August 2013

durham, nc’s online community paper
vol 11, no 8

Toddler having an arguably good time at the Summer in the City festival in Durham Central Park.
(photo by patricia A murray)

2  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

Look for the Skywriter every month—it will be uploaded around the 1st of each month. … LISTEN TO Radio Skywriter every Sunday from 6:30 to 7pm on WNCU / 90.7fm and wncu.org. … WATCH TV Skywriter every Sunday at 7pm on the “Durham Skywriter” YouTube or Google+ page. For story ideas, guest appearances, or information on advertising, call 919-809-9682 or send email to durhamskywriter@yahoo.com.

August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 3

Summer el-cheapo handy hints
patricia A murray

Make your own chemical-free, mosquito, ant, and flea repellent. Here’s how: Let 100 grams of whole cloves marinate in 2 cups of rubbing alcohol for four days. (Stir it once in the morning and in the evening.) Then stir in 100 ml of baby oil (or you can substitute almond, sesame, chamomile, lavender, or fennel oil). Gently rub a few drops of this solution into any skin that’s exposed (arms, legs, etc). This works on pets, too. Are the lenses over your vehicle’s headlights faded and cloudy with age? Take some plain white toothpaste and rub it on the lens with a soft cloth. After a short while the haze should disappear. Buff with a clean cloth. If Fido the puppy is chewing the wooden legs of your furniture, put some tabasco sauce on a cloth and rub it into the furniture legs. You won’t smell it after it dries, but Fido will, and he’ll stay away. Hot weather can really bring out the foul odors of garbage cans. On garbagepickup day (after the trash has been collected), pour in some dish or laundry soap, hot water, some bleach, and swish it around. Then tilt the garbage can over and pour out the soapy water into the street. That should make everything smell a little better. Sometimes with rapid changes of temperatures, car windows can fog up. Keep this from happening by rubbing the inside (not outside) of your vehicle’s windshield with shaving cream. Wipe clean with a soft cloth.

If your car battery is dead and you desperately need to start your car one more time, open the cell covers and drop in a couple of batteries in each. Then close them back up, wait a while (but not more than an hour), and your engine should start up. If your ceiling fan is wobbly, observe where the wobble is and tape some pennies on top of the blades in question. This might take some experimentation. Once you’ve got the blades balanced, attach the coins permanently with duct tape or superglue. If your sink is clogged, try this before calling a plumber: Pour a half-cup of baking soda and a half-cup of salt down the drain, followed by six cups of boiling-hot water. Let it sit overnight and then see if the clog has been dissolved the next morning.

If you created a small dent by dropping something on your wooden floor, fill the dent with a few drops of clear nail polish and let it dry. If you can’t light a short candle in a tall container, light a piece of raw spaghetti and use it as a match. If your plastic patio table top is dull, rejuvenate it with a coat of car wax. This works on Formica countertops, too. Brew a cup of strong, unsweetened tea, let it cool off, and then dip a cloth in the tea and polish your dark wooden furniture with it. Buff with a soft cloth. If you keep getting fruit flies (from the fruit and vegetable scraps that you throw away), toss the scraps into an old plastic grocery bag and stick it in the freezer until garbage-pickup day. If a fly gets into your house, spray it with hairspray instead of bug spray. Hairspray will immediately stiffen the bug’s wings, causing it to fall to the ground. To keep ants from entering your home and finding their way to your garbage can, sprinkle baking soda or baby powder where you see them getting in (cracks, crevices, etc). Or spray those same areas with a 50/50 mix of white vinegar and water.

Another thing you can try is to boil a few tablespoons of dishwashing liquid in a pan of water. (This only works with dish soap that’s advertised as a grease dissolver or as soap that “breaks down grease.”) Pour the boiling solution down the drain. After the water cools somewhat, you can place a plastic jar lid over the drain and use it as a plunger by pushing down on it repeatedly. If your favorite CD has developed an annoying skip, rub a dab of plain white toothpaste into the shiny side of the disc. Don’t rub in a circle—rub from the middle of the CD to the edge. Then buff the disc with a soft cloth. You can also try lemon furniture polish, a drop of car wax, or hand sanitizer.

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4  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

Summer el-cheapo handy hints
You don’t need specialized ant killer to get rid of the ones that get into your house. Spray them with a mix of water and dish soap, cleanser (like Formula 409), or shaving cream. Go around your house sprinkling borax powder (like 20 Mule Team) around the perimeter if ants keep getting into your home. Outdoor lightbulbs often become corroded and are hard to remove when they burn out. Unscrew your lightbulbs now and rub the threads with a bit of petroleum jelly so they can easily be remove later. If a lightbulb does break off when you try to unscrew it, don’t risk cutting yourself on the glass. Cut a raw potato in half, press it carefully into the broken glass, and slowly unscrew the bulb. Remember rubbing your interior car windshield with shaving cream to keep it from fogging up? Well, it works with bathroom mirrors, too. Try not to wear the same sneakers two days in a row—moisture buildup can cause odors. Sprinkle baking soda or baby powder into your shoes before putting them on to absorb moisture while you’re wearing them. Take a good look at your plastic shower curtain. If it’s mildewed, pour a bit of bleach into warm water, wear protective gloves, and wipe the shower curtain clean. Also, go over the soap dish, drain, adhesive stickers, and bath mat with the solution; use a scrub brush if necessary. To keep your bicycle kickstand from sinking in soft dirt, take a tennis ball that you have cut a small X into and slip it over the end of the kickstand. That will keep your bike from sinking into the soft ground and falling over. Hanging pictures can be frustrating if you can’t find the nail or hook with the wire while sliding the picture along the wall. Try sticking a drinking straw over the hook or nail and sliding the picture along it until it’s hung. Then remove the straw. If the gasket (rubbing edging along the door on the inside) has developed a tear, fill the tear with caulk and let it dry. While you’re at it, rub a thin coat of petroleum jelly along the gasket to keep it from drying out and cracking (especially if you have an old refrigerator). You can clean out that microwave by pouring water into a microwaveable cup or bowl. Stir in a couple of tablespoons of baking soda or lemon juice and set the microwave on five minutes. The steam will soften the food residue and you should be able to remove it with a sponge or paper towel. Get blood stains out of clothing by pouring hydrogen peroxide over the stain; let it foam and then wash the item. Or meat tenderizer over the stain and let it sit for 20 minutes; then sponge or rinse off the blood. To really whiten your whites when doing your laundry, add a half-cup of baking soda after pouring in the usual amount of laundry detergent.

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Sometimes skin gets irritated in the summertime soon after the underarm area is shaved. If your skin is sensitive, apply lotion before putting on deodorant. Give your roses a treat by burying banana peels and the occasion solution of water with a touch of Epsom salt close by. They love the potassium. Clean the dust off your computer and TV screens with an old fabric-softener sheet. Send us your el-cheapo handy hints!

The Durham Skywriter is published monthly and is distributed via the worldwide web from Durham, North Carolina to everyone who wants to learn about and keep up with the Bull City. We bring information to our neighbors while looking at our city’s positive side. If you have any ideas, comments, suggestions, or would like to advertise, please write to: durhamskywriter@yahoo.com Or call: 919-809-YOU2 (9682) website: www.durhamskywriter.com video channel: www.youtube.com/ durhamskywriter
patricia A murray, publisher Skywriter logo by John Pinkney ©2013 NCskywriter

  August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 5

Publisher’s pitch
What a strange summer! Just when I had gotten used to being in emergency-drought mode we get a summer where people have lost their homes due to torrential rains and flooding. But it’s not over, folks. Usually, August brings us the highest temperatures on the year. We’ll see. Today, it’s only 82°, sooo we’ll see. Be sure to read the article I wrote about ticks on page 18 (To Your Health. They’re everywhere, especially in high grasses and in wooded areas. I picked up two somehow—one on my leg and one on my stomach! I overreacted when I discovered them and was nervous for several days afterwards. Check yourself, your kids, and your pets, too, while you’re at it. I’m pleased with how the Durham Skywriter is going. “Durham’s online community paper” has lots of new readers, judging by the emails I’m getting. Some people are discovering Radio Skywriter (which airs on WNCU on Sunday nights) on iTunes, which is nice. And I think that TV Skywriter is catching on, too. Two weeks ago, I interviewed former NBA player Jonathan Bender. His publicist had somehow heard about TV Skywriter way across the country in California and she set up the interview. Woohoo! I’m setting up interviews with local stars like Shirlette Ammons and faraway ones as well, including Arjun (from England) and Arranco de Varsóvia (from Brazil). It’s back-to-school month! I’m also on the lookout for people who can share ideas for helping students excel in school. It looks like prospective cuts in education will force us to do more with less. — patricia A murray (durhamskywriter@yahoo.com, 919-809-9682)

Tune in at 90.7fm Listen to our podcasts at www.wncu.org
Morning Jazz • Afternoon Jazz • Evening Jazz 8-Track Flashback • Blues Unlimited • Bonjour Africa BBC World Service • Close to Thee • Democracy Now! Eagle Talk Leadership • Hallelujah Praise • Jazz Focus Mastering Your Money • Radio Skywriter • Reggae Scene • Snap Judgment • Tell Me More The Funk Show • The Loft

Jazz & Public Affairs Specialty Programming

6  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

WORD … WORD … WORD …
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from the American Red Cross—Central North Carolina Chapter, 4737 University Dr, Durham, 919-489-6541, cncredcross.org: Be prepared for emergencies by taking classes offered by the American Red Cross. You can visit the website for class descriptions: • Adult and Pediatric First Aid/CPR/AED— Friday, August 9, 9am–noon; or Saturday, August 17, 9am–4pm; or Tuesday, August 27, 5:30–8:30pm; $85. • Adult CPR/AED—Tuesday, August 6, 9am– noon; or Friday, August 9, 9–10:30am; or Tuesday, August 27, 5:30–7pm; or Monday, September 5, 9am–noon; $55. • Adult First Aid/CPR/AED—Tuesday, August 6, 9am–2:30pm; Friday, August 9, 9–11:30am; or Tuesday, August 27, 5:30–7:30pm; or Monday, September 5, 9am–3pm; $70. • Babysitter’s Training—Saturday, August 24, 9am–4pm; $85. • CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers and Health Care Providers—Thursday, August 1, 6–9pm; $110. • Pediatric First Aid/CPR/AED—Saturday, August 17, 9am–3:30pm; $70. 919-560-4570: If your house was built before 1978, the year lead-based paint was declared unsafe for residential use, and you have kids under age 6 living or visiting your home, you might have a problem. Children coming into con tact with lead can suffer irreversible brain damage/ problems, and it’s important to get as much lead removed from around your home as possible. The City has funding for testing owner-occupied and rental properties for the presence of lead. Homeowners could be eligible for $8,000 lead paint removal assistance. Contact Donald Ham, the City’s rehabilitation pro duction manager, at 919-560-4570 or donald.ham@ durhamnc.gov for more info.

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from the Common Ground Alliance, call811.com:

Every day, people accidentally hit underground utility lines when digging holes for outdoor projects includ ing installing mailboxes, planting trees and shrubs, building decks, and digging ponds. You can disrupt your and your neighbors’ service, and you might be responsible for paying fines and repair costs. All you have to do to avoid this happening to you is to call 811 before digging in your front, side, or back yard. You can call 811 on weekdays between 7am and 7pm. Tell the operator what type of project you’re working on and where you’re planning to dig. Your local utilities will be notified, and then they’ll send a “locator” to mark the location of your underground lines, pipes, and cables, so that you can avoid those areas when starting your project. This service is free of charge. (You can ask for emergency locates between 7:01pm and 6:59am and on weekends.)

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from the Awesome Foundation for the Arts and Sciences, awesomefood.net: The Awesome Foundation is a network of people who enjoy donating money to organizations that help oth ers. The Food Chapter of the organization gives away $1,000 to community gardens and other groups that teach about healthy eating, nutrition, and growing food. If you’re involved with any of these activities, put in an application for one of the $1,000 micro grants. Visit the website, read about the program, and click on the link.

