CATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC COURSES REGISTRATION BOOKLET

For the School Year 2008-2009

course registration deadlines spring 2008

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March 24: March 26: April 4: April 11: April 18: May 1: May 6: May 16: distribute registration materials to teachers at in-service day present registration procedure to students at assembly registration forms due (advisors turn them) registration forms entered & initial course lists distributed to department heads registration changes due (from changes proposed by dept. heads) registration changes due (from changes proposed by parents) all final registration changes reviewed by department heads from department heads: all sectioning teaching assignments lists of AP and Honors students

May 22: May 26: June 1: June 1: June 6: July 1: July: early August: August 22: August 26: Orientation:

Mr. Perlee presents tentative sections & classrooms to curriculum committee Mr. Perlee starts real schedule deadline for committee assignments deadline for requests for Directed Studies deadline for new student registration materials to be returned deadline for placement for new students in math and language schedule finished & final balancing of sections all faculty schedules finished final list of classes for each student (for registration package) seniors may make changes to class list by 7:00 p.m. final list of language & math placement by 7:00 p.m. (end of the new student first day) students receive final schedules

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KINDS OF COURSES 1. A YEAR COURSE runs for the entire year. Students who enroll in a year course in the fall are required to remain enrolled for the entire year. A SEMESTER COURSE runs for one semester and may be offered in the spring or in the fall.

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GENERAL POLICIES 1. 2. All students are required to take a minimum of 2.5 units each semester. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may take more than 3.0 units (excess load) in any one semester only if they have approval of both their advisor and the Director of Studies. Some Advanced Placement (AP) courses are worth 0.625 or 0.75 units per semester and are more timeconsuming than other courses because of extra class meetings or increased homework or both. Students who enroll in such courses should know that the time commitment will be greater. Students may select AP courses when registering for classes, but final enrollment is dependent upon departmental approval. In some subjects, "honors" courses are offered. Students are placed in honors sections by the academic departments involved, in recognition of exceptional ability and achievement. Special circumstances may lead to exceptions being made to the above requirements, but these exceptions need the petition of the student with approval of his or her advisor, and approval of the Director of Studies. Low enrollment in any course or staffing needs may lead to the cancellation of a listed course. At the time of the printing, we are planning to offer all listed courses, but no promise is made, particularly for elective courses, so students should have other choices available. Not all courses listed in this booklet will necessarily be offered, depending on enrollment or staffing. Note: Elective courses must have a minimum sign-up and also have a maximum section size of 14 students. In the event of enrollment beyond this number, a lottery system may be used to determine final placement. 7. Each credit course in the curriculum follows a prescribed course of study -- texts, materials, methods -approved by the department chairperson and the director of studies as being appropriate to the stated goals of the course. Students in a given course are not exempted from any element of its course of study. The terms “lower” and “upper” school are used to designate course loads. “Lower school” refers to 9th and 10th grades, and “upper school” refers to 11th and 12th grades. Directed Studies may not be used to reach the minimum 2.5 units / semester minimum load.

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ARTS -- Foundation Arts and 1 additional unit for entering 9th and 10th grade students. (0.5 units must be taken in the sophomore year) ENGLISH -- 1 course per year. FOREIGN LANGUAGE -- successful completion of a third-year course; students entering with an advanced knowledge of a language must either take that language through the sophomore year or study another foreign language through the third year. HISTORY -- a course in each of the first two years, and U. S. History in the upper school. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT -- Freshman Seminar for freshmen, and Sophomore Seminar for sophomores. MATHEMATICS -- a course per year through the junior year, with the final course determined by the initial Cate entry level. All students are expected to complete Algebra II. SCIENCE -- three years of science. Physics is taken in the freshman year, Chemistry in the sophomore year, and a life science in the 11th or 12th grade year. “Requirement” life sciences include Biology, AP Environmental Science, and AP Biology.

TYPICAL COURSES OF STUDY GRADE 9 The freshman course of study is made up entirely of required courses. Humanities (English/History) Mathematics Foreign Language Conceptual Physics Foundation Arts Freshman Seminar

GRADE 10 (NEW STUDENTS) All new sophomores take the following courses: English 10 Mathematics Foreign Language Topics in Modern World History Foundation Arts Chemistry Sophomore Seminar

GRADE 10 (RETURNING STUDENTS) The following are the options for returning sophomores. English 10 Mathematics Foreign Language Topics in Modern World History Arts Chemistry Sophomore Seminar

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TYPICAL COURSES OF STUDY GRADE 11 Note: The course of study for new juniors is determined by previous courses and by consultation with Cate’s Director of Studies. Virtually all juniors take the following three courses: 1. English 11 2. Mathematics • students who have not taken Algebra II must do so • students who have completed Algebra II may take Pre-Calculus; AP Statistics; Computer Science; or Probability, Statistics, and Calculus to satisfy their third-year requirement • students who intend to take Calculus in the senior year must take Pre-Calculus 3. Foreign Language • juniors who have not completed the required third-year course must do so • students who have completed the required third-year course are encouraged to continue foreign language study through at least the junior year The other requirements in the junior and senior years are: 1. 2. 3. 4. English 12 (taken only in the senior year) U. S. History a course in life science completion of the art requirement, if not already completed (students must take, in addition to Foundation Arts, one additional credit in the arts or its equivalent in semester or half-credit courses)

Thus, juniors may choose as their fourth and fifth courses: • • • • • U.S. History and Science U.S. History and Art (as fulfillment of the requirement or as an elective) Science and Art U.S. History, Science, OR Art, plus an elective two electives (postponing remaining requirements until the senior year is a rare choice and not recommended)

Juniors should plan their junior and senior years. They should consider what workload is appropriate for them in what is, for many students, a busy year. Choosing both history and science is a very common and, for many students, a reasonable load, and is advisable for students who anticipate applying to highly selective colleges. But students, especially those who would benefit from a lighter load in the junior year, should not hesitate to spread the remaining requirements over the last two years. Juniors should also consider interest and ability: for example, students interested in science should take science as juniors, then an advanced science in the senior year; students interested in taking Calculus as seniors must take the prerequisite, Pre-Calculus, as juniors. Students interested in history or foreign language or the arts should take courses in both years.

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TYPICAL COURSES OF STUDY GRADE 12 Seniors must take English 12 in the fall and an English elective in the spring. If they have not already done so, they must complete whatever requirements remain. Electives make up the rest of the required five units (2.5 units each semester).

DIRECTED STUDIES Directed Studies courses are semester-long or year-long. They are designed by any student in conjunction with a faculty director who is willing to supervise and grade the study, and Directed Studies are meant to satisfy an interest that lies outside and beyond the established curriculum. Directed Studies courses must be documented and approved by the Director of Studies by May 15 for the fall semester of the following year, or by December 15 for the second semester. No student may take more than one such course in any one semester unless need or interest clearly warrant it. Directed Studies courses are available for juniors and seniors. Directed Studies may not be used to reach the minimum 2.5 units / semester minimum load.

