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June 20, 2014 Volume 10 Issue 4 FREE
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INSIDE THE ISLAND EYE NEWS
MY SISTER
HAS A
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SUMMER
CELEBRATED
PG 21
Sand continues on page 4 Beach Fee continues on page 2

T
he 26th Annual Piccolo Spoleto
Sand Sculpting Contest took
place Saturday, June 2 on
Front Beach, Isle of Palms.
Teams turned up early to stake
their claim on a slice of sand and
get to work on some serious sand
sculpting. The dominant theme
was the hit Disney movie Frozen.
At least fve Olafs, a snowman with
a penchant for sun and sand, grew
out of the beach over the three
hours of sweat and sand castles.
The Best in Show winner was
a more somber affair however,
Raising the Flag over Iowa Jima.
As always, the talents displayed
were staggering, as was the obvious
planning and effort people put into
this much-loved annual event.
PI CCOLO SAND SCULPTORS WORK UP A SWEAT DURI NG ANNUAL CONTEST
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
Mayor Cronin
protects
sands of SC
I O P MAY O R ' S B E A C H
P R E S E R VAT I O N A C T
S I G N E D I N T O L A W
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
F
or the past two years, Isle of
Palms Mayor Dick Cronin
has been spearheading
a proposal to have the State
Legislature authorize local beach
communities to collect a Beach
Preservation Fee from tourists
that frequent their towns.
With the help of Mike Sottile and
others, the Beach Preservation
Act, passed by the Senate last
year, passed the House in May
and was signed by the Governor
on June 2. If approved by a
referendum of voters, this act will
allow municipalities like the Isle
of Palms to collect 1 percent on
all short term accommodations;
rental properties, hotels etc. The
monies collected can only be
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
PHOTO PROVIDED BY IOP REC CENTER
Mayor Dick Cronin.
“Bee on Me” won Best Family.
2 June 20, 2014
CIVIC
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
used for:
• Nourishment, renourishment,
maintenance, erosion mitigation, and
monitoring of the beaches within the
corporate limits of the qualifed coastal
municipality;
• Dune restoration and maintenance,
including planting of grass, sea oats, or
other vegetation useful in preserving the
dune system within the corporate limits
of the qualifed coastal municipality;
• Maintenance of public beach accesses
within the corporate limits of the
qualifed coastal municipality.
The idea for sourcing these funds from
the people who use the beaches came about
when Cronin gathered together a group of
beach community mayors and their city
administrators to “try to understand what we
do well together and what are the threats to
our community,” Cronin said.
“It became apparent that the federal
government wasn’t going to have funds
to preserve beaches, and that the state
had taken action to eliminate any beach
preservation funds on their part,” Cronin
said. “So it became evident that we needed to
do something.”
The frst meeting of beach mayors took
place three years ago on Folly Beach, and
there have been two subsequent meetings on
Isle of Palms. All the beach communities in
the area were represented and the attendees
focused on understanding what was going
well in each community and what each one
was doing to support its beaches and tourism.
“It’s a sharing experience. It’s quite
informative,” Cronin said. “The mayor from
Pawleys Island comes all the way down here,
he’s in the same boat-no pun intended.”
It was in these meetings that the idea of a
Beach Preservation Fee was born.
“It became apparent from looking at
how each community runs its beaches
that we charged less from a fee standpoint
than the City of Charleston does.
The beaches couldn’t charge the 2
percent accommodations fee that
the Charleston charges, beaches
could only charge 1 percent,” Cronin
said. “Yet we have the beaches being
threatened that need to be preserved
for future generations.”
Cronin and Tim Goodman, the mayor
of Folly Beach, travelled to Columbia
to testify on beach matters before a
Senate subcommittee last year.
“Mike Sottile was very active in
soliciting support in the House, which
it passed this year. The only people
that voted against it were senators
from the upstate area, who really have
an edge for anything to do with the
beach.”
The act also received substantial
support from the tourism initiatives in
Charleston, which recognize that the
beaches are a major tourism drive.
“Not having funding to maintain
them is not in their best interests,”
Cronin said. “It turns out that the
beaches, while from a population
standpoint are not a very large base, but they
provide 30 percent of the tourism activity in
Charleston is on the beaches.”
Currently Accommodations Tax on Isle of
Palms is 5 percent, the city collects 1 percent,
the county 2 and the state 2. If the law passes
a referendum, which if approved by council
will likely take place this November, then the
Isle of Palms’ ATAX will increase to 6 percent.
The extra 1 percent will go exclusively towards
a beach preservation fund.
“This is a way to start building a fun in
the event that we needed a major initiative
on our beaches,” Cronin said. “It will bring in
$700.000 to $800,000 annually.”
Beach Fee continues from cover
A
t a heated, lengthy public
meeting held on June 11,
Sullivan’s Island Planning
Commission presented its
proposed amendments to the
ordinance that governs eating
establishments on the island.
The amendment causing the
most consternation among the
standing-room only crowd of
business owners and citizens
was the addition of a coffee shop
category that will in theory allow
four such establishments on the
island.
“Are we really asking for four
more restaurants? Who wants
this?” Allison Bourland said at
the public meeting. She was not
alone. Many citizens raised their
voice against the amendment,
the main concern being that it
will open the market for more
restaurants to come to the island,
which they do not want.
The amendment defnes
a Coffee Shop as “a small
establishment where beverages
and light meals are prepared for
onsite consumption and made
available only by way of counter
service.” Among the proposed
rules regulating a coffee shop
is a limit on alcohol sales to 15
percent, a maximum size of 700
sq. ft. of patron space and that
“no new bars or restaurants may
be established within 300 ft. of
any existing bar or restaurant.”
As this is a new category, there
are not technically any such
establishments currently on
the island. However, those that
fall under the delicatessen and
bakery categories, such as Café
Medley, The Co-Op and the new
Beardcat’s Sweet Shop, could
apply to be in the new category,
allowing them to expand their
current operations.
Café Medley supports the
new amendment and has had a
petition on its counter for the past
month asking patrons to show
their support of the business.
Such patrons spoke on behalf
of the business owners
at the meeting. Eric
Dodson spoke about
the positive community
atmosphere that Cafe
Medley creates. Jen
Leach said that she felt
safe knowing her children
were safe there and knew
the familiar faces of the staff.
Despite Cafe Medley creating a
positive community environment,
Cindy Ewing said “This island has
had communities for decades…
Where is the dividing point for
a town to keep a business in
business? Take Cafe Medley out
of it. Does the town want four
more coffee shops serving alcohol
and acting like a restaurant?”
“Cafe Medley was our frst
child,” Michelle Harris, owner
of Café Medley, said. “I honestly
thought I would make coffee and
make people happy… It’s not easy
to run a small business.”
The new cafe inclusion to the
laws would allow Cafe Medley to
become compliant and continue
running their community
oriented business.
The Planning Commission
unanimously passed the
amendments as proposed, with
two small changes, reduction
of alcohol permitted from 18
percent to 15, and the defnition
of “light fare” expanded to
keep coffee shops from serving
menu items indicative of full
service restaurants. Next the
amendments go before City
Council for consideration.
Coffee shops cause consternation among citizens
PLANNI NG COMMI SSI ON PI CKI NG A PATH THROUGH THORNY I SSUE OF NEW EATERI ES ON SULLI VAN’ S
BY KATHRYN CASEY & JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITERS
“ARE WE REALLY ASKING FOR FOUR MORE
RESTAURANTS? WHO WANTS THIS?"
~ Allison Bourland
“THIRTY PERCENT OF THE TOURISM ACTIVITY
IN CHARLESTON IS ON THE BEACHES."
~ Dick Cronin
June 20, 2014
3
Isle of Palms
886.6428
www.iop.net
Tuesday, June 24
City Council Meeting
7 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Wednesday, June 25
Municipal Court
9 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Tuesday, July 1
Personnel Committee
10 a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Board of Zoning Appeals
5:30 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Sullivan's Island
883.3198
www.sullivansisland-sc.com
Monday, June 23
Tree Commission Meeting
5 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Wednesday, June 25
Coffee with the Chief!
Stop by for a chat about SI with Police
Chief Howard at Cafe Medley.
8:30 a.m.
2213 Middle Street
Tuesday, July 1
Municipal Court*
5:30 p.m.
2050 Middle Street
Wednesday, July 2
Coffee with the Chief!
See Wednesday, June 25.
CIVIC
* Bench Trials will be at a temporary Town Hall facility located behind the Fire Station, next to the Stith
Park (2050 Middle Street). Contact SI Clerk of Court directly at 883-5734 (Maria LoRusso) for payments or
questions.
Civic Calendar
 
Recycle - WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25 - Recycle
Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com
Jennifer Tuohy
managing editor
jennifer@luckydognews.com
Swan Richards
graphic designer
swan@luckydognews.com
Lori McGee 614.0901
advertising executives
Christian LeBlanc
social media
christian@luckydognews.com
Steve Rosamilia
photographer

Contributors:
Kathryn Casey
Bob Hooper
Bill Martin
Jason Mengel
Kathryn Casey
Mary Pringle
Susan Hill Smith
Jeff Minton
Benjamin Cameransi
Alana Morral
Teresa Simmons
Mark Stoner
Sue Holloman
Dimi Matouchev
Robert Earl
Michael Cuenin
John Nelson

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P.O. Box 837
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Submit your letters to the editor to:
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Future deadline: June 25 for
our July 4 issue
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T
he ongoing saga over the size
of the new Sullivan’s Island
Elementary School came to
a defnite conclusion Monday,
June 9, when Judge
Dennis delivered his
fnal written order and
judgment.
The Judge found
for the defendant, the
Town of Sullivan’s
Island, on all counts.
He denied the plaintiffs
Martha Smith, Kathleen
Post and William Post’s requests
for a declaration that the Town
failed to comply with State law,
and for awards of costs and
attorneys’ fees.
His written ruling clears up any
misapprehension that the Town
Council acted illegally in any way
when refusing to move forward
with a petition requesting a
referendum on the size and scope
of the new elementary school,
which will open this August as
scheduled.
“The plaintiffs had claimed
that the Town acted illegally in
not conducting a referendum,
they were claiming the Town
denied them of their right to vote,
right to due process and right
to petition,” Trenholm Walker,
attorney for the Town, said.
“The court disagreed on all three
claims.”
“There was some suggestion
that Council had acted illegally by
not deferring the petition to the
court,” Walker continued. “The
judge disagreed categorically
on that. Council never took the
position that they had fnal say,
they always deferred to the fact
that the court would have fnal
say.”
In fact, Council did defer the
petition to the court, seeking
what is known as a Declaratory
Judgment to determine if their
actions were correct. That suit
was not dismissed until after
the plaintiffs brought their suit.
Judge Dennis said this was in
keeping with the law, and that
the second lawsuit took the
place of the frst. The court made
the fnal determination on the
petition and ruled it was invalid
for fve separate reasons.
“Because what the petition was
asking was something Council
could not do it was therefore
called facially invalid, so Council
had no obligations and did not
violate anyone’s right,” Walker
said. “What the plaintiffs were
saying following the judge’s oral
ruling, even though this wasn’t
in their lawsuit, was that the
court was the fnal arbitrator,
that the court had the ultimate
authority to rule on the petition.
But Council never disputed that
point.