R from CommunEcos, retail store Recyclique:
2811 Hillsborough Rd, communecos.org: Check out these sustainability/green-living work shops. There’s usually a small, nominal fee: • The Next American Revolution—Friday,

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from the City of Durham’s Community Development Department, 807 E Main St,

  August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 7

WORD … WORD … WORD …
August 9, 6– 8pm. • Public Banking: A Primer—Saturday, August 17, 6–8pm. • Keeping Backyard Chickens—Saturday, August 24, 2–4pm. • Genetic Modification and Food Safety— Friday, August 30, 6–8pm. • Watch the film Journey of the Universe— Friday, September 6, 6–8pm. Recyclique, CommunEcos’ retail store, carries crafts made from recycled and rethought materials, books, and knick-knacks. Hours are Fridays noon–6pm and Saturdays 10am–5pm. Ex-offenders can get help with job searches, résumé preparation, networking, and encouragement from motivational speakers at a free workshop on Wednes day, August 14, 5–7pm. Nowadays, employers check the credit ratings of their prospective employees. Work on improving yours by attending a free debt-management and credit counseling workshop on Thursday, August 15, 9:30– 11am.

R from Durham Technical Community College/

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from the Durham JobLink Career Center, Northgate Mall, 1058 W Club Blvd, space #848, 919-354-2748, contact: Kenneth Motley: Sometimes you can be employed but can fall behind in your bills due to an unexpected temporary setback like hospitalization; or, maybe one adult in a relationship gets laid off and everything falls on the shoulders of the other. Before you know it, the situation gets so serious that you’re in danger of being evicted or losing your home. Help is available every Tuesday from 8:30am to 12:30pm. A case manager can work with you and keep your family afloat while you regain your footing. To see if you’re eligible for this free service, call Frank Bryant II, a homelessness prevention social worker, at 560-8655. Here’s what you’ll need: a copy of your lease, eviction notice/letter from landlord stating the past-due status, proof of income (pay stub or letter), from employer or agency (SSA Work First, ESC, etc) stating the pay rate, a copy of the ID card and social security card for everyone who lives in the home/ apartment, or utility notice. If you’re declared eligible, you’ll get some financial assistance.

The Small Business Center, 400 W Main St, 3rd floor of the SouthBank Bldg, Durham, 919-686-3448, durhamtech.edu/sbc: Durham Tech’s Small Business Center offers free classes and seminars to entrepreneurs who are planning or starting their own businesses. Check the website for additional classes and workshop series: • Introduction to Securities for Entrepreneurs Seeking to Raise Business Capital—Wednes- day, August 7, 11:30am–1:30pm, Orange County Campus (525 College Park Rd, in Hillsborough); learn how to go about asking people to provide investment funds for your business startup the right way. • Let’s Recap: Putting It All Together—Monday, August 12, 6–9pm, Orange County Campus (525 College Park Rd, in Hillsborough); review tax responsibilities, business structure, and inde- pendent contractor and employee issues. • Introduction to Federal and Department of Defense Cost Estimating Techniques—Tues- day, August 13, 11:30am–1:30pm, South Bank Bldg (400 W Main St, 3rd floor); learn about the three major purchases that the federal govern- ment makes—manufactured goods, professional services, and general construction services. • Let’s Recap: Putting It All Together—Tuesday, August 13, 6–9pm, South Bank Bldg (400 W Main St, 3rd floor); review tax responsibilities, business structure, and independent contractor and employee issues.

From 3 to 5pm every Tuesday, military veterans can get help building their résumés, getting job refer rals, conducting job searches. Case management and needs assessments are also available, if needed. These services are free.

8  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

DJ Piddipat

your multicultural deejay

We add just the right accent for your special event
R&B (including old school) • rock/pop • jazz • classical children’s music • world music (including salsa/tropical, bachata, Brazilian, and music from the Middle East, México, and more…)

Nonprofit & Neighborhood Fundraisers
Wide range of background music for banquets (jazz, classical, and pop)

Kids’ parties
all-clean, age-appropriate music birthday parties • school events carnivals • casino nights • pep rallies lighting • giveaways • games

Music • Lights • MCing Great music for dancing (old-school R&B, rock, country, and clean versions of current hints) Ask about our “Worldwide Dance Party” package

WEDDINGS, CORPORATE, and COMMUNITY HOLIDAY PARTIES I have a wide variety of classical music, jazz, and music from around the world.

Call 919-809-9682 today!

August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 9

Don’t let Durham’s online community paper be a one-way street! Got information? Have story ideas? Send them in! Most of our ideas for articles are sparked by conversations with our reader and listeners. Contact us via email at: durhamskywriter@yahoo.com or mail announcements, flyers, and submissions for the Guest Spotlight (poetry, essays, photographs, drawings, etc) to: Durham Skywriter, 1910 Capps St, Durham, NC 27707. Hoping to hear from you soon!
If you can’t listen on Sundays at 6:30pm on WNCU/90.7fm or wncu.org, listen to the podcast any time on iTunes or wncu.org. Call 919-809-9682 to be a guest on Radio Skywriter!

Radio Skywriter
is now available via podcast!

10  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

Zooom!
The kids’ page
Coffee can stilts
You’ll need: • 2 empty coffee (or any type) cans, the bigger the better • a can opener, the kind that makes triangular holes • 2 long pieces of strong string or rope Wash out the cans really well (or get help, because sometimes the edges are sharp. Making sure that the open ends are at the bottom, take the can opener and make 2 holes near the top, across from each other. Do the same with the other can. Carefully fish the string or rope through the holes and tie a knot—these are the handles. Now, step on one can and grab the string, and then step on the other (and grab that string, too). Now you’re a little taller—have fun with your new stilts!

SEND US JOKES! SEND US RIDDLES! SEND US SCIENCE FAIR IDEAS! SEND US MONEY! (LOL! Just kidding!)

Decoupage your notebooks
You’ll need: • • • •
notebooks or folders a paintbrush a bottle of decoupage photos, drawings, ads—any printed materials you like

Funny jokes of the month
Teacher: Johnny, why didn’t you answer my question? Johnny: I did! I shook my head. Teacher: Well, you don’t expect me to hear your head rattle all the way up here, do you? Teacher: Sarah, if you had 10 dollars and asked your mom for 10, how many would you have? Sarah: I would have 10 dollars, and she might tell me to give her those! Say this tongue twister three times fast: A big blue bucket of blue blueberries.

Make your notebooks the coolest in the class with decoupage (pronounced day-koo-pahj). Decoupage is a special white glue for attaching art to things like books, furniture—whatever you want. You can buy a small, 8-ounce bottle of “Mod Podge” from art-supply stores for around $8. Brush some decoupage on your notebook (the same size as your drawing). Place the drawing on top and then brush more decoupage on top. It will dry clear (brush on a couple of extra coats for best results) and no one will ever mistake your notebook for theirs!

We love funny jokes and riddles! Send us one—if we use it, you’ll win a prize!

August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 11

SCHOOL TOOLS
Durham Literacy Center
The Durham Literacy Center (1905 Chapel Hill Rd) is known for helping adults to improve their reading skills, teaching English to speakers of other languages, and working with young people who dropped out of high school to earn their GEDs. Volunteers are needed to work either one-on-one in the adult literacy and GED programs or in front of a classroom while teaching immigrants English. Volunteer Information Sessions will be held on Wednesday, August 7; Thursday, August 8; and Monday, August 12, all from 6 to 7pm. (You only have to attend one.) No teaching or mentoring experience is necessary; they’ll provide the training. Call 919-489-8383 or visit durhamliteracy.org for more information and to reserve your spot.

Parents as Partners
Durham Public Schools invites students and their friends and families to the DPS Family Academy Festival at Hillside High School (3727 Fayetteville St) on Saturday, September 7, 10am– 2pm. Sample a few Family Academy Courses (offered throughout the school year, covering subjects like family goal setting, financial support, school readiness, identifying quality child care, family financial fitness, information for grandparents, becoming an advocate for your child, positive behavior/self-discipline, and homework help). They’ll also have Zumba, student performances, a bouncy house, food, bicycle safety, face painting, and fun.

SmoothStart
Durham Public Schools has created the Smooth Start website to inform parents, grandparents, and guardians about everything they need to be aware of to get their kids to start off the school year right. See the school supplies lists, dates and times for open houses, and get a detailed explanation of the dress code and expectations of conduct. You can also fill out forms for the lunch program, athletic activities, and you can also register for before- and after-school care. Visit dpsnc.net/ parents/schools/smoothstart. If your child is eligible for extra help, be sure to ask about the IEP (Individualized Education Plan—for students with disabilities and learning challenges) and ESL (English as a Second Language) programs. Read up on these programs by going to dpsnc.net/programs-services/academics/ middle-school-program/services-for-students-withspecial-needs.

Save our schools
According to Action NC, the legislature is looking to cut almost $100 million dollars from public schools (to give to private corporations), which will probably lead to the elimination of class size restrictions for some elementary classes while snatching pre-k services from low-income children. Action NC will be holding a meeting for those who want to look at the big picture together and discuss what actions should be taken before the legislature passes their budget. Teachers, students, and parents/grandparents are invited on Wednesday, August 7, 6:30pm, at American Tobacco (318 Blackwell St, Suite 106). Call Gloria De Los Santos at 919-794-8210 to reserve your spot.

12  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

Call before you dig
Every day, people accidentally hit underground utility lines when digging holes for outdoor projects, including installing mailboxes, planting trees and shrubs, building decks, and digging ponds. You can disrupt your and your neighbors’ service, and you might be responsible for paying fines and repair costs. All you have to do to keep this from happening to you is to call 811 before digging in your front, side, or back yard. You can call 811 on weekdays between 7am and 7pm. Tell the operator what type of project you’re working on and where you’re planning to dig. Your local utilities will be notified, and then they’ll send a “locator” to mark the location of your underground lines, pipes, and cables, so that you can avoid those areas when starting your project.

Too much rain!
The North Carolina Cooperative Extension announces that many area gardeners and farmers are noticing some plant damage that has been brought on by the cool spring temperatures and recent excessive rains. Cucurbit downy mildew as well as other plant problems have been detected around the state. Organic growers can use copper-based products to slow down the progress of mildew diseases. Some are using Oxidate and are spraying their plants right before it rains and after their plants have dried following a rainstorm. North Carolina State University has put together a useful fact sheet on Late Blight of Tomato, which can be found at www.ces.ncsu.edu/ wp-content/uploads/2013/06/ Tomato_late_blight_ki.pdf.

the garden shed

This service is free of charge. (You can ask for emergency locates between 7:01pm and 6:59am and on weekends.)

Cucubit downy mildew and late blight have been spotted just south of us in Chatham County. Keep a close watch over your tomato, cucumber, and potato crops. Some growers (including organic farmers) use Oxidate to slow the progress of these diseases. Spray before it rains and/or when plants have dried after a steady rain. Master gardeners, who volunteer in the NC Cooperative Extension/Durham County office, can answer just about any gardening- and lawn-related question you can throw at them on weekdays from 9am to 5pm. They’re also at the Durham Farmers Market on some Saturdays. Call 919-560-0025. Be sure to ask them about problems your plants have developed due to the excessive rains. They’ll be able to research the problem and give you the answer over the phone or by mail or email. You can also pick up helpful brochures and NC State fact sheets from the master gardeners’ office. Be sure to give them a call before stopping in. If you like to conduct your own research, visit durham.ces. ncsu.edu/categories/lawn-garden and take a look at the various websites and resources.

Sipping your garden
Learn how to make herbal tisanes (teas) at the Sipping Your Garden: A Practice of “Greenness” and Spirit workshop, which will be held at the Resource Center for Women & Ministry in the South (1202 Watts St) on Monday, August 5, 7pm. Experience the simple beauty of a delicious cup of tea made from both cultivated and wild plants around us as Marcia Edwina Herman reads from her book, “Sipping My Garden.” Don’t forget to take your favorite a mug for sampling the various teas. Through the years, Ms Herman studied the science and stories behind herbs, and she also helped with the establishment of the North Carolina Botanical Gardens’ medicinal garden. This is a free event; call 919-683-1236 or send email to rcwmsnc@aol.com to reserve your spot.

