HEALTHY LIVING HEALTHY PLANET

feel good live simply laugh more

FREE

EARTH DAY, APRIL 22
THE POWER
CONNECTING WITH NATURE

BE AN ECO-ADVOCATE

HOME OF TREES COOKING
TOP GREEN EATING TIPS
APRIL 2010

TORECYCLERS LOCAL
April 2010

NA TALKS

| Green Country | NAGreenCountry.com
natural awakenings

1

Discover the amazing health benefits of Alkaline Water!
Change Your Life...
918-518-1514

Water for Living Healthy

Change Your Water...

Neutralize the acidity of the body caused by stress, modern diet, air pollution, and many bottled waters. Visit our sister stores and let us show you!
ECO-FRIENDLY • No more buying plastic bottles!

41st & Peoria (across from Whole Foods)

Bring This Coupon In For FREE Water for 30 days and 2 FREE Water Jugs!
109th & Memorial

Get Caught Recycling!
THE RECYCLING REVOLUTION

Yoga Makes Everything Better!

Open Daily Mon. thru Fri. 12-6 pm

Providing Recycling Opportunities for Businesses and Communities
Call us at 918-894-2019 Visit: TheRecyclingRevolution.com or Email: customerservice@therecyclingrevolution.com

$5.00 drop-in classes. Check website for details.
7718 E. 91st Street, Suite 160 Tulsa, OK 74113 (off 91st St., just west of Memorial) innerpeaceyogatulsa.com info@innerpeaceyogatulsa.com

Overwhelmed? Confused? Need Energy?
Package includes a 1 hour European Facial combined simultaneously with 40 minutes of reflexology all for only $84 (regular price is $105) Don’t miss out!
5942 S. Lewis • Tulsa, OK 74105 • 918-749-5130 • Call Becky 918-688-5028 or Linda 918-760-9589

April Special -- 20% discount!!!

I can help you RENEW! Call for a free consultation.
Raymond Lickliter - Holistic Life Coach 918-289-8675

2

Green Country Edition

NAGreenCountry.com

contents
10
10 globalbriefs 12 healthbriefs 16 greenliving 17 wisewords
Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health, nutrition, fitness, personal growth, green living, creative expression and the products and services that support a healthy lifestyle.

16

19 inspiration 22 healthykids 24 consciouseating 26 naturalpet

16 SPRING GREEN REHAB
Give Your Home the Green Light Today
by Crissy Trask

16

19 THE ART OF READING
by David L. Ulin

22

28 fitbody 30 healingways

20 NATURAL AWAKENINGS
TALKS TO LOCAL RECYCLERS
by Kristi Eaton

20

advertising & submissions
HOW TO ADVERTISE To advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit, please contact us at 918-361-6442 or email Publisher@NAGreenCountry.com. Deadline for ads: the 10th of the month. EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS Email articles, news items and ideas to: Publisher@ NAGreenCountry.com. Deadline for editorial: the 5th of the month. CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS Email Calendar Events to:Publisher@NAGreenCountry. com or fax to 888-336-6082. Deadline for calendar: the 10th of the month. REGIONAL MARKETS Advertise your products or services in multiple markets! Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp. is a growing franchised family of locally owned magazines serving communities since 1994. To place your ad in other markets call 239-449-8309. For franchising opportunities call 239-530-1377 or visit NaturalAwakeningsMag.com.

22 OUTDOOR PLAY
Make Every Walk an Adventure
by Debra Bokur

24 SUSTAINABLE
by Rich Sanders

HOME COOKING
Ten Reasons to Take Back the Plate

24

26 NATURAL ANTIDOTES
by Dr. Shawn Messonnier

TO SPRING ALLERGIES

28 10 WAYS TO FEED
Keep the Health Benefits Coming
by Maggie Spilner

26

A WALKING HABIT

NAGreenCountry.com

natural awakenings

April 2010

3

letterfromthepublishers
Natural Awakenings Theme for April is Green Living. And boy are we ready for Green instead of White! Our network of loyal monthly readers is now approaching three million, and growing. We now are in 75 communities in the continental United states, as well as Puerto Rico and Toronto. Natural Awakenings corporate office is conducting a readership survey online at NaturalAwakeningsMag.com. Simply click on the banner, “Take Our Survey”, to participate. Your input will give us a better understanding or your needs as a reader, as well as your needs as a community. Natural Awakenings founding CEO, Sharon Bruckman, believes your responses will help guide and direct the future development of each individual Natural Awakenings franchise. The survey will take only two minutes, so please participate! After you take the survey, please enjoy the April issue. We spoke to 4 local businesses that showed us their passion for recycling. Turn to page 20 to see how recycling moves up the ladder from grass clippings to neighborhood pickup, to business pickup and then where it all ends up in Green Country. Shane Michaels has opened Soma Cafe Organic and you’ll never guess where it is. It’s inside Mathis Brothers furniture store. Read Shane’s story in this months Community Spotlight on page 15. I also urge each of you to support our Natural Awakenings advertisers. Every week, as I speak to advertisers, I am inspired by their passion to create new businesses and new products, and to establish new ideas. Let’s continue together to think globally and act locally. Be well, do good work, and stay in touch.....

Serving Tulsa, Creek, Okmulgee, Osage, Pawnee, Rogers, Washington and Wagner counties
Published by: Oklahoma Healthy Living P.O. Box 1058 Jenks, OK 74037

Phone: 918-361-6442
Fax: 888-336-6082

Publishers Lynn and Joe Parli publisher@NAGreenCountry.com Editorial and Layout Team Lynn and Joe Parli Linda Sechrist Keeley Mancuso Melissa Morrill Design and Production Joe Parli Stephen Gray-Blancett Advertising Consultants Manager: Lynn Parli Regina Collins Franchise Sales John Voell II 239-530-1377

© 2009 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, health and education centers, healing centers, public libraries and wherever free publications are generally seen. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business. We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. We welcome your ideas, articles and feedback.

Happy Birthday Natural Awakenings Green Country! Celebrating One Year of Publishing!
4
Green Country Edition NAGreenCountry.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions are available by sending $18 (for 12 issues) to the above address. Natural Awakenings is printed on recycled newsprint with soybased ink.

newsbriefs
Cancer Treatment Centers of America Hosts Cancer Ministry Seminar
ome experts predict that the number of Americans diagnosed with cancer each year will double by 2050, rising to an estimated 2.6 million annually. With such a gloomy prediction, we can no longer ignore the importance of preventing and treating cancer and the impacts it has on our society. When a cancer patient is diagnosed, so many aspects of that person’s life are impacted, including physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. Our Journey of Hope® (OJOH), the spiritual outreach program of Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA), is inviting churches to participate in a one-day, free seminar called “Building an Effective Cancer Ministry.” Approximately 200 ministers and community leaders from across the country are expected to attend. “Spiritual care should be constant and, therefore, extend beyond our hospital doors,” said Lyn Thompson, spiritual outreach coordinator at CTCA Tulsa. “We hope this seminar will empower and equip people nationwide to join with CTCA to support cancer patients and their families who live and work in their own communities.” The seminar will feature nationally known speakers, including Dave Dravecky, a former all-star major league pitcher for the San Francisco Giants and the San Diego Padres. After he was diagnosed with cancer, resulting in the amputation of his left arm, Dravecky and his wife, Jan, founded Outreach of Hope Ministries. The seminar is scheduled for April 24, 7:30 a.m. - 5p.m., at the Cancer Treatment Centers of America, 10109 E. 79th St., Tulsa. For more information, call Lyn Thompson at 918-286-5235.

S

cacy, conflict resolution and education. The tour provides students with an opportunity to learn about different religions in Tulsa. As the group visits four houses of workshop, the clergy will speak to them and answer questions in order to help the students gain awareness, appreciation and a healthy respect of the different religions. The tour will start as Masjid Al-Salam Mosque with registration, welcome and introductions while continuing to Temple Israel, Christian Science Center and finish at Mt. Zion Baptist Church for evaluation and closing. For more information call the OCCJ office at 918-583-1361. Registration required. Sunday, April 18, 1-5 p.m. Appropriate dress is required for Masjid Al-Salam Mosque, located at 4630 S Irvington Ave, Tulsa, Temple Israel is located at 2004 E 22nd Pl., Christian Science Center, First Church 924 S. Boulder Ave, Tulsa, Mt. Zion Baptist Church is located at 419 N. Elgin, Tulsa.

New Alternative Counseling Center holds Open House on Brookside

U

Operation Understanding 2010

R

educing bias, separation, judgment and racism is a priority among many families today. Although it’s safe to say we have come a long way from where our history books prove we have been, there is still much work to be done to reduce the lines of separation and accepting others who are different than ourselves. Middle and high school students from all church congregations through eastern Oklahoma will be attending the 18th Annual OCCJ Youth Interfaith Tour in Tulsa. The Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice (OCCJ) is a human relations organization dedicated to reducing bias, bigotry and racism in Oklahoma. OCCJ promotes understanding and respect among all races, religions and cultures through advo-

sing short-term modalities to heal from trauma can be quicker and highly effective. A new Brookside Counseling Center brings revolutionary new healing therapies and multilevel holistic treatments to Tulsa. Leta Bell, MS, MA, LPC and Harvard educated Dr. Maya Christobel have joined together to provide alternative treatments for those suffering from trauma. Also on staff is a massage therapist who specializes in several modalities. Dr. Maya Christobel brings patients a cutting edge technology called Voice Stress Assessment. This biofeedback-based therapy unwires the hard wiring we carry in our neurology from trauma with the use of vibrational frequencies. “Having practiced talking therapies for 30 years, we are now able to address how we hold trauma in our neurology: emotional, genetic and collective trauma. This particular modality does 10 years of talk therapy in a few months and permanently removes the triggers to dysfunctional behavior, addictive patterns, self-defeating belief systems and genetic hand-me-downs remarks Dr. Christolbel”. Healing trauma in the individual and family through the use of EMDR (Eye Movement, Desensitization and Reprocessing), Leta Bell uses this technique to include body centered therapies and cognitive behavioral therapies. Leta has her Masters in both Spiritual Psychology and Mental Health Counseling. She is dedicated to treating the whole person with Imago Relationship Therapy for Couples, EMDR, and Voice Stress Assessment. They also host a 5 Elements Acupuncturist and a Naturopathic Doctor one week a month in their office. The Open House will be held April 28 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. The Center is located at 3220 S Peoria, Suite 202, Tulsa. For more information, visit DrMayaChristobel.com or LetaBell.com
natural awakenings April 2010

5

Natural Awakenings Helps Sponsor Festival Earth at Riverwalk Crossing

ore Tulsan’s than ever are dedicated to earth-friendly living and education. Another opportunity to support local environmental and Saturday, April 24. 12-5pm at Riverwalk Crossing. sustainability issues has arrived with the Festival Earth event to be held at Riverwalk What is Festival Earth™? Crossing on April 24. Resources will issues. • An opportunity to highlight local environmental and sustainabilitybe available for locals urce for Tulsans who want to change behavior by adopting a more sustainable lifestyle. lifestyle who are interested in adopting a more sustainable eans to encourage people to have a long-term involvement with their environment. and also engaging in long-term involvement in our environITS 106.9 invite you to join Festival Earth™… an opportunity to become part of the everment. The event is sponsored by KBEZ 92.9, KHITS 106.9 marketplace. This is an exceptional opportunity for your products and services to be and Natural Awakenings magazine. The Festival Earth events iduals seeking out Tulsa’s green alternatives. Help us give them the tools to enjoy a fe… pleaserange from a farmer’s purpose’ to further a hybrid car area to live join us in hosting this ‘party for a market and Tulsa’s efforts in mic growth and environmental stewardship. As a Festival Earth™ partner, your company music and green seminars. “How-To Green Workshops” ensive visibility in the emerging green economy by: will be provided in efforts to explore developments in green ur products and services with onsite attendees. education and recognize city resources, conservation, green our company through an extensive media campaign. ecognitionpower and more.at the event and on all collateral. as a Festival Earth partner ng on a partnership plan Natural Sounds Stage will be full of local vocals and The tailored to meet your business needs while supporting the green . the Kids’ Zone gives kids the opportunity to have fun at the nd will lead this high-profile event.In addition, guestsyour brand reaches everything Festival Earth. This opportunity will ensure can shop for a as well as giving you the chance to demonstrate your green credentials in a unique way. from natural home farmer’s market to solar panels and range of Festival Earth™ events… from a and health and hybrid car area to live musicFair Trade rs. gifts and crafts. on

M

fill Days for Tulsans that are scheduled twice a year at the Quarry Landfill. This year Tulsa utility customers can dispose of unwanted items, with the exception of Freon refrigerant containing items such as air conditioners and refrigerators. Participants must show a City of Tulsa utility bill or a driver’s license with an address within the Tulsa city limits in order to be admitted to the landfill. The Fairgrounds Pollutant Collection Event is Saturday, April 17 and Sunday, April 18 from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. To deliver items, enter the fairgrounds from 15th Street at Gate 7. Trained volunteers will remove pollutants from vehicles. The free Landfills days are scheduled for Saturday, April 17 and Sunday, April 18 at Quarry Landfill, 13740 E. 46th St. N, approximately 1-1/2 miles east of U.S. 169 from 7 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Perspectives on Dying Well
odhicharya Oklahoma welcomes back Khen Ripoche, Abbot of Tashi Lhunpo Tibetan Buddhist Monastery, as he leads a discussion titled Perspectives on Dying Well. The dialogue, with Benelle Reeble of Good Shepherd Hospice, focuses on the various perspectives and practices associated with living and dying well in our culture. “We avoid the topic of death when really, in this Tibetan Buddhist educational system for the mind and body, learning to face death is learning how to be content and happy in reality as it is, instead of how we want it to be,” says Jackie Roemer, Director of sponsor Bodhicharya Oklahoma. April 3 at 7:00 p.m., Fellowship congregational Church, 29th and Harvard, Tulsa. For more info visit bodhicharyaoklahoma.com.

B

Safely Dispose Household  Pollutants

een Workshops – Explore developments in green education, learn about city resources, on, green power and more. Earth will be held at Riverwalk Crossing The Festival – Hear a variety of local vocals on the Natural Sounds Stage. - Hang outSaturday, as they play and learn in Kids’ Zone. 4:00 pm. with your kids April 24 from 12:00 – ors & Businesses - Shop for everything from natural home and health products to solar Fair Trade gifts and crafts.

Contact Kelly Fiddner at kfiddner@rendabroadcasting.com to become part of this event!

ou may not realize it, but most homes are filled with all sorts of dangerous and hazardous pollutants. Many products such as paint and lawn chemicals can be dangerous if used or stored improperly and can cause serious environmental damage if disposed of improperly. Using alternatives and environmentally-safe products can be helpful in reducing your household exposure to these pollutants. Also, consider finding out how to use, store and transport dangerous products properly. The M.E.T.’s semiannual Fairgrounds Pollutant Collection Event is available for two days in April. This is an easy opportunity for residents to make their homes safer by disposing of unsafe or unwanted household chemicals. Transport pollutants to the event in the trunk of a car or the bed of a pick-up truck and remember to wear gloves while handling pollutants. For the items in your house that are not recyclable or hazardous for our landfills, consider the upcoming free Land6
Green Country Edition NAGreenCountry.com

Y

Holistic Moms Network Expands

J

oining forces to expand services to holistic families, Holistic Moms Network (HMN), a non-profit organization has announced their partnership with Wellness Possibilities, an online directory of holistic wellness practitioners and service providers. The new partnership will provide HMN members savings and discounts on a wide range of holistic services including yoga, hypnotherapy, chiropractic care, prenatal services and much more. “At HMN, we are focused on building support communities for holistic parents and helping them to learn about a variety of wellness options,” said Nancy Massotto, Executive Director of Holistic Moms Network. “This new partnership takes our mission to the next level by bringing together practitioners and parents who share a passion for wellness and all things holistic.” To learn more about the Holistic Moms Network and Wellness Possibilities, visit the websites HolisticMoms.org and WellnessPossibilities.com.