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ARTS DEPARTMENT Arts Requirement: Foundation Arts and 1 additional unit (0.5 units must be taken in the sophomore year). Directed Studies may be taken in any arts disciplines, for 0.25 credit only, provided that the student has had at least two years of previous study in that discipline. All applications will be reviewed by the Arts Department for approval before being submitted to the Director of Studies. A student does need to provide evidence not only of a skill but of good time management and organization. FOUNDATION FINE ARTS 0.125 units/semester, Year Course: Foundation Fine Arts, along with Foundation Performing Arts, is one of the prerequisite courses in the Arts Department. This course focuses on the visual language and skills of drawing, design, painting, sculpture and art critique. FOUNDATION PERFORMING ARTS 0.125 units/semester, Year Course: Foundation Performing Arts, along with Foundation Fine Arts, is one of the prerequisite courses in the Arts Department. This course aims to teach the skills and language of the performing arts through the disciplines of music and theater.

CERAMICS/SCULPTURE OPTIONS INTRODUCTORY CERAMICS/SCULPTURE I 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This course emphasizes the expressive and creative nature of clay, not only through hand-building and sculpture but with the learned techniques of throwing on the wheel to create more functional forms. A "vocabulary" of forms is established through a graduated series of assignments while later projects focus on more complex forms and a greater freedom for students to select an appropriate technique to realize their ideas. All forms of decoration and glazing are introduced, with an emphasis on application to stoneware, porcelain and Raku clays. Prerequisite: Foundation Arts

INTERMEDIATE CERAMIC DESIGN 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This course will be run partially as a directed studies, with a two-period, weekly meeting. It is geared toward juniors who, having completed Ceramics I, are unable to take the advanced course (0.5 units) until their senior year, but who wish to continue improving their skills through self-directed projects or to build toward a slide portfolio to enhance their college application. Prerequisite: Ceramics I

ADVANCED CERAMICS/SCULPTURE or AP STUDIO ART (3-D DESIGN) 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: This advanced course provides an ambitious and intensive exploration of the expressive and functional aspects of stoneware and porcelain clays. A developmental sequence of assignments during the first semester helps students gain the advanced technical skills for both sculpture and thrown ware. During the second semester they design their own projects with an emphasis on in-depth exploration of form, design, decoration and glazing. Advanced students are called upon to instruct beginning potters in the capacity as teaching assistants during the first semester. Students selecting the Advanced Placement option will develop a portfolio of work to be submitted in the spring to the College Board. The body of work will be based totally upon the curriculum mandated by the AP program. Prerequisite: Ceramics I and department consent for Advanced Ceramics/Sculpture; Intermediate Ceramic Design or Advanced Ceramics and permission of the instructor for AP 3-D Design.

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ARTS DEPARTMENT (continued) THEATER OPTIONS ACTING 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This course is designed for those students with little acting experience outside the work done for the Theater component of the Foundation Arts Program. Students participate in an ongoing improvisational exercise designed to reduce self-consciousness, increase responsiveness, develop the ability to work truthfully moment to moment, and achieve a full emotional life onstage. Scenework allows for the application of technique to performance. Vocal and movement components are included. Students will be graded on participation, journal entries (that will document personal progress in the work), finished scene-work, and overall work ethic. There will be a final examination consisting of a performance and a critique. Prerequisite: Foundation Arts.

THEATER ENSEMBLE 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This is a performance-based workshop in which students produce fully realized showcases for the school community. These may take the form of scene or monologue nights, staged readings, productions of work written by the class, or more traditional presentations of copyrighted material. Practical work on the production(s) will be supported by lecture/demonstration sessions on various theater topics, presented by the instructor or, at times, visiting professionals in the field. Two convocation performances, concurrent with the end of each semester, can be expected, in addition to other less formal showings. In an effort to become more familiar with the body of dramatic literature, students can be expected to read a number of plays during the year that will not be performed. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

THE ART OF DANCE 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This course will analyze dance as an art form through lectures on the language, history and forms of movement, trips to see local company performances and to participate in workshops and master classes, movement exercises, watching and writing about dance videos, and projects in choreography and scholarly research. Students will come away with a heightened awareness of their own physical instruments as a tool for creative expression, a broad awareness of the meanings that dance and movement motifs play in the artistic and spiritual lives of various cultures, and the confidence and knowledge to create dance pieces of their own making. Prerequisite: Foundation Arts.

MUSIC OPTIONS CAMERATA 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This is a performance-oriented course for serious vocal students who wish to sing challenging literature in a small ensemble. Much of the music is a cappella. A focus on vocal technique and advanced choral interpretation is central to the course. Several performances are presented throughout the year; and performance is required at all of them. Although there is no audition, students must demonstrate the ability to match pitches. CHAMBER MUSIC 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This is performance-oriented course designed for classical instrumentalists who wish to play chamber music. Repertoire from course work is selected for performances. Several performances are scheduled throughout the year, and performance is required at all of them. Enrollment is by audition.

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ARTS DEPARTMENT (continued) JAZZ/CONTEMPORARY MUSIC 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This is a performance-oriented course designed for the instrumentalist who wishes to play jazz and contemporary music. Students are introduced to the elements of improvisation including Jazz harmony, soloing strategies and ensemble playing. There are four levels of Jazz/Contemporary music available to students: Big Band, Jazz/Contemporary Ensemble I, Jazz/Contemporary Ensemble II and Advanced Jazz Ensemble. The appropriate ensemble will be determined by the instructor. Several performances are scheduled throughout the year. Students are required to perform at all performances. Drummers who wish to take the course have two options. They may choose to audit the course for no credit and be brought in for rehearsals only, or they may opt to take the course for credit and a grade, requiring participation in the theory and technique modules at the outset of the course.

MUSICIANSHIP I 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This course offers students an opportunity to study advanced elements of music theory, harmony, ear training, composition, recording technology, and music history. Through a better understanding of the elements of music, students will develop their performance and analytical skills. Prerequisite: Foundation Arts or permission of the instructor.

MUSICIANSHIP II 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This course offers students an opportunity to study advanced elements of music theory, harmony, ear training, composition, recording technology, and music history. Students also work individually on compositional and performance projects. Prerequisite: Musicianship I or permission of the instructor.