  August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 13

Surfing the Internet is fun, but it can cause you to lose track of time. So, in the interest of science and in saving you precious time, I thought I’d tell you about some fun sites I’ve encountered while searching for interesting things to write about. You’re welcome.

hiphopgrams.com
This superfun website helps you send special greetings to family members, friends, and coworkers free of charge. You can even personalize the hiphop messages by choosing the name of the recipient from a pulldown menu (they have a wide choice, including Spanish and Muslim names). Available categories include Happy Anniversary, Congratulations, Best Friends, Break Up, Flirt, Sorry, Birthday, Get Well, Thank You, Holiday (various), Wedding, Mad, and Sympathy. The beats are tight and the messages are delivered with an authentic sound.

dmarie.com/timecap/step1.asp
This website can really come in handy for class and family reunions. Enter a birthdate and the dMarie Time Capsule will create a page that shows the top headlines, celebrity birthdays, TV shows, top songs, popular toys, book bestsellers, Academy Awardwinners, and typical consumer prices for that date. You can use this website to create “Did you know?” or trivia games for special events.

writecomics.com
If you’re not a consummate artist, you can still create your own comics with help from this website. Double-click on elements—characters, background, speech balloons, and props—to set up your comic. You can add panels as you go along and create an actual comic strip.

freeshipping.org
Those who enjoy online shopping can now get their orders sent to them free of charge, even if free shipping isn’t listed on the website. You can identify stores by category (electronics, toys, books, etc) or by store name (hundreds and hundreds of stores, including Home Depot, Sam’s Club, and Barnes & Noble). After you’ve made your order, you can then type in the tracking number and follow your package while it’s en route by way of UPS, FedEx, or the US Post Office.

snapbubbles.com

high-tech hijinks

If you’ve always enjoyed popping bubble wrap, now you can do so anywhere you can get access to the Internet. Click on each bubble and listen to it pop. Keep in mind that you might be driving everyone within hearing range crazy while you sit around casually popping these bubbles.

mysticalball.com nurseryrhymes.com
Sometimes it doesn’t hit you until you’ve had your first child or are in the midst of adopting or fostering a child, that you realize that you’ve forgotten the words to some of the nursery rhymes you grew up with. Now you can visit nurseryrhymes. com and reacquaint yourself with Knick Knack Paddy Whack, John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt, Kookaburra, Oh Dear What Can the Matter Be, and hundreds of additional nursery rhymes. Type a Yes or No question, click on the “submit” button and get the answer from the online magic mystical crystal ball.

guessthecity.com
Test your knowledge of the world’s big cities. Look at the photos and guess the city from the four choices given for each photo.

14  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

From the North Carolina Council of Churches website: There’s a job opening at Partners in Health and Wholeness. They were just awarded a two-year implementation grant from the John Rex Endowment and they’re looking for a project director who can run a new program for reducing obesity in children/families in low-resource congregations in Wake County. The program director should find ways to encourage mothers to care for their bodies before, during, and after their pregnancies and to breastfeed their babies. Mini-grants will be provided to houses of worship to help them create designated spaces for mothers to breastfeed or express milk. This is a 3/4-time position. Visit ncchurches.org to learn more and to put in your application.

tery on Saturday, August 17, 2–5pm. Everyone will meet at the Jamaat Ibad Ar-Rahman masjid (3034 Fayetteville St) and take a short walk to the cemetery. Call Muhammad Naeem Lateef, funeral home manager, at 919-599-0914 for information about the Durham Muslim Cemetery and burial assistance. Visit ibadarrahman.org for more info.

This past month, the Resource Center for Women & Ministry in the South sponsored a series of conversations of women ages 16 to 40, who discussed subjects across the lines of faith and gender that usually go unspoken. Inspired by their honest conversations, the group will be coming out with a book this fall entitled, “Talking Taboo: American Christian Women Get Frank About Faith.” When the book is released, it will probably spark even more conversation. Some of the writers will be on hand to read from their works during A Community-Wide Courageous Conversation on Saturday, August 10, 2–4pm, at 1202 Watts St. You’re invited to speak your mind and to join the group writing exercise. Everyone is welcome. This is a free event, but send an email message to rcwmsnc@aol. com to let them know you’re coming.

the praise page

Durham Congregations in Action’s next meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 20, 5:45pm, at Lowe’s Grove Baptist Church (4430 S Alston Ave). To learn more about the 62-congregation-member DCiA, visit the website at dcia.org.

The Religious Coalition for a Nonviolent Durham’s next Community Luncheon Roundtable will be held on Thursday, August 22, noon–1pm, in the fellowship hall of Shepherd’s House United Methodist Church (107 N Driver St, corner of Driver and Main, back entrance). Join concerned neighbors and friends and discuss how to best respond to societal problems that most people just talk about: gang and handgun violence, and the failure of many ex-offenders to stay out of jail. It’s free; contact Marcia Owen at 919-358-1113 or nonviolentdurham @gmail.com for more information.

Send information about your place of worship’s outreach activities, programs, and special events to durhamskywriter@yahoo. com. These are free listings.

The Jamaat Ibad Ar-Rahman Funeral Home will hold an “open house” for the new Durham Muslim Ceme-

  August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 15

LEGAL EASE
Circles of Support and Accountability
The next Circles of Support and Accountability’s monthly information session will be held at the Criminal Justice Resource Center (326 E Main St) on Thursday, August 1, 6pm. Cosponsored by the Criminal Justice Resource Center, Durham Congregations in Action, these sessions address the strong feelings people have to deal with when they learn about the release of (sexual assault) ex-offenders who have served their sentences. The Circles of Support and Accountability want to ensure that released offenders follow the rules of their parole and that they receive much-needed support and rehabilitation. Check durham cosa.com for more information. (Another information session will be held on Thursday, September 5, 6pm.) This inmate said that if this campaign were to be approved, thousand of dollars could easily be donated with a simple swipe of the debit cards. However, the inmates aren’t allowed to do this. He explained that there are 37,000 prisoners in the North Carolina prison system; if each one donated $1, that would add up to $37,000, which could really help someone. He wants, however, to start with Marion and to expand it statewide (and hopefully, the idea would catch on and expand throughout the country). This inmate explained that many of the men he’s serving time with have not lost their humanity and they really want to do something positive and to become part of the solution. The Marion inmates’ goal is to raise enough money to send three young people to college. If you’re interested in getting involved, by asking Governor McCrory and the NC Department of Corrections to get on board, contact Rachael Williams. She is the cofounder of Can I Live, the nonprofit organization that is trying to turn this idea into reality. Visit the website at canilive.org or call Ms Williams at 919-227-0690.

Can I Live
I had an interesting telephone conversation with an inmate who told me about an initiative that’s under development. He told me that prison inmates have lots of time to think about how they got there. And even though there are lots of people who’d rather not give them a thought (“just lock ‘em up”), someone needs to realize that some inmates want to start making amends by helping the people/families they’ve hurt. Some of the inmates at the Marion Correctional Institution (in Laurinburg) came up with the idea of donating to the Crime Victims Fund of North Carolina. The inmates don’t use cash; instead they make use of the debit cards that are issued to them by the system. Moneys are added to the card on “payday” (some have daily part-time jobs in the prison); some families send funds as well, and they’re applied to the cards. (This is how they make purchases of extras, like snacks, from the prison store.)

NC Gun Law
If you need to get rid of a gun, you can call the Durham Police Department’s (DPD) nonemergency line, 919-5604600 or 919-560-4601, and ask an officer to stop by and pick it up. You can also drop off an unwanted firearm at DPD headquarters (505 W Chapel Hill St). Just make sure you don’t hold it up in the air or display it in any manner that can be misconstrued. But if you’re afraid to handle the gun, just call the number above and let a professional take care of it. If you’d like to receive a pocket-size card that lists some of the state’s firearm statutes, call Project Safe Neighborhoods at 919-560-4438 x29230 to have them send you one.

16  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

1101 University Dr Durham 919-490-1265 or 919-489-7692 shop 919-489-0732 home • 919-919-8169 cell

University BP

Chicken Hut
3019 Fayetteville St Durham 919-682-5697 Mon–Fri 10am–6pm • Sat 7am–6pm

Brake jobs • Used tires Engine work • Transmission work NCI inspections • Tune-ups • Towing
Monday–Friday 7am–6pm Saturdays 7am–2pm Tony & Evelyn Henderson

Take Out • Catering Eat-in lunch 11:30am–2:30pm weekdays new! Saturday Breakfast Buffet 7–11:30
Fried Chicken • Fish • Home-cooked Vegetables Homemade Desserts • Dinners: Baked Chicken, Beef Liver, Chitlins, Oxtails, Ribs (beef and pork) Lemonade & Sweet Tea by the gallon/half-gallon

PHOTO GALLERY | FRAMING | LARGE-FORMAT PRINTING

THROUGH THIS LENS
303 E Chapel Hill Street • 919-687-0250
between the Marriott & the Post Office

Philco Services
dropoff hours: Saturdays 9am–2pm 706 Ellis Rd, Warehouse 4 Durham

Tue–Fri 10:30am–5:30pm • Sat 10:30am–4pm 3rd Fridays open ‘til 9pm
New exhibit: Jesse Andrews’ “Iron Rails Through Virginia” opens August 16. Meet the artist 3rd Friday BUTTON, BUTTON, WHO’S GOT THE BUTTON? Custom Buttons—Small Orders Welcome

Appliances, E-waste (computers, monitors & electronics), Cardboard, Plastic & Styrofoam $15 fee, any amount

Commercial & Residential See philcoservices.com for more info Or call 919-451-2090 or 919-886-0666
Recycling—You can make the difference

Collins
100 S Alston Ave Durham 919-683-2598 collinsexxon.com seniorpharmassist.org

Tune-ups • Oil changes • Brake service 4-step fuel system cleaning • Transmission service Timing belts • Coolant flush • Brake service NC State inspection station • 24-hour towing
Lee E Collins, Operator

If you’re a Durham resident age 60 and up, we can help you: • • • decrease what you pay for your medications manage your medicines safely and effectively get the most appropriate drug and medical coverage (this service is available to all ages)

Sundays 7pm on YouTube and Google+ Go to www.youtube.com and search for “durhamskywriter”, or go to gplus.to/durhamskywriter

TV Skywriter

Watch

Senior PharmAssist is a local nonprofit that has been helping seniors obtain and manage their medications since 1994. If necessary, we can arrange for home visits or transportation. We’re located in the Durham Center for Senior Life building, 406 Rigsbee Avenue.

Call 919-688-4772 for more information or to set an appointment.
Contact us at 919-809-9682 or durhamskywriter@gmail.com to be a guest.
Local coordinating site for NC Seniors’ Health Insurance Information Program (SHIIP)

August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 17

Auto Service Center
4723 Fayetteville Rd Durham 919-544-3735 or 919-544-3736 Monday–Friday 8am–6pm

Speight’s

The High Strung School of Music
1805 W Markham, 2nd floor • 919-251-9401 919-286-3801 (store on 1st floor) • Durham Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass (upright and electric) Guitar, (acoustic, electric, classical) Clawhammer Banjo, Ukulele, Ocarina & more! Private lessons with experienced teachers in a beautiful, newly renovated music studio. Our teachers can help you get started or coach you to new levels in your playing. Visit highstrungdurham.com for details.

All major repairs Specializing in tune-ups • Brakes • A/C Electrical systems • Cooling systems

Awesome Sticks
Buy a stylish walking stick “It’s about style—not age“ Available at the Durham Farmers Market (Durham Central Park) most Saturdays Write to awiexpansion@hotmail for more info

by Aasim Inshirah

Davenport Customs
2824 Hillsborough Rd Durham 919-682-5627 davenportcustoms.com $249.99 limited-time special: Pioneer CD Player Installed + Window Tint Car alarms • Car audio • Car detailing Car TV • DVD & navigation Wheels & accessories • Window tinting Paint • Rims • Keyless entry/Remote start
Financing Available • 90 days same as cash Mention this ad and get $5 off

Durham Upholstery
809 Midland Terrace Durham 919-682-8301 durhamupholstery.com Monday–Friday 8am–5pm

Heritage Square Flea Market
401 E Lakewood Ave Durham 919-943-1431 Monday–Saturday 8am–8pm • Sundays noon–6pm

Indoor & air-conditioned • Friendly atmosphere Booths available: $100/week Floor space (9 feet x 12 feet): $20/day Call Mr Williams today and start selling tomorrow

Reupholstery • Repairs • Refinishing • Restoring also… Car Upholstery • Upholstery cleaning Car tops & covers • Expert antiques repair See our website for impressive Before & After photos We pick up and deliver Call today for your free estimate Individual homes • Businesses • Government
Roger R Brown, sales

Joe's Diner
2100 Angier Ave (at Driver) Durham 919-381-5110 joesbigdog.com Monday–Friday 8am–5pm

JOE’S FISH FRY every Friday in front of the diner $7 plate: Whiting/Tilapia/Croaker sides: cole slaw/collards/potato salad/French fries/ mac-n-cheese/yams (Call in your order!) Let us cater your next special event

18  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

To your health
American Tobacco blood drive
The American Red Cross will hold a Blood Drive at American Tobacco on Tuesday, August 13, starting at 10am. Checkin will be in Bay 12/Upper Level, and the Bloodmobile will be on Carr St (on the west end of the complex). You can sign up for a donation time by calling 1-800-give life or by going online and signing up at redcross.org. Click on “Search by Sponsor Code” and then enter “12543.” Of course, you can also just walk in as well. Be sure to have your photo ID with you. Call Tex Law at 919-730-0605 for more information about the blood drive.