Conquering Gluten Sensitivity Lecture Series Comes to Oklahoma
eliac disease is one of the most common chronic health disorders in western countries. It is also one of the most under-diagnosed. Up until ten years ago, medical schools taught that celiac disease was relatively rare and only affected about 1 in 2,500 people. It was also thought to be a disease that primarily affected children and young people. Recent studies and advances in diagnosis show that at least 3 million Americans, or about 1 in 133 people have celiac disease, but for every 1 patient diagnosed there are approximately 30 patients struggling that have not been diagnosed. The notion that wheat/ gluten sensitivities are solely or exclusively a gastrointestinal condition is a historical misconception. Numerous systems of the body outside of the GI tract have been identified as ‘target organs’ for autoimmune response to wheat/gluten ingestion in sensitive individuals with varied and unrelated conditions. Dr. Tom O’Bryan is a nationally recognized speaker specializing in Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac Disease and is coming to Tulsa and Oklahoma City in April as part of his national lecture tour. He will be presenting the latest research on this condition as well as new testing procedures and protocols to help those with these sensitivities. For more information and to see a short educational video, visit ConquerGluten.com Thursday, April 15 at 6:30 p.m. at OSU/OKC, 9th and Portland, OKC and Friday, April 16 at 7:00 p.m. at Renaissance Hotel, 6808 S. 107 E. Ave, Tulsa. Admission is $20, to register call 877-787-5175. For more information contact Tim Pate, 918-633-6257 or Tim.Pate@Numedica.com. See ad page 25.

C

Virtual Health Assessments
Bringing Technology and Health Together

Improve your health and quality of life through cutting edge Zyto™ Technology and compassionate care off your April appointment
when you mention this ad*
Schedule your appointment today!
Chiropractic • Zyto™ Technology • Acupuncture Kangen Water® System • Nutritional Supplements
(*First time appointments only)

Save 60%

Kim K. Chai, D.C.
1036 East Taft

918-224-0546

Sapulpa, OK 74066

Just because your body is changing doesn’t mean your life has to...

Moving Beyond Grief Workshop

G

etting through loss in our lives can be one of the toughest challenges we face. Learning tools for grief recovery along with support and understanding from our community are helpful ways to get through losses, death, divorce, health, career changes, loss of safety and many other situations. An action workshop to assist people in the grief process will be held at Unity Center of Tulsa. This interactive program is designed to equip the individual to move beyond the grief. All interactive materials and handouts will be provided. The program is based on “The Grief Recovery handbook” written by John W. James and Russell Friedman. The book will be available to purchase at Steve’s Sundries and Books as well as most bookstore chains. Wade Finley, a Certified Grief Counselor accredited through The Grief Recovery Institute will be facilitating the workshop, which is open to the public. The workshop will be held at 6:30p.m. on Thursdays from April 8 - May 20. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. For more information and to register contact Wade Finley at 918-834-1919. See ad page 11.

Find out about Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement!

918-251-6655
www.prescriptionscompounding.com 806-B South Aspen Ave. (81st & 145th) Broken Arrow, OK 74012
natural awakenings April 2010

7

Pam Case Offers Energy Clearing Workshop
aily life in western culture is generally fast paced, over scheduled and often very stressful. These anxiety producing experiences can potentially cause anything from emotional turmoil, hormone imbalances, and mood disorders to physical disease. All of these life experiences can be stored as memories in our energy fields which ultimately affect how we live our lives. Using tools such as a pendulum clear these energy patterns disturbances. Using simple, heart-based methods of clearing this energy in your inner and outer environments can pave a new path in life. “What clearing does is to let me know what my subconscious already knows. I’ve always known things, but the clearing work has strengthened by knowing. The pendulum is the instrument that brings me into the moment,” says Pam Case. Along with learning how to clear your energy, the workshop will also focus on archetypes and how they can help us discover more about who we are. The Clearing Workshop is $65 per person and will be held on April 24. To register contact Pam Case at PamCase8@cox.net.

Zen Teacher to Lead Workshops on Healing & Meditation
en Meditation Teacher Al Rapaport, Sensei will be leading a Zen and the Breath retreat April 24 - 25 called Healing the Heart and Awakening the Mind. Rapaport Sensei is a leading proponent of combining both ancient and modern modalities of spiritual practice including Zen meditation, Zen Dialogue and Zenergy Healing to provide a complete experience for participants. Sensei Al Rapaport is Spiritual Director of Open Mind Zen Center in Melbourne, Florida. He is a Dharma Successor in the White Plum Lineage, a member of the American Zen Teachers Association as well as author of Open Mind Zen: A guide to meditation. There will be a free public talk April 23 at 7:00 p.m. at All Souls Unitarian Church on Cultivating the Mind of Awakening and a retreat April 24 and the morning of April 25 at Tam Bao Buddhist Temple. Beginning instruction will be offered, no experience is necessary. Cost for the retreat $75 if paid by April 10. For more information, or to register contact: Ely DesJardins at 918- 231-3036 or desjely@yahoo.com. All Souls Unitarian Church, 2952 S Peoria Ave, Tulsa. Tam Bao Buddhist Temple, 21st St, Tulsa.

D

Z

Whole Foods Sponsors Film Series Author Dr. B. Raven Lee to Lecture in Tulsa iscovering the impact our
food choices have on our environment, our children and our entire society. Whole Foods is dedicated to connecting their mission with those that have similar beliefs and are taking one more step towards that direction with the new film series “Let’s Retake Our Plates”. The film series features films with messages about the current and potential future state of the food industry and how the actions taken today can impact the future. Making conscious food choices can make a difference for everyone and Whole Foods is dedicated to supporting sustainable food choices. The film series is encouraging consumers to think about the creation of their food and how many elements have touched it during its production. We all have choices and being educated about the food is about taking responsibility for the impact we have on each other. Two films will be showcased at Circle Cinema in Tulsa during April. “Future of Food” will be shown on Tuesday, April 20 and “Fresh”, on Wednesday, April 21. After the film, Whole Foods will be serving food and providing speakers. All proceeds are being donated by Whole Foods to Sustainable Green Country. Circle Cinema is located at 12 South Lewis in Tulsa. For more information call 918-585-3456. 8
Green Country Edition NAGreenCountry.com

D

ombining scientific and psychological perspectives with Buddhist views and spiritual wisdom is not always easy. Dr. B. Raven Lee, author of the article “Embodying Sacred Feminine and the Magdalene Wisdom”, featured in Goddess Shift: Women Leading For A Change, has done just that. Dr. Lee’s approach to therapy is informed by Jung’s archetypal psychology, Tibetan Buddhism, quantum physics, Energy Psychology and neurobiology along with her personal journey of transformation and spiritual awakening. Dr. Lee believes that the goal of therapy is to become aware of our patterns of reactions, to learn tools to dis-identify with our emotions and stories, and to bring compassion and understanding to the integration of our true self. “Patriarchy with its focus on the masculine principle has dominated the worldview for millennia, and has led to economic and ecological crises facing us now. Vital to restoring balance in the world, the Sacred Feminine principle celebrates harmony, collaboration, and interconnectedness,” says Lee. All royalties from this book go to nonprofit organizations dedicated to improving the lives of young women around the world. Dr. Lee will be lecturing and signing books at the Center of Light in Tulsa located at 8123 E 48th Street on April 25 at 2:00 pm. For more information visit IntegrativeWisdomPath.com.

C

Do you have the following symptoms?
Constipation Excess gas Thyroid disease Depression Weight loss Chronic bloating Diarrhea Fatigue

Celiac Pilot Study
Medical care and products provided. Placebo group will receive products at no charge at completion of study.

CALL NOW!

J.E. Block, MD, PhD, FACP 918-591-3891

Jack Wise, NMD 918-492-2400

Daily OM – Learning to Live
nowing the answers to life would be much easier if we had instruction manuals. Knowing how to understand and create healthy relationships, dealing with sorrow and pain and reaching our goals are among the top inquiries people seek to find answers to during their journey through life. In the newly released book, DailyOM: Learninig to Live, author Madisyn Taylor weaves together her award-winning inspirational thoughts based on the popular website DailyOm. com. With her heartrending and candid personal story, she reveals the inspiration behind many of the DailyOm messages that touch millions of people every day. “What I’ve done with this book is set up tools so that you can live your life in accordance with what your soul desires...it’s like having a guardian angel in the form of a book to help you along the way,” shares Taylor.” The first 45 pages of DailyOM: Learninig to Live is available for free to download by visiting: DailyOm.com/book. The book is available to purchase from the DailyOm.com website or by visiting amazon.com or barnesandnobles.com. Madisyn Taylor is co-founder and editor-in-chief of the website DailyOm.com.

K

Tulsa Zoo Celebrates Earth Fest 2010 with Jim Fowler
o green and have fun at the annual Earth Fest celebration at the Tulsa Zoo. This year, special guest Jim Fowler, will be doing animal presentations and chat with guests about his many adventures. Mr. Fowler is a long-time animal expert and co-host of the original “Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom”. Tulsa Zoo Friend’s has also partnered with Mutual of Omaha to offer a unique opportunity to have dinner with Dr. Fowler, Friday April 17 from 7:00 – 9:00 pm. Pricing is $50 per person or guests can purchase a table for this limited availability event. Earth Fest also includes live music, environmentally friendly activities for kids and a Green Market featuring local earth-friendly businesses. This year, save a little money on admission into Earth Fest by bringing in an old cell phone to recycle and receive half off the price of admission. Every phone donated will be recycled to save the environment from toxic cell phone chemicals while also saving guests on Zoo admission. The Tulsa Zoo Earth Fest is April 17 from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm. For more information call 918-669-6608 or visit TulsaZoo.com.
natural awakenings April 2010

G

9

globalbriefs
News and resources to inspire concerned citizens to work together in building a healthier, stronger society that works for all.

Big Improvement

Small Changes Add Up to Large Cut in Carbon Emissions
A new study from Michigan State University demonstrates how altering everyday decisions can collectively reduce direct U.S. household carbon dioxide emissions by 20 percent annually in 10 years, “with little or no reduction in household well-being.” That’s equal to 7.4 percent of U.S. household emissions, and more than the total national emissions of France. Researchers note that most policy attention has been placed on longterm options such as clean energy technologies and cap-and-trade programs, but changing individual habits is reasonably achievable in the near-term. Adopting fuel-efficient vehicles and smart home weatherizing top the list of doable changes, followed by use of energy-efficient appliances and heating/cooling equipment, as well as fuel-smart driving behavior, low-rolling resistance tires and carpooling (http://BehavioralWedge.msu.edu/). Entrepreneur Robin Chase, who founded Zipcar (Zipcar.com), the biggest urban car-sharing program in the world, is now also catalyzing a broader communications network for carpooling, called ride sharing, via local social networks of friends, coworkers, fellow church-goers and school chums. She notes that car sharing, in which users reserve and pay for the time they use a common-access vehicle, has been proven to reduce road time, as well as personal gas, insurance and maintenance costs. Create or join a ride-sharing group at http://GoLoco.org.

Global Crew

Study Shows Earth Already Past Three Tipping Points
A team of 28 scientists responsible for the groundbreaking paper, “Planetary Boundaries: A Safe Operating Space for Humanity,” published in Nature, have identified 10 biophysical systems that are crucial to humanity’s flourishing. They caution against “carbon blindness,” or focusing on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations above all else; rather, they point to 10 safe operating boundaries within which we must remain to maintain the basic environmental conditions in which we have evolved. “Human activities,” the scientists warn, “have now reached a magnitude that may trigger irreversible and, in some cases, abrupt environmental change, by damaging the regulatory capacity of the systems on Earth that keep the planet in the desired Holocene state” (that of the past 10,000 years). As of 2009, biodiversity loss was already at more than four times the identified tipping point, closely followed by a damaged nitrogen cycle; climate change had just passed the crucial tipping point. Ocean acidification and stratospheric ozone depletion are currently at the tipping point. Land system change, the phosphorus cycle and global freshwater use are closing in on the critical point, with chemical pollution and atmospheric aerosol loading the other two categorical dangers. Source: Grist.org

Eco-Moms

Online Communities Support Green Parenting
Mothers who understand the benefits of green living to the health and welfare of their offspring now and in the future can enjoy easy access to helpful practical information. NatureMoms.com, now in its fourth year, offers its own article archives; GreenMoms.com, which celebrates its first anniversary this Mother’s Day, links to targeted articles on various websites of interest. Both online communities share wide-ranging ideas and resources to make it easier to live as a green family and both enable online members to join in recommending products and services and providing their own insights and tips. In addition, GreenMoms.com invites members to form their own local support groups. 10
Green Country Edition NAGreenCountry.com

Good News

Small Wildlife Victories Yield Hope
Attorney Andrew Wetzler, director of the Chicago-based Endangered Species Project, watches and reports on the status of threatened species around the planet. This past year saw the brown pelican fly off the endangered species list. Saiga antelope are making a comeback in Eurasia and wolf sightings are up in Oregon’s Cascade Mountains. Prospects for captive breeding programs are on the upswing for both the Siamese crocodile in Cambodia and endangered freshwater mussels in Kentucky. Expanded preserves will provide more habitat for Humboldt penguins, Peruvian diving petrels and East African elephants. New legislation now protects Alaskan habitat for polar bears and beluga whales. Recent Mexican and U.S. fishing limits will support survival of vaquita marina porpoises and loggerhead sea turtles, and large-scale industrial fisheries have been pre-empted from expanding into U.S. waters north of the Bering Strait to preserve this strategic Arctic ecosystem. More species winners included Chesapeake Bay oysters, England’s rare lapwing (a crested plover) and its Duke of Burgundy butterfly, New Zealand’s parea pigeon, Southeast Atlantic coral reefs and wild-spawning Atlantic salmon, spotted in New York’s Salmon River for the first time in a century. Sources: National Resources Defense Council, Oceana, Environmental Defense Fund

Unity Center of Tulsa
‘We accept, love & inspire people to be all they are created to be.’
11:00 a.m. weekly Sunday Service 6:00 p.m. weekly Wednesday Meditation 6:30 p.m. weekly Tuesday A Course in Miracles

Virtual Library

Pioneering School Library Becomes Bookless
Cushing Academy, in Ashburnham, Massachusetts, might be the first public or private school to trade its paper-and-ink library collection for electronic devices. Before the switchover, spot checks showed that on some days, fewer than 30 books, or about 0.15 percent of its 20,000book inventory, circulated. Today, the small school’s access to books is in the hundreds of thousands and growing. Staff has been added to help students navigate the electronic stacks using the library’s 65 Kindle e-readers and learn to discern, “what is valuable information or reliable from what is junk,” advises Headmaster James Tracy, Ph.D. Students also are downloading books on their laptops, iPhones and iPod Touch players. The school pays as little as $5 to buy an e-book, so it can access six books for the price of a traditional $30 hardcover. Response has been mixed; the hightech library is engaging students, but highlighting and saving notes on passages, “is awful,” reports a junior at the school. Cross-referencing maps and graphics is, at present, problematic. Plus, it’s hard for students to happen upon books as they do when physically walking and browsing the aisles. Primary source: USA Today

Visit UnityofTulsa.com for more classes & events.
Rev. Ann Marie Beale 1830 S. Boston Ave, Tulsa 74119 (corner of 19th & Boston) 918-582-6624

Birds sing after a storm; why shouldn’t people feel as free to delight in whatever remains to them?
~Rose Kennedy

natural awakenings

April 2010

11

healthbriefs

Aloe Vera Gel for Teeth

A

loe vera gel can soothe burned skin, take the itch out of bug bites and help treat rashes from poisonous plants. It also appears to be good for our teeth. A recent study published in the peer-reviewed journal General Dentistry found that aloe vera gel worked as well as regular toothpaste to clean teeth and eliminate cavitycausing bacteria. Moreover, the study showed that the gel isn’t as hard on the teeth as abrasive toothpastes and so may be better for folks with sensitive teeth or gums. However, warns Dilip George, a master of dental surgery and co-author of the study, to be effective, products must contain the stabilized gel from the center of the plant and adhere to gentle manufacturing standards. To find a good aloe vera tooth gel, the researchers suggested checking with the International Aloe Science Council (iasc.org) to review the products that have received its seal of quality.

