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Operations Data Management

Job Functions Performed by the Shift Supervisor Not Directly Related to Oversight of Plant Operations and Status
1008253

Operations Data Management


Job Functions Performed by the Shift Supervisor Not Directly Related to Oversight of Plant Operations and Status 1008253 Technical Update, March 2006

EPRI Project Manager R. Chambers

ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304-1395 PO Box 10412, Palo Alto, California 94303-0813 USA 800.313.3774 650.855.2121 askepri@epri.com www.epri.com

DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES


THIS DOCUMENT WAS PREPARED BY THE ORGANIZATION(S) NAMED BELOW AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED OR COSPONSORED BY THE ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC. (EPRI). NEITHER EPRI, ANY MEMBER OF EPRI, ANY COSPONSOR, THE ORGANIZATION(S) BELOW, NOR ANY PERSON ACTING ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THEM: (A) MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION WHATSOEVER, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, (I) WITH RESPECT TO THE USE OF ANY INFORMATION, APPARATUS, METHOD, PROCESS, OR SIMILAR ITEM DISCLOSED IN THIS DOCUMENT, INCLUDING MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR (II) THAT SUCH USE DOES NOT INFRINGE ON OR INTERFERE WITH PRIVATELY OWNED RIGHTS, INCLUDING ANY PARTY'S INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, OR (III) THAT THIS DOCUMENT IS SUITABLE TO ANY PARTICULAR USER'S CIRCUMSTANCE; OR (B) ASSUMES RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY WHATSOEVER (INCLUDING ANY CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF EPRI OR ANY EPRI REPRESENTATIVE HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES) RESULTING FROM YOUR SELECTION OR USE OF THIS DOCUMENT OR ANY INFORMATION, APPARATUS, METHOD, PROCESS, OR SIMILAR ITEM DISCLOSED IN THIS DOCUMENT. ORGANIZATION(S) THAT PREPARED THIS DOCUMENT ARF, Inc. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

This is an EPRI Technical Update report. A Technical Update report is intended as an informal report of continuing research, a meeting, or a topical study. It is not a final EPRI technical report.

NOTE
For further information about EPRI, call the EPRI Customer Assistance Center at 800.313.3774 or e-mail askepri@epri.com. Electric Power Research Institute and EPRI are registered service marks of the Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. Copyright 2006 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved.

CITATIONS
This document was prepared by ARF 540 Rock View Dr Spring City, TN 37381 Principal Investigators R. Cole J. Thompson Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) 1300 W. WT Harris Blvd. Charlotte, NC 28221 Principal Investigator R. Chambers This document describes research sponsored by EPRI. This publication is a corporate document that should be cited in the literature in the following manner: Operations Data Management; Job Functions Performed By the Shift Supervisor Not Directly Related To Oversight of Plant Operations and Status. EPRI, Palo Alto, CA: 2006 1008253.

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ABSTRACT
Background The most important responsibility of the shift supervisor is the management of the operating staff on duty and the operation of the plant during his shift. He must be given enough time to maintain oversight of the people and whats going on in the plant. A balance must be maintained between reserving their time for monitoring plant operations and performing the other activities and assignments. When abnormal or emergency conditions occur, the shift supervisors response must be based on current knowledge of plant status. He must be ready to make immediate, informed decisions. During normal operations his involvement, experience, and guidance can improve efficiency and/or prevent an accidents. For these reasons he should not be overly involved in activities not directly plant operations related. The shift supervisor is senior managements representative on shift and is responsible for maintaining a broad perspective of all plant operations, and normally on weekends and at night they are the senior managers on site. Because they collectively work 24/7 they are often assigned tasks that are not directly or necessarily operations functions. This report focuses on these distracting duties and some methods used to better handle the information to free the supervisor from them. There are often assumptions that the shift supervisors responsibilities are limited to the day to day operation of the unit(s), however, this is far from the reality that exists in most control rooms were the shift supervisor is often the most senior member of plant management that will be available for decision making on a billion dollar corporate capital investment. Additional responsibilities are often added to his duties because it appears the shift supervisor is best suited to provide the input or duties. Objectives The objectives of this report is raise the awareness of this issue of non-operational duty assignment to the shift supervision, to provide a summary of time spent on non-plant operations activities by shift supervisors, and provide some tools that can be used to make these activities more efficient. As shown by the data there is a wide difference between plants in the nonoperations activities performed and in the amount of time spent performing these activities by the plants in the review. This will provide a good starting set of data for each plant to use to review their shift supervisors activities and compare their times to that of the reviewed plants. Approach Seven plants were visited to gather information for this report, and some follow-up phone calls were necessary to complete the data. A survey type list of potential activities was discussed with the participants, and they were given the opportunity to add to the list. Any additions to the list were factored back into the other interviews.