Stay ‘ticked off’
It’s tick season, and the abundant rain, followed by hot weather has led to high numbers of ticks being found in wooded areas and yards with high grass and clumps of leaves. The next time you go hiking or working in high grassy areas, apply repellent with DEET (20%+) your clothing, especially your shoes, socks, and pants legs. Spray it on exposed skin—arms, wrists, neck, and ears—but be careful around the eyes and mouth. If you’re really worried about ticks, then take the precaution of tucking the bottom of your pants legs into your socks and keep your shirt tucked in. Wear light-colored clothing; you might be able to spot a tick before it latches on to your skin. If you’re hiking and you notice that you’ve walked into a tickinfested area—turn around and leave. Don’t take the chance of getting Lyme disease, one of the diseases that ticks carry. Once you get home, check every inch of your body and toss your clothes into the washing machine as soon as possible. Check the kids and pets, too. Here’s how to remove a tick: Use blunt-edge (not pointy) tweezers, grab the tick and pull upward. Don’t panic—pull steadily for a minute or two until the tick disengages (hopefully intact). Flush it down the toilet. Wash your hands and the affected area with soap and warm water. If you’re feeling sick, save the tick in a ziplock bag and get to a doctor ASAP. Call the Durham County Department of Public Health at 919-560-7635 for more information on tick bites and related diseases.

Check your blood pressure
CAARE’s Jeanne Hopkins Lucas Education and Wellness Center (214 Broadway St) is a Check It Change It site. Anyone in Durham County can stop in to have his or her blood pressure checked free of charge. This free clinic also provides clinical breast exams, PAP smears, prostate and colorectal exams, and makes referrals for free mammograms, MRIs, and biopsies. Call 919-687-0793 or visit caare-inc.org/services/ health-and-wellness for more information.

Free Kids’ Vitamin program

Central Pharmacy (2609 N Duke St, #103) has a Free Kids’ Vitamin Program, where families can pick up a bottle of 30 chewable multivitamins every 30 days. A parent must sign up each child every time he or she picks up the vitamins. Pharmacy hours are Monday–Friday 9am–6pm and Saturdays 9am– 1pm; call 919-220-5121 for more information.

  August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 19

SENIORSCOPE
Q News from the Durham Center for Senior Life,
406 Rigsbee Ave, 919-688-8247, www.dcslnc.org: Mature Adults office, Walltown Recreation Center, 1308 W Club Blvd, 919-560-4296 or Enjoy Movies on Fridays, 1pm in the Theater: 919-354-2710, http://durhamnc.gov/ich/op/prd/ • August 9—The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Pages/Home.aspx: • August 16— Alex Cross • August 23—Crash Socialize and get in some noncompetitive Bowling at • August 30—Trouble with the Curve AMF Lanes Durham on Wednesday, August 7, 9:30am–noon. Call or stop in for more info. Representatives from Durham County Social Ser vices make themselves available on Tuesdays, 1–5pm, The next Mature Adult Trip will be to the Snow to help you deal with Medicaid issues. On Wednes- Camp Outdoor Theatre on Friday, August 9. Enjoy an days, 9am–1pm, you can meet with a social worker evening outdoor presentation of “Pathway to Freedom,” from DSS Adult Services. the story of the hardships faced by North Caro lina’s early Quakers and enslaved Africans. The cost Get crafty with Paper Making and Recycling on Tues- is $20, $18 with a Play More card. Everyone will meet day, August 6, 11am–noon, in the Commons area. at Northgate Mall to board the bus at 4:30pm and the group will return around 11pm. Call or stop in for A Woodlawn Memorial Park Lunch and Learn will more info. be held on Tuesday, August 13, 11:30am, in the The ater. Have lunch with friends. With Dining Around A Birthday Party will be held for August celebrants on Tuesday, August 20, 2pm, in the Commons area. Be sure to get a Free Flu Shot on Tuesday, August 27, 11am, in the Wellness Center. Durham, on Wednesday, August 14, 11am–1pm, everyone will meet at a restaurant (to be named later) and enjoy a meal together. You can ride the bus from the Center (for an extra fee) if you don’t want to drive there. Seniors (age 55+) are invited to pick up some free fruits and vegetables at the Senior Room on the 2nd floor of the Holton Career and Resource Center (401 N Driver St) on Thursdays, August 15 and September 5, at 11am. They don’t always have bags, so you might want to take your own.

Q News from Durham Parks and Recreation,

A Senior LGBT & Friends Meet-Up will be held on Tuesday, August 27, 2pm, at Blue Coffee Café (202 N Corcoran). Enjoy watching Les Misérables on Thursday, August 29, 1pm, in the Theater.

The End of Summer Cook-Out will be held on Friday, August 30, noon; $5 donation.

Check your email and learn how to use the Internet at the Walltown Park Recreation Center’s (1308 W Club Blvd) Open Computer Lab on Mondays and Wednes days, noon–1pm.

20  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

pro soccer player
This month we visited WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary and spoke with Brian Shriver, #21 and forward with the Carolina Railhawks.

ON THE JOB:
A Because I am a big Michael Jordan
fan. When I heard from UNC, I knew that was it.

already knew some of the guys. This is my second year with the Railhawks.

But Michael Jordan didn’t even Q When did you start playing, and Q play soccer! when did you know you wanted to play professionally?

Q The soccer field is humongous! How A We train throughout the week build-

do you cover so much ground and stay in motion the whole game? ing our endurance and strength. We use the whole field when we practice— working on leg strength, cardio endurance, and the ability to run for long lengths of time. Training for soccer is like being able to run 200and 400-meter sprints and cross-country.

A I

started playing when I was 4 years old, but I played baseball, too, including Little League. But when I got older, it was hard playing both seriously. So as a teen I chose soccer. So two or three weekends every month, my mom would drive me to Miami four hours away to play on one of the best teams in the state. I missed out on going to high school dances and even prom, but our goal was getting me into college. I was getting good grades but I knew that soccer was my pathway to see more and get out of Florida. My team was state champ four times while I was playing for them.

Q

Q So is soccer like other sports—
where college scouts recruit the best student athletes in the area?

Well, yes and no. You can make A Yeah, but he’s Michael Jordan! A more money playing soccer for foreign teams, but not everyone wants to live I wouldn’t mind seeing more of Q Is it true that you were drafted abroad. the world—playing soccer is a good way while in college but decided not to take the offer?

I understand that the Railhawks are a development-league team. Is the goal of every soccer player in your league to move up to one of the Major League Soccer teams?

A

Oh, yeah. The scouts come out for games, tournaments, and showcases. I put in the work and got offers from UNC–Chapel Hill, Duke, Wake Forest— they all have good soccer programs.

A

to do it.

Q And you decided to go with UNC–
Chapel Hill—why was that?

Yes. Actually, I had suffered an injury. Instead of pushing myself to play while hurt, I decided to stay, get surgery on my hip, finish classes, and get my degree. I have no regrets. I was drafted again after graduation, played in Florida for a while, and then asked to be traded to this area. I had played on one of the Railhawks’ development league teams and I

Q What’s the best thing about being a professional soccer player? A Scoring goals! It helps the team, I
love to hear the crowd cheer, and love getting that adrenaline rush!

August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 21

SPORTIN’ LIFE
Bikefest
The Carolina Tarwheels Bicycle Club’s biggest event of the year, the 18th annual Bikefest Rural Heritage Tour, will take place on Saturday, August 10. The tour will begins at the Superior Courthouse in downtown Hillsborough, and riders can choose from going on a 35-, 62-, and 100-mile roundtrip tour (with rest stops along the way). Those who want to take a shorter tour can go on the Historic District Fun Ride, which is a 7-mile tour of historic sites in and around Hillsborough. The Historic District Fun Ride is free, but all riders must still register. Registration for riders age 18+ is $40 and $30 for age 17 and under (the Historic District Fun Ride is for all ages). Visit the website at www.tarwheels.org for more information and to register. Durham on Sunday, August 18. Meet at Major the Bull at CCB Plaza (E Chapel Hill and Corcoran Sts) at 2pm. The ride will end at Cocoa Cinnamon on Geer St. The monthly Tipping Point rides are designed to teach bicyclists how to share the road with cars and other vehicles without getting hurt. Call 919-886-3878 for more info.

SPORTS

SHORTS

Youth Capoeira classes
Boys and girls ages 11 to 17 are invited to take a free capoeira class to see if they like it. Capoeira is a fast-growing AfroBrazilian martial arts + music art form; it’s flowing and creative, incorporating the rhythms of samba and moves that seem to mix gymnastics with hip-hop. The free introductory classes will be offered at the Terreiro de Arte e Cultura (723 N Mangum St) on Saturdays, August 3 and 10, noon–1pm. Write to info@terreiro.org or call 919410-8322 for more info.

• The Heart & Sole Mall Wal kers Club walk at Northgate Mall (1058 W Club Blvd) Mon- day–Saturday between 7am and 9pm and Sundays be- tween 9am and 6pm. The free monthly breakfast and health talk will take place on Tues- day, August 13 at 8:30am. Call 919-286-4400 for more info. • Durham Parks and Recre- ation’s High Ropes Course Discovery Day is Saturday, August 17, at Bethesda Park (1814 Stage Rd).The one-hour course is offered from 4 to 8:30pm. Challenge yourself by conquering this obstacle course, which is 55 feet up in the air. The fee is $8, $7 with Play More card. • Heels in Motion, who walk for good health at Streets at Southpoint Mall (6910 Fay- etteville Rd), can walk Mon- day–Saturday between 7am and 9pm and Sundays be- tween 10am and 7pm. The monthly free breakfast and health talk will take place in the Food Court on Wednes- day, August 28 at 8am. Call 919-572-6450 for more info.

Tennis, anyone?
Sign up for Tennis Lessons, which will be offered in Forest Hills Park (1639 University Dr). Kids ages 8 to 10 can take lessons Mondays and Wednesdays, August 12–28 at 6pm ($15, $13.50 with Play More card). And kids ages 11 and 12 can take lessons Tuesdays and Thursdays, August 13–29 at 6pm (also $15, $13.50 with Play More card).

Bull City Gridiron Classic
The annual football grudge match between the North Carolina Central University Eagles and the Duke University Blue Devils will be held on Saturday, August 31, 4pm at Duke’s Wallace Wade Stadium (290 Frank Bassett Dr). Visit goduke.com/tickets or call 919-681-BLUE for ticket info.

Bull City Tipping Point
Grab your bicycle and join the Bull City Tipping Point 10-mile social ride around

22  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

T

GO OUTSIDE AND PLAY! OLD-SCHOOL OUTDOOR GAMES

X

I’ve noticed that kids don’t seem to play outside half as much as I did when I was young. In light of all the media attention being given to inactivity causing obesity, I thought I’d put together an article describing the games we used to play on the south side of Chicago in the 1960s. These games are really fun to play once you get the hang of them. Try them out during summer camp or family reunions! (I say “he” throughout this article for simplicity’s sake. Of course, these game rules apply equally to boys and girls.)

The kids who make it Home before being tagged can help the others trying to reach Home. One kid keeps his hand or foot on Home and holds hands with another kid. They can form a chain and shout, “Electricity!” Any kids running Home can grab the last kid’s hand and be declared Safe.

MOTHER, MAY I?
All of the kids except for the one who’s It line up going across (the opposite of single file). The goal is to reach the It kid (who plays Mother) first. Each kid takes turns trying to move up enough to tag Mother. One by one, each kid asks permission to take a certain number of steps, always starting with “Mother, my I. …” The steps that the kids can choose from are Bathtub, Giant, Regular, and Baby Steps. So, one kid would say something like, “Mother, may I take 5 Giant Steps?” The kid who’s playing Mother can then say, “Yes, you may” or “No, you may not.” Even though Mother doesn’t want the other kids to reach him, it’s not fair to say “No” every time. But he can offer an alternative like, “No you may not, but you can take 3 Regular Steps [or whatever].” Whoever is able to make his way to the front first and tag Mother gets to be Mother next. Here are the steps you can take: Baby Steps—tiny steps made on tiptoe Regular Steps—“normal” steps Giant Steps—the biggest step you can make Bathtub Steps—nothing’s bigger than a Bathtub Step; you lie face down with your arms over head. Then you get up and stand where the tips of your fingers were.