TAI CHI LESSENS ARTHRITIS PAIN

N

The Smell of Virtue

ho would have thought that a clean-smelling room, infused with a barely noticeable scent of citrus, could turn us into better people? A new study at Brigham Young University shows that people who enter a clean-smelling environment do just that; they become fairer, more generous and more charitable. In one experiment, participants received $12, allegedly sent by an anonymous partner in another room. They then had to decide how much to keep and how much to return to their partner, who trusted them to divide it fairly. People in the cleanscented room returned an average of $5.33 to their partner, versus only $2.81 by those in a normal room. In another experiment, those in the citrus-scented clean room showed a higher interest (4.21 on a 7-point scale) in volunteering for a Habitat for Humanity service project than those in the other room (3.29). Also, 22 percent in the clean room pledged to donate money, compared to only 6 percent in the control group. Cleanliness can help shape our actions, the researchers concluded, as well as our judgments about others and ourselves. “This is a very simple, unobtrusive way to promote ethical behavior,” observes Katie Liljenquist, the lead author on the report in Psychological Science, noting its potential usefulness in workplaces, stores and other organizations that typically rely on traditional surveillance and security measures. Perhaps the findings could be applied at home, too, Liljenquist conjectures: “It could be that getting our kids to clean up their rooms might help them clean up their acts, too.” 12
Green Country Edition NAGreenCountry.com

W

ew research from Tufts University School of Medicine shows that patients with knee osteoarthritis who engage in regular Tai Chi exercise both improve their physical function and experience less pain. Tai Chi benefits arthritis sufferers, report researchers, because its range of slow rhythmic movements enhances balance, strength and flexibility and induces mental relaxation, all of which contribute to a more positive perception of health and well being. Source: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009

How To Stop Junk Mail
Junk mail not only clogs our mailboxes and the postal system, it consumes valuable natural resources and contributes to pollution, litter and landfill loads. Celebrate Earth Day by banishing this unhealthy junk; search the stepby-step guide at EcoFuture.org.

Yoga’s Mindfulness Helps Control Weight

INDOOR PLANT ALERT

N

ew, long-term research by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center shows that middle-aged people who practice yoga gained less weight over a 10-year period than those who did not, independent of other physical activity and changes in dietary habits. The difference is that yoga teaches mindful eating. The researchers found that people who were aware of why they ate and stopped eating when satisfied weighed less than those who ate without that awareness. Yoga cultivates mindfulness in a number of ways, starting with being able to hold a challenging pose. A practitioner’s ability to be calm and observant during physical discomfort teaches how to maintain calm in other challenging situations as well, such as declining to eat when we’re not hungry or not eating extra food when it tastes especially good. Satisfaction also comes from awareness of how food looks, tastes and smells. The researchers concluded that mindfulness appears to be a state that can augment the usual approaches to weight loss, such as counting calories, limiting portion size and not eating when emotionally upset or depressed. Adding yoga practice to a standard weight-loss program may both make it more effective and promote eating behavior that is healthy and empowering.

W

e must choose carefully when adding plants to green our home environment. A recent study shows that instead of sucking up harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and breathing out healthy oxygen, like most plants do, some species can release harmful gases into the air. Among the latter group are the peace lily (Spathiphyllum wallisii Regel), snake plant (Sansevieria trifasciata Prain), weeping fig (Ficus benjamina L.) and areca palm (Chrysalidocarpus lutescens Wendl). The researchers further noted that other plants potted in plastic pots and sprayed with pesticides during their commercial production also can emit VOCs. Source: American Society for Horticultural Science, 2009

The Trouble with Antidepressants

F

or starters, antidepressants don’t work for more than half the people who take them. New findings from an investigation at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine suggest that antidepressants fall short because they’re aimed at the wrong biochemical targets in the brain. Research led by Northwestern psychiatry professor Eva Redei, Ph.D., using rats (their brains are remarkably similar to ours in areas related to depression), suggests that antidepressants are more suited to treating stress than depression and undermines the belief that stress itself can be a major cause of depression. Redei’s research further suggests why antidepressants that aim to boost levels of the neurotransmitters serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine are also often ineffective. Her team did not find the dramatic differences in the levels of genes controlling the function of these neurotransmitters that would be expected if depression were related to their activity. In a Neuroscience 2009 conference presentation, Redei concluded that today’s antidepressants have been focusing primarily on the effects of depression, not its cause. Renowned integrative physician Andrew Weil comments that in his view, meditation and regular aerobic exercise are more effective depression busters.

“We travel together, passengers on a little spaceship, dependent on its vulnerable reserves of air and soil; all committed for our safety to its security and peace; preserved from annihilation only by the care, the work and, I will say, the love we give our fragile craft.” ~ Adlai Stevenson

natural awakenings

April 2010

13

localevent

What does going green mean? Partnering together KBEZ, KHITS, Natural Awakenings Magazine and others are hosting Festival Earth™ to educate citizens about Tulsa’s efforts in responsible economic growth and environmental stewardship. This “party with a purpose,” kicks off from noon to 4 p.m., April 24, at Riverwalk Crossing Jenks, Oklahoma. The goal of Festival Earth™ is to bring leading-edge green products, innovations, services and information into people’s lives and communities. Festival Earth™ is the perfect place to learn how to save the planet, grow the green economy and begin healthier, greener ways of living. Festival Earth™ is a celebration of the positive impact of sustainable living, eco/organic products for personal health and wellness and the importance of critical initiatives, like carbon reduction, recycling and renewable energy. Activities will include a Green Learning Center, Kid’s Zone, Entertainment Stage and more! FESTIVAL EARTH HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE: • FARMERS MARKETPLACE - Farmers and vendors from area farmer’s markets will participate in the Farmer’s Marketplace. • GREEN KIDS ZONE - Green-friendly activities will provide fun and education to kids of all ages! • GREEN LEARNING CENTER - Topics in this educational tent include Green Building-new and existing construction and sustainable interiors; Green Living-Make Your Plan and Local Food - BUY FRESH, BUY LOCAL™. • ENTERTAINMENT STAGE - Enjoy live music in the park! • GREEN STREET - Learn how to live greener with information provided by local businesses and organizations. Make plans to join us at Riverwalk Crossing for Festival Earth™! For information on how to participate in the event, please contact Kelly Fiddner at kfiddner@ rendabroadcasting.com.

Mention this ad for 20% off any service. NATURCARE
Stress Reduction Specialist

Offering adult classes 7 days a w eek

Sigrid Myers

Home of RECESS Yo g a Fo r K i d s
Come by and visit our new studio • $5 off your first class •
3315 E. 33rd. Street, Tulsa

Massage & Colon Therapies • Lymphatic Drainage Facial Massage • Ortho-Bionomy • Biofeedback
Celebrating 12 years in Business!
Phone & Fax: (918) 437-9426 *by appt only* Email: naturcare@msn.com

TulsaYogaTherapy.com

918-6 0 5 - 6 5 0 8

14

Green Country Edition

NAGreenCountry.com

communityspotlight

Shane Michael & Soma Café Organic
by Keeley Mancuso

S

hane Michael is a foodie – he loves to cook and eat, especially for others. His commitment to organic food led to opening his own restaurant, Soma Café Organic. He chose the name Soma as it is the Greek and Italian word meaning the Sum of Us, the blend of our experiences and summation of our mind, body and spirit. Cooking with Soma in Italy means cooking with love, just like when Grandma spent hours in the kitchen preparing the red sauce for her family’s meal - you can taste the love in it! This love for healthy food has guided his career as a chef for 30 years. Self-taught, he has worked all over, Tulsa, Taos, and wherever his travels have taken him. After relocating from Taos last fall, he realized his dream when an opportunity came to take over the café located inside Mathis Brothers Furniture. He got the offer this past January 1 and was up and running early February. He grabbed the opportunity to realize his dream of 20 years and ran with it. Shane feels that healthy eating needs to be more accessible and affordable for us to integrate it into our daily lives. Soma’s breakfast and lunch menu offers a variety of organic traditional, and noveau items. Organic means grown without synthethic fertilizers, antibiotics, pesticides, herbicides or fungicides which are toxic to our systems and potentially carcinogenic. Soma offers everything from traditional eggs & bacon breakfast to burgers and rib eye dinners to migas, frittatas, Klub Kroissant and Not Joe Mama’s grilled cheese sandwiches. If pancakes

with fresh blueberries are not enough to tempt you, the chicken or tuna salad or the soup of the day certainly will. Look for a healthy twist to menu items

Shane Michael even the burgers come with rosemary fries. Children have their own specialty grilled cheese sandwich and just ask the chef for special requests or to childsize any menu item. While organic and fresh ingredients are a must for him, his menu is dynamic and he welcomes input from food sensitive customers so he can add menu items. Being gluten intolerant himself, he wants people to be able to eat out and not have difficulty in finding safe, affordable good food. Celiac disease (gluten intolerance) is one of the most underdiagnosed disease in America, affecting 1 of every 133 Americans and can lead to serious malnutrition. Shane is adding more gluten free, vegan, vegetarian, Ayervedic and Moong Dal Kitcheri dishes all the time. Soma only uses local free range organic beef and Shane is currently secur-

ing a local source for organic chicken. Soon they will be offering gluten free biscuits and gravy. Shane loves that his food is accessible to everyone even the salespeople at Mathis who work long hours and just want a burger. He sees them actually getting healthier; feeling better and gaining the energy they need to succeed. He loves contributing to the health of his community. Soma Café Organic is open seven days a week, Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 11a.m. to 5 p.m. Located at 6611 S 101st E, the easiest way to find it is inside Mathis Brothers Furniture off 169 & 71st. You can enter through Mathis Brothers or through their own separate entrance that opens in to the courtyard just to the left of the main entrance. Soma is available after 5 pm for private parties and also offers catering. Want to eat healthy but don’t have time? Stop by for a quick muffins, yogurt or beverage or call ahead at 918-461-7750 to have your meal ready for pickup. Soma Café Organic is a direct reflection of Shane Michael, the summation of all his experiences, passions and spirit. He wants people to come and experience Soma as a cozy, comfortable place with quality food, made by hand with fresh ingredients. Attention all foodies! Be sure to give Soma Café Organic a try! See ad page 31.

natural awakenings

April 2010

15

greenliving

DARE
TO REPAIR
by Crissy Trask

W

hat would you do if the garbage disposal stopped working, your headphones broke or one of the prongs of an extension cord snapped off? Although each of these problems can be repaired easily and economically, most Americans have become accustomed to replacing the defective item with a brand-new one instead of repairing it. When we fix things, we extend their useful life and save money. We also stop frittering away valuable resources on superfluous production of replacements. All it takes is a little expert help and the right information. Compulsively casting off injured possessions for the chance to buy something new is a relatively new behavior in our society. Before we became rabid consumers, repairing stuff was the norm in the United States, as it still is in much of the world. A half-century ago, any American homeowner wouldn’t have thought twice about dragging out the toolbox or sewing machine to put something that had fallen apart back together again. It all hints at a silver lining in today’s era of waste, stressed resources and economic struggle: The wisdom of our grandparents’ natural fix-it mentality is being resurrected. People are waking up to the logic of shifting from a throw-away 16
Green Country Edition

society to one that values permanence. Whether we happen to be game for a do-it-yourself project, or prefer to avoid anything to do with tools, tape, thread and glue, resources abound to help us transform what’s in need of a makeover.

pairs is lacking, bartering websites help us swap items we own or services we can provide for the services we need. The largest among them, U-Exchange.com, specializes in all types of bartering. Co-founder Barb Di Renzo reminds us that bartering isn’t anything new. “Bartering is the way our ancestors conducted their daily business and how they survived,” says Di Renzo. “By educating ourselves on the right way to barter, we open ourselves up to many resources and possibilities. It’s a way of taking care of our needs without spending money.” For example, a hairdresser used the website to trade a professional coif for needed computer repairs, without a cent exchanged.

Hire Help
When hiring help to see a project through, it’s smart to do our homework. Resources like ServiceMagic.com match project details to prescreened professionals in a local area and provide contractor profiles, including customer ratings and reviews. David Lupberger, Service Magic’s home improvement adviser, stresses the importance of customer feedback, “The bar for customer service in construction is set so low that it is invaluable to know we are hiring a contractor who will return phone calls, show up on time and meet or exceed our expectations.” Once we have a short list of contractors we feel good about, the experts at 411HomeRepair.com recommend obtaining three estimates, or bids, for the project. Before hiring any contractor, always verify that they are licensed (if required), bonded and insured. Spurred by necessity and conscience, new generations are waking up to the eco sense and common sense of maintaining things to make them last. Our future looks brighter because of it. Primary sources: Service Magic, Inc.; Instructables.com; U-Exchange.com; 411HomeRepair.com. Crissy Trask, the author of It’s Easy Being Green: A Handbook for Earth-Friendly Living, is a freelance writer and green lifestyle consultant based in Washington state. She can be reached at CT@GreenMatters.com.

Do It Yourself
Many things around the house can be restored with low-cost replacement parts and basic tools by an interested do-it-yourselfer, and fixing things ourselves can leave us with a genuine sense of satisfaction. We may need to look no further than our local hardware store, but the Internet also serves up a slew of how-to websites, with step-bystep DIY instructions for repairing, refurbishing, cleaning and maintaining common household items. At Instructables.com, people share what they do and how they do it. Founder and CEO Eric Wilhelm believes that the fiscal advantage of repairing things is just the beginning. “When you repair something, you have a deeper relationship with it,” says Wilhelm. “Having a connection to things we used to take for granted makes them more valuable to us.”

Barter
If our skill, interest or confidence in DIY re-

NAGreenCountry.com

Coming in May

wisewords Merging Social Investing and Philanthropy
A Conversation with Author Woody Tasch
by Linda Sechrist

WOMEN’S HEALTH

I
Reclaim your vitality: physically emotionally spiritually
in this empowering women’s edition

n Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money, author Woody Tasch points the way to strategies for fixing the economy, from the ground up. His principles of responsible investing connect investors to the places where they live and to the land, offering life-affirming, culturally rich alternatives to global markets run amok. What do you mean by the term slow money? There are two aspects to slow money. The first is intertwined with the slow food movement, initially begun as a response to the opening of a McDonald’s restaurant in Rome, Italy. Now, this grassroots social movement, with some 85,000 members, promotes a way of living and eating that strengthens the connections between the food we eat and the health of our communities, our bioregion and our planet. The second aspect is about creating a grassroots financial movement. The initial goal is to attract the attention of one million or more Americans who are willing to invest a small fraction of their investment dollars in small-scale agriculture. This supports the health of the individual and ultimately, leads to a more robust community. Slow Money is a new nonprofit that organizes local and national networks and develops new financial products and services to bring money back down to earth. We are cur-

rently steering significant new sources of capital to small food enterprises, appropriate-scale organic farming and local food systems. In addition, we seek to catalyze the emergence of the new nurture capital industry—entrepreneurial financing aimed to support soil fertility, carrying capacity, sense of place, cultural and ecological diversity and nonviolence— all of which connects investors to their local economies. Present examples include credit unions, co-ops, community supported agriculture and community development venture capital funds like Community Development Financial, which is already in place. At the heart of our organization are two questions. What if we put soil fertility into return-on-investment calculations that serve people and place as much as they serve industry sectors and markets? What if we could design capital markets built around preservation and restoration, rather than extraction and consumption? So, by contrast, how would you define fast money? Fast money refers to investment dollars that have become so detached from the people, places and activities being financed that it is impossible to say whether the world economy is going through a correction in the markets triggered by the sub-prime mortgage crisis, or whether we are teetering on the edge
April 2010

For more information about advertising and how you can participate, call

918-361-6442

natural awakenings

17

Why do you believe today’s industrial finance strategies are not working? Organized from “markets down,” rather than from “the ground up,” industrial finance is inherently limited in its ability to nurture the long-term health of a community and bioregion. These limits are nowhere more apparent than in the food sector, where financial strategies bent on optimizing the efficient use of capital have resulted in cheap, chemical-laden food; millions of acres of genetically modified corn; trillions of food transport miles; widespread degradation of soil fertility; depleted and eutrophied aquifers [where nutrient and algae overload snuff out oxygen and helpful organisms]; a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico; and an obesity epidemic that exists side-by-side with persistent hunger in this country. What do you believe is the crux of the problem with the present financial system?

of something much deeper and more challenging. Fast money creates a baffling environment that cannot be understood or managed, even by financial experts. This kind of befuddlement arises when the relationships among capital, community and bioregion are broken. If we continue to invest in ways that uproot companies, putting them in the hands of a broad, shallow pool of absentee shareholders whose primary goal is the endless growth of their financial capital, the depletion of our social and natural capital will continue.