PHOTOGRAPHY AND MEDIA OPTIONS PHOTOGRAPHY I 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: Photography is introduced as a medium for communicating information and ideas in effective visual form. Students learn to use the camera (Digital cameras and a variety of traditional film formats) to document and communicate their observations, perceptions and ideas in a form that exemplifies the fundamentals of good design. The primary image output will be digital, although basic lab processes are introduced. Project work ranges from highly structured assignments to more individualized projects. The aesthetics of the photographic image are the focus of the second semester. To control the visual characteristics of their images, students learn to use increasingly advanced photographic and digital equipment, materials and techniques, from camera work and lighting to image refinement using the latest image enhancement software. Digital darkroom work is coupled with the use of traditional and non-silver printing techniques. Prerequisite: Foundation Arts. PHOTOGRAPHY II 0.25 unit/semester, Year Course: This course explores advanced photographic and digital techniques and concepts. In the first semester, each student photographer will pursue a single subject matter. Subject matter has been the primary concern for the notable photographers throughout the history of the medium. In the second semester, color is introduced, as is advanced digital image manipulation with PhotoShop software. Studio lighting and advanced digital print techniques will enhance the student's skills inventory. At least one hour of homework per week is required of each student. A portfolio is submitted at the end of each semester. Prerequisite: Photography I or permission of the instructor.

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ARTS DEPARTMENT (continued) INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL ARTS 0.25 unit/semester, Year Course: This course explores the hardware, software, and peripherals used in the world of digital art and design to create a plethora of digital imagery. No previous experience in the digital arts is necessary to have a rewarding and successful year in this class. The student will learn to use software such as Photoshop CS2, Illustrator CS2, iStopmotion, and Final Cut Express HD. Students will manipulate scanned images, create original images, learn to use digital cameras and sound equipment, and manipulate sound and visual tracks in live-action and animation filmmaking. We will work in teams and as individuals. At least one hour of homework is assigned per week. There are no final exams. Each student turns in a portfolio at the end of each quarter. Prerequisite: Foundation Arts. DIGITAL FILMMAKING 0.25 unit/semester, Year Course: This course is designed to further explore the complex and exciting world of digital art including projects in PhotoShop CS2, Illustrator CS2, iStopmotion, and Final Cut Express HD. The focus of the year will be the art and techniques of digital liveaction and animated filmmaking. We will delve into the styles and techniques of masters and incorporate their visions and accomplishments into our own work with filmmaking as a medium of personal expression. Other instructors will be invited into class sessions to further the students’ understanding of audio, story telling, and the “look” of film. In addition, guests and field trips will expose the students to professionals and unique Southern California venues. At least one hour of homework is assigned per week. There are no final exams. Each student turns in a portfolio at the end of each quarter. Prerequisite: Introduction to Digital Arts.

STUDIO ART OPTIONS STUDIO ART I 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: Through a series of structured and more open-ended assignments, students continue to broaden their skills and become more facile with various media. Drawing, painting, sculpture and design projects challenge students to think creatively and interpret both realistic subject matter and abstract conceptual problems. Figure drawing is introduced. Critiques in class teach the students to look at their classmates’ and their own work and constructively discuss what makes one piece more successful than another piece. At least one hour of homework per week is required of each student. A final exam in the form of a project is given at the end of each semester. Prerequisite: Foundation Arts.

STUDIO ART II 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: Studio II is recommended for students who want to continue developing their artistic skills. A range of studio techniques and media are used in this class. Assignments are longer and more challenging than those from Studio I, requiring the student to push him/herself creatively. Figure drawing becomes an integral part of Studio II. Students begin to develop portfolios at this level, which may be used as support material for college applications or for the AP portfolio. Colored pencils, graphite, gouache, watercolor, acrylics, sculpey, charcoal, and caran d'ache crayons are some of the materials used in this class. At least one hour of homework per week is required of each student. A final exam in the form of a project is given at the end of each semester. Prerequisite: Studio Art I or permission of the instructor.

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ARTS DEPARTMENT (continued)

STUDIO ART HONORS or AP STUDIO ART 0.625 units/semester, Year Course: This class takes a more individualized creative approach toward learning art. While students continue to develop previous skills and use of media, they are encouraged to experiment more and take greater risks. Presentation becomes more important at this level. Assignments generally last much longer, and they involve much more thought and research and many more preliminary sketches before the actual piece may be started. Organization of time is critical in working on these long-term projects. Students spend a lot of class time developing basic life-drawing, painting, visual problem solving, and design. Critiques and assignment or "art-world/scene" oriented discussions play a significant role in the curriculum. Toward the end of the year the student will be given the option to concentrate on one specific area in art that interests him/her in particular and to come up with a specific project with specific goals. A final exam in the form of a project is given at the end of each semester. Students selecting the Advanced Placement option will develop a portfolio of work to be submitted to the College Board. Students are encouraged to sit for the AP examination. Prerequisite: Studio Art I or permission of the instructor.

ART HISTORY or AP ART HISTORY 0.625 units/semester, Year Course: Art History explores the relationship between the form and content of art works (primarily painting, sculpture, and architecture) and the different social, political, philosophical, religious, and scientific beliefs which have shaped them. Art History also provides an encounter with the interesting ideas, important questions, and compelling conceptions of truth and beauty which have been communicated in visual form through art. Period styles -- Classical, Baroque, Impressionist, to name a few -- are approached both chronologically and thematically. In addition to offering an understanding of art history, the course provides a visual overview of Western history. The art history program develops skills in reading, writing, and observation. Students learn how to read a wide range of written works, including texts, critical and analytical pieces, works of journalism, and literature. Art works are viewed in the form of digital images, CDs, and videotapes. Students are encouraged to sit for the AP examination. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Requirement: One course per year. HUMANITIES (English/History) 1.0 units/semester, Year Course: This double course replaces the traditional 9th grade English and Topics in History with a blended historical and literary study of Western Europe. We begin with an intensive three weeks of writing, refreshing skills in description, narration, and the essay paragraph. We also present the basic investigative approaches to historical study: what did social, economic, political, and intellectual life look like in each period? Then we move on to the following historical periods: the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and finally the Industrial Revolution. We look at the art and literature of each period (e.g. The Wife of Martin Guerre, Romeo and Juliet, A Tale of Two Cities) as expressions of the values of the time and also as inspirations for our own writing and art work. Supplementing all this is a thorough study of Level I grammar. The year ends with a three-week study of the world's major religions and two novels: The Life of Pi and Siddhartha.

ENGLISH 10 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: The first three weeks of this course are dedicated exclusively to student writing; the goal is that students refine the skills they have acquired in Humanities and develop important new skills. This work is supplemented by intensive vocabulary acquisition and a review of Level I principles. The second phase of the course is a study of poetry with an emphasis on the enjoyment and appreciation of figurative expression. For the rest of the year, students read a number of works in a variety of genres and cultures (Wiesel's Night, Homer's Odyssey, Salinger's Nine Stories, and a novel such as Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre) and write regularly in the report, narrative, and essay forms.