SIMON SAYS
Simon is the leader. He stands in front of the group and all the other kids are supposed to do whatever he says. Simon gives orders like, “Touch your nose,” “Jump up and down like a monkey,” or “Spin around.” However—and here’s the key—nobody should do what he says unless he starts with “Simon says.” So, if Simon says “Spin around,” don’t do anything. Anyone who does is out. If he says, “Simon says spin around,” then go ahead and spin around. The last kid left is the winner and gets to be Simon.

HIDE AND SEEK
One kid is It. He stands at Home, which can be anything he chooses, like a particular tree or bush. He then turns his back, covers his eyes, and counts out loud to 25 (or whatever number the kids agree on). While he’s counting, the other kids run and hide. After reaching “25,” the kid who’s It calls out, “Ready or not, here I come!” Then he runs and tries to find the others. Whenever he finds one, he has to chase her and tag her Out before she can run Home.

  August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 23

T
RED ROVER

GO OUTSIDE AND PLAY! OLD-SCHOOL OUTDOOR GAMES
FREEZE TAG

X

Now, here’s the tricky part: If the kid asking permission forgets to start with “Mother, may I,” he has to go all the way back and start all over.

Just like in the regular game of Hide and Seek, one kid is It and runs around trying to tag the others before they run Home. But in Freeze Tag, any kid who gets tagged is frozen in place. He can’t move until another kid unfreezes him by tagging him. Then both of them try to run Home before being tagged. The last kid left without being tagged gets to be It next.

You need a bunch of kids to play this game! Form two teams. Each team stands on opposite sides (maybe 10 or 12 feet across), facing the other team and holding hands tightly. Team A shouts, “Red Rover, Red Rover, send Jimmy [or whoever] right over!” Jimmy, who’s on Team B, runs as fast as he can toward Team A and tries to break through the line. If he does break through, he gets to choose one kid from Team A and the two of them run back to Team B. But if he doesn’t break through, he has to join Team A. Then it’s Team B’s turn to shout, “Red Rover, Red Rover, send Kelly [or whoever] right over!” The team that ends up with the most kids, wins.

HOW TO CHOOSE WHO GETS TO BE “IT”
Naturally, everybody wants to be It when deciding to play a game. Here’s one way to do it: Form a circle and have each kid put one foot forward to form a circle with their feet. Ordinarily, the natural leader (or loudest kid) chooses to start by reciting a rhyme while going around the circle touching each shoe to the rhythm of the rhyme. Whoever’s shoe is touched at the end of the rhyme is eliminated and the rhyme is repeated until there’s one shoe left. That kid is declared It. Here’s one of the rhyme we used as kids:

RED LIGHT
Just like with Mother, May I, the goal of this game is to line up across the yard and reach the kid who’s It first. The kid who’s It turns his back and loudly counts up to 10 as fast as he can, ending with “Red Light!” (He whirls around when he shouts “Red Light!”) While he has his back turned, the other kids run and try to tag him before he whirls around. But they have to Stop when he shouts “Red Light!” Anyone who moves even a little bit has to go back and start all over. The first kid to tag the It kid gets to be It next.

Engine Engine number 9, going down Chicago line. If the train should jump the track, do you want your money back? The kid whose shoe is touched while the leader says the word “back” can answer Yes or No. If he says No, the leader then continues around the circle saying, “N-O spells No, so out you go with a dirty dirty dishrag on your toe.” Whoever’s toe is touched with the word “toe” is eliminated. If he says Yes, then the leader continues with “YE-S spells Yes.” No one is eliminated at this point. This continues until one kid is left and he gets to be It.

24  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

Brothers Daniel and Chantin Collins at the first annual Summer in the City festival, a fundraiser for the CNOTE Foundation, an education-based nonprofit that they run with their older brother Vic

Gorgeous mailbox in the lobby of the SunTrust building downtown. The building is being renovated, and in a couple of years it will emerge as a boutique hotel.

Aasim Inshirah works on his Awesome Sticks at the Summer in the City Festival in Durham Central Park. photos by patricia A murray — see more pix at flickr.com/photos/durhamskywriter

August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 25

Curtis Glenn and family run a martial arts class at A Cultured Alliance on Hwy 54 and Sedwick Ave. They teach Mawjac, a blended form of the Japanese arts aikido, shi toh ryu, and judo.

photos by patricia A murray — see more pix at flickr.com/photos/durhamskywriter

26  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

LET’S GO!
RECURRING EVENTS

Í You can drop off Household Hazardous Waste

on Tuesdays and Wednesdays noon to 6pm, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays 7:30am to 3pm, at 1900 E Club Blvd. They’ll take paint, used motor oil, pesticides, fertilizers, pool cleaners, strong cleansers, stains, varnishes, and fluorescent bulbs. If you’re worried about spills, wrap con tainers with newspapers and place them in card board boxes for safe transport. This service is for individuals only—commercial users are not allowed. Call Durham One-Call at 919-560-1200 or visit durhamnc.gov/ich/op/swmd/Pages/ Hazardous-Waste.aspx for more info.

handmade soaps, home-made yummies, and antibiotic and hormone-free meats. Check durhamfarmersmarket.com or call 919-484-3084 to find out what’s in season.

Í Take your fiddle, guitar, mandolin, flute, tinwhistle,
concertina, tenor banjo, or harp and learn Irish jigs, reels, and hornpipes phrase by phrase at High Strung Musical Instruments’ Irish Learning Jam now at a larger venue, Outsiders Art Gallery (718 Iredell St) on Thursdays, 6:30–8pm. It’s free and “near-beginners” are welcome. Call 919-286-3801 or check highstrungdurham.com for more info. (Please note that High Strung has moved to 1805 W Markham.)

Í Overeaters Anonymous meetings are held on Í Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30–1:30pm, at First
Presbyterian Church (305 E Main St, 2nd floor of the Christian Ed Wing). Call Robin at 919-6833013 for more info. Meetings are also held on Saturdays, 10–11:30am, at Westminster Presbyterian Church (3639 Old Chapel Hill Rd, Youth Hut). Call Harriette at 919-596-9543 for more info. Sunday meetings are held at 10am for newcomers and 10:30am for regulars at the Structure House (3017 Pickett Rd, Room 220). Call Judith at 919-929-9891 for more info.

English Country Dance sessions are held every Thursday, 7:30–9:30pm, at the Freedman Center of Beth El Synagogue (1004 Watts St). Be sure to take soft, non-street shoes or dance in your socks. $5 suggested donation; beginners are welcome. Visit ncfolk.net/contra for more info.

Í Take a tour of a roastery and sample different
types of coffee on Fridays, 10am, at Counter Culture Coffee (4911 S Alston Ave). It’s free; call 919-361-5282 or visit counterculturecoffee.com for more info.

Í Have you always wanted to learn how to play

“old-time” music? Take your stringed instru ment to High Strung Musical Instruments’ Old Time Learning Jam now at a larger venue, Out siders Art Gallery (718 Iredell St) on Tuesdays, 6:30–8pm. It’s free and “near-beginners” are welcome. Call 919-286-3801 or check highstrung durham.com for more info. (Please note that High Strung has moved to 1805 W Markham.)

Í

The Durham Central Park Pavilion at 502 Foster St is the home of the Durham Farmers’ Market on Saturdays from 8am to noon. You can buy fresh produce, free-range eggs, honey, cheese, handmade soaps, home-made yummies, and antibiotic and hormone-free meats. Check durhamfarmersmarket.com or call 919-484-3084 to find out what’s in season.

Í

The Durham Central Park Pavilion at 502 Foster St is the home of the Durham Farmers’ Market on Wednesdays from 3:30 to 6:30pm. You can buy fresh produce, free-range eggs, honey, cheese,

Í

The Durham Craft Market is open on Sat urdays, 8am–noon, right across the street from the Durham Farmers Market. Check out the hand crafted jewelry, pottery, woodcrafts, metallic art,

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and more. Visit durhamcraftmarket.com to learn more about the artists.

Í

The South Durham Farmers Market is held on Saturdays (rain or shine) from 8am to noon in the Greenwood Commons Shopping Center (5510 Hwy 55). You can buy produce, meats, pies, crafts, and more. Check southdurhamfarmers market.org to read about the vendors and to subscribe to the e-newsletter.

Motorco Music Hall (723 Rigsbee Ave). Featured artists will include Shirlette Ammons, Dasan Ahanu, the Bull City Slam Team, and DJ Whole wheat. People’s Durham goal is to form a coali tion of community-minded black and brown working-class people in the Bull City. Admis sion fee is $10; contact Dasan Ahanu at 919-295 0176 or dasan67@live.com for tix (or order online at acausetoparty.splashthat.com). Contact Bryan Proffitt at 919-210-9256 or bproffitt33@ yahoo.com for more info on People’s Durham.

AUGUST 1 – 4

Í The Hayti Heritage Center (Fayetteville and Lake-

Í

Enjoy the mashups of local jazz and indie band members at Motorco (723 Rigsbee Ave) at the Zombie Jazz Apocalypse on August 1, 9–11pm. Invited musicians include Zoocru (with Al Strong and Eric Hirsh), Canine Heart Sounds, Blanko Basnet, Hammer No More the Fingers, and Yandrew. Admission is $5, $3 membership, plus a pledge (any amount) to the Art of Cool’s Kick starter fund to bring a jazz festival to Durham next spring. Call 919-901-0875 or visit motorco music.com/art-of-cool-zombie-jazz-apocalypse for more info (and to pledge).

wood Sts) invites everyone to check out The Mar ket, a new venture with vendors selling jewelry, clothing, art, books, metal work, books, and snacks/coffee, on Saturday, August 3, 8am–1pm. Call 919-683-1709 or visit hayti.org for more info.

Í Preservation Durham will host Stepping Into
Durham’s Long Civil Rights Movement: A Downtown Walking Tour on August 3, 10am– noon, starting at the Parrish Street Forum (108 W Parrish St). It’s free. Call 919-682-3036 or visit preservationdurham.org for more info.

Create Nothing Other Than Excellence, better Í Durham Central Park’s Warehouse Blues Series Í known as the CNOTE Foundation, will host the will feature Mel Melton & the Wicked Mojos on Friday, August 2, 5:30–7:30pm, at 501 Foster St. It’s free (but be aware that food trucks will be there); visit durhamcentralpark.org for more info.

Í

The Brightleaf Square Concert Series will feature traditional Irish and Appalachian songs by Little Windows on August 2, 7–9pm, at Gregson and Main Sts. It’s free; call 919-682-9229 for more info.

Summer in the City Festival in Durham Central Park (501 Foster St) on August 3, 3–9pm. Enjoy live music, art and crafts displays, and games. Free admission; proceeds from the sale of food and beverages (and all donations) will go toward CNOTE’s educational programming for middle and high school students in Durham. CNOTE is also starting an endowment for college-bound Durham students. Call 919-599-1136 or visit cnotestyle.org for more info.

Í People’s Durham will throw a fundraising ben

Í

efit concert and afterparty on August 2, 9pm, at

Durham Parks and Recreation’s Rock the Park concert will feature the Sahara Reggae Band on August 3, 6–8pm, in Rock Quarry Park (701

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Stadium Dr). It’s free; call 919-560-4355 for more info.

Í The Streets at Southpoint’s Music on Main con

challenging as the jam progresses. It’s free; all levels are welcome. Call 919-286-3801 or check highstrungdurham.com for more info. (Please note that High Strung has moved to 1805 W Markham.)

cert series will feature pop, rock, and blues by Lauren Light on August 3, 6–8:45pm, in the outdoor Cinema Circle at 6910 Fayetteville Rd. It’s free; call 919-730-8033 for more info.

Í The Stadium 10 Kids Summer Movie Series will

Í

Piedmont Laureate John Claude Bemis will share his love of storytelling, music, and folklore at the North Regional Library (221 Milton Rd) on August 3, 6:30–7:30pm. Call 919-560-0203 or visit durhamcountylibrary.org for more info.

feature Megamind at Northgate Mall (1058 W Club Blvd) Tuesday–Thursday, August 6–8, 9:30am. It’s free; Northgate’s “movie survival package“ (popcorn, drink, and candy) is $5. Visit northgatemall.com/movies/kids-summer-movie series or call 919-286-1001 for more info. Now you can get fresh fruits and vegetables in the employees’ parking lot of Duke Regional Hospital (3643 N Roxboro Rd) on Friday, August 6, 3–7pm. If you have a DukeCard, scan it for recipes and Farmers Market schedule. Check hr.duke.edu/benefits/wellness/farmers/ for more info.