CONTENTS
1 INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE ..............................................................................................1-1 1.1 Purpose and Scope..................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Background ..............................................................................................................1-1 1.3 Use and Implementation of this Technical Update...................................................1-2 1.4 Definitions.................................................................................................................1-2 2 OBSERVATIONS AT STATIONS ..........................................................................................2-1 2.1 Clearance records ....................................................................................................2-1 2.2 Time sheets..............................................................................................................2-1 2.3 Inventories................................................................................................................2-1 2.4 Run times .................................................................................................................2-2 2.5 Procedures revisions................................................................................................2-2 2.6 Emissions .................................................................................................................2-2 2.7 Providing general information to non-shift persons (does not include management)2-2 2.8 Event investigations .................................................................................................2-2 2.9 Trading floor/dispatcher............................................................................................2-3 2.10 Security interfaces ..............................................................................................2-3 2.11 Contracts from outside plant ..............................................................................2-3 2.12 Fuel crew............................................................................................................2-3 2.13 Deliveries............................................................................................................2-3 2.14 Shift maintenance...............................................................................................2-4 2.15 Callouts ..............................................................................................................2-4 2.16 Training ..............................................................................................................2-4 2.17 Answering phone/E-mail ....................................................................................2-4 2.18 Visitors................................................................................................................2-4 2.19 Human Resources..............................................................................................2-4 2.20 Meetings .............................................................................................................2-5 2.21 Store Room ........................................................................................................2-5 3 TOOLS USED.........................................................................................................................3-1 3.1. PlantView by EPRI Solutions ........................................................................................3-1 3.1.1 PlantView Report Library....................................................................................3-1 3.1.2 PlantView Data Visualizer ..................................................................................3-1 3.1.3 PlantView Electronic Rounds .............................................................................3-1 3.1.4 PlantView Electronic Logbook............................................................................3-1 3.1.5 PlantView Corrective Action Planning (CAP) .....................................................3-2 3.1.6 PlantView Event Report .....................................................................................3-2 3.1.7 PlantView Self Assessment Tool........................................................................3-2 3.1.8 PlantView Alarm Response Database ...............................................................3-2

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3.1.9 PlantView Automated Training Manager (ATM).................................................3-2 3.2. iWare by CanWeb Internet Services Ltd. .................................................................3-2 3.2.1 Effective interface with maintenance..................................................................3-3 3.2.2 Finding and following procedure ........................................................................3-3 3.2.3 Procedural guidance ..........................................................................................3-3 3.2.4 High standards of conduct enforced by management........................................3-3 3.2.5 Supplemental operator knowledge to perform required functions......................3-3 3.2.6 Improved control of temporary conditions ..........................................................3-3 3.3. Eclipse by NiSoft ......................................................................................................3-4 3.4. AutoTour by Data Systems & Solutions ...................................................................3-4 3.5. Utility In-House Software..........................................................................................3-4 3.6. Status Boards...........................................................................................................3-4 A APPENDIX ............................................................................................................................ A-1

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LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 3-1 Good Example of Hardcopy data management .......................................................................3-5 Figure 3-2 Example of poor organized and inadequately posted data ......................................................3-5 Figure 3-3 Example of Manual Data Overload...........................................................................................3-6 Figure 3-4 Mixed Status Panel...................................................................................................................3-6 Figure 3-5 Congested Status Pane............................................................................................................3-7

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1
INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE
1.1 Purpose and Scope The purpose of the Operations Data Management Report is to provide a summary of activities managed by the shift supervisors that are not directly related to operating the plant. The report will provide a listing of some of the tools available to more efficiently manage some of these activities. 1.2 Background