“When Judge Dennis said ‘I
agree with both sides,’ which was
a loose remark during his oral
ruling, he had thought Council
could act on a petition as it saw
ft. He then reviewed the case
law and realized that he does
not defer to Council’s decision,
the court has to make his own
decision and that’s what he did.
I think the other side mistakenly
thought he was ruling in their
favor in some way. The plaintiffs
were trying to argue that the
town made a mistake in not
following their frst lawsuit, but
the Judge said it really made no
difference whether the decision
was rendered in the town’s
lawsuits or the plaintiff’s lawsuit;
the court would deliver a binding
decision.”
Representatives of Islanders
for a Smaller School, the group
behind the petition signed by the
plaintiffs, released this statement
on June 16 regarding Judge
Dennis’ written ruling. They
requested that it be printed in
full.
“We are very proud of what
we did and what we have
accomplished. This case was
always about holding our
elected offcials accountable
and giving all citizens a voice in
their government. As a result
of our efforts, Sullivan’s Island
residents are fully engaged in
the ongoing effort to protect and
preserve our historic, residential
community.
“We were absolutely stunned
to read Judge Dennis’ written
ruling on the Sullivan’s Island
Referendum lawsuit, because it
appears to contradict the oral
ruling made in court on May 16.
That is truly baffing, particularly
to those who attended the court
proceedings and heard the oral
ruling that day.
“Although we were disappointed
Town wins SIES lawsuit on all counts
P L A I N T I F F S MI S TA K E N I N B E L I E V I N G J U D G E R U L E D F O R T H E M
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
Lawsuit continues on page 4
“ALTHOUGH WE WERE DISAPPOINTED WITH
THE WRITTEN RULING AND DISAGREE WITH
IT, WE RESPECT JUDGE DENNIS’ AUTHORITY
TO MAKE IT."
~ Islanders for a Smaller School
4 June 20, 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
with the written ruling and disagree
with it, we respect Judge Dennis’
authority to make it.
“We will continue to follow closely
what our elected offcials are doing,
and will continue our efforts to
keep all Sullivan’s Island residents
fully informed about decisions
being made by Town Council and
the impact of it all on the entire
Sullivan’s Island community.”
To have won the suit as outlined,
the plaintiffs would have had to
show that some right was violated.
The judge ruled that no rights
were violated. There has to be an
“actionable wrong” and if there was
no right violated then the town
didn’t act illegally.
“Basically, what the plaintiffs
were saying in the end was; ‘We
have a right to be sued personally
and a right to lose that lawsuit
because we brought a facially
invalid petition and the Town
must sue us and we must lose for
the Town not to have violated our
rights,’” Walker said.
In the end, the plaintiffs did lose
the lawsuit, the Town was cleared
of any illegality and Sullivan’s
Island’s brand new, state of the
art school will begin educating the
children of the island at the start of
the next school year.
Lawsuit continues from page 3 Sand continues from cover
WINNERS FOR 2014
Best of Children's
1st - Site AA - Frozen - Olaf's
Minions
2nd - Site W - Minecraft
Serpent
3rd - Site T - Piccolo Octopus
Best of Young Adults
1st - Site A - 9-11 Tribute
2nd - Site 2 - Recharging for
Summer
3rd - Site B - Turtle Topia
Best of Family
1st - Site 27 - Bee on Me
2nd - Site BB - Lego on
Vacation
3rd - Site 25 - Peace
Most Creative
1st - Site 22 - Finion
2nd - Site 4 - Mr. Spoleto Head
3rd - Site 20 - Couch
Best Architectural
1st - Site 14 - Game of Sand
2nd - Site 5 - Colosseum
3rd - Site 35 - Piccoloctopus
Best of Adults
1st - Site 19 - IOP - Spoleto
2nd - Site 21 - Frozen in the
Summer
3rd - Site 18 - Spo-Le-To Frogs
Best of Show - Overall
Site 12 - Raising the Flag over
Iwo Jima
PHOTO PROVIDED BY IOP REC CENTER
June 20, 2014 5
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
T
he 23rd Floppin’ Flounder 5K took place on
Sullivan’s Island Saturday, June 7. Participants
and volunteers enjoyed a post-race breakfast
provided by the Triangle Char & Bar and the Black
Bean Co. The Charleston Running Club organizers of
the event donated half of all the race proceeds to the
Sullivan’s Island Fire Department.
PHOTOS BY STEVEN ROSAMILIA
The starting line of the 5K Floppin’ Flounder on Sullivan’s Island.
Young standout Ben McElveen and Colin Baker,
youth champion.
Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Marathon winner Chris Bailey pulls ahead of the feld.
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
6 June 20, 2014
J
ust as in real estate, the
location of a loggerhead’s
nest is very important and
may make the difference as to
whether or not it survives to
produce hatchlings. On June 5 a
sea turtle crawled ashore and laid
eggs in the beach volleyball court
near the VFW and Windjammer
on the Isle of Palms. Could this
be our beloved and rehabilitated
“Jammer” returning here to nest?
Most likely not, but this is an
example of where not to leave
a nest, so it was moved to 29th
Avenue.
The South Carolina Department
of Natural Resources, who
oversees the activities of the
Island Turtle Team, instructs us
to relocate eggs if they are laid in
a place where they will not survive
to hatch. Examples of this are if a
nest is at the foot of an escarped
dune chopped off by severe
erosion, a nest in a vehicular
path onto the beach, or a nest
laid below the tide line which
will cause the egg chamber to
be repeatedly fooded by tide.
Although “volleyball court” was
not listed, we thought it best not
to leave the eggs there. When
turtles encounter sand bags or
a wall or barrier of any kind,
they most often turn around
and return to the ocean without
nesting. This happened at the
sand bag wall at Beachwood
East on June 8 and is likely to
happen again in Wild
Dunes this season.
For the frst two
nests of the season our
loggerheads wisely, or
more likely by chance,
picked excellent high
dunes at 46th Avenue
and 39th Avenue. In
these cases the presence of eggs
was confrmed and the nests were
left where laid.
Nesting Trends
The 2014 season is off to a slow
start for us. Loggerhead nesting
has been tracked by records kept
on certain “Index Beaches” in
South Carolina where 44 percent
of all nests are laid and where
nesting activity has been recorded
since the 1980s. These beaches
include Cape Island, Bull Island,
and Lighthouse Island in the Cape
Romain National Wildlife Refuge,
South Island near Georgetown,
Edisto Beach, and Fripp Island.
Records from these beaches
show that the usual trend in
the past has been a couple of
years of high nest numbers and
then a plunge or dip in nesting
activity. This does not mean that
the loggerhead population is
in trouble, but more likely that
more females are resting up and
taking the season off to rebuild
their nutritional reserves.
The last dip was in 2009. So the
experts were interested to see that
we have had an unprecedented
four consecutive high years, 2010,
2011, 2012 and 2013. In fact the
2013 nesting season was record-
breaking, with 5,198 nests in
SC, the highest since 1982 after
many years of gradually declining
nest numbers.
In the high year of 2012 our
group had 28 nests by June 8
compared to 3 on Isle of Palms
in 2014. This low trend is also
happening on beaches near us
and all along the Atlantic Coast.
We remember 2004, another
plunge year, when there were
only 9 nests on the Isle of Palms
and none on Sullivan’s with 34
stranded turtles. Compare this to
67 nests in 2012, quite a roller
coaster. We hope it’s just a late
start, but time will tell.
Location, Location, Location!
L O G G E R H E A D S D O N ’ T A L WAY S C H O O S E T H E WI S E S T S P O T F O R T H E I R N E S T S
BY MARY PRINGLE
FOR THE ISLAND EYE NEWS
PHOTOS BY BARB BERGWERF
Mary Pringle measures turtle tracks that reveal a turtle climbed onto the beach to
nest but was discouraged by the sand bags positioned on the beach at Wild Dunes to
prevent erosion.
Tee Johannes and Mary Pringle plan what to do with the nest unwisely built in a beach
volleyball court.
“IN THE HIGH YEAR OF 2012 OUR GROUP HAD
28 NESTS BY JUNE 8 COMPARED TO 3 ON
ISLE OF PALMS IN 2014"
June 20, 2014 7
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
S
eventh-graders from
Laing Middle School of
Science and Technology
recently helped restore
saltwater marshes at Palmetto
Islands County Park by planting
seedlings of smooth cordgrass
that the students had grown
and studied for several months.
The project, “From Seeds
to Shoreline: Engaging
Students in Salt Marsh
Restoration,” is offered
through the S.C. Sea Grant
Consortium in partnership
with the S.C. Department
of Natural Resources and
Clemson Extension. It allows
students to help protect a vital
ecosystem and fts with Laing’s
approach to learning through
STEM (Science, Technology,
Engineering, and Math).
Laing has been at the forefront
of the STEM education trend,
emerging as a national leader
for incorporating STEM concepts
and methods throughout the
school curriculum. This spring,
Laing faculty members have
delivered STEM presentations at
three national education forums.
They also have been invited to
share their work at two more
conferences in South Carolina
this summer.
More than 180 Laing seventh-
graders took part in the activities
at Palmetto Islands County Park
May 19 and 20. S.C. Department
of Natural Resources personnel
assisted students with planting
the cordgrass – also known
as Spartina alternifora or simply
Spartina grass - and provided
several other educational
activities, including a forest
scavenger hunt, a water quality
station and a bioaccumulation
station.
Laing started the project
in December as students
germinated Spartina seeds
from local marshes. After one
month, the students planted
the germinated seeds in pots
that they kept in greenhouses
and watered regularly. While
waiting for the seedlings
to grow, classes studied
salt marsh ecology and the
importance of watersheds.
“The project has truly been
a rewarding experience for
our students,” said seventh-
grade science teacher Caitlin
Goss. “From their research
on the importance of Spartina
grass to the planting process,
students are using critical
thinking skills to complete the
salt marsh restoration project. In
doing so, they are helping our
community with an important
ongoing issue.”
Laing has infused STEM
learning into its curriculum in
many ways. On May 15, Laing
faculty members delivered the
presentation "Whole-School
STEM: New Tools for Student-
Centered Learning," at the
National Science Teachers
Association's STEM Forum &
Expo in New Orleans. Earlier
this spring, they presented at
the Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers Integrated
STEM Forum in Princeton, N.J.,
and the International Technology
and Engineering Educators
Association meeting in Orlando.
Laing would like to connect with
local businesses, organizations
and others interested in
supporting the Charleston region's
frst whole-school STEM program.
To learn how you can help,
please contact Principal James
Whitehair,James_Whitehair@
charleston.k12.sc.us, 843-849-
2809.
PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY LLC
Seventh-graders plant seedlings
for marsh restoration project
L A I N G MI D D L E S C H O O L O F S C I E N C E A N D T E C H N O L O G Y E ME R G I N G
A S N AT I O N A L L E A D E R F O R S T E M L E A R N I N G
BY SUSAN HILL SMITH
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Molly McGovern with the S.C. Department of Natural Resources talks with students
at Laing Middle School of Science and Technology as part of the project,“From
Seeds to Shoreline: Engaging Students in Salt Marsh Restoration.”
Laing seventh-graders Wells Burnette, with shovel, and Ronnie Hutto, in ball cap,
prepare to plant Spartina seedlings at Palmetto Islands County Park in Mount Pleasant.
4 June 20, 2014
June 20, 2014 9
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
I
ce cream and the beach just
naturally go together, so
when the team behind The
Obstinate Daughter, Sullivan’s
Island’s newest eatery situated
just two blocks from the beach,
was looking for something to do
with the space underneath their
Italian-infuenced southern
restaurant the idea of a gelato
shop didn’t take long to form.