Í

Í

Singer-songwriter David Russell will give a free concert at the Sacred Grounds Coffeehouse (2700 N Roxboro Rd) Christian-music venue on August 3, 7:30pm. Donations will be accepted; call 919-220-2458 or visit sacredgroundscoffee house.org for more info.

Í High Strung Musical Instruments sponsors the

Í This year marks the 30th anniversary of National

Ukelele Jam, which has expanded to a bigger venue, St Paul United Methodist Church (2700 N Roxboro St), on Monday, August 5, 7–8:30pm. The first half-hour will be spent going over basic chords and strums, and the music will get more challenging as the jam progresses. It’s free; all levels are welcome. Call 919-286-3801 or check highstrungdurham.com for more info. (Please note that High Strung has moved to 1805 W Markham.)

Night Out, where neighbors get together the evening of Tuesday, August 6 and celebrate “America’s night out against crime.” This year’s official kickoff site (sponsored by the Durham Community Development Department) will be the Southside Community Center (Enterprise and South Sts) from 4:30 to 6:30pm. City and Durham Police Department officials will greet the crowd and the builders of 48 new single-family homes in the area will introduce themselves. A few of the bigger National Night Out events will be held at McDougald Terrace (1101 Law son St) from 4 to 7pm. Sponsored by the North Carolina Central University Police Department, this neighborhood NNO will have music, food, games, Greek organizations from NCCU, the Tooth Truck, and representatives from the Board of Elections, the Women’s Center, and McGruff (the Crime-Fighting Dog). The Woodcroft Com munity Association will have its NNO activities at

AUGUST 5 – 11

Í High Strung Musical Instruments sponsors the

Ukelele Jam, which has expanded to a bigger venue, St Paul United Methodist Church (2700 N Roxboro St), on Monday, August 5, 7–8:30pm. The first half-hour will be spent going over basic chords and strums, and the music will get more

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the Swim & Tennis Club (1203 W Woodcroft Pkwy) from 6 to 8pm. They’ll have a pool party, picnic, a DJ, kids’ activities, and games. Edgemont Park’s NNO event will be held at 203 S Elm St (off Angier and between Fayetteville and N Alston). They’ll have DJ Piddipat, food, line dancing, games, and fun. Go to durhampolice.com, scroll down, and click on List of 2013 National Night Out Events under “Latest Special Events and Feature” to see all of the NNO events. the Bryan Research and Nanaline H Duke build ings off Research Dr. If you have a DukeCard, scan it for recipes and Farmers Market schedule. Check hr.duke.edu/benefits/wellness/ farmers/ for more info.

Í UniPoint Post Acute Care–Carolina Point will put

Í Local writers and poets, including Tanya Olson,

Justin Boening, Ross White, and Meaghan Mulholland, will read from their works as part of the Omission East Coast Literary Tour on August 6, 7pm, at the Regulator Bookshop (720 Ninth St). Call 919-286-2700 or visit regulatorbookshop. com for more info.

on a Back-to-School Event on August 9, 1–5pm, at 5935 Mt Sinai Rd. They’ll have music, face paint ing, refreshments—and for every kid between ages 5 and 13—a bag with school supplies. It’s free; call 919-402-2450 for more info.

Í Move and glide to the music as the WD Hill

Í Downtown Durham Inc’s concert series will fea

ture Khalat Africa with Diali Cissokho on Thursday, August 8, 7pm, at CCB Plaza (Parrish and Corcoran Sts). It’s free; call 919-682-2800 for more info.

Recreation Center (1308 Fayetteville St) presents Family Roller Skating under the new lights on the outdoor rink just beyond the lower parking lot on Friday, August 9, 6–8pm. DJ Piddipat will play a wide range of fun music. Admission fee for kids up to age 17 is $2, free with Play More card, and adults pay $3, also free with Play More card. Take your own skates; if you don’t have any, you can borrow a pair at no extra cost. Call 919560-4292 for more info.

Í Attend the Garden Design Charrette Party at Í The Brightleaf Square Concert Series will feature
the SEEDS community garden (706 Gilbert St) on August 8, 6–8pm. As you might know, the SEEDS building is being completely gutted and reno vated (they’re working out of the John O’Daniel Exchange building at 801 Gilbert St). After every one enjoys a snack, SEEDS staff would like to know what changes you’d like to see in their community garden (for example, benches, memorial gar dens, work spaces, etc). Register for this free event at https://secure.commonground.convio.com/ seeds/seedsgardendesignparty/ or call 919-683 1197.

swingin’ 1940s–60s tunes by Straight Up on August 9, 7–9pm, at Gregson and Main Sts. It’s free; call 919-682-9229 for more info.

Í The next District 3 PAC (Partners Against Crime)
meeting will be held on Saturday, August 10, 10am, at Lyon Park (1309 Halley St). Find out what’s going on in your neighborhood and learn about City/County services.

Í The

Í

The Duke U community has access to fresh fruits and vegetables at the Duke Farmers Mar ket on Friday, August 9, 11am–2pm, between

next District 4 PAC (Partners Against Crime) meeting will be held at IR Holmes Sr Recreation Center at Campus Hills (2000 S Alston Ave) on August 10, 10am. Find out what’s going on in your neighborhood and learn about City/ County services.

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Í Learn
some local history while taking the Durham Tobacco Heritage Walking Tour given by Preservation Durham on August 10. The 45 minute tour will start at the Durham Farmers Market in Durham Central Park (501 Foster St) at 10am. It’s free; call 919-682-3036 or check preservationdurham.org for more info. at Northgate Mall (1058 W Club Blvd) Tuesday– Thursday, August 13–15, 9:30am. It’s free; Northgate’s “movie survival package“ (popcorn, drink, and candy) is $5. Visit northgatemall.com/ movies/kids-summer-movie-series or call 919-286 1001 for more info. next District 5 PAC (Partners Against Crime) will be held at City Hall (2nd-floor Council Committee Room) on Tuesday, August 13, 5:30pm. Find out what’s going on in your neighborhood and learn about City/County services.

Í The Streets at Southpoint’s Music on Main con

Í The

cert series will feature blues and Southern rock by the Harvey Arnold Dalton Band on August 10, 6–8:45pm, in the outdoor Cinema Circle at 6910 Fayetteville Rd. It’s free; call 919-730-8033 for more info.

Í American Tobacco’s new Midweek Music Series
starts off with beach-music band the Embers on Wednesday, August 14, 6–8:30pm, at 318 Black well St. It’s free; you can take a picnic, but no glass or alcohol. Visit americantobaccohistoricdistrict. com for more info.

Í

Singer-songwriter Danny Smith will present a free concert at the Sacred Grounds Coffee house (2700 N Roxboro Rd) Christian-music venue on August 10, 7:30pm. Donations will be accepted; call 919-220-2458 or visit sacred groundscoffeehouse.org for more info.

Í Flit from venue to venue downtown during Third

AUGUST 12 – 18

Í The

next District 2 PAC (Partners Against Crime) meeting will be held at the Durham Public Schools’ Resource Center (2107 Hillandale Rd) on Monday, August 12, 6pm. Find out what’s going on in your neighborhood and learn about City/County services. Visit pac2durham.org for more info.

Friday on August 16, 6–9pm (depending on the venue). Enjoy art displays, live and recorded music, and snacks; participating spaces include the Durham Arts Council/Durham Art Guild, Bull City Arts Collaborative, Through This Lens, The Scrap Exchange, Durham Arts Place, Exotique, Claymakers, The Carrack Gallery, Golden Belt, and others. Check thirdfridaydurham.com for more info. It’s also opening night (6–9pm) for the Signed, Sealed, Delivered exhibit at The Scrap Exchange (923 Franklin St, Bays 1 and 2) Green Gallery.

Í Meet author Melody Moezzi at the Regular

Bookshop (720 Ninth St) on August 12, 7pm, as she reads from her latest book, “Haldol and Hyacinths.” Call 919-286-2700 or visit regulator bookshop.com for more info.

Í Move and glide to the music as the WD Hill

Í The Stadium 10 Kids Summer Movie Series will
feature Alvin and The Chipmunks: The Squeakquel

Recreation Center (1308 Fayetteville St) presents Family Roller Skating under the new lights on the outdoor rink just beyond the lower parking lot on August 16, 6–8pm. DJ Piddipat will play a wide range of fun music. Admission fee for kids up to age 17 is $2, free with Play More

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card, and adults pay $3, also free with Play More card. Take your own skates; if you don’t have any, you can borrow a pair at no extra cost. Call 919560-4292 for more info. Please note: Aug 16 is Old School R&B night!

Í The Streets at Southpoint’s Music on Main con

cert series will feature the jazzy stylings of Sidecar Social Club on August 17, 6–8:45pm, in the outdoor Cinema Circle at 6910 Fayetteville Rd. It’s free; call 919-730-8033 for more info.

Í The Brightleaf Square Concert Series will feature Í jazzy a capella tunes by Thelonious on August
16, 7–9pm, at Gregson and Main Sts. It’s free; call 919-682-9229 for more info.

Í The Hayti Heritage Center (Fayetteville and Lake wood Sts) invites everyone to check out The Mar ket, a new venture with vendors selling jewelry, clothing, art, books, metal work, books, and snacks/coffee, on Saturday, August 17, 8am–1pm. Call 919-683-1709 or visit hayti.org for more info.

The Bethesda Bluegrass Band will give a free concert at the Sacred Grounds Coffeehouse (2700 N Roxboro Rd) Christian-music venue on August 17, 7:30pm. Donations will be accepted; call 919-220-2458 or visit sacredgroundscoffee house.org for more info.

Í Eyes On U Entertainment presents an Old School

Í

The next District 1 PAC (Partners Against Crime) meeting will be held at the Holton Career & Resource Center (410 N Driver St) on Saturday, August 17, 9:30am. Find out what’s going on in your neighborhood and learn about City/County services.

Jam at the Hayti Heritage Center (Fayetteville and Lakewood Sts) on August 17, 9am–1pm. Dress like it’s the 1970s and ‘80s. Admission is $10 at the door; call 919-683-1709 or 919-490-5516 or visit hayti.org for more info.

Í Join a Community Dialogue about the 1963

Í Learn who participated in the Civil Rights Move ment in Durham and how the movement affected citizens both black and white by going on the Civil Rights Legacy Walking Tour given by Preservation Durham on August 17. The 45 minute tour will start at the Durham Farmers Market in Durham Central Park (501 Foster St) at 10am. It’s free; call 919-682-3036 or check preservationdurham.org for more info.

March on Washington for Jobs & Freedom: 50 Years of Change on Sunday, August 18, 3–5pm at the Main Library (300 W Roxboro St). In 1963, 250,000 people gathered near the Lincoln Memorial for the March on Washington, where they demanded racial and economic justice. Give your opinion on what has been accomplished in the 50 years and what remains to be addressed. (This Community Dialogie is the 2013 Bayard Rustin Commemoration Project of the National Black Justice Coalition, in partnership with the Durham County Library.)

Í

AUGUST 19 – 25

Durham Parks and Recreation’s Family Movie will be the animated film Ice Age: Continen tal Drift, which will be shown on August 17, 8– 10pm, in Durham Central Park (502 Foster St). It’s free; call 919-560-4355 for more info.

Í High Strung Musical Instruments sponsors the

Ukelele Jam, which has expanded to a bigger venue, St Paul United Methodist Church (2700 N Roxboro St), on Monday, August 19, 7–8:30pm. The first half-hour will be spent going over basic

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chords and strums, and the music will get more challenging as the jam progresses. It’s free; all levels are welcome. Call 919-286-3801 or check highstrungdurham.com for more info. (Please note that High Strung has moved to 1805 W Markham.)

Í

Tour given by Preservation Durham on Saturday, August 24. The 45-minute tour will start at the Durham Farmers Market in Durham Central Park (501 Foster St) at 10am. It’s free; call 919-682-3036 or check preservationdurham.org for more info.