The bifurcation of social purpose and fiscal prudence is at the root of the problem. If the goal is to make more money through our investments as fast as possible, so that we have more money to give away for cleaning up existing problems, then we are on the wrong track. Cleaning up problems with philanthropic money may have seemed to make sense in the 20th century, but it is no longer conscionable or appropriate for the 21st century. We need more realistic expectations for smart investments that can sustain and preserve the planet’s wealth for generations to come. We have to ask ourselves this: Do we want communities whose main streets include local merchants whom we know, or do we want them made up of multinational companies, owned by people we think we know, that produce products under conditions of which we are not aware? For more information about Woody Tasch and Slow Money, visit SlowMoneyAlliance.org.

Hildegard Patterson Reflexology
Professional Practitioner Certified Instructor

Change Your Perspective Change Your Life
• • • • • • SlenderSizing Stop Smoking Alleviate Fears Hypno4Birth Sports Improvement Hypnotist Training
JenksHypnosis.com 918.298.6884

Tai Chi

&

Jenks Hypnosis and Training Center

Call for Appointment 918-724-4676

Don Reno, Certified Instructor Nancy Reno, Board Certified Hypnotist

$200 OFF

Therapy for the New Millennium
ADVANCED MASSAGE THERAPY CRANIOSACRAL THERAPY

Warm Water Without the Cost Call 494-0886 - SunCityEnergy.com

Call for an Appointment 918-740-3443
Chuck Fluker, LMT, CST 1727 S. Cheyenne Ave., Tulsa

18

Green Country Edition

NAGreenCountry.com

inspiration

The Art of Reading
by David L. Ulin

I

n his 1967 memoir, Stop-Time, Frank Conroy describes his initiation into literature as an adolescent on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. “I’d lie in bed…,” he writes, “and read one paperback after another until two or three in the morning. The real world dissolved and I was free to drift in fantasy, living a thousand lives, each one more powerful, more accessible and more real than my own.” I know that boy: Growing up in the same neighborhood, I was that boy. And I have always read like that, although these days, I find myself driven by the idea that in their intimacy, the one-to-one attention they require, books are not tools to retreat from the world, but, rather, ways to better understand and interact with it. As an act of contemplation, reading relies on our ability to still our mind long enough to inhabit someone else’s world, and to let that someone else inhabit ours. We possess the books we read, but they possess us also, filling us with thoughts and observations, asking us to make them part of ourselves. This is what Conroy was hinting at in his account of adolescence. In order for this to work, however, we need a certain type of silence, an ability to filter out the world’s incessant noise. Such a state is increasingly elusive in our hyper-networked culture, in which every rumor and banality is blogged and tweeted. Today, it seems it is not contemplation we seek, but an odd sort of distraction, busily masquerading as being in the know. How do we pause when we must know everything instantly? How do we ruminate when we are constantly expected to respond? How do we become immersed in something (an idea, emotion or deci-

sion) when we are no longer willing to give ourselves the space to reflect? This is where real reading comes in, because it demands that space and restores time to us in a fundamental way. Books insist that we slow down and immerse ourselves in them. We can rely on books to pull us back from the world, to reconnect us with a more elemental sense of who we are. Text has a permanence that eclipses boundaries of time and space, whether written yesterday or 1,000 years ago. After spending hours each day reading emails and fielding phone calls in the office, tracking informa-

A 2008 Scholastic study found that 82 percent of children ages five to eight and 55 percent of teens ages 15 to 17 like to read for pleasure. Nearly two-thirds prefer to read physical books rather than a computer screen or digital device. High-frequency Internet users are more likely to read books for fun every day.
tion across countless websites, I find it difficult to quiet down in the evening. I pick up a book and read, but some nights it takes 20 pages to settle down. Still, it happens if we want it to, if we consider it necessary. “My experience,” William James once observed, “is what I agree to attend to,” a line Winifred Gallagher uses to set forth the theme of her book, Rapt: Attention and the Focused Life. Attention, she posits, is a lens through which we consider not merely identity, but desire. Who do we want to be, she asks, and how do we go about that process of becoming, in a world of endless options, distractions and possibilities? When I was a kid, my grandmother used to get mad at me for attending family functions with a book. Back then, if I’d had the language for it, I might have argued that the world within the pages was more compelling than the world without; I was reading both to escape and to be engaged. All these years later, I find myself in a similar position, in which reading has become an act of contemplative meditation, with all of meditation’s attendant difficulty and grace. I sit down. I try to make a place for silence. It’s harder than it used to be, but still, I read. David L. Ulin is the book editor of the Los Angeles Times.

April 11-17 is National Library Week

natural awakenings

April 2010

19

Natural Awakenings talks to Local Recyclers
By Kristi Eaton

R

ecycling is the process of taking a product at the end of its useful life and using all or part of it to make another product. The internationally recognized symbol for recycling includes three arrows moving in a triangle. Each arrow represents a different part of the recycling process, from collection to re-manufacture to resale. Recycling is better for the environment for several reasons: 1. Conserves resources - By using recycled materials, resources like trees, oil and metals can be conserved. 2. Energy conservation - By reducing the need to process new materials, energy is also reduced because it requires more energy to produce new materials. For example, recycling aluminum can save 95 percent of the energy required to make the material from scratch. 3. Pollution reduction - Reducing energy usage in turns means burning less fossil fuels like coal, which, when burned, release pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and carbon monoxide, into the air. 4. Land conservation - The materials recycled will not be sent to landfills, allowing for more usage later on of the landfills. 5. Economic benefits - Recycling can be profitable. There are 1.1 million jobs in the recycling sector in the country. Also, the industry sees $236 billion in gross annual sales and $37 billion in annual payrolls. For every person holding a job collecting recyclables, there are 26 jobs in processing the materials and manufacturing them into new products. 6. Fewer greenhouse gas emissions - Since recycling means producing less new products, the energy saved from making new products reduces the emissions of greenhouse gases into the air. On average, each one of us produces 4.4 pounds of solid waste each day. 20
Green Country Edition

This adds up to almost a ton of trash per person, per year. Recycling at home is as important as recycling at work. There are many easy ways Green Country residents can reduce waste and promote recycling on a daily basis. Making Lawn Care Greener In the last year, Terri Higgs has not only done her part to alleviate emissions and pollution into the air, she’s also lost five pounds. Higgs is the owner of Reel Mowing, a lawn mowing company that uses a push reel mower battery trimmer, brooms and rakes. What started out as a trial test after her father bought her a $10 mower at a garage sale, has now turned into a seasonal business for Higgs. “This will be my third season,” she says. “I’m trying to promote this. I know it’s old fashioned, but you can do it. It’s really a healthy way to take care of your lawn. I want to remind people that there is an alternative to the gas mowers. While the technique is good for making lawns look nice — Higgs says it’s like a scissor cut —she initially became interested because of her allergies. She recalls how her allergies would be so bad when her husband mowed using a riding lawnmower that she was unable to even go outside. “I realized it was the emissions from the riding lawn mower my husband had and the way the lawnmower’s blade smashes up the grass,” she explains. “I started doing research and found that gas lawnmowers caused some ground pollution that contributes to the problem on Ozone Alert days. It can be harmful for people with respiratory illnesses.” Reel Mowing is continuing to grow, although it is not yet a full-time job. The size of the yard will determine how long it takes to mow, but Higgs estimates about 30 minutes for an average-sized lawn. Plus, she notes,

she enjoys taking her time. Prices are comparable to traditional services. “I’m not a lawn service that is in and out in 15 minutes,” she says. “I enjoy getting to know my clients and their lawns, listening to the birds, talking to their cats and dogs. With non-gas powered mowing, yards need to be cut consistently because once grass has grown too high the mowers are unable to cut. She recommends the grass be cut once a week and leaving the grass clippings on the lawn and composting leaves and lawn debris. Although Higgs is hoping to get the word out about her business and expand her clientele, she is also trying to promote the usage of non-gas powered mowers among the community and is willing to let people try out her own equipment free of charge. The mower she uses is available locally for about $140. “It is about the same as pushing a gas mower, and fairly light weight,” she says. “I can pop it in and out of my vehicle, and I’m almost 50 years old and fairly small.” She notes that she no longer goes to the gym because she is able to get her exercise by mowing. Reel Mowing is quiet, clean and green. Good for your lawn, good for your health and good for the environment. Finding a Solution to a Problem When Peggy Klare moved to Broken Arrow from Oklahoma City several years ago, she was surprised about the lack of residential curbside recycling. Her friend of 28 years, Vicki Gaines, was also surprised upon her move to Broken Arrow. “It really disappointed us to find they didn’t offer curbside recycling,” Klare says. So, Klare, who was in banking, and Gaines, a child therapist, put their jobs aside and decided to start their own curbside recycling business, Gentle Earth Recycling, in September 2004. “When you have the knowledge of what it’s doing to our planet, I just don’t see how you can’t recycle. It’s such a part of our day. We see so much that is going to the landfill,” Klare says. Oklahoma is behind in terms of recycling due to education and awareness, Klare says, but there have been improvements in the last few years and she believes it will continue to

NAGreenCountry.com

improve. For $9.50 per month, residents in Bixby, Broken Arrow and Owasso can have their recycling picked up twice a month. Everything can be placed in one bin and Gentle Earth Recycling will separate the materials before they are taken to Greenstar Recycling in Sand Springs. People also have the option of signing up for six months of service for $57 or one year for $96. Filling a Niche Realizing there wasn’t really a service for businesses to recycle, Kristen McCormick started The Recycling Revolution in January 2009. “It’s been growing like crazy,” she says. “I started this business because I got laid off from my job, and I wanted to do something that would make a difference. A recycling service for businesses was a niche not being filled.” McCormick commends the other local recycling programs in town, and says The Recycling Revolution only hopes to complement them. Customers are asked to separate paper and cardboard, but other than that, everything can be commingled. The Recycling Revolution then separates the material before delivering it to various locations around the state. Right now, McCormick says about 10,000 pounds of recycling is picked up each week. And what does McCormick hope the future holds? “I would love for recycling at businesses to be part of the culture, like curbside recycling is becoming. I agree Oklahoma is a little bit behind, but it seems to be picking up.” Privatized Recycling Greenstar Recycling, one of the largest private recycling providers in the country, has two locations in Oklahoma — one in Oklahoma City and one in Sand Springs. The company, headquartered in Texas, processes two million tons each year in the U.S. Greenstar accepts four types of materials to recycle: paper, plastic, metals and glass. John Stevens, the recycling and solid waste consultant at Greenstar, explains the process. First, the paper comes in and

is sorted before being put through the bailer. Then, the bails are loaded on the trucks and sent to the paper mill. From there, the bails will be broken open and pushed through a huge pulper. “Essentially, it looks like a huge mixing bowl,” he says, “the water and chemical mixture turns the paper into a liquid pulp and is pressed into a sheet, thickens and comes out of the other side. Greenstar offers single stream recycling, which means all of the paper and containers are collected in the same bin instead of being sorted into separate bins, like newspaper, cardboard, plastic and glass. According to Stevens, “In recent years, single stream recycling has become the primary recycling solution for communities across the United States. This is largely due to its ability to cut collection costs while simultaneously increasing recycling rates through simplified collection of all residential recyclables in one container.” Recycling in Oklahoma, is not as prevalent compared to communities on the east and west coasts. “Everyone wants to do the right thing,” Stevens admits, “but there is a cost factor. Financially, there’s not an incentive here because disposal rates are so low.” He does, however, believe this will change and recycling will increase in the state. “In time, as disposal rates go up, I think we’ll see a change as the prices go up over the next few years.” But what does all this have to do with you? Recycling is a simple way that we, as consumers, can help out the environment, create a profitable market for recycled goods and help preserve natural resources from being depleted. Contact Terri Higgs at Reel Mowing, 918691-5691. See Want Ad page 33. Contact Peggy Klare or Vicki Gaines at Gentle Earth Recycling 918-630-0841 or visit www.GentleEarthRecycling.com. Contact Kristen McCormick at The Recycling Revolution at 918-894-2019 or visit TheRecyclingRevolution.com. See Ad page 2. Contact John Stevens at Greenstar-Tulsa at 918-245-7030 or visit GreenStar-na. com.

Keep Waste to a Minimum
Reduce
n Share project details and measurements with a salesperson or contractor to obtain material estimates and avoid over-ordering. n Measure twice and cut once to avoid expensive material waste.

Reuse & Recycle
n When renovating, think deconstruction, rather than demolition. n Require that a contractor’s bid include a plan for reducing, reusing or recycling construction waste and references from similar projects. n Much of what is left over after demolition and remodeling can be recycled or reused. Use Earth911. org to identify such materials and businesses willing to take them. n Save leftover paint, adhesives and scraps that can be used later for touch-ups and repairs. n Look for a materials exchange, such as Habitat for Humanity’s ReStores (Habitat.org/env/restores. aspx), which may offer both new (surplus/overstock) and used building materials and components. Contributing Source: Union of Concerned Scientists at ucsusa.org/ action

natural awakenings

April 2010

21

healthykids

OUTDOOR PLAY
MAKE EVERY WALK AN ADVENTURE
by Debra Bokur

H

elping our children form successful relationships with other people as a basis for getting along in the world is important, but building other connections is also vital—including a respectful relationship with nature, animals and the world we inhabit. Embarking on an outdoor walking adventure is an easy and enjoyable way of introducing children to nature’s wonders. Sandra Friend, author of numerous books, including The Florida Trail: The Official Hiking Guide and Hiking Trails of Florida’s National Forests, Parks and Preserves, says that many parents don’t realize the wealth of options that likely exist a short distance from where they live. “County park and recreation offices can provide information on a wide variety of parks, urban walks and other resources that you may not even be aware are close by,” says Friend. “Check your county’s website, where you can almost always find excellent information on these and other resources.” When she was young, Friend kept a terrarium on her bedroom windowsill, filled with the things she discovered while outdoors. She understands the benefits of giving children the license and space to explore nature in ways that stimulate their own imagination. Friend offers the following suggestions for engaging children while you’re out walking, and turning these experiences into memorable adventures that can help cultivate their inherent curiosity.

Urban Outings

Botanical gardens, parks, butterfly gardens and zoos are perfect settings for walking adventures, even on a rainy day. Should a child show interest in particular animals, make repeat visits at various times when the animals are being bathed, fed or cared for in different ways. Between visits, watch a nature video together or explore a picture book about the animal. Do your research so that you can share facts about the animal’s behavior, colors, diet and habitat. If individual animals aren’t already named, let your child choose his or her own name. Then, as opportunities arise at home, you can bring up the topic of George the Giraffe or Lucy the Lioness, and encourage kids to use their imagination to create stories starring their animal friends.

Whether it’s on your street, in a nearby city park or in the yard, a single tree can become an adventure all its own, especially for a small child who may not be able to manage long excursions. Make an outline of the tree on a piece of paper using a thick crayon or marker, and then run off multiple copies. Have the little one chronicle the tree’s seasonal

Keep a Record

22

Green Country Edition

NAGreenCountry.com

changes by coloring them in and by adding the flowers that grow at its base or the birds and squirrels that live among its branches. Older kids can add more information, such as where the tree originated, its general lifespan and what it’s used for. “You can also carry along a camera to record things you encounter on your walks,” advises Friend. “Then, help your children assemble a scrapbook of their walking adventures.”