ENGLISH 11 or AP ENGLISH 11 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: English 11 begins with a writing period (narrative and essay), then a study of poetry. The rest of the year is devoted to writing (mainly essay), a study of Level II principles, intensive vocabulary acquisition, and readings in American Literature. Works include Miller’s Death of a Salesman, selections from Thoreau's Walden, some short stories, Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Cather's My Antonia, Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, and usually Morrison’s Song of Solomon. Those students in AP sections (selected by the department) also prepare for the Advanced Placement exam in Language and Composition.

ENGLISH 12 0.5 units/semester, Fall Semester Course: The fall semester of English 12 consists of a three-week writing unit, a month of poetry, a month studying Hamlet, and approximately three weeks on a classic novel, such as Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, or a collection of stories.

ENGLISH 12 LITERATURE ELECTIVES 0.5 units/semester, Spring Semester Course: Each spring the English Department offers to seniors a number of courses that satisfy the second half of their English 12 requirement. Seniors will be provided a list of the course options in the fall. These offerings vary slightly each year, but frequently include such courses such as California Literature, Russian Stories, Creative Writing, The American Novel, Film Studies, and Modern Drama.

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FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT Requirement: Successful completion of a third-year course. Students entering with an advanced knowledge of a language must either take that language through the sophomore year or study another foreign language through the third year. INTRODUCTORY COURSES FOREIGN LANGUAGE I (Chinese, French, Japanese, and Spanish) 0.5 units/semester; Year Courses: Level I courses provide an in-depth introduction to French, Spanish, Chinese, and Japanese. The classes emphasize the acquisition of the basic knowledge and skills required for effective communication, including grammatical principles, accent, intonation, and pronunciation. Reading and listening comprehension are also stressed, as are writing skills. Students speak French/Spanish/Chinese/Japanese from the first day of class. FOREIGN LANGUAGE II (Chinese, French, Japanese, and Spanish) 0.5 units/semester; Year Courses: These courses continue to develop the basic language skills introduced in Level I, with considerable focus on grammar and vocabulary. (In addition, Level II courses in Spanish utilize a video series throughout the year.) Besides continued refinement of speaking and listening skills, these courses emphasize the development of concise, well-organized compositions. French and Spanish students also begin to read literature in preparation for the third-year courses. FOREIGN LANGUAGE III (Chinese, French, Japanese, and Spanish; in Spanish only, there is also a section of III Honors) 0.5 units/semester; Year Courses: These are intermediate courses in which students are able to refine and apply the skills acquired in the first two years. Students are required to make numerous oral presentations and participate in daily class discussions; in addition, students read increasingly sophisticated works and begin to write more fully developed essays. (Students in Spanish continue to use the "Destinos" video series introduced in Spanish II.) (III HONORS is offered only in Spanish due to staffing and enrollment.)

ADVANCED COURSES CHINESE IV 0.5 units/semester; Year Course: Students learn increasingly complex speech forms as they progress to a level more similar to that of a native speaker. They strive to understand dialogues between native speakers and increase their knowledge of slang and idioms. While learning more advanced rules of pronunciation and grammar, students read Chinese folk stories and classical and modern literature as they strengthen their appreciation of Chinese culture. Students use computers extensively to produce more effective writing. Prerequisite: Chinese III or permission of the department chair.

JAPANESE IV 0.5 units/semester; Year Course: This course requires vigorous study of grammar, composition, conversation, and culture. Considerable energy is devoted to improving facility with keigo (honorific speech) and plain forms of speech. In addition, knowledge of kanji is expanded to cope with the greater focus on literature and the development of writing skills. Prerequisite: Japanese III or permission of the department chair.

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FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT (continued)

FRENCH IV 0.5 units/semester; Year Course: This course encompasses the reading of plays, short stories, articles of current interest, movie scripts (and showing of movies), and conversation (using a vocabulary book as a guide). Grammar is reviewed with an advanced grammar and reading text. For those who wish to prepare for the AP Language Examination, the course will cover the necessary material, but taking the examination will not be mandatory, nor the focus of the course itself. (Examples of texts to be used: Interaction, Au revoir les enfants, a short story anthology, Schaum's French Vocabulary, AP French, Sartre's "Huis Clos.") Prerequisite: French III or permission of the department chair.

SPANISH IV 0.5 units /semester; Year course: This course is for students who have successfully completed Spanish III and who wish to continue their study of Spanish. The course develops the four skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening), with particular emphasis on oral communication and cultural competency; promote student-centered (pair and group work) and contextual learning, as well as critical thinking skills; and develop reading as a basis for general discussions, rather than for close literary analysis. The cultural component consists of a general study of the twenty-one countries of the Spanish-speaking world, organized geographically in eight units. Short readings, music, and videos are part of this component, as well as projects on art history, geography, and other historical, economic, and cultural topics. After each unit, students will watch a movie and discuss it. Students will be expected to achieve a general understanding of the issues that the Spanish-speaking world faces in the actual world. Grammar will be reviewed through the reading component, and as problems arise. Assessment is based on vocabulary quizzes, compositions, oral presentations, and projects. Daily participation should demonstrate the effort to gain linguistic confidence and speaking proficiency. Prerequisite: Spanish III or permission of the department chair.

AP FRENCH or SPANISH LANGUAGE 0.5 units/semester; Year Course: These courses involve advanced work in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The courses include specific preparation for the AP Language exams (given in May), which test students' communication skills in French and Spanish. Students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in the spring. Prerequisites: French or Spanish III and permission of the department chair.

AP FRENCH or SPANISH LITERATURE 0.625 units/semester; Year Course: These courses follow the standard AP course descriptions prepared by the College Board. Students study plays, short stories, novels, and poetry spanning several centuries. The courses include specific preparation for the AP Literature exams given each May. Prerequisites: French or Spanish IV, or equivalent, and permission of the department chair.

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HISTORY DEPARTMENT

Requirement: A course in each of the first two years and U.S. History in the upper school.

HUMANITIES (English/History) 1.0 units/semester, Year Course: This double course replaces the traditional 9th grade English and Topics in History with a blended historical and literary study of Western Europe. We begin with an intensive three weeks of writing, refreshing skills in description, narration, and the essay paragraph. We also present the basic investigative approaches to historical study: what did social, economic, political, and intellectual life look like in each period? Then we move on to the following historical periods: the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and finally the Industrial Revolution. We look at the art and literature of each period (e.g. The Wife of Martin Guerre, Romeo and Juliet, A Tale of Two Cities) as expressions of the values of the time and also as inspirations for our own writing and art work. Supplementing all this is a thorough study of Level I grammar. The year ends with a three-week study of the world's major religions and two novels: The Life of Pi and Siddhartha.