Executive Chef Jaques
Larson recruited his hostess
turned pastry chef from sister-
establishment The Wild Olive to
bring to life this sweet shop that
serves up baked goods, juices,
coffees, teas and smoothies
alongside homemade gelato and
sorbets.
Arguably ousting its creator
for title of most uniquely-
named-establishment on the
island, BeardCat Sweet Shop
opened for business Friday,
June 6 and has been scooping
up frozen goodness at a crazy
rate ever since.
Gelato goddess Caroline
Sherman, who spent time in
Bologna, Italy studying the
art of the Italian ice cream at
Carpigiani Gelato University,
is justifably proud of her new
domain. The clean crisp interior
of the sweet shop is a cool respite
from the sweltering summer
heat, and if the City Council
allows them to put some chairs
and tables in the place, it will be
a great spot to stop and savor the
eclectic favors such as olive oil
and sea salt, peach, pistachio,
hazelnut and creamsicle. Of
course the staples are also
available, strawberry, vanilla,
mint choc chip and chocolate.
“We sell more chocolate
than any other favor by at
least double,” Sherman said,
intimating that so far their best
customers have defnitely been
the children of the island.
The sorbets have been a big
hit with the adult crowd, and the
palate pleasing favors include
grapefruit, berry and coconut.
Everything is made with fresh
ingredients and a focus on
seasonal goodies, such as berries
and watermelon (coming soon).
With the addition of BeardCat’s
and new lunch hours The
Obstinate Daughter’s domains
now offers food from 7:30 a.m. to
11 p.m, 7 days a week.
The Obstinate Daughter,
located at 2063 Middle Street,
Sullivan’s Isand, serves lunch
Monday through Friday 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m., brunch Saturday and
Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and
dinner daily from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
(11 p.m. Friday and Saturday).
Beardcats is open daily from 7.30
a.m. and closes around the time
the restaurant does.
PHOTOS BY STEVEN ROSAMILIA
Dawes Caldwell serves up a tasty treat.
Sullivan’s welcomes Beardcat’s Sweet Shop
T H E O B S T I N AT E D A U G H T E R S PA WN S A S I S T E R , I N T R O D U C E S L U N C H , B R U N C H
BY JENNIFER TUOHY
ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR
The sweet shop team: Allison Highfeld, Emily Lamm, Caroline Sherman and Christian
Belcher.
Local boy wins
MLB Hit, Pitch, Run
I
sle of Palms sports
phenom Derek Sireci,
14, won the sectional
MLB Hit, Pitch and Run
competition for his age
group. This is the second
time in the past three years
Derek has accomplished
this milestone. He will
compete in the regional
competition at Tuner Field in
Atlanta on June 14. The top
three fnishers nationwide in
each age group will be invited
to compete at the national
fnals at the MLB All-Star
game in Minneapolis, MN.
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
10 June 20, 2014
04/05/14 – While investigating
a vehicle stuck in the sand on
the beach path at Sta. 28 1/2 it
was learned that the driver was
a missing person from Johns
Island. Charleston County
Deputy Sheriff responded to
the scene and transported the
subject to Roper Hospital for
treatment.
04/05/14 – Offcers responded
to a report of an auto accident
involving a vehicle and a bicycle,
on arrival it was discovered
that the bicyclist was struck
and knocked down by a white
vehicle, a search of the area for
the vehicle produced negative
results. The bicyclist was
transported to the hospital by
EMS.
04/13/14 – A complainant
reported that he rolled his grill
into his yard and returned into
his residence, when he return to
the yard about 30 minutes later
the grill was gone.

04/15/14 – A complainant
reported that just after her lawn
service had fnished the yard the
side window of her vehicle had
been broken into.
04/17/14 – A subject was
stopped for a traffc violation and
while conducting the stop the
offcer learned that the driver did
not have a driver’s license. The
vehicle was towed; the driver was
cited and picked up from the
scene by a friend.
04/22/14 – A complainant
reported that three males had
entered his residence and ran
out when he approached them.
The complainant stated that they
were his son’s friends but he did
not wish to have them around
the residence. The subjects were
unable to be located.
04/22/14 – Offcers responded
to a suspicious vehicle, on
arrival the offcers found the
vehicle with 4 occupants, 3 male
subjects and a female juvenile
who was highly intoxicated
and unresponsive. EMS was
called for the female who was
transported to the hospital, on
further investigation marijuana
and a pistol were located in
the vehicle. The 3 subject were
arrested and lodged in the
Charleston County jail.
04/23/14 – Isle of Palms
police were dispatched to their
recreation center in reference to
2 black males threating people
and brandishing a gun. The
subject left the area and the
offcers requested all units be
on the lookout for the vehicle.
While patrolling a Sullivan’s
Island offcer located the vehicle
on Jasper Blvd. The vehicle was
stopped and held until the Isle
of Palm unit could respond and
take over the investigation.
04/24/14 – SIPD and SIFD
responded to a house under
construction in reference to a
fre in a dumpster. The fre was
extinguished; the cause of the
fre was undetermined.
04/24/14 – A complainant
reported that her husband had
set out kayaking in the morning
and had not returned. A search
was launched by the SIFD who
was assisted by the USCG,
SCDNR, and CCSO. The subject
was located the next morning on
Morris Island.
04/24/14 – A complainant
reported that several nights
before she had been at a party
in Mount Pleasant and left with
a subject she met, the two were
doing drugs and went to the
beach on Sullivan’s Island. The
two woke up on the beach and
the complainant felt as if she
had been sexually assaulted.
After an interview with the
complainant and her parents
she decided not to prosecute the
subject.
04/26/14 – A vehicle was
located illegally parked with
the doors open and two purses
on the seat, the owner and
passenger were located and it
was determined that both had
been drinking and were unable
to drive. A friend was called to
pick them up and the vehicle
was towed per the owner’s
request.
04/27/14 – A complainant
reported that while he was on
the beach someone stole his bag
containing cash, a Nook and his
car keys.
04/29/14 – Offcers received
a report of a bicyclist who
appeared to be injured on the
causeway, the subject was
located on the Mount Pleasant
side of the causeway and
determined to be intoxicated.
The subject was checked by frst
responders and escorted to his
residence in Mount Pleasant by
MPPD.
04/30/14 – A complainant
reported that she left her vehicle
parked on the side of the road
on Poe Ave., when she returned
to her vehicle she saw that it
had been struck and damage
had been done to the mirror and
fender.
Sullivan’s Island Police Report, April
June 20, 2014 11
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
April 5: Saturday
Burglary: Ocean Boulevard.
The complainant reported that
unknown person(s) entered
into the rental property and
stole three (3) televisions.
Investigators responded and
processed the scene. There were
no indications of forced entry.
Theft of Motor Vehicle: 42nd
Avenue. The victim reported
that he had parked his golf cart
at a beach access path to visit
the beach. Upon his return,
approximately an hour later, he
discovered the golf cart missing.
April 8: Tuesday
Breach of Trust: Palm Boulevard.
The complainant reported that
her adult brother is withdrawing
funds from her mother’s
checking account, in excess
of the amounts he was given
permission to withdraw.
April 11: Friday
Petty Larceny: Beach at 9th
Avenue. The victim reported that
unknown person(s) stole her
beach bag, which had been left
unattended on the beach. The
bag also contained a friend’s
iPhone.
April 12: Saturday
Petty Larceny: Marina. 41st
Avenue. The victim reported that
unknown person(s) stole his
bicycle and a quantity of cash,
which had been left unsecured.
April 16: Wednesday
Attempted Burglary: Grand
Pavilion. The complainant
reported that she was closing
up the outdoor bar but left the
area for 10-15 minutes. When
she returned, she discovered
that unknown subject(s) had
activated the alarm system by
apparently prying open one of
the doors to the bar. No items
taken. Cosmetic damage only to
the door.
April 18: Friday
Criminal Sexual Conduct: J C
Long Blvd. Offcers responded
to the area in reference to a
sexual assault that had just
occurred. The victim stated she
had nonconsensual sex with a
male subject she had met earlier
in the night. The investigation is
ongoing.
Simple Assault: Harbor Golf
Course. The juvenile victim
reported that a male subject
struck him with a golf club.
The juvenile and his friends
were riding their bicycles on the
cart path when the victim was
struck.
Burglary: Grand Pavilion.
The victim reported unknown
subject(s) removed fve beach
chairs from the enclosed garage
at the residence (value $160).
April 19: Saturday
Harassment: Carolina Blvd. The
victim reported he has received
threatening text messages from
an acquaintance.
April 20: Sunday
Petit Larceny: Grand Pavilion.
The victim reported that
unknown subject(s) removed
63 Oxycodone pills from his
prescription bottle along with
$100 from the petty cash drawer
in an offce at the location.
Vandalism: Twin Oaks Lane. The
victim stated she returned home
after being gone for nine days
and discovered that unknown
subject(s) had forced open the
front door to the residence,
heavily damaging the door and
frame. Everything inside the
home seemed in place with
nothing reported missing by
the victim. Damage to the door
estimated at $500.
April 21: Monday
Petit Larceny: 41st Avenue. The
complainant reported unknown
subject(s) removed two foor
jacks from the outdoor lot at the
business.
April 26: Saturday
Vandalism: Beachside
Community. The complainant
reported three juveniles
rearranged the furniture at
the pool area and broke off an
egress handle at the pool before
leaving on bicycles.
April 27: Sunday
Vandalism: Palm Boulevard. The
complainant stated that a male
customer became angry when
the business would not provide
him with free paper cups. The
subject pushed the door hard
while exiting causing the glass
portion to shatter as it struck an
outside display.
Petit Larceny: Beach near 1100
Block of Ocean Boulevard. The
victim stated his shoulder bag,
cooler and towel were removed
from the beach as he was
swimming. The victim’s vehicle
was later discovered missing
from the Municipal Lot (See
below).
Motor Vehicle Theft: Municipal
Lot. The victim reported his
vehicle missing from the parking
lot after his bag was stolen off
the beach containing the keys.
(Recovered burned in Berkeley
County).
April 29: Tuesday
Harassment: Sandcrab Court.
The complainant reported she
has been receiving unwanted
phone calls and messages from
her ex-boyfriend.
Vandalism: Palm Boulevard. The
victim stated she discovered her
rear glass door broken. A metal
pellet and BB were recovered at
the scene.
Isle of Palms Police Report, April
GOLF TIPS
M
any golfers dread
having to hit
out of greenside
bunkers. However with
the proper technique
and a little practice
bunker shots can less
intimidating.
As is the case with
all shots in golf, proper
fundamentals are key in
successful sand shots. In
a greenside bunker focus
on the following three
thoughts:
First, dig your feet
in the sand, this will
help ensure that the
club contacts the sand beneath the ball; this is also a great way to
determine the texture and consistency of the bunker.
Second, Keep the clubface slightly open allowing the natural
bounce of the club to slide through the sand. If the ball is slightly
buried square the clubface allowing the leading edge the club to dig
the ball out of the bunker.
Third, be sure to always make a full swing. The displacement of
sand from the bunker will get the ball up and out. Increasing or
decreasing the speed of your full swing in the bunker will be a good
way to control the distance of the shot.