Masters of Massage and Body Work

Into the Wild

Vacations are another opportunity for family walking adventures. Have kids research the area you’ll be visiting before leaving home, and plan walking routes ahead of time to make the most of your vacation. Remember, though, that huge expanses of wilderness can be intimidating, especially if you’re not even two feet tall. “Short trails are good for small kids,” counsels Friend. “Make it an adventure by picking a topic before you head out. If it’s butterflies, for example, have your child point out what they notice when they encounter one.”

Sandalwood
and

Check our Website for Monthly Specials

Day Spa & Salon

Instant Online Gift Certificate
SerenityAvedaDaySpa.com
918-835-4424
1211 S. Harvard Ave. Suite B Sandi@SerenityAvedaDaySpa.com

Serenity Aveda Day Spa & Salon

Instant Gift Certificates
Online Booking available SandalwoodSpa.net Call 918-576-6711 3711 S. Harvard, Tulsa

Make it a Quest

Don’t discount the mysteries and magic of your own backyard. Especially when children are very small, walking around the seemingly vast universe right outside their back door can be the source of some pretty great adventures. Hang a birdfeeder and learn the names of the birds that come to visit. Chart the seasons with their comings and goings, as well as the changes in the nearby plants and various trees. Older children can be in charge of their own garden plots; strolls to and from watering and caring for them can be a slow excursion to examine the rocks and insects along the way. Just be sure you’re ready to answer questions about everything you see. Poet, screenwriter and author Debra Bokur looks forward to her daily meditation walks in the Colorado Rockies. She is a contributor to Mindful-Mama. com, a healthy parenting community. Her latest Web-based project is NextPlaneMedia.com.

Massage and Rolfing Restore Inner Harmony Renew • Rebalance • Revitalize Kay Blanchard-Grell-LMT Graduate of the Rolf Institute 1988 Call 918-630-4098

Massage, Reflexology & Reiki
Healing Hands Massage and Pain Relief

Venita Bentley, LMT Call for Appointment
918-282-7844 or va.bentley@hotmail.com

YOUR AD HERE! CALL 918-361-6442

Interested in living young and being healthy?
Pain and Injury Care Structural Balancing Relaxation Emotional Release Pregnancy Massage Couples

backtobasics
918-519-6892
Michael Jamison btbmassage.com

natural awakenings

April 2010

23

consciouseating

HOME COOKING
Ten Reasons to Take Back the Plate
by Rich Sanders

Sustainable

W

e’re all cooks now. Or at least, we should be. The word is spreading about healthy home cooking and its connection to sustainable, local food. Here are 10 reasons to help you get cooking with conviction.

rupted by cheap chemicals and corn syrup. We’ve forgotten how wonderfully delicious fresh food tastes because we are acclimated to food polluted with preservatives. Sustainable, local ingredients just taste better, so let good food help you take back your palate, so you can take back your plate.

1. It’s economical

Home cooking saves money. At a restaurant, you’re spending dollars on the cost of running somebody’s business. Purchasing prepared food from the grocer’s freezer involves paying for the processing, packaging and advertising of that product. When you cook sustainably, you take savings to the next level, using locally raised and produced food, so you’re not footing the bill for transporting ingredients across the country or around the globe.

5. It tastes like you want it to

When you do your own cooking, you can customize the flavor to suit your own (or your family’s or guests’) preferences. Once you get the hang of it, experimentation is the name of the game. As you learn to cook sustainably, you’ll begin to find combinations of the tastes you like and which foods are especially healthy for you.

2. It’s safer

6. It’s satisfying

When you cook, you have more control over what goes into your body. By buying organic, sustainably raised or minimally treated meat, dairy and produce, you can dramatically reduce your consumption of food contaminated by chemical fertilizers, hormones, antibiotics or harmful bacteria.

You’ll discover that you derive the same sense of satisfaction from learning to cook sustainably that many people get from working out. By preparing healthy meals with local ingredients, you can be confident that you’re doing something good for yourself, your family and the environment.

3. It’s healthier

7. It makes reducing meat consumption easier

You have control over the nutritional value of the foods you prepare. Locally grown food is fresher and more nutritious. Cooking methods also count. For example, roasting a vegetable preserves vitamins that are wasted by boiling it; retaining the peel on many fruits and vegetables provides additional vitamins. Are you watching your salt or sugar intake or keeping an eye on fats or carbohydrates? You’re in control of all of these when you are the cook.

Many people are pledging to cut out meat one day a week for their own health and that of the planet. MeatlessMonday. com advises that going meatless once a week reduces our risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity. It also reduces our carbon footprint and saves precious resources like fresh water and fossil fuel. Learning to cook helps you create signature meatless dishes, whether they’re twists on old standbys or tasty recipes that start out meat-free.

4. It tastes better

8. It’s a gift to future generations

We’re losing our palates to an industrialized food system. Not so long ago, herbs, spices and sugar enhanced the flavor of our food. In recent decades, our taste buds have been cor24
Green Country Edition NAGreenCountry.com

If the good food movement is to succeed, it will be through our children; invite them to participate in cooking. Kids love to “play” in the kitchen, and there are dozens of ways they can be involved—from reading a recipe and washing pro-

Top Green Eating Tips
Indulge in the Big O
Organic food is grown and/or processed in ways that support healthy people and a healthy planet. If you can’t find or afford organic options for everything, recognize that some nonorganic produce contains more pesticides than others. The Environmental Working Group offers their Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides as a free, downloadable guide and iPhone application that identifies the fruits and veggies with the most and least pesticides. Visit FoodNews. org/walletguide.php.

duce to mixing nature’s ingredients and decorating healthful homemade cookies. Take kids shopping at farmers’ markets, so they can see the source of their recipe ingredients. Even better, take them to a farm, where they can follow the food trail from the beginning. They will learn by example and in a generation, healthy, sustainable home cooking will once again be the norm and not the exception.

9. It enriches your life

Feast on Fair Trade fare

Fair Trade-certified food ensures a proper wage and working conditions for those who harvest and handle it. It’s also greener for the environment. Fair Trade certification is currently available in the United States for coffee, tea, herbs, cocoa, chocolate, fresh fruit, flowers, sugar, rice and vanilla.

Involve friends in a sustainable dinner party, a perfect opportunity to build community and spread the word about sustainable local food. Download a Sustainable Dinner Party Kit at SustainableTable.org/spread/kits. Sharing a meal together and engaging in face-to-face conversation with family or friends reinforces a precious bond.

10. It makes a statement

Go local

Local, seasonal food cuts back on transportation, uses less packaging, is fresher and tastier and comes in more varieties. It also supports small local growers. Good sources of local foods include farmers’ markets or community supported agriculture (CSA) groups.

Learning to cook sustainably is an opportunity to vote with your soup pot, while you lobby with your fork; make it your own special way of furthering values you believe in—stewardship, responsibility, independence and loving care—by taking control of what goes onto your plate and taking away some of the power of industrialized agribusiness. Rich Sanders, a lifelong foodie, is the director of Sustainable Table, at SustainableTable.org. His corporate career has consistently married technology and the arts, in television, multimedia and software and Internet business development. Connect at Rich@SustainableTable.org.

Don’t follow the pack

Look for unpackaged or minimally packaged foods; experiment with bringing your own containers and buying in bulk, or pick brands that use bio-based plastic packing. Recycle or reuse any packaging you do end up with.

Compost the leftovers

Composting eases the burden on the landfill, contributes to productive soil and keeps the kitchen wastebasket odorfree. Apartment dwellers can do it, too. A useful introduction for indoor composters can be found at JourneyTo Forever.org/compost_indoor.html.

Grow your own

Raise mini-crops in a raised garden bed, greenhouse or window box. Even urbanites can get a lot of good eats from not much space. Visit VeganOrganic.net and search for the exact phrase, “windowsill gardening,” for an introductory article.

Eat it raw

Many people advocate the benefits of eating raw foods. Besides the possible health advantages, preparing raw food consumes less energy, and because raw food is usually fresh, it is more likely to be locally grown. Primary source: PlanetGreen. Discovery.com
natural awakenings April 2010

25

naturalpet

Natural Antidotes to SPRING ALLERGIES
by Dr. Shawn Messonnier

A

s the weather warms, so does the chance of a family dog, cat or other pet suffering from springtime allergies. While we can’t always prevent them, we can use several natural therapies to lessen a pet’s allergy discomfort and help them heal. Simply stated, an allergy is an overreaction of the immune system to a foreign protein (allergen). More pets suffer more from environmental allergies from sources as various as molds, house dust mites and pollen than from food allergies. Certain breeds of dogs tend to more susceptible to the problem, including retrievers, spaniels and terriers; West Highland white terriers are the number one breed for susceptibility to allergic skin disease. While some animals sneeze and have runny eyes and noses, the classic symptom seen in an allergic pet is itching. Excessive grooming, licking, rubbing and scratching are all signs that an animal is probably suffering from environmental allergies. Because other diseases can have similar symptoms, it’s always best if a trusted holistic veterinarian is called on to properly diagnose a condition before beginning a treatment plan. 26
Green Country Edition NAGreenCountry.com

Conventional Therapies
Conventional doctors have traditionally used several medications to help allergic pets. The most common medication by far is some type of corticosteroid, usually prednisone, a powerful drug that can quickly relieve itching. While it can be used safely as part of a natural therapy program, too often pets are treated with steroids for many months or even years, without benefit; possible side effects of any use of steroids include diabetes, osteoporosis, obesity and adrenal and liver disease. Antihistamines are another conventional medication to treat allergies. Unlike corticosteroids, long-term use is usually safe. The two big drawbacks to antihistamines are that they are not very effective in most pets and, when they are effective, they must be administered several times a day in order to reduce itching.

Natural Therapies
A better approach to helping pets heal from allergies involves the use of natural therapies, including nutritional supplements, herbs and homeopathic remedies. Each veterinarian has his or her favorite natural therapies and application of brandname supplements. There are a few supplements

that generally can be useful in countering pet allergies. Fatty acids (specifically the omega-3s found in fish oil) actually change the biological nature of the body’s cells to allow long-term healing; they also have natural corticosteroid-like benefits. Note that these must be given at many times the labeled dose marked on most product labels in order to be effective as anti-itching supplements. Antioxidants, which are also helpful in relieving itching for allergic pets, counteract the chemicals released by cells damaged through exposure to allergens. In my opinion, the most important aid for pets that suffer from allergies or any skin disease is to bathe them frequently with an organic shampoo.

Those specifically designed to relieve itching when used on a frequent basis work well without harming the pet’s skin. I encourage owners to bathe their pets every 24 to 72 hours, depending on the severity of the itching. Feeding a pet a natural diet that is free of potentially harmful chemicals, preservatives, flavoring agents and plant and animal byproducts is always recommended. Reducing the impact of unnecessary vaccinations by using annual blood antibody titer testing to monitor exposure to environmental allergens will also decrease cell damage and reduce itching in allergic pets. I try to avoid vaccinating pets aged 12 years and older. Providing relief for pets with allergies using natural therapies does

not always happen overnight, but with patience and the help of a holistic veterinarian, we can both improve a pet’s health and reduce its allergic symptoms without the need for chronic medication. Shawn Messonier, a doctor of veterinary medicine practicing in Plano, TX, is the award-winning author of The Natural Health Bible for Dogs & Cats; his latest book is Unexpected Miracles: Hope and Holistic Healing for Pets. He also hosts a weekly radio show on Sirius. His iPhone app is http:// PawsForPeace.com/iphone. For more information, visit PetCareNaturally.com or DrShawnsOrganics.com.

South Memorial Animal Hospital & Physical Rehabilitation
Offering integrative veterinary care
Offering holistic healing therapies and spa, wellness education classes, books and gifts.

Call for Your
Appointment Today!
Keeley Mancuso, CEO Healing Touch & EFT Energy work Life Coach & Spiritual Teacher Detox therapies & Cayce Remedies Travis Cagle Massage, Ear Candling Venita Bentley Massage & Reflexology & Reiki Amanda Merrill Intuitive Readings

918-660-Soul
7903 E 50th St, Tulsa, OK 74145

PhytoBurst & MannaBears
REAL FOOD TECHNOLOGY SM

For more details call

southmemorial.com

or visit our web site

918.664.8690

Wellness Solutions

918-740-3876
April 2010

natural awakenings

27

What Is OsoLean™ fitbody Powder?
A New Science for an Old Battle...the Bulge!

WALKING HABIT
Keep the Health Benefits Coming
by Maggie Spilner

10

Ways to Feed a

R
What have You Got To Lose?

ecently, the American Podiatric Medical Association published a list of alternative activities for people who felt their walks were just too boring. While I agree that some variation in exercise is a plus for both mind and body, walking never needs to be boring or static. A walk can be like an oasis in a hectic day or a mini-vacation when the world seems overwhelming. It can provide an exhilarating workout or a simple release of tension and a break from too much sitting. With such ongoing easy access to it and so little cost or hassle, a walk is too good of an exercise option to walk away from. Here are 10 ways to make sure your walks keep you coming back for more.

This type of training increases endurance and cardiovascular fitness and burns more fat than steady walking alone can.

4 5 6

Access hills at least one day a week. If you’re a flatlander, find some stadium stairs or another architectural feature to include in a walk. Find a waterway. A walk around a lake or along a river or canal is a pleasure. Taking in the greenery and watery reflections works to soothe the soul and reduce the effects of stress. Practice a meditative technique while walking. The natural, stressreducing effect of a rhythmic walk, combined with meditation, can be especially soothing. It may be as simple as breathing in for four steps, then breathing out for four steps, keeping your mind focused on the steps or the breath and allowing other thoughts to pass. Or just count triplets; one, two, three; one, two, three—and you’re waltz walking.

1
Get Started Today on a Healthy Tomorrow!
OsoLean Consultant K.B. Austin, ED.D. drkbtw@gmail.com 918-740-3876
28
Green Country Edition

Keep a pair of walking shoes and socks in your car. If you pass a tempting park or an alluring pathway during the day, stop, slip on your shoes and take a short stroll.

2 3

Find a buddy and join in at least two walks a week. Regularly meeting with an activity-oriented friend is a good way to cement a relationship, both with the person and with walking. Boost fitness and fat burning with interval training. This simply means warming up, walking steadily and adding in increasingly long bursts of fast walking.

7 8

Try a pair of walking poles. You’ll burn extra calories and get a synergistic workout without the muscle strain that can occur from walking with weights. Head for town or for the mall. Sometimes, nature just isn’t calling and you may decide you’ll be more entertained window shopping. Walking the

NAGreenCountry.com

errands that you normally do by car can give a different perspective on your neighborhood; having a specific destination makes the walk seem more purposeful.

9

Tunes and talks are an invigorating option. Download favorite tunes or a podcast or pick up a book on tape or a CD from the local library and listen while you walk. Just make sure you are in a place that’s safe from hazards and where you’re not alone; stay aware of your surroundings.

10

Take your dog along. Few dogs say no to exercise. If your pet is a lousy walker, consider obedience training classes. There’s nothing quite like walking with a happily grinning, well-heeled dog. Maggie Spilner has been writing about health and fitness for 25 years, including 17 as an editor at Prevention Magazine. Her books include Prevention’s Complete Book of Walking for Health and Walk Your Way Through Menopause. See WalkForAllSeasons.com for information on Spilner’s walking vacations.