TOPICS IN MODERN WORLD HISTORY 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: Topics in Modern World History is a sophomore course that continues to emphasize skills, but includes specific content objectives. Half the course focuses on modern European history (1815-Present), and half focuses on modern Asian history with emphasis on China. Students switch teachers mid-year.

UNITED STATES HISTORY (0.5 units/semester) or AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (0.625 units/semester), Year Course: This course teaches skills in reading and interpreting history, through primary and secondary sources, in writing on historical topics, and in preparing a research paper. Students will study the origins of the American political system, the development of the American economy and American culture, and the various crises that have beset the county in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. An important goal of this course is to develop interest in America’s past by showing its contemporary relevance. Students enrolled in the AP section will be expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in the spring. Enrollment in the AP class may be limited and placement is determined by the department.

ELECTIVE COURSES

AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: AP Comparative Government introduces students to the fundamental concepts of political science and considers the processes and outcomes of politics in six core countries: China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia. The course gives students an opportunity to learn about the diversity and complexity of political life around the world and to contemplate the ways in which the American system is both similar and different from other political structures. While the focus of the course is on the political life of the core nations, students will also examine the cultural patterns of these six countries. The fall semester includes an on-line negotiation project where a team from Cate assumes the identity of a core nation and engages in a series of negotiations around issues of trade and security with students from other California schools. Comparative Government is a full year course, but students who take AP American Government in the fall may join the Comparative Government course in the spring. Open to juniors and seniors.

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HISTORY DEPARTMENT (continued) TOPICS IN NATIONAL AND GLOBAL ECONOMICS 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: This course provides an introduction to basic economic concepts and theories and examines topics related to our contemporary national economy: monetary policy, federal budget, business cycles, the stock market, environmental issues, and the role of the government in regulating the economy. The course will also look at the benefits and risks entailed in global economics. Though there is a textbook for the class, daily newspapers, guest speakers on and off-campus, and field trips to local businesses will supplement the background provided by the textbook. The goal of the course is to provide students with a foundation in economics and an understanding of and fluency in the language used to discuss contemporary economic issues and trends Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

AP ECONOMICS 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: This full-year introduction to Economics is divided into two distinct, but fundamentally related, fields: microeconomics and macroeconomics. The study of microeconomics includes, but is not limited to, the following concepts: supply and demand, firm production/costs/revenues, profitability, and the different types of competitive markets. The study of macroeconomics features examination of measurements of aggregate economic performance (e.g. GNP, unemployment, inflation), monetary and fiscal policy, and international economics, to name only a few of the major concepts. In both microeconomics and macroeconomics, students will apply their knowledge to "real-world" phenomena - for example, students will participate in a stock market project where they will utilize their knowledge of economic concepts and financial markets to hypothetically invest their money. Students in this course will be expected to take the Advanced Placement examinations in Microeconomics and Macroeconomics given in May. Enrollment in this course may be limited. Prerequisite: May be taken only as a Directed Study in 2008-2009.

Fall semester: HISTORY RESEARCH 0.25 units/semester, Fall Semester Course: The purpose of this course is to provide students the opportunity to learn about topics of their own choosing from any aspect of American, Asian, or European history they find interesting. The format for the course is student-conducted independent research, working with history and library faculty, and presentations to the class. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 0.5 units/semester, Fall Semester Course: AP American Government introduces students to American government and the American political system. Beginning with the Constitution, students examine the institutions and processes that make up our government. Current topics and events play an important part in the course. Students will be well prepared for and are expected to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Enrollment in this course may be limited. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

Spring semester: HISTORY RESEARCH 0.25 units/semester, Spring Semester Course: The purpose of this course is to provide students the opportunity to learn about topics of their own choosing from any aspect of American, Asian, or European history they find interesting. The format for the course is student-conducted independent research, working with history and library faculty, and presentations to the class. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors

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HISTORY DEPARTMENT (continued) AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY 0.5 units/semester, Spring Semester Course: In this course we will examine the major themes in African-American history beginning with the development of the African slave trade to the present. We will review concepts of race and race relations throughout this period; the development of African-American culture; and issues, events, and people that contributed to shaping the African-American experience in the United States. Close attention will be paid to how African-Americans destroyed the myth of black infallibility, broke the chains of Jim Crow and emerged as a people in modern society. Each student will write several shorts papers and one long research paper. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

GEOGRAPHY 0.5 units/semester, Spring Semester Course: Students will be introduced to the various topics included in the formal study of Geography (including Historical, Physical, Economic, Political, and Human) while also learning a number of practical skills such as mapmaking and the interpretation of data, graphs, and maps. We’ll not only learn where places are but why and how various cities, countries, and populations developed. We’ll also focus on current and future trends and issues with people, places, and politics. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST 0.5 units/semester, Spring Semester Course An introduction to the modern Middle East from the collapse of the Ottoman Empire to the recent revival of Islamic fundamentalism. Focus will be on the 20th century confrontation with the West, including the mandate system and decolonization, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Iranian Revolution, and recent Western incursions into Iraq and Afghanistan. Understanding the origins, nature, and evolution of Islam will receive significant attention. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

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HUMAN DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT Requirements: Freshman Seminar and Sophomore Seminar. FRESHMAN SEMINAR 0.125 units/semester, Year Course: Meeting two periods per week and required of all freshmen, this course brings about discussion of moral issues and participation in activities designed to build trust, cooperation, internal growth and self-understanding. The objective is to build a sense of community within the school through open communication and the development of mutual respect. FRESHMAN RESEARCH SKILLS Research Skills works in conjunction with Cate's Humanities course to help students prepare two important research projects—one in the fall and another in the spring. In the course, we introduce students to valuable print resources that they may use for their projects; we teach students how to correctly cite sources using MLA guidelines and how to create lists of works cited; we discuss issues of academic honesty and plagiarism, as well as the ethical use of the Internet; we introduce students to the online resources available at Cate, and we teach them how to become more effective searchers using appropriate keywords and other strategies; we teach students how to effectively use the Internet to find more authoritative Web sites for their research projects; and we introduce students to the interlibrary loan process. FRESHMAN STUDY SKILLS The Freshman Seminar study skills course will introduce students to the concepts, skills, and strategies of active versus passive study habits. Students will learn to utilize effective strategies in note taking, reading texts, writing essays, preparing for and taking tests while leveraging their personal learning styles and strengths in the process. In addition, students will cover material regarding important discoveries in brain research, nutrition and learning, and use of multiple intelligences in learning and in the classroom. SOPHOMORE SEMINAR 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: This is a required sophomore course designed to provide an opportunity to talk openly and thoughtfully about issues involving personal health, drugs and alcohol, sexuality, relationships and important life choices. The objective is to provide accurate information and honest communication on these topics within a personal and interpersonal ethical context.