There are often assumptions that the shift supervisors responsibilities are limited to the day to day operation of the unit(s), with such activities as: Shift manning, or staffing Oversight of the crews performance Ensuring the dispatchers orders are implemented Corrective actions to equipment issues that limit power maneuvering Initiating the crew actions to startup, change power, or shutdown the unit(s). Etc. However, this is far from the reality that exists in most control rooms were the shift supervisor is often the most senior member of plant management that will be available for decision making on a billion dollar corporate capital investment. Then additional responsibilities are often added to his duties because it appears the shift supervisor is best suited to provide the input or duties. A popular topic with the shift supervisors is activities that take them away from monitoring the operation of the plant. That was the case in the three plants that received operations assessments, in the dozen or so other plants visited recently, and with the approximately 25 plants represented at the two EPRI Operations Conferences. Anytime this subject or question comes up, immediately you can see that you have everyones attention. The shift supervisor is senior managements representative on shift and is responsible for maintaining a broad perspective of all plant operations, and normally on weekends and at night they are the senior managers on site. When abnormal or emergency conditions occur, the shift supervisors response must be based on current knowledge of plant status. He must be ready to make immediate, informed decisions, or during normal operations his involvement, experience, and guidance can improve efficiency and/or prevent an accident. For these reasons he should not be overly involved in activities not directly plant operations related. There are increasing pressures of doing more with fewer resources. Because the shift supervisors collectively work 24/7, they are often assigned tasks that are not directly or necessarily operations functions. A balance must be maintained between reserving their time for monitoring plant operations and performing the other activities and assignments.

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1.3

Use and Implementation of this Technical Update

This study can be used to help evaluate the time the shift supervisor is involved in non-plant operations activities. The table in Appendix A can be used to compare the shift supervisors activities with those of the seven plants observed. Individual activity times will vary between your plant and those in the table, but you should evaluate any activities where your times are well above the average. Short times or zeroes in the table can mean that the plant has a very efficient way to perform the task or that the task is performed by someone other than the shift supervisor. 1.4
None

Definitions

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OBSERVATIONS AT STATIONS
Seven plants were surveyed to obtain an estimate of the time the shift supervisor spent during a 12 hour shift performing job functions not directly related to the oversight of plant operations and status. The survey showed an average of five hours spent per shift not directly related to plant operations oversight. The job functions are described herein after with average time spent per shift. The range of time taken per function is also included in this assessment. A matrix of the various administrative duties from each plant reviewed is provided in Appendix A. 2.1 Clearance records

The daily operating plan includes scheduled maintenance work during the shift that generally requires clearances. Often, unplanned work is performed that also requires clearances during the shift. Issuing clearances, depending on the utilitys preference, is done by the unit operator, a designated clearance scheduler, or the shift supervisor. The computerized clearance systems typically take a lot less of the shift supervisors time. Some plants also have clearance audit requirements for the shift supervisor. Strong consideration should be given to assigning those duties to others. Ultimately, the shift supervisor is responsible. The average time per shift is 20 minutes. The range is 0 60 minutes per shift. 2.2 Time sheets

Time sheets are typically electronic. Time records are recorded by exception. The time to record the crews time averaged 20 minutes/shift. The exception is calling in additional crew and initiating time sheets to record the unscheduled crews activities. Depending on the number called in, this could add another 15-30 minutes that the shift supervisor does not have because of a start-up or emergency condition, or it reduces the time available to monitor and supervise the plant and personnel. The range was 10-60 minutes. Consider more responsibility for individuals and other administrative support personnel. 2.3 Inventories

Inventories such as process chemicals, fire protection tank levels, and fuel for emergency diesels should be kept above established minimum levels. The shift supervisor should be aware of any that are approaching the minimum. The time spent is 10 minutes. The range was 0-15 minutes. At one of the plants observed all the inventory information was added to a common report at midnight every day by the watch standers and required very little of the shift supervisors time.