The following bunker play drills will give all golfers more
confdence:
1. While practicing bunker shots swing the club and try to splash
sand out of the bunker and onto the green. This will be sure
that the club in contacting the sand behind the ball and that
the player is making a full swing.
2. Try practicing hitting Tennis Balls out of the bunker. This will
ensure the proper amount and depth of sand is being displaced
as well as assists in developing proper swing speed for bunker
shots.
3. In the practice bunker tee the ball up so the top of the tee is
slightly above the level of the sand. Take a normal swing a
focus on just clipping the top of the tee. This drill promotes a
shallower swing path and better bunker shots.

Jeff Minton is Director of Golf at Wild Dunes Resort. Call 843.886.2164
for a tee time; www.wilddunes.com.
Sand Play
BY JEFF MINTON
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
12 June 20, 2014
S
pine related pain is one
of the most challenging of
chronic pain conditions
to treat. The majority of adults,
estimated at over 80 percent, will
experience some type of neck or
back pain at some point during
their lives. Chief among all
musculoskeletal disorders, low
back pain is the primary reason
for patients seeking medical care
and remains the single leading
cause of disability worldwide.
The actual cause of low back
and neck pain can be complicated
as well as diffcult to accurately
diagnose. This is due to the many
changes in and around the spine
that can cause pain, including
injury to spinal ligaments,
muscles, nerve roots, discs and
facet joints. Degenerative changes
and the usual wear and tear of
the facet joint can play a major
role in generating pain symptoms,
frequently involving the neck,
shoulder, mid-back, low back or
legs, as well as a potential cause
of certain types of headaches.
Pain complaints associated with
facet joints are largely referred to
as Facet Syndrome. Treatment of
Facet Syndrome is second only to
that of epidural steroid injections
of the low back as the most
commonly performed procedure
in the United States.
The human spinal column is
made up of 24 individual and
specialized bones known as
vertebrae. Facet
joints are paired
and exist on the
sides of each of
the vertebrae. In
conjunction with
the disc between
each of vertebrae,
the facet joints
are responsible for stabilizing
the spine as well as allowing
for spinal movement; fexion,
extension and rotation. Similar to
other synovial joints in the body,
the relatively small facet joints
are lined with protective cartilage.
Additionally, at each spinal level,
the joints are supplied with a very
small nerve branching off each
major spinal nerve root as it exits
the spine. These small Median
Branch nerves are responsible
for transmitting the pain that
arises from the normal wear
and tear of these joints as well
as the resulting arthritic and
infammatory changes.
Facet Syndrome can be
diagnosed by temporarily
numbing the Medial Branch
nerve that transfers the pain
signal from the joint to the spinal
cord. This is done by injecting a
small amount of local anesthetic
into the facet joint under direct
x-ray guidance while positioned
comfortably laying face down in
the physicians offce. If indeed
the typical pain as experienced
is temporarily blocked by this
injection, a diagnosis of Facet
Syndrome can be established.
Once diagnosed, Facet
Syndrome can be treated
by a highly specialized and
sophisticated, yet relatively
simple procedure, known as
Radiofrequency Ablation. This
procedure is routinely performed
in the physician’s offce under
direct x-ray guidance either with
or without conscious sedation.
In delivering RF Ablation, a
specialized needle is advanced
near the facet joint to a location
where the Median Branch nerve is
known to transit. Once properly
positioned, the needle is simply
attached to a small unit capable
of delivering a controlled source
of radiofrequency energy. At the
needle tip, the RF energy creates
heat, which is delivered to the area
around the nerve. Only about 90
seconds of RF energy is needed
to disrupt the ability of the nerve
to transmit the facet generated
pain signals; a process known
as denervation. An advantage
of today’s more sophisticated
RF units is that multiple nerves
at multiple levels can be treated
simultaneously. It usually
takes upwards of a few weeks to
experience the full therapeutic
value of denervation of the Median
Branch nerves to occur. While
not usually a permanent “cure”
of Facet Syndrome, most patients
experience signifcant pain relief
ranging from six months to
upwards of twelve to eighteen
months, or longer. Another
beneft of this highly advanced
therapeutic technique is the
procedure can be repeated into
the future if Facet Pain symptoms
return once again.
Dr. Ben Cameransi can be found
at Comprehensive Pain Specialists.
Their Mount Pleasant offce is
located at 3070 Highway 17
North, Suite 102. www.cpspain.
com 855.615.7246 (PAIN).
Find out about facet syndrome
BY BENJAMIN CAMERANSI, MD
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
HEALTH & WELLNESS
E
ast Cooper Community
Outreach announces the
renovation of its Food
Warehouse. Thanks to a generous
donor, ECCO is doubling its
capacity to store and distribute
food for East Cooper families
living in poverty (which last year
equated to 200,000 pounds). After
months of research and planning,
ECCO began the ten-day project
last week. Volunteers and staff
cleared out the entire warehouse
and packed up all of the food
and provisions, everything from
canned peas and rice to toilet
paper and soap.
While the organization has
focused recently on expanding the
health services and empowerment
programs for local low-income
residents, the highest percentage
of clients still visit ECCO’s 14,500
square foot Mount Pleasant
facility for food and clothing. In
recent years, the demand for food
has been even greater during the
summer, which is also a time
when food donations slow down.
Rachel Vane, Director of Volunteer
Engagement noted that “most of
us are thinking about vacations,
barbeques, and spending time
with our friends and family.
However, our clients, especially
those with kids, are spending
their summers worrying about
fnding childcare and food.” This
is an issue across the country,
and it plagues South Carolina
as well. During the school year,
children of low-income families
receive free or reduced lunches.
Staff ramped up efforts early
on this year to secure more food
in preparation for the summer.
Several new retail grocery
stores were added to the weekly
food pickup schedule, and the
number of organized food drives
with religious institutions,
social groups, neighborhood
associations, schools and
more, has been expanded. The
warehouse, which essentially
had not been changed since the
building was constructed over
ten years ago, wasn’t able to
properly accommodate the infux
of donations collected during this
time.
Upon conclusion, ECCO’s Food
Warehouse will be equipped with
over 70 shelves, each able to hold
up to 1,500 pounds - doubling
the previous capacity limit.
Additionally, a new sorting area
has been added to the layout,
which Vane is excited about and
said, “We can now better utilize
our volunteer resources through
this streamlined process for order
fulfllment.” The Food Warehouse
will reopen on Monday, June
9th at 10am, and will have the
ability to provide clients with a
larger variety of food items on a
more consistent basis. Executive
Director, Jack Little added,
“The changes are very exciting,
especially because of what it
means for ECCO’s clients.”
Thanks to the following for
providing the support and
resources needed to ensure
a smooth transition: South
Carolina STRONG, Nucor, Big
Guy Pressure Washing, Berlin’s
Restaurant Supply, BI-LO, Harris
Teeter, and Custom Equipment
Company.
ECCO’s renovated warehouse space.
Renovations double storage capacity
for ECCO’s food warehouse
BY ALANA MORRALL
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
"ONE OF THE GREAT JOYS OF SUMMER IS HAVING
TIME TO READ—ON THE BEACH, IN THE CAR, ON
THE PLANE AND TO EACH OTHER."
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
June 20, 2014 13
MUSSELS AND LINGUINE
Linguine originated in Campania,
Italy and is traditionally served with
seafood or pesto. One of the original
dishes made with this noodle is seafood
and clams. The fragrant broth of this
dish is enhanced by the delicious elixir
of the mussels, so be sure to have
plenty of crusty bread to sop it up.
When serving this dish, I often place a
big bowl in the center of the table for
family and friends to discard mussel
shells once eaten. This is a great dish
for a large beach crowd. Try Mussels
and Linguine paired with the 2011 la
Louvetrie Muscadet. Serves 4.
Ingredients
8 ounces Italian linguine
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil,
plus more for pasta
1 onion, fnely chopped
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon tomato paste
2 cups Roma or summer tomatoes,
diced
2 cups dry white wine
2 cup fsh stock
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
½ teaspoon red pepper fakes
3 pounds fresh black mussels,
scrubbed and debearded
¼ cup fresh herbs (such as parsley,
thyme and chives)
Directions
1. Cook pasta according to package
instructions. Toss with olive oil to
avoid sticking.
2. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a
large stew pot over medium heat.
Add onion and cook until soft. Add
minced garlic and tomato paste
and cook for 1 minute, stirring
frequently.
3. Add the tomatoes and sauté 10-15
minutes. Add the white wine, stock,
bay leaf, salt, black pepper and red
pepper. Cook until reduced by half.
4. Make sure mussels are tightly
sealed. Add mussels to sauce,
turning to coat. Increase heat to
medium-high and cover.
5. Cook mussels until open, about 7
to 10 minutes. Add fresh herbs and
cooked pasta.
6. Place evenly into bowls and serve
with crusty bread drizzled with
olive oil.
T
he Island Eye News welcomes Marilyn Markel,
Culinary Director at Southern Season, as a new
food columnist to the newspaper, she will be
contributing seasonal recipes to each issue. Markel
developed a lifelong passion for food while learning
from her grandmother in the kitchen as a child. In
2013, she was privileged to act as a judge for the
James Beard Cookbook Awards and attended the
James Beard Book and Broadcast Awards Ceremony
in New York City. Markel began developing Southern
Season’s Cooking School over a decade ago and has
helped develop the store into a food destination and
nationally-recognized culinary center hosting over
300 classes a year for seasoned and novice cooks.
Markel teaches some cooking classes herself,
allowing customers to learn with hands-on or
demonstration-style classes. She also hosts book
signings with local, regional and some of the nation’s
most renowned chefs such as Curtis Stone, Martin
Yan, Caprial and John Pence, Masaharu Morimoto,
Daisy Martinez and Shirley Corriher. Local chef
celebrities include Carrie Moray of Callie’s Charleston
Biscuits as well as cookbook author and James Beard
Award-winner Nathalie Dupree. Markel’s industry
connections allow customers to learn from their
favorite cookbook authors and culinary heroes.
“Embracing the Chapel Hill and Charleston food
scenes has been a very rewarding experience,” Markel
says. “I have always loved cooking and reading
cookbooks, and I am intrigued by the limitless
possibilities and combinations of favors. Working
in the cooking school is an amazing job as we get to
cook and learn something different every day. Our
entire team is very passionate about what we do, and
that energy can’t help but spill over in our classes at
Southern Season.”
Seasons
South
of the
July 19 Is l and Eye Cal endar
June 20
ONGOING EVENTS
Tuesdays
Storytime
10:30 a.m. Time for Twos at Edgar
Allan Poe/Sullivan’s Branch.
Mount Pleasant Farmers Market
3:30-7 p.m. Corner of Coleman
and Simmons Street
Wednesdays
Nickelodeon Character
Wednesdays
Starting June 4 your favorite
Nickelodeon characters will be
making special appearances at the
waterparks on Wednesdays this
summer. Catch them during your
visit to Splash Zone, Splash Island,
and Whirlin’ Waters Adventure
Waterpark. Characters will make
appearances during regular park
hours; exact times will be available
on site.
Barn Jam
The Awendaw Green Barn every
Wednesday, 6-10 p.m. $5 at the
door, all ages welcome. Enjoy
a night of diverse music from
around the globe on the uniquely
bohemian ground of the Sewee
Outpost. Wood fred pizza and
fresh grilled oysters (while in
season) will be available as well
as libations. www.facebook.com/
awendawgreen.