Studio Bilancia is now offering The Gibbon’s Method of Muscle Release Therapy, MRTh®
4154 South Harvard 918.712.7200 studiobilancia.com

Workday Walking Tips
n Keep a pair of walking shoes at work and take 10- to 20-minute brisk walking breaks. n Map out a variety of walking routes to and around your place of employment. n Remember to count various inside routes via hallways and staircases. n Send documents to a printer that's not near your desk. Walk to a colleague’s office for a discussion, rather than sending email. Get off the bus or train one stop early and walk the rest of the way, or park in a distant lot. n Hold walking meetings with a coworker, so you can walk and talk. n Exercise first, then eat lunch, which encourages sensible eating. n Find out what works for you, understanding that your preferences may regularly change.

natural awakenings

April 2010

29

healingways

NATURE
THE POWER OF TREES
by S. Alison Chabonais

CONNECTING WITH

B

ecause trees are larger and older than we can ever The Nature Walk hope to be; because they provide shade, food, mediJoe H. Slate, Ph.D., a licensed psychologist and author of Concines, furniture, wood for musical instruments, fuel, necting to the Power of Nature, offers a step-by-step guide to paper, shelter, recreation and space to commune with an enriching walk in the woods as a gateway to self-empownature; and because they stretch from Earth to heaven, trees erment. “It facilitates a positive interaction with nature that have been revered since before recorded time. Even with tobuilds feelings of worth and self-assurance, while balancing day’s technology, we still rely daily upon all of their products and bringing into harmony the mind, body and spirit,” says and we need trees to help counteract global warmSlate. He has field-tested the program for years, ing and protect the planet. as a psychology professor, now emeritus, In her new book, Lives of the of Athens State University, in Alabama. Trees, Diana Wells explores the He advises that walkers history of 100 distinctive tree follow marked trails during species, from the versatile daylight hours and allow acacia to the long-lived yew, plenty of time to soak in known in Japan as ichii, the experience. Joining or tree of God. hands before and after Wells notes the walk also reinforces that the Tree of Life the expressed sense of appears in cultures purpose. worldwide, while individual trees Step 1 – have been conFormulate Goals sidered sacred. She Prior to the walk, affirm a remarks that, “The words commitment to no more ‘tree’ and ‘truth’ share the than three defined goals. original Old English word Think of the forest as an root, treow.” enormous repository of “Nothing contributes energy that is receptive more to men’s long lives than to goals that may be the planting of many trees,” as simple as experiobserved English writer and garencing the serenity dener John Evelyn as early as 1664. and beauty of the forest Scientists are even using cores from a to foster better health, self-insight and career suc1,000-year-old Southeast Asian evergreen, cess. the Fokienia hodginsii tree, to decode the climate history that affects us all. Every year, Step 2 – Select a Forest people around the world celebrate anew the complex living communities we call Select a safe forest setting with a trail for We enter the woods to trees on World Forestry Day at the spring the walk, preferably in the company of a equinox (autumnal equinox in the southern drink in the calming, quiet partner or group that can add both prohemisphere). strength of the trees. tection and interactive enrichment. 30
Green Country Edition NAGreenCountry.com

Upon entering the forest area, pause to experience its splendor by sensing its sights, sounds and smells. Take time to calm your mind as you breathe in the fresh forest air. Sense the forest’s energies merging with your own to permeate your total being. As you walk deeper into the forest, soak in its peace and tranquility. Notice the richness of the environment and let yourself feel the renewal and inspiration that typically accompany the walk. Periodically pause at highly energized points to reflect upon your goals. Take time to form goal-related images and let them go forth, perhaps navigating among the trees to gather the energies required for your complete success.

O

N o pe w n!

Step 3 – The Walk

SOMA
Cafe’ Organic
Inside Mathis Brothers

Open Mon.-Sat. 8 am to 5 pm and Sun. 11 am to 5pm

71st & 169 Expressway

Step 4 – Listen to the Forest
Throughout your walk, listen to the sounds and unspoken messages emerging from deep within the forest. Think of them as embracing your presence and confirming your future success and fulfillment.

Bio-Mat Session with purchase of a 1 hr massage!

FREE

Step 5 – Conclusion
Upon completing the walk, turn your hands toward the forest in recognition of its empowering relevance as you affirm in your own words your complete success in achieving your goals. Once you’ve completed this healing program, you can reactivate its benefits at will by simply taking time to visualize the forest and reflecting on your interactions with it. Rather than fading with time, the rewards will become stronger as you reflect upon them, becoming sources of power that are available at will. “The therapeutic effects of this program can be worth hours of psychotherapy,” advises Slate. “For couples, it’s an excellent way to open new communication channels and find solutions to relational problems. Overcoming depression, reducing stress, building self-esteem and staying in shape are all within the scope of this program. The forest is a natural therapist.” S. Alison Chabonais is the national editor of Natural Awakenings. Connect at 239-434-9392.

Discover the benefits of the Amethyst Bio-Mat!
Improve Your Immune System and Optimize Your Quality of Life • • • Far Infrared Rays for deep, penetrating heat Negative Ion therapy for the vitalization of cell metabolism Healing, calming properties of Amethyst FDA approved medical device. Trial and Demo available to Health Practioners.

1819 East 19th St., Tulsa

Judy Bomar judy.thebiomatcompany.com 918-744-3305

Increase Energy - De-Stress - Relax - Feel Great

Usui and Karuna Reiki Master For Treatments & Classes Call 918-254-8645 - rak2you@hotmail.com - reikiyourworld.com

Ruth Ann Kelley

Reiki

Preparing for a Forest Walk
American Forests (AmericanForests.org) provides many resources for children, including a link to a partnered interactive site, Treetures.com. National Arbor Day Foundation (ArborDay.org) offers a free downloadable Nature Explore Families’ Club kit with developmentally appropriate activities to engage families in joint explorations of Earth’s natural treasures. Rainforest Alliance (Rainforest-Alliance.org) serves up a coloring book, rainforest stories and animal facts to keep kids informed and entertained. U.S. Forest Service (FS.Fed.us/) links to individual forest websites that can be searched by state or by name using their forest locator guide.

about what you put on your skin
High Quality, Affordable Natural Products for your family

Skin Care

Personal Care

Gluten-Free Line Gluten-

Wishing You a Natural Year! Wishing You a Naturally Merry Christmas!
www.BeautePurpose.com 918.693.0874

natural awakenings

April 2010

31

communityresourceguide
Connecting you to the leaders in natural healthcare and green living in our community.

ANIMAL/EQUINE THERAPY
HELPING HUMANS TO HELP THEIR ANIMALS ACHIEVE THE BEST Cindy Kraft CEMT, CMT 918-758-0433 918-758-6695 c WindmillMoon.com Gidyupgone@aol.com Helping all animals achieve their full potential. Energy work, Kinesiology, Massage Therapy, Magnetic Therapy, and Reiki work.

ESSENTIAL OILS
ANABELL’S ESCENTIALS
202 E. Dewey Sapulpa, OK 918-224-7377 AnabellsEscentials.com Enjoy the uplifting and detoxifing benefits of premium grade essential oils and soy candles. Experience our fragrence oils, body lotions, hand-crafted soaps and bath gels.

NATURCARE

Sigrid Myers NaturCare@msn.com 918-437-9426 Massage & Colon Therapy, Lymphatic Drainage, Facial Massage, Ortho-Bionomy. Call for appointment. See ad page 14.

NATUROPATH
THE NATUROPATHIC HEALING ARTS CENTER
Dr. Robert L. Groves, ND, Bob Van Flee LMT, Debra McCall LMT 918-496-9401 1660 E. 71st. Suite 2-O Tulsa, OK 74136 Providing customized individual health regeneration plans utilizing nutritional, blood, hair, and structural analysis, far-infrared detoxification sauna, pure whole food concentrates, custom herbal formulas, personal care products and many forms of massage and bodywork including Total Body Modification (TBM) Kinesiology, Laser & Electro-Acupuncture/Acupressure. Over sixty years combined experience. Serving Tulsa since 1983.

FELDENKRAIS METHOD BIO-IDENTICAL HORMONE
PRESCRIPTIONS COMPOUNDING PHARMACY
Digi L. Field D.Ph. 918-251-6655 806-B South Aspen Ave. (81st & 145th) www.prescriptionscompounding.com We specialize in preparing customized medications to meet unique patient needs. Find out about our Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement. We can customize ANY prescription. See ad page 7.

STUDIO BILANCIA

4145 S Harvard Bldg. H-1 StudioBilancia.com 918-712-7200 We believe in a holistic approach to movement and body conditioning. We also strive to provide a place for the individual to progress in a stress-free, non-competitive environment. We currently offer Yoga, Pilates Mat & Apparatus, Feldenkrais Functional Integration, Muscle Release Therapy®, Massage Therapy , Skillywork. See ad page 29.

HYPNOSIS
JENKS HYPNOSIS & TRAINING CTR
Nancy and Don Reno JenksHypnosis.com 918-298-6884 We are proud to offer professional training for the emerging field of Hypnotherapy. Let us help in these common problem areas: smoking, weight management, and self esteem. See ad page 18.

BIO-MAT
AMETHYST BIO-MAT
Judy Bomar 918-744-3305 St. John Health Club judy.thebiomatcompany.com Discover the benefits of the Amethyst Bio-Mat! Improve Your Immune System and Optimize Your Quality of Life. FDA approved medical device. Trial and Demo available to Health Practioners. See ad page 31.

INTUITIVE ARTS
AMANDA MERRILL
Certified Level III Reiki Practitioner Tulsa, OK 918-660-SOUL lightworker25@hotmail.com Reiki, readings, spiritual counseling, life-coaching. Let me help you bring more light into your life. Call for rates and appointments. See ad page 27.

CRANIOSACRAL
URBAN RENEWAL
1727 S. Cheyenne Ave, Tulsa Chuck Fluker, LMT, CST 918-740-3443 CrainoSacral Therapy is a gentle yet powerful form of healing. Come try a innovative approach to health. See ad page 18.

Step up to Feeling Better,

ENDOCRINOLOGIST
JACK WISE, NMD
Naturopathic Ednocrinologist 918-492-2400 Specializing in natural health treatments including Celiac, Lyme’s Disease and Cancer. Pediatrics to geriatrics. See ad page 9.

NATURAL/HOLISTIC HEALTH
NIRVANA BODY & SOUL
7903 E 50th St, Tulsa, OK 74145 HealingTherapiesAndWellness.com 918-660-SOUL Offering healing therapies, coaching & self-care education to assist you in your Self-Healing Journey. See ad page 27.

Naturally!

Reflexology by Pat
ReflexologyByPat.com 918-855-3636

32

Green Country Edition

NAGreenCountry.com

NATURAL PRODUCTS
OSOLEAN POWDER
K.B. Austin, ED.D. OsoLean Consultant drkbtw@gmail.com 918-740-3876 OsoLean powder is the shape of things to come. It’s all natural and helps target fat loss and spare lean muscle when combined with the OsoLean Plan and proper exercise. See ad page 28.

PILATES
STUDIO BILANCIA
4145 S Harvard Bldg. H-1 StudioBilancia.com 918-712-7200 We believe in a holistic approach to movement and body conditioning. We also strive to provide a place for the individual to progress in a stress-free, non-competitive environment. We currently offer Yoga, Pilates Mat & Apparatus, Feldenkrais Functional Integration, Muscle Release Therapy®, Massage Therapy , Skillywork. See ad page 29.

YOGA SPIRIT ACADEMY

JANET PARACHIN 918-261-9786 yogaspirttulsa.com Become a yoga teacher through our 200-hour yoga teacher training program. Now offering 50-hour advanced yoga courses in Tulsa. How will Yoga change your life?

ZERO POINT ENERGY
NATURAL ENERGY WAND
Tulsa, OK 918-518-1514 NaturalEnergyWand.com The crystals in the wand have powerful healing qualities and are energy amplifiers that can absorb, store, release and regulate energy.

REFLEXOLOGY
REFLEXOLOGY BY PAT
Pat Bella Certified Reflexologist 918-855-3636 ReflexologyByPat.com Practicing since 1997. The reflexes in the feet and hands are related to each and every organ and gland in the body. Stimulation of these reflexes can eliminate energy blockages that may relieve pain or disease. See ad page 32.

WATER
Water for Living Healthy
918-518-1514 WaterforLivingHealthy.com

Discover the amazing health benefits of Alkaline Water! Neutralize the acidity of the body caused by stress, modern diet, air pollution, and many bottled waters.
See Ad page 2.

classified advertisements
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
CURRENTLY PUBLISHING NATUR A L AWA K E N I N G S M A G A ZINES – Be part of a dynamic franchised publishing network that is helping to transform the way we live and care for ourselves. As a Natural Awake n i n g s p u b l i s h e r, y o u r m a g a z i n e will help thousands of readers to make positive changes in their lives, while promoting local practitioners and providers of natural, Earthfriendly lifestyles. You will be creating a healthier community while building your own financial security working from your home. For sale in Birmingham/Huntsville AL, Denver CO, Mobile AL, and Morris County NJ. Call for details, 239-530-1377.

REIKI
RUTH ANN KELLEY

YOGA
INNER PEACE YOGA
7718 E. 91st Street, suite 160 Tulsa, OK 74113 918.809.4444 innerpeaceyogatulsa.com Yoga makes everything better! 33 classes a week for any level. Check our website for lots of great workshops. See Ad page 2.

Certied Usui/Karuna Reiki Master 918-254-8645 reikiyourworld.com Reiki is a drug-free healing alternative. Take direct responsibility for your own health and wellness. Treatments and classes available. See ad page 31.

TAI CHI
TAI CHI / REFLEXOLOGY
Hildegard Patterson 918-724-4676 Certified Professional Achieve a better mind, body and spirit. Improve health, fitness, personal safety and rejuvenate energy. Serving Tulsa for 15 years. See ad page 18.

THERAPIES OF SVAROOPA® YOGA

Rebecca Ward 918-629-9464 yoga1wing@yahoo.com Certified Yoga Therapist/Teacher, Registered Nurse Offering by appointment : A Compassionate and Powerful Tool for Healing & Personal Transformation Embodyment® & Yoga Therapy Private, Semi-private & Small Group Classes.

GREEN YARD CARE Earth friendly lawn care, no gas powered equipment. Mowing, trimming, and spring cleanup. Call Reel Mowing, 918-691-5691. Quiet, clean and green. WHY BUY? - RENT TO OWN! $1,250 Ionic Detox Foot Bath Only $49/ Mo. $1,500 Water Ionizer $39.95/Mo. Ozone Generator $29.95/Mo. Handheld Laser $29.95/Mo. 239-649-0077 www.BeWellU.com SEND YOUR SUBMISSIONS TO: EDITORIAL@NAGREENCOUNTRY .COM

VETERINARY
SOUTH MEMORIAL ANIMAL HOSPITAL TULSA YOGA THERAPY
Dr. Lori Freije 918-664-8690 SouthMemorial. com Integrative veterinary care including pet weight loss, physical rehab, therapeutic massage and accupuncture. See Ad page 27. 3315 E. 33rd St. 918-605-6508 RecessForHealth.org TulsaYogaTherapy.com Offering several group classes at various levels as well as private sessions for your individual therapeutic needs. Also, check out our children and school programs. See ad page 14.

natural awakenings

April 2010

33

calendarofevents
Note: All Calendar events must be received by the 10th of the month and
adhere to our guidelines. Email CalEvents@NAGreenCountry.com for guidelines and to submit entries.

SUNDAY, APRIL 11
Ordinary Enlightenment, Experiencing Gods Presence in Everyday Life – 9:30-10:30am. With Jodi Tuttle. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. Sacred Sunday Celebration – 2-3:45pm. With Celeste. Chakra Awareness & Tune Up. Cost $13 or $22/2. Register with Celeste at 918-814-4774 or Heal@CelestialYoga.com. Discovering the Sacredness of Sound and Breath – 2-4:30pm. Visiting Australian interfaith minister and recording artist Phil Jones will present an interactive workshop teaching meditation and simple breathing techniques with the Australian didgeridoo. Cost is $30 ($25 if prepay by April 5), space is limited. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center.918660-SOUL.

THURSDAY, APRIL 1
I Ching Drumming – 7-8:30pm. The I Ching Drumming Circle is a meditative, spiritual drum circle based upon ancient an Chinese teaching. Bring your own drum, or use ours. The Center of Light, 8123 E. 48th St., Tulsa. Love Donation Contact Jan at 918-836-3058 or Manda at 918747-1922. BioIdentical Hormone Replacement Therapy – 7-8:30pm. Free monthly health lecture with Dr. Rebecca Ward. Find our what you need to know about BHRT. Call to reserve your seat. Natural Health Associates, 5460 S. Garnett, Suite H, Tulsa, 918-794-0310.