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2.4

Run times

The unit operator at the end of the performance period totalizes the collected operations data and submits the numbers to the shift supervisor and other appropriate managers. This information is normally used more by other plant groups. The shift supervisors involvement averaged 30 minutes. The range was 0-120 minutes. Some plants have technicians monitor and track performance data. Consider reassigning this work to others. 2.5 Procedures revisions

Operating procedures are reviewed and revised by teams or by individuals. The drafts and the revised procedure are reviewed and approved by the shift supervisors. Depending on the procedure, the shift supervisor can spend 15 minutes reviewing the procedure. The range was 020 minutes. These reviews are generally done on weekends and the back shifts. It is important to have these reviews and revisions done by individuals with current plant operations knowledge, and if they must be done on shift by the shift supervisor ensure plant monitoring and supervisory time is not overly impacted. 2.6 Emissions

Environmental ascendances are documented in the operator logs. The log entry should include the persons notified, the times of notification, the elapsed time of the occurrence, the corrective actions taken by the operator, and the time when normal operation was restored. The notification reports and notifications are sometimes done by the shift supervisors for convenience. One plant was observed where the shift supervisor actually was required to do the monitoring. The shift supervisor should only need to review the log entries for completeness. Each ascendance can require up to 30 minutes, but the average spent was 12 minutes. 2.7 Providing general information to non-shift persons (does not include management) General information is provided to non-shift persons that are working during the shift in the shift crew meetings or during pre-job briefings, and this is where they should be supplying this information. Calls to the shift supervisor for general information by non-shift persons should be discouraged. At some plants the shift supervisor is the supplier of general information for the plant, every thing from lunch menus to basic insurance information. The average time spent was 48 minutes. The range was 0-200 minutes. 2.8 Event investigations

Events involving personal injury, environmental ascendances, equipment damage, loss of generation, and unit or plant shutdown are documented in the operator logs. Entries should provide sufficient information to reconstruct the event. The shift supervisor should review the log entries for completeness. Shift supervisors are often put on teams to investigate events and determine root cause. Ensure these assignments dont infringe on supervising and monitoring time. The average was 22 minutes. The range was 10-60 minutes.

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2.9

Trading floor/dispatcher

Shift supervisors and/or unit operators communicate with the trading floor and/or the dispatcher. The discussions communicate plant and unit status, planned de-ratings, or outage durations. The average time communicating was five minutes, and the range was 0-20 minutes. 2.10 Security interfaces

Plant portals are typically staffed by contracted security companies. The portals are either staffed 24/7 or 16/5 with the back shifts and weekend access controlled by a unit operator phone and cameras. Some plants lockdown the facility limiting access to only those with security coded badges. For some shift supervisors the involvement is limited to approving access to contractors, deliveries, and visitors in the absence of portal security. Other shift supervisors are the company management contacts for weekends and back shifts. The average time per event averaged seven minutes, and the range was 0-20 minutes. 2.11 Contracts from outside plant

Shift supervisors manage and supervise outside contractors on the back shifts and during weekend work. The contractor supervisor generally participates in the shift crew briefings and provides work status updates to the shift supervisor as the work progresses. The shift supervisors check contractor progress during their rounds. Many of these contractors show up at night and on weekends when the other plant contacts may not be available. The shift supervisors are called upon from outside the plant to supply general plant information to company non-company contacts. The average time spent was 16 minutes, and the range was 0-20 minutes. 2.12 Fuel crew

The fuel crew normally operates independently from the shift operations crew. Supervision is often separate, but one plant observed the fuel crew reported directly to the shift supervisor. The shift supervisor is still ultimately responsible for the crew during the shift. The railroad and/or barge line dispatchers typically communicate with the fuel crew supervisor, but there are situations on the back shift and during weekends that the shift supervisor gets involved as managements representative. In some cases the shift supervisor also gets involved in inventory. The average time spent was 22 minutes. The range was 0-30 minutes. 2.13 Deliveries

Process chemicals, materials, rental equipment and parts are normally scheduled and received by the stores personnel during the day shift. During the back shifts and weekends the shift supervisor is notified by security and approves access to the plant site, and in some cases has to receive the deliveries. Other operations and/or maintenance personnel normally receive the deliveries. The shift supervisor on occasion might walk down the chemical unloading process or fuel deliveries. The average time spent was 16 minutes per delivery, and the range was 0-20 minutes.

