’s great. I must be doing
something right.’ You remember the
old saying, ‘You keep on doing it
wrong till you like it that way?”’
Two things happened in the early
1970s to give Nelson the advantage
in those wars — his
decision to leave
Nashville and relo-
cate to Austin,
Texas, and the
release of
“Outlaws.” The
album, a collec-
tion of odds and
ends from Nelson,
Jennings and others,
was the first country
album to go platinum and
was accidentally timed perfect-
ly to take advantage of an
obsession with
Southern culture
in the U.S. dur-
ing the Age of
B u r t
Reynolds.
Accidental outlaw Willie Nelson celebrates 80th