Bentley. Workshop on developing your consciousness and the power within you. Cost $60, First Class is Free. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, Tulsa. 918-6607985. Elements of Empowerment – 6:30pm. A Class in Conscious Creating. With Dr. Robert L. Groves. Class will cover the structure and success of affirmations, wisdom journaling, and exploring various paradigms expressing universal principles. Materials fee $20. The Naturopathic Healing Arts Center, 1660 E. 71st Street Suite 2-O, Tulsa. 918496-9401.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7
Envisioning Millennial Spirituality – 7-9pm. With Rev. Culliver Brookman. Discussions center around themes that help us explore life as a Spiritual Being having a Spiritual Experience. Free to the public. The Center of Light, 8123 E. 48th St., Tulsa. 918-629-9926.

MONDAY, APRIL 12
Okmulgee Trash-Off Day – Downtown Okmulgee. Businesses, organizations and volunteers will pick up trash off the streets, sidewalks and wherever else trash might be lying. This is a community effort to clean up Okmulgee. For more info: 918-756-7284. All In One Workshop – 6-8pm. With Venita Bentley. See Monday, March 1 listing. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, Tulsa. 918-660-7985. Circle of Light – 6:30pm potluck, 7:30-9:30pm discussion. Monthly meeting. Subject varies according to guest speaker or theme for the evening. Please bring a dish or appetizer to share. Center of Light, 8123 E 48th St, turn E next to Sonic drivein, Tulsa. For more information contact Manda Pie at piezerfun@galstar.com Tulsa 9/12 Project Educational Committee Mtg. – 6:30pm. With Dr. Robert L. Groves. To provide educational resources for learning and understanding the Constitution of the United States. The Naturopathic Healing Arts Center, 1660 E. 71st Street Suite 2-O, Tulsa. 918-496-9401.

SATURDAY, APRIL 3
Woolaroc Easter Egg Hunt – 11am. The grounds of Woolaroc will ring with the laughter of children as they search for hundreds of hidden eggs and all that candy. The Easter Bunny and friend will make a special appearance too. For more info: call 918-336-0307 Easter Extravaganza (Egg Hunt) – Children find eggs and prizes are awarded. Okmulgee Dripping Springs State Park - 918-756-5791. Grow Your Soul Spiritual Community –3-5pm. With Keeley Mancuso. Ongoing spiritual support group for growing your soul with prayer, meditation, knowledge and expression. Love Offering. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, 918-660-SOUL. Perspectives on Dying Well – 7pm. With special guest Khen Rinpoche. A discussion of the various perspectives and practices associated with living and dying well in our culture. Fellowship Congregational Church, 29th & Harvard, Tulsa.

THURSDAY, APRIL 8
Moving Beyound Grief – 6:30-8pm. With Wade Finley. A 7 week action workshop to assist you in moving beyond death, divorce, and other losses including health, career and faith. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. I Ching Drumming – 7-8:30pm. See Thursday, April 1 listing. Love donation. Center of Light, 8123 E 48th St, turn E next to Sonic drive-in, Tulsa. Contact Jan 918-836-3058 or Manda at 918-747-1922. HcG Detox and Weight Loss program – 7-8:30pm. Free monthly health lecture with Dr. Rebecca Ward. Allow the body to metabolize fat and use it as energy. Call to reserve your seat. Natural Health Associates, 5460S. Garnett, Suite H, Tulsa, 918-794-0310.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 14
Naturopathy & a Living Diet –7-9pm. Living food preparation and tasting is presented by Kristin Spohrer, ND. Discover what the world eats with an overview of Naturopathy. Test your body ph at this class for free. $25 love donation. The Center of Light, 8123 E. 48th St., Tulsa, (off of Memorial) Reserve space with Kristin at SpiritSpaInfo@aol.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 4
Ordinary Enlightenment, Experiencing Gods Presence in Everyday Life – 9:30-10:30am. With Jodi Tuttle. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. Planetary Activation Organization – 2-4pm. PAO Intergalactic studies, videos, speakers and other topics related to this fascinating subject. Center of Light, 8123 E. 48th St., Tulsa, (east on 48th at Memorial).

SATURDAY, APRIL 10
Okmulgee in Bloom – Herb and plant festival, informational booths and speakers, vendors and children activities. Mian Street, downtown Okmulgee. For more info: 918-758-1015. Reiki I Class – 9am-5pm. No prerequisite needed. Reiki Level I opens energy pathways and enables the student to receive and transmit Reiki energy. Lunch provided. Registration required. Love Donation. Contact Ruth Ann Kelley, 918254-8645. Celebrating the Art of Healing: A Family Journey – 9am-2:30pm., Monte Cassino School, 2206 S. Lewis, Tulsa. To register or for more information, call St. John PulseLine at 918-7440123.

THURSDAY, APRIL 15
Moving Beyound Grief – 6:30-8pm. With Wade Finley. See Thursday, April 8 listing. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. BioIdentical Hormone Replacement Therapy – 7-8:30pm. Free monthly health lecture with Dr. Rebecca Ward. Find our what you need to know about BHRT. Call to reserve your seat. Natural Health Associates, 5460 S. Garnett, Suite H, Tulsa, 918-794-0310.

MONDAY, APRIL 5
Healing Share – 6-7pm. With Michael Beale. An opportunity to give or receive energy work. Everyone welcome. All modalities. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. All In One Workshop – 6-8pm. With Venita

34

Green Country Edition

NAGreenCountry.com

OSU/OKC, 9th and Portland, OKC and Renaissance Hotel, 6808 S. 107 E. Ave, Tulsa

APRIL 15 – 6:30-8:30pm APRIL 16 - 7-9pm

SUNDAY, APRIL 18
Free Landfills Days–7am-3pm. Quarry Landfukkm 13740 E. 46th St. N, Tulsa. Ordinary Enlightenment, Experiencing Gods Presence in Everyday Life – 9:30-10:30am. With Jodi Tuttle. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. Fairgrounds Pollutant Collection Event – 10am-3pm. 15th St and Yale Ave, Tulsa. Gate 7. EFT Workshop – 2-4pm. With Kristin Spohrer, ND. Once you know that the cause of all negative emotions disrupts the body’s harmony, you are free to use EFT to help bring balance into your total being again. $15 love donation. Center of Light, 8123 E 48th St, turn E next to Sonic drivein, Tulsa.

Rebecca Ward. Allow the body to metabolize fat and use it as energy. Call to reserve your seat. Natural Health Associates, 5460S. Garnett, Suite H, Tulsa, 918-794-0310.

FRIDAY, APRIL 23
Tap Into Wellness – 6-8pm. Learn how to talk to and tap into your body’s energy fields to enhance wellness and inner peace. Cost $75. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center.918-660-SOUL.

Identifying and Conquering Gluten Sensitivity
Public lecture with Dr. Tom O’Bryan. Learn the latest in research as well as new testing procedures and protocols, followed by Q & A. Cost $20. For more info, or to register call 877-787-5175. FRIDAY, APRIL 16
Third Friday Noon Meditation – 12noon-1pm. With Keeley Mancuso. Guided meditation for balancing, healing and grounding. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, 918-660-7985.

FRIDAY, APRIL 23 THRU SUNDAY, APRIL 25
Zen Teacher to Lead Workshops on Healing & Meditation - Using both traditional Zen meditation and modern Zenergy techniques, we will paractice together to learn to access the authentic presence that we all possess. Friday, April 23 – 7pm. Cultivating the Mind of Awakening. All Souls Unitarian Church, 2952 S Peoria Ave, Tulsa. April 24 – 8am-6pm. Retreat. Tam Bao Buddhist Temple, 16933 E 21st St, Tulsa April 25 – 8-10:30am. Retreat. Tam Bao Buddhist Temple, 16933 E 21st St, Tulsa For more information or to register contact: Ely DesJardins at 918231-3036 or desjely@yahoo.com. SATURDAY, APRIL 24
Jenks Pancake Breakfast – 6:30-10:30am. Join us for pancakes before you go to the Herb and Plant festival. Cost:$4. First Baptist Church, 205 E. A St, Jenks. Building an Effective Cancer Ministry – 7:30am-5pm. The spiritual outreach program of Cancer Treatment Centers of America, is inviting churches to participate in a one-day, free seminar. Cancer Treatment Centers of America, 10109 E. 79th St., Tulsa. Lyn Thompson, 918-286-5235. Jenks 15th Annual Herb & Plant Festival – 8am-5pm. The festival spills over on to Main Street this year with more wonderful herbs and other plants of every variety, garden decorations and enhancements, and lots of other extras for your home and garden plus festival foods, guest lectures, live entertainment, children’s area, and garden railroads. Downtown Jenks.

MONDAY, APRIL 19
Healing Share – 6-7pm. With Michael Beale. An opportunity to give or receive energy work. Everyone welcome. All modalities. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 948-582-6624. Healer’s Support Group –7-9pm. Ron Gudde. Open for experienced healer’s to donate their healing gifts for each other and those who attend who are interested in healing. Love Donation requested. Center of Light is at: 8123 E, 48th St., Tulsa (48th near Memorial). For more information contact rrgudde2112@yahoo.com. All In One Workshop – 6-8pm. With Venita Bentley. See Monday, April 5 listing. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, Tulsa. 918-660-7985.

SATURDAY, APRIL 17
Free Landfills Days–7am-3pm. Quarry Landfukkm 13740 E. 46th St. N, Tulsa. Reiki I Class – 9am-5pm. No prerequisite needed. Reiki Level I opens energy pathways and enables the student to receive and transmit Reiki energy. Lunch provided. Registration required. Love Donation. Contact Ruth Ann Kelley, 918254-8645. Tulsa Zoo Earth Fest – 9am-5pm. Go green and have fun at the annual Earth Fest celebration at the Tulsa Zoo Fairgrounds Pollutant Collection Event – 10am-3pm. 15th St and Yale Ave, Tulsa. Gate 7. Super Psychic Saturday – 12noon-6pm. Noon6pm. Angel readers, tarot & oracle readings, astrologists, mediums, and intuitive healers will be available. No admission - special prices allow you to sample readers. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center.918660-SOUL. Near Death & Other Mystical Experiences – 3-4:30pm. An informal group of people discussing the subject of altered consciousness as experienced by members of the group. Love Donation. The Center of Light,8123 E. 48th St., Tulsa. For more information contact Dr. Ann Ellis at 918504-1601. Reiki Share – 7-9pm. Come give/receive a Reiki treatment. Learn about this wonderful gift. Ask all of your questions. No experience necessary. Contact Ruth Ann Kelley, 918-254-8645. reikira.com.

TUESDAY, APRIL 20
Future or Food - 6:30pm. Film displaying the corporate control of agriculture and the seed supply is meeting more and more resistance from the sustainable food movement that has risen up around the world. Presented by Whole Foods at Circle Cinema, 12 S Lewis, Tulsa.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21
Fresh - 6:30pm. A film to be a gateway to action. The aim is to help grow FRESH food, ideas, and become active participants in an exciting, vibrant, and fast-growing movement.Presented by Whole Foods at Circle Cinema, 12 S Lewis, Tulsa.

THURSDAY, APRIL 22
Moving Beyound Grief - 6:30-8pm. With Wade Finley. See Thursday, April 8 listing. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. I Ching Drumming – 7-8:30pm. See Thursday, April 1 listing. Love donation. Center of Light, 8123 E 48th St, turn E next to Sonic drive-in, Tulsa. Contact Jan 918-836-3058 or Manda at 918-747-1922. HcG Detox and Weight Loss program – 7-8:30pm. Free monthly health lecture with Dr.

natural awakenings

April 2010

35

Clearing Workshop – TBA. Learn how to clear your energy and about archetypes to discover more about who you are in this one day workshop. $65. Contact Pam Case for more info at PamCase8@Cox.net Reiki II class – 9am-5pm. Reiki II provides the opportunity to become more consciously aware. Through the use of special symbols, the student learns to send Reiki energy long distance. Expansion of intuition, wholeness, peace, harmony, and joy are but some of the benefits derived from learning Reiki. Prerequisite: Reiki I attunement and certification. Lunch provided. Contact Ruth Ann Kelley, 918-254-8645. Reikira.com Grow Your Soul with Meditation – 10:30am12Noon. Keeley Mancuso teaches different meditation techniques to purify and heal, increase understanding of self, and grow spiritually. 7 Week Series. Cost is $120 ($100 if prepay by April 17th). Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center.918-660-SOUL.

group for growing your soul with prayer, meditation, knowledge and expression. love Offering. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, 918-660-SOUL.

THURSDAY, APRIL 29
Moving Beyound Grief – 6:30-8pm. With Wade Finley. See Thursday, April 8 listing. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. I Ching Drumming – 7-8:30pm. See Thursday, April 1 listing. Love donation. Center of Light, 8123 E 48th St, turn E next to Sonic drive-in, Tulsa. Contact Jan 918-836-3058 or Manda at 918-747-1922.

SUNDAY, APRIL 25
Ordinary Enlightenment, Experiencing Gods Presence in Everyday Life – 9:30-10:30am. With Jodi Tuttle. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. Tulsa Rosicrucian Group – 2pm. Open meeting. Contact Jodi Tuttle for more info, 918-284-6683 or raven@circlesofessence.com. Zarrow Library, 2224 W 51st St, Tulsa. Embodying Sacred Feminine and the Magdalene Wisdom - 2-4pm. Dr. B. Raven Lee, will offer her lecture and sign her book. Love donation, seating limited. Center of Light, 8123 E 48th St, turn E next to Sonic drive-in, Tulsa.

FRIDAY, APRIL 30
Okmulgee Spring Health Festival – 9am-2pm. Several health vendors will have booths set up to educate the public on health issues. There will be guests speakers. George Nigh Rehabilitation Center, 900 E. Airport Road, Okmulgee. 918-7569211. Leading Edge Networking Community for Women – Kickoff Meeting– 5-7pm – Happy Hour. New networking community of women sponsored by the Tulsa Women’s Foundation. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center.918-660-SOUL. RSVP required, call Ginger Heald at 284-2406.

SATURDAY, APRIL 24 Festival Earth – 12noon-4pm. Sponsored by 92.9 KBEZ, 106.9 KHITS and Natural Awakenings magazine. Events range from a farmer’s market and a hybrid car area to live music and green seminars. Riverwalk Crossing, 300 Riverwalk Terrace, Jenks.
Prosperity and Manifestation – 1-3pm. Learn how to use Meditation, Visualization and Wellness Tapping to clear obstacles and increase prosperity in your life. Six week course is $150 and includes class materials. RSVP required. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center.918-660-SOUL.

MONDAY, APRIL 26
Healing Share – 6-7pm. With Michael Beale. An opportunity to give or receive energy work. Everyone welcome. All modalities. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. All In One Workshop – 6-8pm. With Venita Bentley. See Monday, April 5 listing. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, Tulsa. 918-660-7985. Fixing Our Country: A Course on Understanding and Using Our Constitutional Rights –6:30pm. With Dr. Robert L. Groves. Learn what each of us as individuals can do to set our country on the right course and keep it there. Your rights - use them, or lose them. $60. The Naturopathic Healing Arts Center, 1660 E. 71st Street Suite 2-O, Tulsa. 918-496-9401.

COMING IN MAY
Bartlesville Area Farmers Market – 8:30-11am. Buy Fresh Buy Local............ Offering a wide variety of fresh locally grown fruits, vegetables, and other farm-fresh items such as eggs, honey, plants, flowers, and hand-crafted items and much more. Frank Phillips Blvd & Keeler Ave, Bartlesville. 918-333-0790.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28
Personal Skin Care Consultations – 1-4pm. See Wednesday April 7 listing. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E. 50th St, Tulsa.

SATURDAY, APRIL 24

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28

Grow Your Soul Spiritual Community –3-5pm. With Keeley Mancuso. Ongoing spiritual support

Counseling Center Open House Family Yoga Class For Parents and Children 5:30-7:30 pm. 1pm - 2:30 pm Visit with Dr. Maya ChristoAt Tulsa Yoga Therapy Stu- bel and Leta Bell and learn dio 33rd and Harvard, Tulsa about many holistic treatCost: $10/adult, $8/child ments and cutting edge techFor more information or to nology now being offered. Inregister, please call 812-1613 formation about 5 Elements or email tulsayoga4kids@ accupuncture, Voice Stress gmail.com Assessment and more. 3220 S Peoria, Suite 202, Tulsa
Green Country Edition NAGreenCountry.com

36

Connecting communities...
creating a better world.