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2.14

Shift maintenance

Scheduled maintenance is performed by operations personnel and/or scheduled maintenance crews on the back shifts. The maintenance performed by operations requires more supervision by the shift supervisor. These crews participate in the shift crew meetings and oversight is maintained by the shift supervisor. Normally the shift supervisor makes at least one round during the shift to monitor work status and progress. The average time was 13 minutes, and the range was 0-40 minutes. 2.15 Callouts

Callouts are made to fill shift vacancies and/or to bring in maintenance crews to work unscheduled events. Some of the shift supervisors observed spend a lot of time every day to ensure the oncoming shift will be sufficiently manned. This is normally more of problem when the shifts are not fully staffed. The average time for callouts was 22 minutes. The range was 040 minutes. 2.16 Training

Shift supervisors are rarely involved in training activities on shift. This varies considerably depending on the experience of shift personnel. When there is training activities they normally take place at night and weekends. The average was six minutes, and the range was 0-40 minutes. 2.17 Answering phone/E-mail

The shift supervisor is normally the focal point for incoming calls to the control room during the shift. The shift supervisor also communicates to management and the crew via e-mail. The plant staff should be cautioned about unnecessarily calling the control room. The average time spent was 34 minutes, and the range was 20-60 minutes. 2.18 Visitors

Board members, politicians, apprentice groups, and contractors make impromptu to visits to plants. When there is advance notice for these visits someone other than the shift supervisor should be responsible for escorting the individuals. The average time per visit was 23 minutes. The range was 10-60 minutes. 2.19 Human Resources

The shift supervisor frequently meets with HR regarding union grievances and other employee issues. The shift supervisor is often called by site employees for general insurance and other HR information such as vacation, sick leave, jury leave, and company policy. The average time expended was 5 minutes, and the range was 0-20 minutes.

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2.20

Meetings

The shift supervisor participates in team meetings, safety committee, outage, environmental, and general information. A complaint often heard is we attend too many meetings. When the shift supervisor is to be included in a meeting, ensure that it is necessary for him to be there. The average time in meetings was 6 minutes, and the range was 0-20 minutes. 2.21 Store Room

The shift supervisor is required at times particularly at night and on weekends to provide access to the store room for materials and parts for unplanned maintenance activities. This responsibility may be better suited to maintenance. The average time was 6 minutes, and the range was 0-20 minutes.

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TOOLS USED
The purpose of this Report is not to evaluate or recommend any of the tools listed or discussed. Each plant and utility should do their own evaluation of tools and how they can be customized to fit their processes. Some of the effective tools observed were developed by the utilities themselves, and their willingness and cost to share the in-house tools was not pursued because those decisions would need to be made at above the shift supervisor level. For the commercially available tools contact the vendors and ask them to supply a list of their customers. You can then contact the utilities directly for how they are applying the tools and their satisfaction with the results. 3.1. PlantView by EPRI Solutions PlantView is a versatile suite of integrated applications that supports the engineering, maintenance, operation, and training knowledge management processes to help facilities sustain optimal reliability, efficiency, and safety. Each application automates information entry, storage, management, and reporting for numerous facility functions. EPRI Solutions provides PlantView application services for configuration and delivery, content development, assessment and improvement coaching, application services, and user training. 3.1.1 PlantView Report Library This application provides a document repository coupled with equipment condition assessment and recommendations. It provides broad team access and simple search retrieval tools to aid analysis and troubleshooting to drive operating and maintenance decisions. 3.1.2 PlantView Data Visualizer This application enables viewing and trending process data from control system data historians in support of PdM equipment condition assessment. 3.1.3 PlantView Electronic Rounds This application enables viewing operator and technician rounds data, filtering it to PdM equipment, and linking the data to PdM assessments as technology exams. It provides broad access and simple retrieval of data for real time analysis to escalate the value of collecting rounds data. 3.1.4 PlantView Electronic Logbook The logbook captures and manages critical unit-specific process knowledge, including operator actions, process conditions, operating concerns, surveillance observations, and work-arounds for the creation of a distributable shift report. It enhances communications among staff, teams, and management with direct access and posting of log information. Search and retrieval tools aid troubleshooting and information gathering for efficient analysis.