Thursdays
Mah Jongg Nights (adults)
Poe’s Library hosts Mah Jongg
Thursdays at 6 p.m. Learn to
play American Mah Jongg. No
experience necessary. 1921 I’on
Avenue, 883.3914.
Nature Movie at SeeWee
Visitor Center
2 p.m. Call 843-928-3368 for more
information.
Yappy Hour and Pups, Yups &
Food Truck return
Both held on select Thursday
evenings at James Island County
Park and Palmetto Islands County
Park in Mount Pleasant. Yappy
Hour features live music and
beverages for sale, directly in the
off-leash dog park at James Island
County Park. Yappy Hour kicks
off on May 15 with a performance
by the Soul Fish Duo. Pups, Yups
and Food Trucks offers on-site
food trucks and live music in
the meadow at Palmetto Islands
County Park in Mount Pleasant,
just adjacent to the dog park.
Pups, Yups and Food Trucks will
debut May 22 with the Cast Iron
Food Truck and live music by
family favorite Dave Landeo.
Fridays
Acoustic Sunset Oyster Roast
The Wreckfsh, 7690 Northwoods
Blvd. Every Friday 5-8 p.m. on
the outdoor patio. There is $12
all you can eat oysters as well
as live music and drink specials.
Call 843.580.4040 for more
information.
Saturdays
Irvin-House Vineyards
"Sippin' Saturday"
Held each week during the
summer from 12 to 4 p.m. Each
Saturday, the winery will showcase
a different local food vendor
and musical group to entertain
locals and visitors. The famous
Irvin~House Vineyards Wine-a-
Ritas will be served on the patio.
The winery/distillery will offer
tastings of their wines as well as
their FireFly vodkas. Patrons will
receive complimentary glasses
during both tastings. Lawn chairs
and blankets are welcomed.
For complete information call
843.559.6867.
Tae Kwon Do for Seniors
Must be 50 or older. 9-10 a.m.
at the Isle of Palms Recreational
Center. $35 resident fee and $40
non-resident fee. There is a drop
in fee of $10 per class. For more
information call 843.886.8294
Charleston Farmers Market
8 a.m.-2 p.m. rain or shine in
Marion Square, 329 Meeting
Street. A variety of local produce,
plants, herbs and cut fowers
as well as breakfast and lunch
vendors, live entertainment and
an assortment of juried arts and
crafts from local artisans for
visitors to experience.
ONGOING
Unfurled: Flags from the
Collections of the Charleston
Museum
The Charleston Museum presents
an original exhibition, Unfurled:
Flags from the Collections of the
Charleston Museum, from May
5, 2014 to January 4, 2015. On
display in its Historic Textiles
Gallery, the Museum's fag
collection spans from the early
19th century to the late 20th
century, with examples covering
a range of functions and styles.
Many fags are exhibited for the
frst time.
Live Music at Southerly
Every night - 6 to 9 p.m. Southerly
Restaurant and Patio at Southern
Season offers Live Music on the
patio every evening from (11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on Sundays). Make the
most of happy hour with appetizers
and craft beers and cocktails
from our Patio Bar and unwind to
the tune of local bands from the
Lowcountry. Southern Season, 730
Coleman Blvd, 843.416.3965.
FRIDAY, JUNE 20
Story puppet theater
10.30 a.m. See clouds, the moon, a
caterpillar, a coyote and fre in this
delightful show at The Edgar Allan
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch
KKBE Reform Jewish
Congregation Shabbat Service
Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim Reform
Jewish Congregation will host
a Shabbat on the Beach service
East of the Cooper at 7 p.m. on
the Isle of Palms beach at 21st
Avenue. Bring your own chairs.
Parking will be available at First
United Methodist Church, 12 21st
Avenue. Everyone is welcome.
An Oneg will follow. Bring your
dinner and join us at 5:45 p.m.
for a picnic on the beach. For
more information or for alternate
schedule in case of bad weather,
please call 723.1090. (There is no
scheduled service downtown that
night.)
Family Beach Walks
10 to 11 a.m. Spend quality time
with your family outdoors! This
summer stretch your legs on a
guided walk at the beach as we
investigate tide pools, the swash
zone, and the wrack line. All ages
welcome. Chaperone required for
ages 15 and under. Meets at: Isle
of Palms County Park. Fee: Free
with regular park gate admission
Cowboy Mouth
Performing at The Windjammer
Friday and Saturday, 1008 Ocean
Boulevard, Isle Of Palms 9 p.m.,
$20 each day, $30 2 day pass,
www.cowboymouth.com www.
facebook.com/cowboymouth1.
SATURDAY, JUNE 21
Play: buzz buzz with the bee cause
10:30 a.m. Learn about bees, make
crafts, and taste different kinds of
honey. At The Edgar Allan Poe/
Sullivan’s Island Branch.
Sewee Pond open for fshing
The front pond at Sewee Visitor
Center will be open from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. for family fshing. For
more information, please call
843.928.3368.
Florence Crittenton Night at The Joe!
Join us at 5 p.m. as The
Charleston RiverDogs take on The
Kannapolis Intimidators! Tickets
are just $10. Free Parking & Kids
Eat Free! $5 of the ticket price will
beneft our programs.
Beach Lover’s Book Club
10.30 a.m. A discussion of
A Hundred Flowers by Gail
Tsukiyama at The Edgar Allan
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch
Sandpiper Group Show / Mary
Alice Monroe Book Signing
5:30 – 7:00 p.m., Sandpiper
Gallery will host a group show
featuring a book signing with Mary
Alice Monroe and her latest novel,
The Summer Wind. Sandpiper
Gallery is located at 2201C
Middle Street, across from Poe’s
and beside SALT on Sullivans
Island; 843.883.0200, www.
sandpipergallery.net.
TUESDAY, JUNE 24
Farm to Table Dinner
at Southerly
6 p.m., $55. Enjoy a four-course
dinner featuring the best of the
summer bounty highlighting
local produce and local brews.
Chef Chad Billings will craft
dishes showcasing the freshest
ingredients from St Jude Farms,
Thackeray Farms, Grow Food
Carolina and the Mt. Pleasant
Farmers' Market for a farm fresh
menu that celebrates prime
produce season. Southern Season,
730 Coleman Blvd, 843.416.3965.
Storytime with MAC
10:30 a.m., at The Edgar Allan
Poe/Sullivan’s Island Branch.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25
Blue from Nickelodeon’s Blue’s
Clues at Splash Island
For further details on the
waterparks, or a full summertime
character schedule, visit
splashparks.com or call
843.795.4386.
THURSDAY, JUNE 26
Pups, Yups, and Food Trucks
5 – 8 p.m. Mount Pleasant
Palmetto Islands County Park.
It’s a party in the park with your
dog! You and your pup are invited
to join us after work for live
music performed by the V-Tones,
beverages, and the Charleston
Festival Foods food truck. All dogs
must remain on leash. No outside
alcohol or coolers permitted. Free
event with your regular park gate
admission!
FRIDAY, JUNE 27
Mix and Mingle: Singles and
Beer - Cooking with Cold Ones
6 p.m., $35. It's time to cool off
with a cold one and learn to cook
with different kinds of beers.
Cooking School Instructors Nicole
Marriner and Lisa Moore teach
you how beer makes any meal
better. Enjoy an hour of cooking
and eating followed by an hour of
mixing and mingling. Southern
Season, 730 Coleman Blvd,
843.416.3965.
Color Magic
10:30 a.m. Learn about colors with
stories, songs and activities. At The
Edgar Allan Poe/Sullivan’s Island
Branch.
SATURDAY, JUNE 28
Carolina Day!
See story page 25.
Annual SIF&R Fish Fry
5-7 p.m., ticket & event
information coming soon.
Oyster Roast and Southern
BBQ at Palm Cove pool
Wild Dunes Resort from 6 p.m. to
8:30 p.m.
Play: Splash with the Sewee
Education Center
10:30 a.m. Come face-to-face with
common reptiles and amphibians
of the Lowcountry. At The Edgar
Allan Poe/Sullivan’s Island
Branch.
FRIDAY, JULY 4
Happy Fourth of July!
Independence Day Fireworks
Fireworks will be shot over the
Isle of Palms Front Beach area on
Friday, July 4 at 9:15 p.m.
Independence Day Family Fun
Run/Walk
Join Wild Dunes at the Grand
Pavilion at 8 a.m. for a run on the
beach! Prizes will be awarded for
the top male and female fnisher.
Entry fee is $25 and includes a
T-shirt. Please pre-register at the
Fitness Center. 843.886.7008.
Duney’s Watermelon
Eating Spectacular
Watch or compete in this holiday
favorite at the new Palm Cove in
Wild Dunes. Competitors must
register by 12 p.m. at Palm Cove.
843.886.2171.
4th of July Cook-Out
Join Wild Dunes on the Village
Plaza for an all American cookout
from 5:30 - 7 p.m. or 7:30 - 9 p.m.
Dinner includes hamburgers and
hot dogs with assorted cheeses,
caramelized onions, sweet pickle
and all appropriate condiments.
BBQ chicken, pulled pork, potato
salad and baked beans will also
be served along with a special July
4th dessert. Cost for Wild Dunes
Resort Guests is $40 for adults,
$15 for children ages 5-12. For
Non-Resort Guests, cost is $46 for
adults, and $17 for children ages
5-12. Complimentary for children
4 and under. Inclusive of tax and
gratuity. Reservations required.
843.886.2307.
SATURDAY, JULY 5
PLAY: DIY Arts and Crafts
with Ms. Grace
10 a.m. Being crafty and creative
is easier than you think. At The
Edgar Allan Poe/Sullivan’s Island
Branch.
SATURDAY, JULY 19
IOP Beach Run 5K Run/Walk
and 10K Run
8 a.m., Front Beach Isle of Palms.
Register at www.racesonline.
com ; www.iop.net or at the IOP
Recreation Department #24 28th
Ave, Isle of Palms.
16 June 20, 2014
island eats
Ben & Jerry’s
Enjoy an array of ice cream
favors, from Chocolate Therapy
to Peach Cobbler on Isle of Palms’
Ocean Boulevard
$
886-6314
www.benandjerrys.com
1009 Ocean Boulevard,
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Café Medley
Start your day or end it with
a well rounded café, serving
breakfast, lunch, and a glass of
wine in the evening.
$$
793-4055
www.cafemedley.com
2213 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
High Thyme Cuisine
A small island bistro with a wide
range of dishes from seafood,
tapas on Tuesdays, and a brunch
on Sunday mornings.
$$$
883-3536
www.highthymecuisine.com
2213 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Home Team BBQ
Not limited to barbeque, this
casual eatery also serves salads,
wraps, tacos, and quesadillas, as
well as Sunday brunch.
$$
883-3131
www.hometeambbq.com
2209 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Long Island Cafe
Come in for lunch, dinner, or
Sunday brunch and enjoy all your
favorite seafood plus so much
more at this island favorite.
$$
886-8809
www.longislandcafesc.com
1515-A Palm Boulevard
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Morgan Creek Grill
Relax with a front row seat on
the Intracoastal waterway while
enjoying fresh seafood and
southern hospitality.
$$$
886-8980
www.morgancreekgrill.com
80 41st Avenue
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Poe’s Tavern
Famous for their gourmet burgers
and chicken sandwiches, this Poe-
inspired eatery also features great
deals on fresh fsh tacos.
$$
883-0083
www.poestavern.com
2210 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC
SALT at Station 22
Enjoy a fun atmosphere with fresh
seafood and southern favorites,
and a fresh, local raw bar.
$$$
883-3355
www.saltstation22.com
2205 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
SaltWorks Dockside Deli
Located inside the Isle of Palms
Marina Market, come enjoy
fresh breakfast, smoothies, &
sandwiches. Open from 7AM-3PM
daily.