ETHICS AND LEADERSHIP 0.25 units/semester, Fall or Spring Semesters, or Year Course: This course will provide an opportunity to examine and challenge personal morals and ethics. Students will be invited to examine real-life situations, current events, and film and video, identifying ways ethical principles have been tested. Issues of effective ethical leadership will also be examined in depth. Students may take the course in either semester, or for the entire year. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

SENIOR TEACHING ASSISTANTS 0.25 units/semester, Year Course: Senior Teaching Assistants are selected in the spring of their junior year on the basis of their commitment to work with younger students, their dependability and their ability to lead and work cooperatively with others. TA's are assigned in male/female pairs to assist with one of the Freshman or Sophomore classes. All TA's are trained in teaching, group leadership and peer counseling skills. They meet as a full group one evening a week to receive special training about the potential problems and decisions that may confront students as they go through high school and college. Freshman Seminar TA: Freshman TA's provide personal guidance and support for new students and assist in running class discussions and exercises. TA's meet with their section twice a week and meet with other Freshman TA's once a week to plan and prepare for the week's classes. Sophomore Seminar TA: Sophomore TA's lead class discussions and activities and are expected to be available to the students in their class for personal support and advice. TA's meet with their section twice a week and meet with other Sophomore TA's once a week to plan and prepare for the week's classes.

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HUMAN DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT (continued)

PEACE STUDIES 0.5 units/semester, Fall semester only. This course will investigate the power of peacemaking, both interpersonally and internationally. Students will get to know the unsung nonviolent heroes of history. Students will create and implement their own "Call to Action Project" and become innovative leaders committed to solving the most difficult problems facing our world. This course will be a scholarly, practical, and personal pursuit that examines nonviolent alternatives to injustice, violence and war. This graded course meets 4 times a week and contains a service-learning component. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

SPIRITUALITY 0.5 units/semester, Spring semester only. Spirituality involves one’s capacity for creativity, growth, and a sense of purpose in life. It can be seen in wisdom, love, hope, connectedness, and compassion. Spirituality is inclusive of, but not limited to, institutional religion. We will explore what spirituality is, does, and can offer us as human beings. The aim of the class is to expose students to a variety of spiritual paths, experiences, traditions and practices. It also seeks to foster a multi-dimensional sense of spirituality in students, including personal spirituality, social spirituality, and global spirituality. Individuals from many faiths and spiritual backgrounds will speak to the class on a regular basis. This graded course meets 4 times a week and has a large reading and writing component. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

MYTHS AND RITUALS 0.25 units/semester, Spring semester only. Study the stories and ceremonies of meaning from a variety of cultures. Embark upon a personal odyssey of the spirit. Begin to understand the myths and legends that have shaped us. This spring semester class will investigate who we are and where we may be going in life. With a focus on the earliest memories of our childhood, we will begin to reflect on who we truly are today. We will write out, discuss, and interpret the signs and symbols associated with our dreams. This class will involve some handwork projects to keep us mindful of the simplicity of creativity. The study of Native American rituals, including a sweat lodge ceremony, will occur alongside the rituals we create together. We will also study diet, nutrition, meditation, and yoga practice. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

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MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT Requirement: A course per year through the junior year, with the final course determined by the initial Cate entry level. All students are expected to complete Algebra II. Essentially, the requirement is three years of mathematics, including comparable high school level courses taken prior to Cate, although four years of math are recommended. Policies: A TI-83+ or 84 graphing calculator is required for all mathematics courses. Students taking Advanced Placement courses are expected to take the Advanced Placement examinations in the spring. Advanced levels (beyond Algebra II) and AP courses require the consent of the department, which means demonstrated competence in the prerequisite class. Normally, semester grades of C or better are required to advance to the next level class in the regular sequence through Algebra II. For Honors selection, grades of A- or better are expected. For AP classes, grades of B or better are expected. These standards are intended to ensure proper placement in challenging courses and to help students make good choices so that they can be the most successful.

ALGEBRA I (ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA) 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: This course introduces and stresses the basic concepts of algebra, including types of numbers and their properties, variables, operations with expressions, exponents, radicals, axioms, working with polynomials, solving linear and quadratic equations, solving inequalities, and working with rational expressions. Emphasis is placed on developing skills needed for future work in math, problem-solving techniques, logic, and applications to real-world situations.

GEOMETRY 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: This course introduces and stresses the basic topics and concepts of plane and solid geometry and coordinate geometry, including angles, triangles, lines, circles, polygons, area, similarity, congruence, and right angle trigonometry. Emphasis is placed on developing problemsolving skills, logical understanding of theorems and proofs, the deductive reasoning process, and relating the material to realistic applications. Prerequisite: Algebra I.

ALGEBRA 1.5 (INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA WITHOUT TRIGONOMETRY) O.5 units /semester, Year Course: This course is intended as a transition course into Algebra II for students who have taken Algebra I but are not ready for the pace of Algebra II. Algebraic skills covered include operations of functions, graphing, polynomials, exponents, radicals, and solving equations and inequalities. The emphasis is on skill development and refinement to prepare students to handle Algebra II. Offered only when needed or possible due to enrollment, placement, and staffing. Prerequisite: Geometry.

ALGEBRA II or ALGEBRA II HONORS (ADVANCED ALGEBRA INCLUDING TRIGONOMETRY) 0.5units/semester, Year Course: This course builds a strong foundation of algebraic principles and skills by reviewing and extending the topics from previous courses. This is achieved through the study of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. In addition, discrete topics such as sequences, series, the binomial distribution, and combinatorics are considered. Emphasis is placed on the skills of graphing and analyzing functions, problem-solving, and relating the material to realworld applications. Honors level is offered and selection is made by the department. The purpose of the honors course is to offer the challenge of greater depth and faster pace to the most able students. Prerequisite: Geometry.

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MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT (continued) PRE-CALCULUS or PRE-CALCULUS HONORS 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: This course is designed to prepare students for calculus by providing a review of algebra skills and a thorough study of functions and applications. It is also intended to introduce students to topics in advanced mathematics beyond an Algebra II level. The course begins with a thorough treatment of functions and trigonometry and finishes with a study of polar coordinates, parametric equations, fractals, conic sections, and matrices. Realistic applications are included in each area. Pre-Calculus students should have a strong background in Algebra, usually meaning B- or better in Algebra II. Honors level is offered and selection is made by the department. In the honors-level course, the second semester focuses on differential and integral calculus, following the Advanced Placement AB syllabus. Students enrolling in the honors course may be eligible to enroll in Calculus II (BC) in the following year. Prerequisite: Algebra II and consent for Honors.