Now you can get fresh fruits and vegetables in the employees’ parking lot of Duke Regional Hospital (3643 N Roxboro Rd) on Friday, August 20, 3–7pm. If you have a DukeCard, scan it for recipes and Farmers Market schedule. Check hr.duke.edu/benefits/wellness/farmers/ for more info.

Í The Streets at Southpoint’s Music on Main con

cert series will feature soul, rock, and beach music by the Mark Roberts Band on August 24, 6–8:45pm, in the outdoor Cinema Circle at 6910 Fayetteville Rd. It’s free; call 919-730-8033 for more info.

Í

The Duke U community has access to fresh fruits and vegetables at the Duke Farmers Mar ket on Friday, August 23, 11am–2pm, between the Bryan Research and Nanaline H Duke build ings off Research Dr. If you have a DukeCard, scan it for recipes and Farmers Market schedule. Check hr.duke.edu/benefits/wellness/ farmers/ for more info.

Í

Singer Charlie McNeill will give a free concert at the Sacred Grounds Coffeehouse (2700 N Roxboro Rd) Christian-music venue on August 24, 7:30pm. Donations will be accepted; call 919-220-2458 or visit sacredgroundscoffeehouse. org for more info.

Í

Í Move and glide to the music as the WD Hill

Recreation Center (1308 Fayetteville St) presents Family Roller Skating under the new lights on the outdoor rink just beyond the lower parking lot on August 23, 6–8pm. DJ Piddipat will play a wide range of fun music. Admission fee for kids up to age 17 is $2, free with Play More card, and adults pay $3, also free with Play More card. Take your own skates; if you don’t have any, you can borrow a pair at no extra cost. Call 919560-4292 for more info.

A Workshop for Percussionists will be held in North Carolina Central University’s BN Duke Auditorium (Fayetteville and Lawson Sts) on Sun day, August 25, 2pm. A Percussion Auction will be held at 5pm, followed by the NCCU Jazz Per cussion Faculty and Alumni Concert at 6pm. Free admission to all events. Send email to tetaylor@nccu.edu for more info.

AUGUST 26 – SEPTEMBER 6

Í

Í The Brightleaf Square Concert Series will feature Í Enjoy the sights and stories while going on the

classic and current rock hits by Crush on August 23, 7–9pm, at Gregson and Main Sts. It’s free; call 919-682-9229 for more info.

Durham Architecture and Landscape Walking

Free Homebuyer Classes are offered to first-time prospective homeowners by Reinvestment Partners at Northgate Mall (1058 W Club Blvd, outside entrance #4, Suite 856). They’re usually held on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays; you must attend all three days in order to get the 8hour certificate. Learn about credit, budgeting, how to apply for a mortgage, home inspections, closings/settlements, and how to work with a lender and the prequalification process. The

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next classes will be offered Monday, August 26– Wednesday, August 28, 10am–12:40pm. Register by contacting Mayra at: mayra@reinvestment partners.org or 919-667-1000 x41. music from around the world. Don’t forget your lawn chairs and/or blankets. Visit durham centralpark.org for more info.

Í American Tobacco’s new Midweek Music Series

Í American Tobacco’s new Midweek Music Series

starts off with ‘80s party band The Breakfast Club on Wednesday, August 28, 6–8:30pm, at 318 Blackwell St. It’s free; you can take a picnic, but no glass or alcohol. Visit americantobaccohistoric district.com for more info.

starts off with Beatles-tribute band Abbey Road Live! on Wednesday, September 4, 6–8:30pm, at 318 Blackwell St. It’s free; you can take a picnic, but no glass or alcohol. Visit american tobaccohistoricdistrict.com for more info.

Í Move and glide to the music as the WD Hill

Recreation Center (1308 Fayetteville St) presents Family Roller Skating under the new lights on the outdoor rink just beyond the lower parking lot on August 30, 6–8pm. DJ Piddipat will play a wide range of fun music. Admission fee for kids up to age 17 is $2, free with Play More card, and adults pay $3, also free with Play More card. Take your own skates; if you don’t have any, you can borrow a pair at no extra cost. Call 919560-4292 for more info.

Í Move and glide to the music as the WD Hill

Recreation Center (1308 Fayetteville St) presents Family Roller Skating under the new lights on the outdoor rink just beyond the lower parking lot on September 6, 6–8pm. DJ Piddipat will play a wide range of fun music. Admission fee for kids up to age 17 is $2, free with Play More card, and adults pay $3, also free with Play More card. Take your own skates; if you don’t have any, you can borrow a pair at no extra cost. Call 919560-4292 for more info.

Í The Brightleaf Square Concert Series will feature

Í

jazzy rock and indie pop by the Will McBride Group on August 30, 7–9pm, at Gregson and Main Sts. It’s free; call 919-682-9229 for more info.

The Brightleaf Square Concert Series will feature dance, party, and beach music by Johnny White & the Elite Band on September 6, 7–9pm, at Gregson and Main Sts. It’s free; call 919-6829229 for more info.

Í The Streets at Southpoint’s Music on Main con

Í

cert series will feature soul, rock, and beach music by Big Time Party on August 31, 6– 8:45pm, in the outdoor Cinema Circle at 6910 Fayetteville Rd. It’s free; call 919-730-8033 for more info.

Í

Durham Central Park’s next Food Truck Rodeo will be held at the park (501 Foster St) on Sunday, September 1, 12:30–4:30pm. More than 30 food truck vendors will be there with a wide range of delicious treats, and DJ Piddipat will play fun

The St Joseph’s Historic Foundation presents the Bull Durham Blues Festival on September 6, 6–11pm, at the Hayti Heritage Center (Fayetteville and Lakewood Sts). Performers will include Big Daddy Wilson, Claudette King, Jimmy Haggard, Rhonda Robichaux, and Jason Damico and the New Blue. Tickets are $25. Call 919-683-1709 or visit hayti.org for more info and go to etix.com for tickets.

34  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

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THE GREAT OUTDOORS

Í Eno River State Park, 6101 Cole Mill Rd,

Í Jordan Lake State Recreation Area,
280 State Park Rd, Apex, 919-362-0586, ncparks.gov/Visit/main.php; email address: jordan.lake@ncdenr.gov: • Astronomy Viewing Session—Saturday, August 10, 8:30–10:30pm; take a celestial tour of the constellations at Ebenezer Beach with a More- head Planetarium educator. It’s free. If the weather is “iffy,” call 919-962-1236 to see if the viewing session is still on.

919-383-1686, ncparks.gov/Visit/main.php; email address: eno.river@ncmail.net

• Beginning Fishing—Saturdays, August 10, 17, 24, and 31, 10am; kids ages 5 to 15 can learn how to fish; gear will be provided, but take a small can of corn (with a pop top) for bait. It’s free; call to register. • Dragonflies at Occoneechee Mountain— Saturdays, August 10 and 24, 1pm; dragonflies seem to be almost magical on the mountain. It’s free; call to register. • Fishing with the Naturalist—Sundays, August 11, 18, and 25, 8:30am; guided fishing sessions with the Naturalist; fishing gear will be provided, but take your own bait. Children under age 16 must be accompanied by an adult, and partici- pants age 16+ must have a fishing license. It’s free; call to register. • Let’s Build a Boat—Friday, August 16, 10am; kids will build boats out of recycled materials and will then see if they float on the river. It’s free; call to register. • River Explorers—Saturday, August 17, 2pm; kids ages 5–12 will wade in the river with nets search for fish, bugs, crayfish, and snakes. It’s free; call to register. • Geology Hike at Occoneechee Mountain— Saturday, August 24, 10am; go on an informative hike led by a geologist. It’s free; call to register. • Occoneechee Mountain Sunset Hike—Friday, August 30, 7pm; a ranger will lead a group to view the sunset at the Overlook on the Moun- tain. It’s free; call to register. • Power Hike (age 14+)—Saturday, August 31, 8am; a naturalist will lead a vigorous, physi- cally challenging 4-mile hike. It’s free; call to register.

Í Sarah P Duke Gardens, 426 Anderson St,

919-684-3698, hr.duke.edu/dukegardens; garden- ing workshops are held in the Doris Duke Center; call 919-668-1707 or 1708 to reserve your spot:

• Terraces and Perennial Gardens: Color and Plant Combinations—Thursday, September 5, 9–11am; learn how to combine perennials, seasonal plantings, foliage and tropical plants in your garden; $7, $5 for Friends. • Walk on the Wild Side—September 5, 11am– noon; take a tour of the BlomquistGarden of Native Plants; $7, $5 for Friends. • Discovery Day—Saturday, September 7, 10am– noon; demonstrations, stories, experiments and hands-on projects for families visiting the Char- lotte Brody Discovery Garden; free. • Charlotte Brody Discovery Garden Family Workshops—September 7, 1–2:30pm; learn how to plan, plant, harvest, and maintain an edible garden; $10 per parent/child, $3 per additional sibling.

Í William B Umstead State Park, 8801 Glenwood
Avenue, Raleigh, 919-571-4170, ncparks.gov/Visit/main.php; email address: william.umstead@ncparks.gov: • Snakes of North Carolina—Saturday, August 10, 2pm; learn all about local native snakes. Meet

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• • • • at the Visitors Center. It’s free; call to register. Dragonflies for Beginners—Monday, August 19, 11am; join a short hike to a storm water runoff basin to see dragonflies in their native habitat. It’s free; call to register. Big Lake Boat-A-Bout —Tuesday, August 20, 7:30pm; join a 90 minute twilight canoe tour and watch wildlife at sunset; canoes, paddles and life jackets are provided, but take bug spray. It’s free; call to register. Run with a Ranger—Thursday, August 22, 8:30am; go on a 5-mile run on the park’s trails and gravel roads. It’s free; call to register. Animals of Umstead—Sunday, August 25, 3pm; learn about the various animals that live in the park. It’s free; call to register.

Í A free Mind-Body Approaches to Coping with

Cancer workshop will be given on Thursday, August 1, 3–4:30pm, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, room 0N01). Family members are welcome; call 919-684-4497 for more info. (Additional workshops will be given on August 15 and September 5.)

Í The next Friday morning Chemotherapy Educa-

Í The Morehead Planetarium sponsors free Sky • Jordan Lake’s Ebenezer Church Recreation Area (Ebenezer Rd, Apex)—Saturday, August 10, 8:30–10:30pm; take a celestial tour of the constellations at Ebenezer Beach with a More- head Planetarium educator. It’s free. If the weather is “iffy,” call 919-962-1236 to see if the viewing session is still on.

tion Class will be held on August 2, 9–10am, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, room 0N01). Get your questions answered about treatment and side effects. Family mem bers are welcome; call 919-681-0691 or 919 613-6275 for more info. (Additional classes will be held on August 9, 16, 23, 30, and September 6.)

watcher Sessions (you can call 919-962-1236 for directions and day-of if weather conditions cause you to wonder if the session will be can celled):

Í The next Leukemia, Lymphoma, Multiple Mye-

loma Support Group Meeting will be held on Monday, August 5, 11am–12:30pm, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, room 0N01). Family members are welcome; call 919 684-4497 or send email to cancersupport@ duke.edu for more info. (Additional meetings will be held on August 19 and September 2.)

Í The

HEALTH

Í Free, confidential HIV tests are administered at

the Lincoln Community Health Center (1301 Fay etteville St) on Mondays, 5–7:30pm, in the Spe cialty Clinic. They use OraQuick, an oral mouth swab, and results are available in 30 minutes. No appointment is necessary; send email to durham HIV@gmail.com for more info.

next Monday afternoon Chemotherapy Education Class will be held on August 5, 1–2pm, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, room 0N01). Get your questions answered about treatment and side effects. Family mem bers are welcome; call 919-681-0691 or 919-613 6275 for more info. (Additional classes will be held on August 12, 19, 26, and September 2.)

Í The next Look Good, Feel Better session for

female cancer survivors will be held on Monday, August 5, 5:30–7:30pm, in Duke Regional Hospital’s North Conference Room (3643 N Roxboro Rd). Get a free cosmetics kit and learn coping and beauty techniques as a way to

36  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

LET’S GO!
enhance your appearance while being treated for cancer. It’s free; call 919-470-7168 to register. caregivers are welcome; call 919 403-4374 for more info.

Í The next Gastrointestinal and Pancreatic Can

Í The

cer Support Group Meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 6, 2–3:30pm, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, room 0N01). Family members are welcome; call 919-684-4497 or send email to cancersupport@duke.edu for more info. (Additional meetings will be held on August 20 and September 3.)

next Genitourinary Cancers Support Group Meeting will be held on Monday, August 12, 2–3:30pm, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, room 0N01). Family members are welcome; call 919-684-4497 or send email to cancersupport@duke.edu for more info.