Reaching 2.5 million readers each month, Natural Awakenings magazines are now serving more than 70 communities across the country.
• Birmingham, AL • Huntsville, AL • Mobile/Baldwin, AL • Little Rock/Hot Springs, AR • Phoenix, AZ • Tucson, AZ • San Diego, CA • Boulder, CO • Denver, CO • Hartford County, CT • Fairfield County, CT • New Haven/Middlesex, CT • Daytona/Volusia/Flagler, FL • NW FL Emerald Coast • Ft. Lauderdale, FL • Jacksonville/St. Augustine, FL • Melbourne/Vero Beach, FL • Miami & Florida Keys • Naples/Ft. Myers, FL • North Central Florida • Orlando, FL • Palm Beach, FL • Peace River, FL • Sarasota, FL • Tallahassee, FL • Tampa/St. Petersburg, FL • Florida’s Treasure Coast • Atlanta, GA • Augusta, GA • Lexington, KY • Louisville-Metro, KY • New Orleans, LA • Ann Arbor, MI • Grand Rapids, MI • Greater Genesee, MI • Greater Oakland/Macomb, MI • Wayne County, MI • Central Missouri • Asheville, NC • Charlotte, NC • Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill, NC • North Carolina Southern Coast, NC • Somerset-Middlesex Counties, NJ • Monmouth & Ocean, NJ • Morris County, NJ • Santa Fe/Albuquerque, NM • Long Island, NY • New York City, NY • Rockland/Orange Counties, NY • Westchester/Putnam Counties, NY • Cincinnati, OH • Oklahoma City, OK • Tulsa, OK • Portland, OR • Northeast PA • Lehigh Valley, PA • Bucks County, PA • Rhode Island • Charleston, SC • Columbia, SC • Grand Strand, SC • Upstate, SC • Chattanooga, TN • Knoxville, TN • Nashville, TN • Austin, TX • East Texas • Houston, TX • San Antonio, TX • Richmond, VA • Southwestern, VA • Madison, WI • Puerto Rico • Toronto, Canada

For information about how to publish a Natural Awakenings in your community call 239-530-1377.
Currently publishing Natural Awakenings magazines for sale: Birmingham/Huntsville, AL; Denver, CO; Mobile, AL; Morris County, NJ

natural awakenings

April 2010

37

ongoingevents
SUNDAY
Gratitude & Grace – 9:30-10:45am. With Stephen Saunders. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Soft Yoga – 9:30-10:40am. With Kelly. A gentle approach to yoga. Perfect for beginners, seniors, pregnant women, students with physical limitations or injuries Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Center of Light Interactive Service– 1011:30am. For those looking for a spiritual, metaphysical, new-thought experience. Rev. S. Culliver Brookman Center of Light, 8123 E. 48th St, Tulsa. CenterOfLight-Tulsa.org. Prenatal Yoga – 2:30 pm. With Melissa Morrill. Yoga for pregnant women hosted by Natural Lullabies at Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, 918-381-0828. Deep Stretch Yoga– 3:30-4:40pm. With Josh. Perfect for all levels. Postures are designed to get to the deeply rooted sources of tension within all the major areas of the body. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Living the Wisdom of the Tao – 5-6pm. Book study led by Mary Farrar. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 948-582-6624. Power Yoga – 5-6:10pm. With Josh. For the fit intermediate and advanced student. This heated, rigorous, power ‘Vinyasa’ flow class is fun, fast paced, physically challenging, and will make one sweat, get strong and in shape. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Restorative Yoga – 6-7:30pm. With Stephen Saunders. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Deep Stretch Yoga – 12:30-1:40pm. With Meghan.See Sunday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Children’s Yoga–3:45-4:45pm. Ages 5-8. With Dian and Natasha, certified YogaEd instructors. Our yoga classes offer games, poses, breath and relaxation techniques, and are designed to train for a lifetime of health and wellness. All Souls Church, President’s Room, 30th and Peoria, Tulsa. To enroll, email tulsayoga4kids@gmail.com or call Dian at 918-232-7533. Healthy Recipe Monday Night – 4-7pm. Plan healthy meals for the week at Whole Foods Market. Sample several healthy recipe ideas while shopping. Whole Foods Market, 1401 E 41st St, Tulsa. Signup early to reserve a space: 918-712-7555. Children’s Yoga – 4:50-5:50pm. Ages 5-8. With Dian and Natasha, certified YogaEd instructors. Our yoga classes offer games, poses, breath and relaxation techniques, and are designed to train for a lifetime of health and wellness. All Souls Church, President’s Room, 30th and Peoria, Tulsa. To enroll, email tulsayoga4kids@gmail.com or call Dian at 918-232-7533. Yoga-Gentle Stretch – 5:30-6:45pm. With Marcia. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Soft Yoga – 6-7:10pm. With Meghan. See Sunday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Enchanted Feelings – Discussion Group. Explore Your Feelings. Pre-registration required. Contact Brian Geis at 918-231-2136. Yoga – 6-7:15pm. With Lucy Weberling. Hairbenders’ 2. Rogers and A St, Skiatook. 918-633-8890. Feldenkrais – 7-8pm. With Lesa. Awareness through movement using small, simple movements and touch. Feldenkrais guides the student into new ways of moving in the world. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Release and Restore Yoga – 7-8pm. With Stephen Saunders. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Sacred Art of Doodling – 7-8:30pm. Explore your artistic and spiritual side with Sacred Art Classes! Join Kay Blanchard-Grell to exploreimages we draw naturally that reflect back to us messages that help and heal. donations for class and materials. Enrollment requested. For more information call 918-630-4098 or kayshand@ yahoo.com. Yoga Jam – 7:30-8:40pm. With Meghan. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918809-4444. Kundalini Yoga & Meditation – 7:45-8:50pm. With Celeste. Known as the Yoga of Awareness, experience this ancient technology as it assists you in awakening and accessing your highest consciousness. Different theme/concentration each class. All classes include chanting, breathwork, stretching, movement, music and meditation/ relaxation. Studio Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200.

TUESDAY
Stretch & Strengthen – 7-8am. With Lori. Begin the day with deep breathing, slow stretching and gentle strengthening. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Skillywork – 8-9:30am. With Skilly. See Monday listing. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Gentle Yoga: Chair & Bar – 8:15-9:30am. With Lori. A class to increase mobility, improve balance and strengthen muscles. Using a chair, various props and the wall this is an appropriate class for seniors and those who may have some difficulty getting up and down from the floor. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Soft Yoga – 9:30-10:40am. With Sunny. See Sunday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Restorative Yoga –11am to 12Noon. With Melissa Morrill. Modified Yoga and meditation for beginners & anyone with movement restrictions at Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, 918-660-7985. Lower Body Grounding Yoga – 12noon-1pm. With Stephen Saunders. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Mindful Yoga – 12noon-1pm. With Melissa Morrill. Yoga and meditation in motion. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, Tulsa. 918-660-7985. Therapeutic Yoga – 12Noon-1pm. With Elizabeth Barlow. Designed for those wanting to strengthen as well as those with limited mobility, pain or dysfunction. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Power Yoga – 12:30-1:40pm. With Keri. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918809-4444. Personal Skin Care Consultations – 3-6pm. Regina Collins of Beaute Purpose will give free consultations and allow customers to test products before they buy to reduce the likelihood the products end up in the “cosmetic graveyard.” Anabell’s Escentials, 202 E. Dewey, Sapulpa. Vinyasa Flow – 5:45-6:55pm. With Meghan. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Pilates Mat – 5:30-6:30pm. With Robee See Monday listing. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Tai Chi – 5:45pm. With Hilde Patterson. Radiant Body Health and Deep Body Soul Centering. Call 918-724-4676. The Many Paths to God – 6:30-8pm. Study group on book by Dr. Chaco Priest with Rudy Lack. Discussions are open ended with each chapter reading to encourage group participation. Love Donation. Center of Light, 8123 E 48th St, turn E next to Sonic drive-in, Tulsa. A Course in Miracles – 6:30-8pm. With Rev. Ann Marie Davis. The teaching of the Course strikes at the heart of the basic human condition. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S Boston, Tulsa. 918-582-6624. Bioenergetic Therapy – 6:30-8pm. With Elizabeth King, PhD. This class is based upon the work of Alexander Lowen and provides emotional stress release through body centered movements

MONDAY
Skillywork – 8-9:30am. With Skilly. Skillywork blends all disciplines. Body power/Alignment Balance, Strength/Flexibility and Movement/ Endurance. Multi-level, gentle. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Pilates Mat – 9:30-10:30am. With Cynthia. Holistic approach to the Pilates method. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Yoga Mix – 9:30-10:40am. With Mary. Each class is unique, incorporating a blend of yoga styles to open the body and release tension and stress. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Viniyoga 101 – 9:30-10:45am. With Kristine. Skills to lay a foundation for a safe and effective personal practice. Adaptations are made for each individual. Breath awareness, adaptation of form and appropriate sequencing are the key elements. Lakeside Yoga – 10-11:15am. With Lucy Weberling. Lakeside Gar and Brill, Crosstimbers Marina, Skiatook Lake. 918-633-8890. Upper Body Expansion Yoga – 12noon-1pm. with Stephen Saunders. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Flowing into Yoga – 12noon-1pm. With Elizabeth Barlow. After practicing specific poses slowly, we will string the pearls of poses together into a safe and effective flow series. Tulsa Yoga Therapy

38

Green Country Edition

NAGreenCountry.com

and positioning. $8/class. Naturopathic Healing Arts Center, 1660 E. 71st Street Suite 2-O, Tulsa. 918-496-9401. Release & Restore Yoga– 6:45-7:45pm. With Stephen Saunders. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Kundalini Yoga – 6:45-7:50pm. With Celeste. Studio Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Deep Stretch – 7:10-8:20pm. With Meghan. See Sunday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Restorative Yoga – 8:30-9:40pm. With Josh. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444.

THURSDAY
Skillywork – 8-9:30am. With Skilly. See Monday listing. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Gentle Yoga – 9-10:15am. With Lucy Weberling. All Souls Church, Presidents’ Room, 30th and S. Peoria, Tulsa. Lucyoga@mac.com. 918-633-8890. Iyengar Yoga – 9-10:30am. With Stacie. The Iyengar approach is known world wide for its precision and accuracy in alignment. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918605-6508. Soft Yoga – 9:30-10:40am. With Sunny. See Sunday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Chair Yoga – 10:30-11:15am. With Lucy Weberling. All Souls Church, Presidents’ Room, 30th and S. Peoria, Tulsa. Lucyoga@mac.com. 918-633-8890. Restorative Yoga –11am to Noon. See Tuesday listing. With Melissa Morrill. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, 918-660-SOUL Back in Balance Yoga– 12noon-1pm. With Stephen Saunders. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Mindful Yoga – 12noon-1pm. With Melissa Morrill. See Tuesday listing. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, Tulsa. 918-660-SOUL. Yoga Mix – 12:30-1:40pm. With Jenny. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91stSt, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918809-4444. Holistic Mother’s Group – 1:15-2:30pm. With Melissa Morrill. Mindful discussions about motherhood with guided meditation hosted by Natural Lullabies. Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, 918-381-0828. Pilates Mat – 5:30-6:30pm. With Cynthia. Studio Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918712-7200. Ashtanga Vinyasa – 5:45-6:55pm. With Meghan. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. European Natural Health Center – 6-6:30pm. Join us each week on KGEB TV Channel 53 (Cox Chnl 23) , as we address important and controversial health matters such as vaccinations, cholesterol, weight loss and many others from the standpoint of European Naturopaths. If you would like to join the studio audience or have health questions contact us at info@enhcenter.com or call 918-398-0252. Medicine Circle – 6:30-8:30pm. With Tuttle. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 948-582-6624. Prenatal Yoga – 6:30-7:40pm. With Celeste. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918712-7200. Meditation Class – 6:30-8pm. Learn 8 different types and variations of meditation. Connie Smith, 918-859-9325. Gentle Stretch Yoga –7-8:15am. With Lucy Weberling. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E. 33rd, Tulsa. 918-633-8890. Lucyoga@mac.com Yoga Mix – 7:10-8:20pm. With Janet. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Kundalini Yoga – 7:45-8:50pm. With Celeste.

See Tuesday listing. Studio Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200.

FRIDAY
Stretch & Strenghthen Yoga – 7-8am. With Lori. See Tuesday listing. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Skillywork – 8-9:30am. With Skilly. See Monday listing. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1,Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Gentle: Chair & Bar Yoga - 8-9:15am. With Lori. See Tuesday listing. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Feldenkrais – 9:30-10:30am. With Lesa. See Monday listing. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Vinyasa Flow – 9:30-10:40am. With Sunny. See Tuesday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444 The Art of Bending – 12noon-1pm. With Beth. Bending well and healthily is a learned skill. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Deep Stretch – 12:30-1:40pm. With Meghan. See Monday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Strong & Long Yoga – 5-6:15pm. With Stephen Saunders. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Yoga Jam – 6-7:10pm. With Meghan. An eclectic flow of postures mixed with upbeat energetic music, this nontraditional yoga class is a fun way to exhale the week and welcome the weekend. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Beyond the Twelve Steps – 7pm. With Randy Waterbury. Continues the Spiritual Journey. Unity Center of Tulsa, 1830 S. Boston, Tulsa. 948-582-6624.

WEDNESDAY
Skillywork – 8-9:30am. With Skilly. See Monday listing. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Gentle Yoga - 9-10:15am. With Lucy Weberling. All Souls Church, Presidents’ Room, 30th and S. Peoria, Tulsa. Lucyoga@mac.com. 918-633-8890. Iyengar Yoga - 9-10:30am. With Stacie. The Iyengar approach is known world wide for its precision and accuracy in alignment. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918605-6508. Soft Yoga – 9:30-10:40am. With Sunny. See Sunday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Chair Yoga – 10:30-11:15am. With Lucy Weberling. All Souls Church, Presidents’ Room, 30th and S. Peoria, Tulsa. Lucyoga@mac.com. 918-633-8890. Back in Balance Yoga– 12noon-1pm. With Stephen Saunders. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Yoga Mix – 12:30-1:40pm. With Sunny. See Monday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91stSt, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Organic Skin Care Consultations – 1-4pm. Regina Collins, owner of Beaute Purpose, an organic, glutenfree, all natural skin care product line, offers consultations at Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, 918660-SOUL. Pilates Mat – 5:30-6:30pm. With Cynthia. Studio Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918712-7200. Ashtanga Vinyasa – 5:45-6:55pm. With Meghan. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Prenatal Yoga – 6:30-7:40pm. With Celeste. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918712-7200. Gentle Stretch Yoga –7-8:15am. With Lucy Weberling. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E. 33rd, Tulsa. 918-633-8890. Lucyoga@mac.com Yoga Mix – 7:10-8:20pm. With Meghan. See Monday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Kundalini Yoga – 7:45-8:50pm. With Celeste. See Tuesday listing. Studio Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1, Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Deep Stretch – 8:30-9:40pm. With Josh. See Monday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444.

SATURDAY
PowerYoga –9-10:10am. With Jon. See Sunday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91st St, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Mindful & Deep – 9:30-10:45am. With Stephen Saunders. Tulsa Yoga Therapy Studio, 3315 E 33rd Street, Tulsa. 918-605-6508. Pilates Mat – 10-11am. With Cynthia. See Monday listing. Bilancia, 4145 S Harvard Bldg, H-1,Tulsa. 918-712-7200. Yoga Mix – 10:30-11:40pm. With Meghan. See Monday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91stSt, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444. Intuitive Wisdom Readings – 1:30-4:30pm. With Amanda Merrill. Need extra insight into a relationship, business situation or upcoming decision? Nirvana Body & Soul, 7903 E 50th St, Fontana Shopping Center, 918-660-7985. Vinyasa Flow – 6-7:10pm. With Jenny. See Tuesday listing. Inner Peace Yoga, 7718 E 91stSt, Ste 160, Tulsa. 918-809-4444.

natural awakenings

April 2010

39

TM

40

Green Country Edition

NAGreenCountry.com