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3.1.5 PlantView Corrective Action Planning (CAP) Part of the continuous improvement applications, this module provides a structured process for problem classification, review team assignments, assessments and root cause analysis, implementation tracking, and notification. Administrative reports aid in managing the CAP program, tracking and searching historical records, and the integration of knowledge. 3.1.6 PlantView Event Report Simple data entry forms aid in the documentation, assessment, problem remediation, and notification of key operational events. It helps drive focused investigations around lessons learned and distribution of CAPs to prevent repeating costly events. 3.1.7 PlantView Self Assessment Tool This application provides a platform to develop free-formed team performance assessments and benchmarks of work processes. It facilitates an assessment process, provides justifiable scoring and ranking criteria, and documentation of evaluation results. Summary reports provide visual display of performance results and coordinating improvement activities to enhance work processes. 3.1.8 PlantView Alarm Response Database This application provides online support of alarm knowledge by providing cues for alarm validation, probable causes, recommended corrective action procedures, and possible overreaching effects to system operation, and links to access supporting documentation. The database aids staff to perform timely quality actions to ensure operational reliability 3.1.9 PlantView Automated Training Manager (ATM) ATM provides a comprehensive learning management system for training delivery, automated testing, qualification evaluation, management of learner training profiles, and administration of training records. Tools simplify configuration of training content and evaluation instruments. ATM provides an economical training tool enabling on-shift, self-paced learning to speed workforce competency time. 3.2. iWare by CanWeb Internet Services Ltd.

CanWeb has recently released iWare, a Knowledge Management Solution for industrial applications in the oil & gas, refining, petrochemical, energy and utilities, manufacturing, transportation and power generation sectors. The iWareTM Family of Solutions provides systems for any size operation from the single, small facility with basic requirements to the large, multi-site client needing a solution with advanced functionality. The iWareTM Suite of Products includes: operator support for advanced control systems (DCS, HMI) and operator training simulation, asset and maintenance management, compliance/procedure management, electronic operator logbook, incident tracking and pipeline data management.

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3.2.1 Effective interface with maintenance The scheduling function allows the operator to schedule maintenance work directly from the control console, and provides the capability to monitor progress of the work. 3.2.2 Finding and following procedure Emergency, little used and best practice procedures can be quickly accessed through drop down menus and brought up on the operator screen. When the operator accesses the procedure it can come from a secure and approved file that is available in real time and eliminates binder updating issues. 3.2.3 Procedural guidance All of the procedures that apply to the job function can be set up for immediate access from the drop down menu at the console. The operator simply clicks on the procedure and follows it step by step. 3.2.4 High standards of conduct enforced by management This is an organizational issue which often breaks down when the information available is in the provable grey area where the supervisor doesnt have the record of the actions to use as the reference for discussion with the operator. iWare provides both an electronic logbook and an electronic logging capability. This can provide a mix of data recorded and time stamped from sensors and control changes made as well as manual entry. This allows supervision to track operator control actions and the resulting changes in the process and provides the information for the supervisor to know where to focus training, what to discuss during counseling, and the factual basis for disciplinary actions. It also provides capture of good procedures to translate to new operators. 3.2.5 Supplemental operator knowledge to perform required functions The menu can be structured to provide reference material directly on the operator console for the operator to follow, or in compliance format. 3.2.6 Improved control of temporary conditions The operator can relate observed conditions to the reference material as an aide to identification of the right solution for a situation. This can deliver procedures directly to the operator, and removes reliance on operator memory of infrequently used procedures. Many power generators are concerned about the results of major turnover in their aging workforces and about the effectiveness and reliability of their operations, said Jackie Grant, Vice-President, iWare Division. They have supported studies investigating operations assessments, capturing undocumented operator knowledge and maintenance experience and hope to avoid incidents like large scale blackouts or service disruptions. iWares Operator Support System improves operator reliability and safety, enhances operating training initiatives and provides immediate paybacks.

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3.3.

Eclipse by NiSoft

The eclipse software can be used to implement an electronic lockout/tagout program. 3.4. AutoTour by Data Systems & Solutions

Data Systems & Solutions AutoTour allows T&D operations and management to install a low cost alternative to automatically track equipment or systems that would otherwise not be monitored, or to replace manual (paper) logs that are collected only for record keeping purposes. By eliminating paper logs, AutoTour simplifies the collection of plant field data; at the same time, it improves the accuracy of the data being recorded and its usefulness in performance monitoring and predictive analysis. AutoTour facilitates the electronic collection of operations and maintenance data from local gauges and equipment not monitored by existing plant process computer systems. This information can then be easily trended and compared to other related key parameters to more effectively monitor the performance of equipment, trains, and systems. 3.5. Utility In-House Software