Í The next Speech and Communication Group

Í The next Cancer and Diabetes Support Group

meeting will be held on Wednesday, August 7, 11am–noon, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, 0 level conference room). Call 919-684-6124 for more info. (Additional meet ings will be held on August 14, 21, 28, and September 4.)

for Parkinson’s Disease meeting will be held on Monday, August 12, 3–4pm, at the Teer House (4019 N Roxboro Rd). Learn speech strategies and practice communication skills. Caregivers are encouraged to attend. It’s free; call 919-416-DUKE to register.

Í Lots of folks join the Heart & Sole Mall Walkers

Í The next Wednesday afternoon Chemotherapy
Education Class will be held on August 7, 1–2pm, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, room 0N01). Get your questions answered about treatment and side effects. Family mem bers are welcome; call 919-681-0691 or 919-613 6275 for more info. (Additional classes will be held on August 14, 21, 28, and September 4.)

Club and walk at their leisure in Northgate Mall (1058 W Club Blvd) anytime between 7am and 9pm Monday through Saturday and between 9am and 6pm on Sundays. Stop by the Food Gallery at 8:30am on Tuesday, August 13 for the free monthly breakfast and free CPR training session before starting your morning walk. Call 919-286-4400 for more info.

Í The

next Cancer Caregiver Support Group Meeting will be held on Wednesday, August 7, 4–5:30pm, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, room 0N01). Call 919-6844497 or send email to cancersupport@duke.edu for more info. (Additional meetings will be held on August 21 and September 4.)

Í The next Guided Relaxation Session will be held

on Wednesday, August 14, 12:30–1pm, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, Quiet Room on the 0 Level). Learn how to reduce stress levels and gain serenity. Call 919-681-2928 or send email to Kristy.Everette@Duke.edu for more info. (Another session will be held on August 28.)

Í The next Stroke Support Group meeting will Í The
be held on Monday, August 12, 1–2:30pm, in Duke Regional Hospital’s Private Dining Room C (3643 N Roxboro Rd). Family members and

next Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Support Group Meeting will be held on Wednesday, August 14, 3–4:30pm, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, room

  August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 37

LET’S GO!
0N01). Family members are welcome; call 919 684-4497 or send email to cancersupport@ duke.edu for more info. (Another meeting will be held on August 28.)

Í Start your walking routine by joining Heels in

Í The topic of the next DukeWell Series seminar

will be Take Control: Sugar-Busting Tips for Diabetics and Pre-diabetics on Thursday, August 15, 5:30–7pm, at Duke Integrative Medicine on the Duke Center for Living Campus (3475 Erwin Rd). Learn how buy the healthiest food you can afford and how to store and prepare it. It’s free; call 888-ASK-DUKE for more info.

Motion, the mall-walkers at Streets at South point Mall (6910 Fayetteville Rd). The Streets at Southpoint opens for Heels in Motion members Monday–Saturday at 7am (and closes at 9pm) and Sunday at 10am (closes at 7pm). Stop in at the Food Court on Wednesday, August 28, 8am, for the free breakfast and health talk before starting your morning walk. Call 919-572-6450 for more info; sign up at any time at the Welcome Center on the ground floor. They keep a notebook on the desk where you can keep track of your mileage every day.

The next Daughters Concerned for Aging Í The next Mood Disorders Support and Educa- Í Relatives Support Group meeting will be held tion Group Meeting will be held on Thursday, August 22, 6–7pm, at Duke Faculty Practice (2200 W Main St), 3rd floor conference room, suite 340. Organized by the Duke Department of Psychiatry Call 919-286-5261 or send email to jones106@ mc.duke.edu for more info. on Wednesday, August 28, noon–1pm, in the Duke Clinic Bldg (formerly Duke Hospital South (in Room 3512 in the Blue Zone, 3rd floor). You can park in Parking Deck I on Trent Dr; call Bobbi G Matchar at 919-660-7510 for more info.

The next Durham Evening Alzheimer’s Family Í The next Prostate Cancer Support Group Meet- Í Support Group meeting will be held on ing will be held on Monday, August 26, 4–6pm, in the Duke Cancer Center (20 Duke Medicine Circle, room 0N01). Family members are welcome; call 919-684-4497 or send email to cancersupport @duke.edu for more info.

Thursday, August 29, 6:30pm, in the Duke Clinic Bldg (Medical Center Board Room, 1170B Yellow Zone, 1st floor). You can park in Parking Deck I on Trent Dr; call Bobbi G Matchar or Cornelia Poer at 919-660-7510 for more info.

Í The next Cary and Ruth Henderson Patient/ Í A seminar, Parkinson’s Disease 101: An Intro Caregiver Support Group meeting will be held
on Tuesday, August 27, 10:30am–noon, at Grey Stone Baptist Church (2601 Hillsborough Rd). Contact Lisa Gwyther at 660-7510 or lpg@geri. duke.edu for more info.

Í The topic of the next Healthy Eyes Seminar
Series seminar will be Double Vision on Tuesday, August 27, 10–11am, at the Duke Eye Center (2351 Erwin Rd). It’s free; call 888-ASK-DUKE for more info.

duction, will be held on Friday, September 6, 1– 4pm, at the Teer House (4019 N Roxboro Rd). This seminar is for newly diagnosed individuals and their loved-ones (one per patient). Get an overview, an explanation about the benefits of physical therapy, and tips on how to cope. It’s free; call 919-684-5128 to register.

38  The Durham Skywriter — August 2013

LET’S GO!
MUSEUMS • GALLERIES • STATE HISTORIC SITES • EXHIBITS
Gallery hours: Monday–Thursday 9am–7pm, Fridays 9am–5pm, Saturdays 11am–4pm, and Sundays 1–5pm; free admission:

Í Bennett Place, 4409 Bennett Memorial Rd,

Hidden in Plain Sight: Architectural Reminders of Durham’s Vital Past, a new exhibit of photographs 919-383-4345, nchistoricsites.org/bennett by Jack Anderson, can be viewed on the Porch Hours: Tuesday–Saturday 9am–5pm; free Gallery. The haunting, black-and-white photos admission: show long-forgotten houses, churches, and other buildings as they look at night. Hidden in Plain Enjoy Tales of the Tar Heel State as told by local Sight will be on display through August 31. authors and storytellers on Saturday, August 10, 10am–4pm. Hear all sorts of entertaining stories, purchase books, and have them autoDuke Homestead, 2828 Duke Homestead Rd, graphed. It’s free; donations will be grate 919-477-5498, nchistoricsites.org/duke fully accepted. [This is a Second Saturday event.] Hours: Tuesday–Saturday 9am–5pm; free admission: The Carrack Modern Art, 111 W Parrish St, The Summer Children’s Festival will be held on thecarrack.org Saturday, August 10, 10am–4pm. Enjoy music, Hours: Tuesday–Friday noon–6pm, Saturdays dancing, historical arts & crafts, games, and fun. 2–5pm; free admission: It’s free; donations will be gratefully accepted. [This is a Second Saturday event.] Jaclyn Bowie, Eric Waters, Nora Weatherby, Jon O’Neill, Jenny Morgan, Chris Vitiello, Amanda Dahil-Moore, Jonathan Lee, Jacki Huntington, Historic Stagville, 5828 Old Oxford Hwy, and Allison Swaim created an exhibit, Hold 919-620-8154, stagville.org Capacity // Trade Route Stories, Reimagined, Gallery hours: Tuesday–Saturday 10am–4pm; free from real-life stories and information gleaned admission: from sailors from around the world. Hold Capacity Learn all about fainting couches, killer corsets, is on display through Sunday, August 11. and other popular misconceptions at Ameri Durham Cinematheque’s Tom Whiteside pre can History Myths Debunked on Saturday, sents Durham Then and Now: See Yourself in the August 10, 9am–1pm. The special event fee is Image Machine, a revisiting and reworking of three $15 (free for students), and lunch is included. For $25, local vintage films—Tobacco Land USA, Movies of you get an autographed copy of Mary Theobald’s Local People, and Negro Durham Marches On. “Death by Petticoat”; she’ll be leading the tour. Whiteside also did some “re-photography,” where Stagville used to be North Carolina ’s largest planta he took 2013 photos from the same vantage point tion. [This is a Second Saturday event.] of scenes of the original 1930s and ‘40s-era films. Durham Then and Now will be on display August Through This Lens, 303 E Chapel Hill St, 12–25. 919-687-0250, http://throughthislens.com Hours: Tuesday–Friday 10:30am–5:30pm, Center for Documentary Studies, 1317 W Saturdays 10:30am–4pm; free admission: Pettigrew St, 919-660-3663, documentarystudies.duke.edu

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  August 2013 — The Durham Skywriter 39

LET’S GO!
Iron Rails Through Virginia, a new photographic exhibit by Jesse Andrews, takes the viewer on a trip via his old-school gelatin-silver black-and white pictures. Meet the artist during the open ing reception on Third Friday (August 16).

READ ALL ABOUT IT!
Durham/Triangle/Triad–area authors: Send us your latest book and information if you want to be featured in the Skywriter.

THEATER • FILM • DANCE • RADIO • TELEVISION

Phyllis Wiley / “Soul Grasping Poetry and More”
published by Trafford Publishing and available at amazon.com (paperback), and barnesandnoble.com (paperback)

Í

WNCU/90.7fm, North Carolina Central University; listen online at wncu.org: Be sure to listen to Radio Skywriter on Sundays, 6:30–7pm). Durham Skywriter publisher Pat Murray and guests talk about community issues and let you know what’s happening in the Bull City (and beyond). Don’t forget your pen and paper—we might have just the information you need! If you miss the broadcast, you can go to wncu.org the Tuesday following the air date for at least a week and listen to the podcast—or, type “Radio Skywriter” or “WNCU” in the search field of iTunes to listen to or download our three most recent shows.

Ms Wiley says it all on the back cover: “This poetry is all about learning how to love yourself and become your own best friend. No one should ever give up on life no matter what your situation may be. As we live this life we sometimes will have to face many disappointments and oppositions. Looking outside of yourself for fulfillment could prove to be dangerous and perhaps even fatal if we refuse to look inside of ourselves for the inner strength to pull us up to where the creator intended for one to be in order to fulfill our God-given purpose.”

NOW HEAR THIS!
Durham/Triangle/Triad–area artists: Send us your latest CD and information if you’d like to be featured in the Skywriter!

TV Skywriter, a livestreaming online interview/ variety show, will air right after Radio Skywriter on Sundays at 7pm. You can watch it by going to the Durham Skywriter channel on Youtube (go to www.youtube.com, type “durhamskywriter” on the search field, and click on the channel); or watch from the Durham Skywriter’s Google+ page (go to www.gplus.to/durhamskywriter).

Robin Carter / “Return to Paradise”
(available at amazon.com, cdbaby.com, and iTunes— all offer the CD and mp3 downloads)

Í

Send us information on your special events— these are free listings!

Chip Crawford was the musical director for this velvety collection of familiar tunes. The musical arrangements fully recognize the mature and soothing nature of Ms Carter’s voice and create a backdrop that flows nicely from R&B, to jazz, to Brazilian, and back. The songs on the CD are: Return to Paradise, With a Child’s Heart, It’s Gonna Take a Miracle, When Sunny Gets Blue, So You Say, Who Needs Forever, and This Is Your Life. The producer was Stick Reed for Bull Durham Dynasty Productions and the horn arrangements were by Jay Davidson.

The Durham Skywriter 1910 Capps Street Durham, North Carolina 27707 durhamskywriter@yahoo.com 919-809-YOU2 (9682)

Guest spotlight
What Will You Do
I’ve often heard my father say The most powerful words that still rings from his grave It takes me six months to mind my own business And six months to leave yours alone And by the time these months roll around my time is gone Just when I arise to possibly start to meddling The time starts all over again So unless you are going to be a help to someone There is not much time to meddle or become Busy taking care of other folks’ business For you will have to look at your time clock and get with it For too much time has passed and your own business is not fixed I thought about that as I began to grow up and become independent Minding your own business is some time well spent For if you don’t take care of your own matters Then who else will look after What’s important to you What will you do

— phyllis wylie
Send us your poems, cartoons, commentary, photos, artwork, etc if you’d like to be in our “Guest spotlight.” Keep it positive, and keep in mind that we can’t return what you send us (so don’t send your only copy).

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