$
www.saltworkscc.com
50 41st Avenue
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Sullivan’s
Grab a casual dinner of fried
founder or crab cakes in a cozy
atmosphere, as well as lunch on
the weekends.
$$
883-3222
2019 Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Taco Mamacita
Enjoy made-from-scratch “Tex
Mex” soups, salads, tacos, and
enchiladas, and quench your
thirst with one of several specialty
margaritas.
$$
789-4107
www.tacomamacita.com
2213-B Middle Street
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
Crave Kitchen & Cocktails
Located just over the bridge from
IOP, Crave's National Award
Winning Chef proudly serves Low
Country visitors and residents
a unique casual fne dining
experience!
$$$
(843) 884-1177
www.cravekitchenandcocktails.
com
1968 Riviera Drive
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
Gilligan's Seafood Restaurant
For Family Friendly Fun-
Gilligan's is the One! Patio and
private dining available as well as
daily and happy hour specials.
$$
(843) 849-2344
www.gilligans.net
1475 Long Grove Dr.
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
Southerly Restaurant & Patio
Open for breakfast, lunch,
dinner, and weekend brunch,
boasts a fresh seasonal menu
highlighting local ingredients and
contemporary cuisine, all with
Southern fair. Our scenic outdoor
patio is a lovely setting to savor
a meal, while our elegant indoor
spaces are perfect for receptions,
parties and meetings.
$$
(843) 416-3965
www.southernseason.com
730 Coleman Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
Sewee Restaurant
See Wee Southern Style local
Seafood, local farm to table
veggies, sinful homemade
desserts.
$$
(843) 928-3609
www.seeweerestaurants.com/
4808 N Hwy 17,
Awendaw, SC 29429
Stack's Coastal Kitchen
Come join us for lunch where
we offer fresh soup, salads and
sandwiches. Enjoy dinner in a
casual
bistro-style setting with a nice
wine selection, full bar, and
outdoor dining.
$$-$$$
(843) 388-6968
www.stackscoastalkitchen.com/
1440 Ben Sawyer Blvd #1107
Mt Pleasant, SC 29464
off-island eats
N
ow through fall 2015,
meetings and groups
visiting Wild Dunes Resort
can share an unforgettable
Southern meal with the Lee
Bbothers, masters behind
Charleston’s thriving culinary
scene.
James Beard award-winning
cookbook authors and regular
contributors to Travel + Leisure
and Bon Appétit, Matt and Ted Lee
are beloved icons in the celebrity
chef world. With multiple TV
appearances on Food Network,
Travel Channel, NBC’s “The
Today Show” and CBS’ “Early
Morning Show” as highlighted in
this video, the Lee Brothers’ lively
personalities and fair for the
favors of Charleston make them
a favorite among such stars as
Bobby Flay and Mario Batali.
With choice from a
conversational cooking class,
traditional Lowcountry oyster
roast or custom dinner
featuring recipes from any of
the Lee Brothers’ award-winning
cookbooks, groups can sip, savor
and shuck their way through
authentic Charleston cuisine
with the iconic duo themselves.
Matt and Ted Lee will introduce
guests to the distinctive concepts
and ingredients unique to the
city with cuisine options like
Hoppin’ John, Oyster Pie and
the acclaimed Southern specialty
Shrimp and Grits.
Groups can customize their
Lee Brothers Charleston culinary
experience based on the size of
the group and food preferences
with a variety of one-of-a-kind
dinners available including: A
Demonstration Cooking Class,
an Oyster Roast Experience and
a Lee Brothers Custom Dinner.
Matt and Ted will mingle with
guests throughout the cocktail
hour and make remarks at the
beginning of the meal as well as
throughout the dinner if guests so
wish, describing the backgrounds
and favors behind the recipes.
To book a Lee Brothers
Charleston culinary experience,
Wild Dunes Resort suggests at
least a two week lead time and
culinary experiences are based on
availability. For more information
on any of the Lee Brothers culinary
experiences or for more meetings
specials and packages, please
call 866-499-7142 or visit www.
wilddunesmeetings.com.
Lee brothers collaborate
with Wild Dunes
C H A R L E S T O N ’ S C U L I N A R Y K I N G S O F F E R
I N T E R A C T I V E O F F E R I N G S AT T H E R E S O R T
STAFF REPORT
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
The Lee brothers have partnered with Wild Dunes to offer unique
dining experiences to visiting groups and meetings.
17 June 20, 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
T
hirteen local students have been awarded $1000 scholarships
from the Volunteer Services Organization a non-proft
organization at East Cooper Medical Center.
This year’s recipients of the $1000 scholarships are: Sean Brady,
Mollie Davidson, Emily Stafford, Ainsley Wingard, Jackson Wood,
Sarah Faulkner, Anna Gazecki, Rita Hirsch, Cameron Kahn, Brooke
Lupton, Ashton Williams, Kevin Pinet and Ashley Prentice. The
students will be attending South Carolina universities including
MUSC, USC, Clemson University and College of Charleston.
The Wishing Well Gift Shop at East Cooper Medical Center is
managed by volunteers and each year sales from the gift shop go to
local charities, medicines for patients in need, and to fund scholarships
for area students. In addition, the VSO also holds several fundraisers
throughout the year. Last year, seven scholarships were distributed.
Through volunteer efforts, the amount awarded this year almost
doubled to thirteen. To apply for the scholarship, students must
complete an application form, provide letters of recommendation and
have a cumulative grade point average of B and above. A scholarship
committee reviews the applications and chooses the recipients.
The scholarships were given at East Cooper Medical Center during
an intimate gathering and celebration to honor the chosen recipients.
CEO, Jason Alexander, and Jan Ledbetter, President of the VSO,
congratulated each student on their hard work and wished them
continued success in their college career.
“It’s an honor to award these scholarships on behalf of our
volunteers. They work hard to raise this money and we’re thrilled to
be helping local students attend college and pursue their dreams,”
said Jan Ledbetter, President of the VSO.
VSO Awards
Scholarships
BY TERESA SIMMONS
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Back row: Kevin Pinet, Emily Stafford, Ashley Prentice, Mollie Davidson, Brooke Lupton,
Cameron Kahn and Jason Alexander. Front row: Anna Gazecki, Jan Ledbetter, and Rita
Hirsch.
I
f you’ve noticed that your chimney brick or masonry is loose,
crumbling, stained, or otherwise deteriorating, you may have
already been thinking you’d like to have it repaired to improve the
appearance of your chimney. But did you know that it’s also crucial to
repair chimney brick to prevent expensive water damage not only to
your chimney
but to all areas
of your home
around your
chimney?
In addition
to leaks, a
water-damaged
chimney can
become both a fre hazard and health hazard, due to the accumulation
of mold, mildew, and rust. Also, if you spot white streaks down your
chimney brick it’s likely something known as “efforescence,” which
is crystallized water and evidence of a problem. But the bottom line
is that the more your chimney’s structure is compromised by leaks
the less effcient and the more hazardous it becomes.
Signs That Your Chimney Brick Needs Repair
Brick and mortar are both surprisingly porous materials and
become even more so as the years go by and the elements take
their toll—especially if your chimney has been left unprotected by
a professional waterproofng, which is what we recommend our
customers have done following restoration of their masonry.
According to the Chimney Safety Institute of America, “A chimney
deteriorated by constant exposure to the weather can be a potential
safety hazard. Weather-damaged lining systems, fue obstructions,
and loose masonry materials all present a threat to residents.”
The following are signs that your chimney’s masonry needs
attention by a certifed chimney mason and tuck pointer:
• Loose bricks
• Crumbling mortar
• A stained, streaked, or rusted chimney
• A rusted damper or frebox assembly
• A “settled” or leaning chimney
• Water stains on the ceilings or walls around your chimney
Once your chimney has been repaired, there are many surefre
ways to prevent future damage, including chimney caps, top-sealing
dampers, new or repaired fashing, and waterproofng agents.
Mark Stoner is President of Ashbusters Chimney Service. He is
the current President of the Chimney Safety Institute of America,
the National Chimney Sweep Guild Ethics committee chairman and
fnalist in the Nashville NEXT Entrepreneur of the Year award. www.
ashbusterscharleston.com, 843.225.9985.
Why Your Chimney
Masonry Needs Attention
PAY AT T E NT I ON T O Y OUR CHI MNE Y MA S ONRY
B E F ORE I T COME S CRUMB L I NG DOWN.
BY MARK STONER
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
"“A CHIMNEY DETERIORATED BY CONSTANT
EXPOSURE TO THE WEATHER CAN BE A
POTENTIAL SAFETY HAZARD.”
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
18 June 20, 2014
W
hat a wonderful feeling
it was for all those who
worked so hard on the
Florence Crittenton Garden
Makeover to see it completely
fnished. In mid-May, many
of those who worked, donated
labor or materials, the Florence
Crittenton Board of Directors
and the women currently living in
the facility gathered to enjoy this
beautiful renovated space.
It was wonderful to see the
many months of hard work come
to such special fruition. The
space went from an unused, wet,
overgrown backyard, to a light
airy garden, with a new patio, a
new deck, newly painted wall and
shed with wonderful plantings
and lovely pathways to walk and
enjoy being outdoors. The new
raised planting bed was full of
herbs and vegetable plants for
the women to enjoy.
This project was undertaken by
the Kiawah-Seabrook’s Exchange
Club Child Abuse Prevention
Committee. The Isle of Palms
Exchange Club soon joined in,
offering funds and help with
the work in the garden. It was a
wonderful joint effort between the
two clubs.
For all those who labored long
hours painting, digging, nailing
and helping whenever they could,
it was more than worth it to see
the results. It couldn’t have
happened without the generosity
of many of our local contractors,
businesses, and tradesmen who
gave time, and materials to see
this project though.
Bob Mason, Chair of the Child
Abuse Prevention Committee of
the Exchange Club was tireless
in his pursuit of businesses to
provide labor or materials for
the garden. John Sandy, was
the project manager and made
at least forty trips downtown to
oversee the work in the garden.
Don Smith, developed the master
plan for the space and then
oversaw the new plantings and
Don Day and David Woodworth
constructed the deck. Many
members of the
Exchange Clubs
came to help with
the painting,
planting, deck
construction and
building the fower
bed.
Everyone who
provided so much
time and materials
should be proud to
have participated
in this amazing
transformation of
this unused space
into such a beautiful
garden. The Kiawah Seabrook
Exchange Club’s Child Abuse
Prevention Committee sponsored
this project and provided
some of the funds necessary
to supplement the donated
materials. The committee is
composed of Bob Mason, Robert
Aldridge, Henry Billiter, Barbara
Campbell. Elisa Cooper and
Sue Holloman. They all enjoyed
participating and watching this
transformation take place over
the six months it took to complete
this project.
The Kiawah-Seabrook
Exchange Club and the Isle of
Palms Exchange Club has left
a lasting legacy for Florence
Crittenton.
Exchange Clubs leave lasting
legacy for Florence Crittenton
I OP CLUB HELPS KI AWAH/ SEABROOK PARTNERS TO BUI LD GARDEN
BY SUE HOLLOMAN
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Elizabeth and Paul Grantham observe their work on the
new garden.