Utilities have developed some very effective soft ware to improve the accuracy and efficiency of their processes. Some good stand alone tag out and log keeping systems have been observed. One utility observed has developed and integrated their soft ware for log keeping, tag outs, and work control. When tag outs are implemented or closed out, they are automatically listed in the log along with the status. This site uses a common log for all the operations shift positions. When equipment deficiencies are identified and the work orders initiated this information is also automatically placed in the notes section of the log. The integrated processes make the status keeping more efficient during the shift and for shift turnovers. 3.6. Status Boards

Status boards are very easy and useful tools to organize data for use and reference by the shift supervisor. The information needs to be kept up to date. Depending on the individual data item it should be updated as the condition changes or updated on a set periodic schedule such as once per shift or every four hours. The presentation needs to be neat and easily readable, and where possible have the items printed on the status board and write the status or values in the space provided. Either have the different items divided by a line or leave enough space so values do not get confused. Following are some good and poor examples of status boards:

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This a good example of a well organized and maintained Hardcopy data chart used by operations.

Figure 3-1 Good Example of Hardcopy data management

This is a bad example of data management and a housekeeping and standards problem. Also represents a bad wall paper job.

Figure 3-2 Example of poor organized and inadequately posted data

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The following is an example of Hard copy data overload with poor standards. Although, information is captured and displayed, it represents too much information of mixed systems and guidance.

Figure 3-3 Example of Manual Data Overload

The following are examples of whiteboard data management that can become a burden or low standard. Data displayed should be focused about a key information transfer need such as equipment temporarily out of normal alignment. Avoid the use of whiteboards to continually expand on various communication needs to prevent confusion and distractions to its original intent.

Figure 3-4 Mixed Status Panel

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Figure 3-5 Congested Status Pane

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A
APPENDIX
Shift Supervisor Activities Clearance Records Plant 1 0.5hr/wk Plant 2 15min/shift Plant 3 1-2hrs/wk 2060min/wk Plant 4 3-4hrs/wk Plant 5 1hr/month Plant 6 1hr/wk 0 Plant 7

Time Sheets

10 min

5-10 min/shift

15min/shift

10min/shift

2-3hr/wk

2hrs/wk 3045min/shift 10 min/qtr. 1hr/wk

Inventories Run Times Procedures Revisions

1-1.5hrs/wk 0.5hr/month 0.5-1hr/wk

0 0 1hr/wk

.5hr/wk 4-5hr/week .5hr/wk

15min/shift 1hr/shift 1hr/wk 1520min/shift

.5hr/wk 0 0

0 0 1hr/wk

Emissions

0.5hr/shift 1020min/shift

15min/shift

15min/event

15min/wk

Providing general information to non-shift persons

15min/shift

3-4hr/wk

1hr/wk

10hrs/wk

minimal

Event Investigations Trading Floor/Dispatcher

2-3hrs/event

1020min/event

1 hr/wk

1hr/wk

1hr/event

1hr/event

30min/event

1 hr/wk

20min/wk

minimal

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Shift Supervisor Activities Security Interfaces Contracts from outside plant

Plant 1 0

Plant 2 0

Plant 3 1 hr/wk

Plant 4 15min/shift

Plant 5

Plant 6 15min/shift

Plant 7 0

0.5-1hr/event

1 hr/wk

0.5hr/wk

1hr/wk 1530min/shift 15min/shift 30min/shift 015min/shift 0

1hr/wk

minimal

Fuel Crew Deliveries Shift Maintenance

2hrs/week 0 0.5-1hr/shift 0.52hrs/event 0

0 45min/event 1hr/shift

1hr/wk 0-1hr/wk 1-2 hr/wk

.5hr/shift 0-1hr/shift 0

.5hr/shift 0-1hr/wk 0

minimal 0-1hr/wk 0

Callouts Training

1-2hrs/event 2hrs/wk 3060min/shift 4560min/event 0 0 0 0

0.5 hr/wk 0

30min/shift 0

.5hr/shift 0

.5hr/shift 0

Answering phone

1hr/shift

1 hr/wk

0.5-1hr/wk

.5hr/shift

.5hr/shift

.5hr/shift

Visitors HR Meetings Store Room Observations

1hr/visit 0 1hr/wk 1hr/wk 0

0-5hr/wk 0 0 0 0

0.5/wk 0 0 0 0

1hr/visit 0 0 0 3hr/month

1hr/wk 1hr/wk 0 1hr/wk 0

.5hr/shift 30min/wk 1hr/wk 0 0

A-2

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