AP CALCULUS I (AB) 0.625 units/semester, Year Course: This college-level mathematics course is designed to prepare students for the external Calculus (AB) Advanced Placement Examination (a good performance on this exam can result in college credit). A variety of topics relating to integral and differential calculus are studied in detail. The course outline follows the Advanced Placement syllabus and focuses on the tools of Calculus for problem solving. Students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in the spring. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus and consent of department. AP CALCULUS II (BC) 0.625 units/semester, Year Course: This course prepares students for the Calculus (BC) Advanced Placement Examination. Emphasis is on theory and more complex problems than those encountered in Calculus I. Topics include a review of differential and integral calculus, advanced integration techniques, applications, infinite series, vector algebra, and vector calculus. The course outline follows the Advanced Placement (BC) syllabus. Students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in the spring. Prerequisite: Calculus I or Pre-Calculus Honors and consent of department.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE 0.50 units/semester, Year Course: This course prepares students for either the A or the AB Computer Science Advanced Placement examination. It is designed to develop computer knowledge and skills including: the components of computer systems, program design, program implementation, program analysis, standard algorithms, and data structures. Students use the Java language to complete the course. The class focuses on a hands-on approach while working to understand the main principles of object-oriented software design and programming. Students may elect to take either the A or AB Advanced Placement exam in the spring, depending on prior experience and work completed during the year. Prerequisite: Algebra II and consent of department. AP STATISTICS 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: AP Statistics is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, noncalculus based, college course in statistics. Algebra II is a pre-requisite, and the course can be taken by any student, regardless of intended major in college. The purpose of AP Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: (1) Exploring data: observing patterns and departures from patterns; (2) Planning a study: deciding what and how to measure; (3) Anticipating patterns in advance: producing models using probability and simulation; and (4) Statistical inference: Confirming models. Students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in the spring. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus, or Prob Stat Calc, and consent of department.

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MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT (continued)

COMPUTER SCIENCE A, B 0.5 units/semester, Semester or Year Course: This is an introductory course in computer science for students with limited experience in programming. This one-semester course will be individually designed to introduce programming using the Java language. Programs will focus on problem solving and include the use of objects and classes. Projects may include animation, graphics, and interactive applications. Students may elect to take a second semester as a continuation of the course. (Note: may not be offered, depending on staffing and enrollment.) Prerequisite: Algebra II and consent of department.

PROBABILITY, STATISTICS, AND CALCULUS (WITH MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE APPLICATIONS) 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: This course is intended as a non-AP advanced mathematics elective for juniors and seniors who do not choose to pursue one of the AP options. In the first semester it provides an introduction to the discrete math topics of probability and statistics, including the analysis of data, the conducting of surveys, sampling, experiments, and inference. In the spring the major themes of calculus (the limit, derivative, and integral) are introduced in a conceptual approach with applications, with extensive use of the graphing calculator. Financial applications including the use of spreadsheets will be included. Prerequisite: Algebra II.

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SCIENCE DEPARTMENT Requirement: Three years of science is required. A typical course of study is as follows: Conceptual Physics is taken in the freshman year, Chemistry in the sophomore year, and a life science, which may be Biology, AP Environmental Science, or AP Biology, must be taken in the junior or senior year. Students entering Cate in grade 10 are enrolled in Chemistry and satisfy the remainder of the departmental requirements (physics and a life science) in the junior and senior year. CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS (9th Grade) 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: (for all 9th grade students) This course is an introduction to the sciences at Cate. Using examples from everyday life, Conceptual Physics is designed to help students make important connections between theory and practical application. This activity-based course places special emphasis on the inter-related nature of all scientific disciplines and makes liberal use of the concepts from biology, astronomy, chemistry, and earth science. Topics addressed in this course include classical mechanics, the nature and characteristics of sound and light, electricity and magnetism, and atomic structure. CHEMISTRY 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: (for all 10th grade students) This introductory course in chemistry is designed to help students recognize the important role that chemistry plays in their lives. Students are introduced to chemical principles which will enable them to think more intelligently about current issues that involve science and technology. Basic concepts introduced include: evolution of atomic theory, conservation of matter and energy, chemistry of gases, kinetic theory, electrochemistry, acid-base chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. Demonstrations, experiments, and group activities are used extensively to foster an appreciation for scientific inquiry and to enhance student understanding of essential concepts. PHYSICS 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: This upper-school course is open to students in the 11th or 12th grades who have not had a Physics course. Students will investigate the behavior and structure of matter in the world around them. Special emphasis is places on showing the connections of physics to the other disciplines of biology, chemistry, and earth/space science. Topics addressed include mechanics, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism, as well as relativity and atomic structure. Prerequisite: Chemistry

BIOLOGY 0.5 units/semester, Year Course: This new departmental offering will examine major themes in biology with an emphasis on ecological relationships and human interactions with the biosphere. The course will cover many of the essential ideas presented both in AP Biology and AP Environmental Science, but without the breadth of content. Without the constraints of an external AP syllabus, students will have the opportunity for more in-depth consideration and discussion of fewer core topics, allowing for an increased level of understanding of those biological concepts most critical for an informed citizenry. Topics such as cell biology, evolution, genetics, biodiversity, and ecology will be highlighted to develop critical thinking skills, and laboratory work will emphasize the connection between humans and their living environment. Prerequisite: Chemistry AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 0.625 units/semester, Year Course: Set against a framework of the fundamental principles of ecology, evolution, genetics, and biodiversity, this course helps develop critical thinking skills about environmental issues. These include energy consumption and alternatives, resource management, endangered species, population growth, sustainable development, global warming, environmental health, and pollution of the air, water and land. Laboratory and fieldwork are designed to focus on real-world problem solving related to the local community as well as broader global issues. Fieldwork includes participation in a local creek restoration project, research on the invasive plant Cape ivy, and maintenance of the newly developed Cate Nature Trail. The syllabus parallels that recommended by the College Board, and prepares students for the AP exam in Environmental Science. Prerequisite: Chemistry

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SCIENCE DEPARTMENT (continued)

AP BIOLOGY 0.75 units/semester, Year Course: The syllabus parallels that recommended by the College Board for a first-year college biology course, and prepares students for the advanced placement examination. This course covers in detail the underlying concepts of life at the molecular, organismal, and community levels. A rigorous laboratory program provides an opportunity to develop advanced lab skills using sophisticated procedures and instrumentation. Throughout the course there is an emphasis on the presentation of ideas in essay form. Students read scientific literature and are encouraged to follow breaking news stories in biological research. Prerequisites: Chemistry and departmental permission.

AP CHEMISTRY 0.75 units/semester, Year Course: The purpose of this advanced course in chemistry is to help students develop an in-depth and practical understanding of fundamental chemical concepts: stoichiometry, reaction kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium, nomenclature, and descriptive chemistry. The course has an extensive laboratory component. The content of the course is based on the outline established by the College Board for a first-year college chemistry course and will prepare the students for the AP examination. Prerequisites: Chemistry and Physics and departmental permission.