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
19 June 20, 2014
Breach I nl et Ti de Char t
Date High Tide Low Tide
Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.
Source: www.saltwatertides.com
Jun 20
Jun 21
Jun 22
Jun 23
Jun 24
Jun 25
Jun 26
Jun 27
Jun 28
Jun 29
Jun 30
Jul 1
Jul 2
Jul 3
2:36am/3:13pm
3:33am/4:11pm
4:29am/5:06pm
5:24am/5:58pm
6:16am/6:47pm
7:06am/7:32pm
7:53am/8:15pm
8:38am/8:56pm
9:21am/9:34pm
10:03am/10:12pm
10:44am/10:48pm
11:25am/11:25pm
12:06pm
12:03am/12:49pm
8:41am/9:19pm
9:36am/10:22pm
10:31am/11:20pm
11:23am
12:14am/12:13pm
1:04am/1:00pm
1:51am/1:45pm
2:34am/2:28pm
3:15am/3:09pm
3:54am/3:49pm
4:30am/4:28pm
5:06am/5:08pm
5:41am/5:51pm
6:18am/6:37pm
FINANCIAL FOCUS
H
ere’s an interesting
statistic: Over the past
three decades, the
centenarian population in the
United States has grown about
66 percent, according to the
U.S. Census Bureau. Of course,
this doesn’t necessarily mean
that you have a good chance of
living to 100 — but the possibility
may not be as remote as it once
was. In any case, if you do plan
to retire in your mid-60s, and
you are in good health, you may
well have two, or even three,
decades ahead of you. To enjoy
this time to the fullest — and to
help prevent the possibility of
outliving your fnancial resources
— you will need to invest for
income and growth throughout
your retirement years.
As a retiree, how much
income do you need from your
investments? There’s no one
“right” percentage for everyone.
Furthermore, you shouldn’t have
to rely solely on your investment
portfolio, because you may have
other sources — such as Social
Security and potentially your
employer-sponsored retirement
plan — from which to draw
income. Nonetheless, your
investments can play a big role
in providing you with the income
you’ll need during retirement.
Many retirees depend on
fxed-rate investments for a good
portion of their retirement income
— so it’s a real challenge when
interest rates are
low, as they have
been for the past
several years.
Consequently,
when you retire,
you’ll certainly
need to be aware
of the interest-
rate environment and the income
you can expect from these
investments. Longer-term fxed-
rate vehicles may be tempting, as
they typically offer higher rates
than shorter-term ones, but these
longer-term investments may
have more price fuctuation and
infation risk than shorter-term
investments. Ultimately, you’ll
likely need a balance between
short-, intermediate- and long-
term fxed-income investments
to provide for a portion of your
income in retirement.
While it’s important to invest for
income, you can’t ignore the need
for growth — because you won’t
want to lose purchasing power
to infation. As you know, we’ve
experienced quite mild infation
recently. But over time, even a
low rate of infation can seriously
erode your purchasing power. To
illustrate: If your current monthly
costs are $3,000, they will be
about $4,000 in 10 years with
only a 3 percent annual infation
rate. And in 25 years at that
same rate, your monthly costs
will have more than doubled, to
about $6,200. To help protect
yourself against infation risk,
you should consider having at
least some investments that
offer growth potential, rather
than only owning fxed-income
vehicles. And some investment
vehicles, such as dividend-paying
stocks, can offer both growth
potential and current income. In
fact, some stocks have paid, and
even increased, their dividends
for many years in a row, giving
you not just income, but rising
income. (Keep in mind, though,
that companies are not obligated
to pay dividends, and can reduce
or discontinue them at any time.)
To determine the right mix of
growth and income vehicles for
your individual needs, consult
with a fnancial advisor who is
familiar with your retirement
plans, your risk tolerance and
your family situation. And it may
well be a good idea to plan for a
very long retirement. You may not
live to be 100 — but it would be
a good feeling to know that you
could afford to do so.
This article was written by
Edward Jones for use by your
local Edward Jones Financial
Advisor.
Can you afford to live to 100?
BY DIMI MATOUCHEV
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
"IF YOUR CURRENT MONTHLY COSTS ARE $3,000,
THEY WILL BE ABOUT $4,000 IN 10 YEARS WITH
ONLY A 3 PERCENT ANNUAL INFLATION RATE."
20 June 20, 2014
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
T
here is a whole category of
vicious viruses that are on
the rise and you need to be
ready.
Last week I wrote about your
"Data" and how important it is
to back it up. Well that column
could not be more true now with
CryptoLocker (and many different
variations) infecting computers.
As I have said in the past,
malware went from destroying
your hardware or data to just
collecting it, following you on
the Internet, etc. Now the theme
is to "lock" or encrypt your data
right on your hard drive and then
ransom it back to you.
The hackers will give you
48 hours to cough up a lot of
dough, sometimes in the $500-
$1,000 range, or the data stays
encrypted. So back up your Data.
Online backup such as
Carbonite or Mozy cannot be
infected through your computer
as the virus does not see it as a
drive. An external hard drive that
constantly backs up your data
can be seen by the virus and can
be encrypted if connected at the
time of the infection.
So what did I just
say? Consider an
online backup that
works continuously
if you have lots of
data that you are
constantly updating,
such as QuickBooks or some
other business software. If you
have personal data that does not
change often, such as pictures
or documents, consider backing
them up to an external hard drive
that you do not leave attached to
the computer. An external hard
drive connected to your computer
that backs up all the time is a
good thing except in the case of
this virus.
One note about the
CryptoLocker and all it variants
right now, it only infects Windows
based computers. Right now that
is, many experts seem to think a
Mac malware that does the same
is not far from happening. One
thing is for sure, these idiots are
not dumb and since Mac products
are not cheap I'm sure they are
trying to fgure a way to "lock" up
a MacBook.
A new version called
Simplocker attacks Android
based smartphones (mostly in
Eastern Europe) as does another
one called Koler. For now, the
Apple iPhone is safe but again be
very careful, use virus protection
on your phone, which you can
fnd in the app store.
If in doubt please call a pro to
help you out. As others have said
do everything you can not to pay
these cretins. Last week's ending
to the column bears repeating so
here it is again:
Regardless of whether you are
using Windows or Apple based
computers please back up your
data, either in-house or online,
just do it.
Finally if you use QuickBooks
please pay for and use their online
backup. Several clients have had
to pay lots to restore the QB data
onto a new computer after a
crash. Important data should be
considered just that, important.
As always if you have questions
or need help you can call or email
me, Rent A Bob at 843.822.7794
or rentabob@live.com.
Vicious virus on the attack
BY BOB HOOPER
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
“THE HACKERS WILL GIVE YOU 48 HOURS TO
COUGH UP A LOT OF DOUGH, SOMETIMES IN
THE $500-$1,000 RANGE, OR THE DATA STAYS
ENCRYPTED. " ~ Bob Hooper
COMPUTER CORNER
21 June 20, 2014
B
estselling novelist and Isle of Palms’
resident Mary Alice Monroe is
celebrating the release of The Summer
Wind. The second installment of The
Lowcountry Summer Trilogy, The Summer
Wind is a follow-up to last year’s New York
Times bestselling The Summer Girls.
Monroe began writing The Lowcountry
Summer Trilogy after learning that about
52 percent of the resident dolphins in South
Carolina and Florida are sick or contaminated.
The current plight of the Atlantic bottlenose
dolphin became the backdrop of the trilogy.
The Summer Wind continues the story
about sisterhood,
second chances and
lifelong bonds among
three estranged half-
sisters forced to
spend a fnal summer
together at the
family’s beach house
on Sullivan’s Island,
SC. It continues the
saga of Delphine,
an enigmatic wild
dolphin whose
perilous life serves
as the trilogy’s
keystone.
“With every novel,
I strive to re-connect
human nature with
the natural world,”
Monroe said. “And my hope is that
when readers close the book they’ll
love the story, but also realize they’ve
learned a lot about our beloved Atlantic
bottlenose dolphins.”
On Saturday, June 21 from 5:30
– 7 p.m., Sandpiper Gallery on
Sullivan’s Island will host a group
show featuring a book signing with
Monroe. A group of paintings by
a few of Sandpiper Gallery’s own
summer girls; artists Sara Jane
Doberstein, Susan Hecht, Isabel
Forbes, Leslie Pratt-Thomas, Beth
McLean and Tammy Papa that
have been inspired by the book will
be on show. It is always intriguing
to see the way that various artists
interpret a common theme. Each
of these painters has a very specifc
style and way of telling a story with
their artwork.
Trade paperbacks and hardcover
editions of The Summer Wind, as
well as trade paperbacks of the
prequel, The Summer Girls, will
be on hand for personalization by
the author. If you are not able to
attend, you can order a book from
Sandpiper Gallery in advance and
have it signed by Monroe during the
show.
Sandpiper Gallery is located at
2201C Middle Street, Sullivan’s
Island. Monroe will also host a book signing
at 2 p.m. on June 21 at Mt. Pleasant Barnes &
Noble, 1716 Towne Centre Way.
Art, words and summer celebrated
S A N D P I P E R G A L L E R Y H O S T S MA R Y A L I C E MO N R O E B O O K S I G N I N G
STAFF REPORT
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
(above) Coco, 10 x 10 oil on panel by Sara Jane Doberstein.
(left) Mary Alice Monroe's book, The Summer Wind.
22 June 20, 2014
A
pple recently executed a
7-for-1 stock split which
will lower the stock price.
Although stock splits may sound
like a value creating event for
shareholders, they neither
add nor destroy value, but the
psychology behind them can
often create more demand for the
stock.
One Benjamin for Five
Jacksons
As nice as it is to have a $100 bill
in your wallet, this denomination
is notoriously diffcult to use
on a daily basis because many
merchants will not accept them.
Therefore, it’s usually best to
take that $100 to a bank and
exchange it for fve $20 bills.
A stock split is a corporate
action that increases the number
of shares by dividing each share,
which in turn diminishes its price.
The stock's market capitalization,
or the overall value of the equity,
remains the same much like
the value of the $100 bill is not
altered by swapping it for fve $20
bills.
Although a stock split may
seem pointless given the value
remains the same, companies still
do them for three key reasons:
Increased Liquidity: By
increasing the number of shares
available for purchase, the
liquidity for that stock will rise.
Increasing liquidity will result
in lower costs for trading. For
example, Berkshire Hathaway
(ticker: BRK-A) has never split
their stock and is now trading at
close to $190,000/share. Since
only a few hundred shares trade
daily, the cost to buy the stock
is substantially more expensive
than a highly liquid stock where
millions of shares trade daily.
Marketability: A lower stock
price makes that equity more
attractive to smaller investors
who want to own more than a
few shares. For example, most
smaller investors cannot afford
to buy BRK-A simply because
the cost for one share is often
prohibitive and/or undiversifed.
ESOPs: An Employee Stock
Option Program (ESOP) is
designed to pay employees with
company stock, and a lower stock
price allows management more
leeway to pay its employees.
This split is Apple’s frst since
2005, and many investors are
asking why they chose to split
their stock now. Apple explained
its decision to split the stock
very simply: "We want Apple
stock to be more accessible to a
larger number of investors." Our
Investment Committee, along
with the broader institutional
investor community, believes
that Apple is positioning itself
to be included in the Dow Jones
Industrial Average Index (Dow),
which is one of the most popular
equity indexes in the world.
The Dow is a price-weighted
index, which means that high-
priced stocks have a bigger impact
on the index. A $500+ stock
would have an outsized impact
on the index price, so it would
not be considered for inclusion.
By contrast, Apple would ft well
now that the shares have split.
A stock that gets added to
indexes like the Dow or the S&P
500 will often rise in price in
anticipation of big institutional
investor buying. For example, a
mutual fund that tracks the Dow
is usually required to own every
stock in the index, so if Apple
were to be added to the Dow then
this manager would need to add
Apple’s stock to their fund.
Simply put, increased
institutional investor demand
for Apple’s stock could cause the
value of the stock to rise even
further.
Implications for Investors
While the logic above is sound
as stock prices typically do rise
when added to indexes, we are
less optimistic about the impact
to Apple given that the Dow is
not as popular as the S&P 500 or
Russell indexes for the majority
of institutional managers.
Rather, we believe that
inclusion into the Dow is
important because it is a further
indication that Apple is no longer
a growth company, and value
investors should take notice.
The Dow index typically
represents mature companies
that are more shareholder
friendly than younger companies
more focused on growth.
Inclusion in the Dow could act as
a psychological trigger for those
value investors that still struggle
to believe that Apple is nothing
more than a damaged growth
stock.
This commentary is not
intended as investment advice or
an investment recommendation.
It is solely the opinion of our
investment team at the time
of writing. Fusion Capital is a
Registered Investment Advisor
frm. If you have comments or
questions, please contact Jason
Mengel at jmengel@fusioncapital.
net or call 843.972.0065.
The Psychology Behind Apple’s Stock Split
BY JASON M. MENGEL
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
FINANCIAL
M
ay 10 was a busy, but rewarding, day for the Notre Dame Club
of Charleston. In support of the university's month of service,
the club participated in two community service events.
Club members started the day at an East Cooper Habitat for
Humanity project house near the Sullivan's Island Elementary
School. The team spent the morning constructing concrete forms,
grading landscaping and painting the interior.
After completing the Habitat project, club members gathered at
Dunleavy's Pub for lunch and camaraderie. Once refueled, they
picked up trash along four beach walks as part of their semiannual
beach clean up.
PHOTO BY STEVE ROSAMILIA
Cleaning up for
house and home
BY ROBERT EARL
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Members of the Notre Dame Club of Charleston help clean up the beach.
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
25 June 20, 2014
TAKE HOME A LUCKY DOG
Lucky Dog Club
LDC
G
r
a
d
y
G
rady loves the grass. He is a 3yr 7 month old Staffe
mix. Give Grady the freedom he craves and adopt
him at The Charleston Animal Society. Charleston
Animal Society is offering great
deals on adult dogs through
Memorial Day. All of our
animals come with their
shots and some degree of
training. Visit us today
at 2455 Remount Road
in North Charleston.
F
ort Sumter National
Monument invites you to
celebrate Carolina Day
with a free weekend of special
programs at Fort Moultrie on
Saturday and Sunday, June 28
and 29. This year’s event features
Revolutionary War musket
and artillery demonstrations,
period medical program, life of
a Revolutionary War soldier as
portrayed by members of the 2nd
South Carolina regiment, and
a Saturday evening concert by
the 246th Army Band at 7 p.m.
The programs will be ongoing
throughout the day between 10
a.m. and 4 p.m. The fort and
visitor center will be open from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the normal
entrance fee will be waived for
the weekend.
Carolina Day, observed every
year on June 28 throughout
South Carolina, commemorates
the successful defeat of British
land and naval forces by Carolina
and Virginia patriots on June 28,
1776. This was the frst decisive
victory by the American Colonies
in their fght for independence
and prevented the British from
gaining a foothold into South
Carolina for another four years.
This year marks the 238th
anniversary of the battle of
Sullivan’s Island.
Fort Moultrie is administered
by the National park Service as
a unit of Fort Sumter National
Monument. Located at 1214
Middle Street, Sullivan’s Island,
South Carolina, the fort and
visitor center are open daily
from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. except for
New Year’s, Thanksgiving, and
Christmas Days. An entrance fee
to tour Fort Moultrie is normally
charged. For more information,
call 843.883.3123 or visit us on
online at www.nps.gov/fosu.

CAROLINA DAY CELEBRATION SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
June 28, 2014
10:00 Children’s Musket Drill Program
10:30 Infantry/Musket Firing Demonstration
11:30 Cannon Firing Demonstration
1:00 Children’s Musket Drill Program
1:30 Infantry/Musket Firing Demonstration
2:30 Cannon Firing Demonstration
3:00 Children’s Musket Drill Program
3:30 Infantry/Musket Firing Demonstration
4:30 Cannon Firing Demonstration
7:00 246th Army Band Concert
June 29, 2014
10:30 Infantry/Musket Firing Demonstration
11:30 Cannon Firing Demonstration
1:00 Children’s Musket Drill Program
1:30 Infantry/Musket Firing Demonstration
2:30 Cannon Firing Demonstration
3:00 Infantry/Musket Firing Demonstration
3:30 Cannon Firing Demonstration
Celebrate Carolina Day
where it all began
F O R T MO U L T R I E O F F E R S F R E E A D MI S S I O N
BY BILL MARTIN
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
Zack Pace, Bob Sherman and John Misenheimer
enact the defense of South Carolina at last year’s
Carolina Day celebrations.
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
26 June 20, 2014
M
other Theresa once said: “Let us make
one point, that we meet each other
with a smile, when it is diffcult to
smile. Smile at each other, make time for each
other in your family.” Since the East Cooper
Community Outreach Dental Clinic opened
23 years ago in June of 1991, our mission
has been to enable ECCO’s eligible clients
the ability to smile. This is accomplished
by the collaborative efforts of area dentists,
MUSC dental students/
residents and auxiliaries
who unselfshly donate
their time and talents to
enable those in need to
create a better future for
themselves.
The advent of the
job readiness initiative
ECCO Works is especially
important to the Dental
Clinic staff and volunteers.
This is new program
offers a sustainable
approach to poverty
elimination. Incorporating
job preparedness, case
management, skills
training, and help with
job placement, the goal of
ECCO Works is to work
with program participants
to help them get a job and
keep it for one year, while
striving to advance into a
career where livable wages can be earned.
More information is available at www.
ECCOcharleston.org in the Empowerment
program subsection.
Enabling these ECCO clients to eliminate
generational poverty oftentimes means
providing them a healthy smile. An unhealthy
smile is often cause for low self-esteem and
can be a signifcant barrier to acceptance in
the workplace. A healthy smile gives these
clients the self-confdence to move forward
in both the job interview and placement
processes.
South Carolina licensed dentists provide
critical care to East Cooper residents living
in poverty Monday through Thursday
during the day, and Tuesday and Thursday
evenings. More than 7,000 dental procedures
are performed throughout the year at ECCO’s
facility, which is home to a state of the art
four chair Dental Clinic. Area dentists are
encouraged to volunteer several hours a
month to help underserved neighbors at the
East Cooper Community Outreach Dental
Clinic (Six Mile Road in Mount Pleasant).
To lend a helping hand, please contact Ms.
Leslie White at lwhite@ECCOcharleston.org or
call 843.416.7115 or 843.343.2984.
Dental clinic at ECCO supports
Job Readiness Initiative
BY MICHAEL F. CUENIN
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
MUSC Senior Dental Student Mathew Keckeinsen treats a patient at the ECCO
dental clinic.
T
hese Memorial Flags decorated the municipal parking lot on
Pavilion Drive, Isle of Palms over Memorial Day weekend.
They few to recognize men from the Lowcountry who lost
their lives in the war on terror.
HOTO BY STEVEN ROSAMILIA
Island Remembers
ISLAND PHOTOGRAPHY
WWW.ISLANDEYENEWS.COM
27 June 20, 2014
[ A n s w e r : “ P o m e g r a n a t e , ” P u n i c a g r a n a t u m ]
K
a-BOOM!
Here’s a fower that looks
like a small explosion. In
this photo, you are looking at a
blossom head-on, so to speak.
There are 5-8 feshy sepal lobes,
and plenty of stamens remaining
in the fower. It used to have a
number of red-orange, foppy
petals, but these have all fallen
away. Before long, this fower will
be producing a fruit.
If all goes well, the fruit will
be globose, the size of a baseball
(or perhaps even a softball), and
covered with a smooth, leathery,
orange-red skin. Botanists refer
to this fruit as a special kind
of berry, and it is tightly flled
with plenty of seeds, maybe a
couple hundred or so. Each seed
will be packed into a number
of white, pithy chambers, and
at maturity, each seed will be
enclosed in a ruby-red, juice-
flled outer layer. The refreshing
juice is deliciously sweet and
sour, and flled with vitamins.
Ripe seeds are often eaten as a
delicacy. It’s a bit of a chore to
chew off the delicious, outer juicy
layer, but some connoisseurs
just chew up the whole thing,
seed and all. Otherwise, you can
sometimes fnd its juice bottled
in specialty grocery stores. And,
of course, there is sweet, syrupy
“grenadine,” which is derived
from the juice.
Our Mystery Plant is a shrub
or small tree, native to the
Mediterranean and southern
Asia. It has been known since
antiquity, and is prominently
featured in plenty of ancient
stories and mythology. The
ancient Greeks loved this plant,
and grew it commonly as an
ornamental. Of course, they
were also interested in its juice,
as were the Romans, somewhat
later. This is a plant that is easy
to grow in the warmer parts of
the United States. The shrubs,
which are sometimes a bit spiny,
feature shiny, dark green leaves,
sharp-pointed at the tips. When
the plants are frmly established
in the garden, they may produce
their marvelous fruits all summer
long. This species especially
appreciates long, hot summers,
and it likes it dry.
You may not recognize the
fower at all, for it’s really the fruit
for which this plant is known.
Ripe fruits will
be topped with
the remnants
of the feshy
calyx, and this
resembles a
crown. These
fruits are quite
decorative,
and for those
who are
reluctant to
eat the seeds,
the fruits look
great piled
into a bowl,
sometimes
featured at Thanksgiving. The
French word for one of these
fruits is “grenade,” and sure
enough, this botanical structure
has thus provided inspiration for
the use of the word that now gives
us the explosive hand grenade. A
big, ripe, fruit, if dropped on the
foor, will sometimes burst into
a number of pieces, scattering
its seeds. (The seeds are thus
the shrapnel inside.) The fruit
itself resembles a swollen, red
apple, and when flled with its
ripe seeds, allows for the plant’s
perfectly good French common
name, pomme-granate, which, of
course, means “seedy apple.”
John Nelson is the curator of
the A. C. Moore Herbarium at
the University of South Carolina,
in the Department of Biological
Sciences, Columbia SC 29208. As
a public service, the Herbarium
offers free plant identifcations.
For more information, visit www.
herbarium.org, call 803.777.8196,
or email nelson@sc.edu.
MYSTERY PLANT
PHOTO BY JOHN NELSON
A seedy apple
BY JOHN NELSON
FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS
J
ames Sireci took this photo of a blacktip shark found dead
on the beach near 30th Ave. on the Isle of Palms. This
time of year it’s common for sharks to migrate through the
waters off the Lowcountry. Some of the larger species are tracked
by ocearch.org. Visit the website for more information.
Shark washes up
on IOP beach
ISLAND PHOTOGRAPHY

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