AP PHYSICS (B) 0.625 units/semester, Year Course: This non-calculus based college level physics course follows the course syllabus established by the College Board and prepares students for the advanced placement examination. Students examine, at an advanced level, a wide variety of topics including: kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, properties of matter, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and relativity. The extensive laboratory component introduces students to a variety of sophisticated scientific equipment and procedures. Prerequisites: Physics and Algebra II and departmental permission.

FALL SEMESTER ELECTIVE COURSES

GENETICS 0.5 units/semester, Fall Semester Course: This elective explores the fundamental concepts of transmission and molecular genetics through laboratory experiments, class discussions, and various handson exercises. Among the topics considered are: the function of DNA, chromosomes and genes within a single cell; patterns of inheritance; genetic mutations; and biotechnology, such as genetic engineering, the Human Genome Project, forensics, and stem cell research. Lab exercises include live crosses using different yeast strains, DNA “fingerprinting”, DNA sequencing, recombinant DNA and cloning, and the polymerase chain reaction. Students will learn to use the latest technology to access information about new developments in the field. Students will also examine and debate the ethical issues raised in conjunction with genetic technology. Prerequisite: An introductory biology or environmental science course; open to juniors and seniors.

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SCIENCE DEPARTMENT (continued)

INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY 0.5 units/semester, Fall Semester Course: This senior elective will consider the major forces that created and continue to be at work to maintain the world ocean. Beginning with important concepts in earth structure and plate tectonics and the construction of ocean margins and basins, the class will then consider the interactions of landmasses, the oceans and the atmosphere to create the marine habitat and so greatly influence the global climate. Students will use a wealth of internet resources, such as real-time satellite images, archived data banks, and color-enhanced and infrared imagery, to understand and analyze the formation of hurricanes, the relationship between earthquakes and tsunamis, and the periodic changes in the marine environment that result in El Niño conditions that affect the local environment. Field trips will focus on an understanding of the nature of California's active coastline and the forces that have created it. Prerequisite: Chemistry, and Biology or Environmental Science SCIENCE LABORATORY ASSISTANT 0.25 units/semester, Fall Semester Course: Science lab assistants assist science department faculty members in preparing lab experiments for a variety of courses. Students learn how to make solutions, to prepare bacterial cultures, to properly dispose of chemicals, to maintain aquaria, and to calibrate instrumentation used in the science program. Students are expected to commit 90 minutes each week working in Cate’s laboratories. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors with departmental permission.

SCIENCE RESEARCH 0.25 units/semester, Fall Semester Course: This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with an individual teacher to create and carry out a student-designed investigation. After a primary area of interest is identified, students isolate a specific problem to investigate. Students propose and implement an experimental design, collect and analyze the results obtained, and present the findings both in a formal written scientific paper and a seminar presentation to the Cate community. Interested students may also choose to enter projects in local and national competitions. Areas of investigation may be related to any area of science. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors with permission of instructor.

SPRING SEMESTER ELECTIVE COURSES

ADVANCED TOPICS IN PHYSICS: DIRECTED STUDY 0.25 units/semester, Spring Semester: This calculusbased college level physics course follows the course syllabus established by the College Board. Students will examine, at an advanced level, classical mechanics including: kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotational dynamics and gravitation. Co-requisites: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of AP Phys. (B) and AP Calculus I.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 0.5 units/semester, Spring Semester Course: Students investigate the structure and function of the systems of the human body in this spring semester course. Lab experiences include explorations of the working of the lungs, heart, kidneys, brain, digestive tract, bones, and muscles. Computer simulations, videos, and dissections are also included. Prerequisite: Biology or Environmental Science; open to seniors.

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SCIENCE DEPARTMENT (continued) ASTRONOMY (observational) 0.5 units/semester, Spring Semester Course: This course is designed for those who are curious about what they see when gazing into the night sky. The course provides an understanding of how the universe works and how we have come to develop this understanding. Some of the topics studied during the semester include: the creation and destiny of the universe; mythology and constellations; eclipses and meteor showers; astronomical knowledge and archaeology of ancient cultures; the evolution of stars, planets and moons, and galaxies; and the search for extraterrestrial life. There are naked-eye and telescopic observation sessions. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors.

MARINE BIOLOGY 0.5 units/semester, Spring Semester Course: This course introduces students to the marine environment as interdependent ecosystems creating diverse habitats for biological communities. Students will survey major groups of organisms that populate these communities and examine the patterns of interaction that characterize marine ecosystems. Although field and lab work will emphasize California oceanic and coastal communities, students will examine the world ocean's most significant warm and coldwater communities also. Field trips include whale watching, elephant seal observations at San Simeon, a day at the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific, and trips to local sandy beaches and tide pools. Prerequisite: Chemistry, and Biology or Environmental Science THE AMERICAN WILDERNESS 0.5 units/semester, Spring Semester Course: The purpose of this course, which may be taken as either an English or science elective, is to enhance students’ perception of the natural world. This course consists of a classroom component, combining literature and environmental science, and an experiential component, where students apply these connections to their own personal experiences outdoors. Students will develop descriptive writing and observation skills through the use of journals and will examine the works of authors such as Thoreau, Abbey, Stegner, Leopold, McPhee, and Duncan. Scientific study will focus primarily on river ecosystems, with an emphasis on cartography, river hydrology, and water quality, including discussions of current political issues surrounding the environment. Students will each perform a wilderness backpacking solo in the local area. They will learn the basic skills of whitewater kayaking in the pool and in the ocean surf, culminating in a weekend trip to the Kern River. The course concludes with a week-long wilderness river trip during exam week. Prerequisite: Open to seniors. SCIENCE LABORATORY ASSISTANT 0.25 units/semester, Spring Semester Course: Science lab assistants assist science department faculty members in preparing lab experiments for a variety of courses. Students learn how to make solutions, to prepare bacterial cultures, to properly dispose of chemicals, to maintain aquaria, and to calibrate instrumentation used in the science program. Students are expected to commit 90 minutes each week working in Cate’s laboratories. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors with departmental permission.

SCIENCE RESEARCH 0.25 units/semester, Spring Semester Course: This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with an individual teacher to create and carry out a student-designed investigation. After a primary area of interest is identified, students isolate a specific problem to investigate. Students propose and implement an experimental design, collect and analyze the results obtained, and present the findings both in a formal written scientific paper and a seminar presentation to the Cate community. Interested students may also choose to enter projects in local and national competitions. Areas of investigation may be related to any area of science. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors with permission of instructor.

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