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Contents
1 Introduction
2 The Institute of Commercial Management (ICM)
3 ICM Articulation Agreements with Universities
4 Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy
4.1 Assessment
4.2 Student Workload
5 ICM Qualifications and Progression
5.1 ICM Certificates (equivalent to NQF Level 4 Diplomas)
5.2 ICM Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 5 Diplomas)
5.3 ICM Advanced Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas)
5.4 ICM Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas)
5.5 ICM Post Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 7 Diplomas)
5.6 Relative Positioning of ICM Qualifications
6 Student Registration & Course/Level Entry Requirements
6.1 Student Registration
6.2 Student Registration Fees
6.3 Course/Level Entry Requirements
7 Examinations and Results
7.1 Examinations
7.2 Examination Entry Fees and Forms
7.3 Examination Timetable
7.4 Examination grades and remarking
7.5 Examination re-sits
7.6 Examination Closing Dates
7.7 Examination Results
7.8 Examination Grades
7.9 Transcript of Academic Results
7.10 Replacement Certificates
7.11 Deferrals
7.12 Subject Exemptions for Professional Programmes
7.13 Single Subject Candidates
8 Subject advice, educational guidance and student support
8.1 Study Methods
8.2 Payment Methods
8.3 Choosing your course of study
8.4 ICM Approved Centres
9 Textbooks
10 Students with learning difficulties
11 Copies of past examination papers and other forms of assessment
12 Unit Information
12.1 Programme Objectives
12.2 Recommended Course Duration
12.3 Continuing Education

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12.4 Entry Requirements
13 Course Structure
13.1 Unit Syllabuses
13.1.1 Business Management & Administration Syllabus
13.1.2 Numeracy & Statistics Syllabus
13.1.3 Marketing Syllabus
13.1.4 Accounting Syllabus
13.1.5 Economics for Business Syllabus
13.1.6 Business Law Syllabus
13.1.7 Organisational Behaviour Syllabus
13.1.8 Strategic Management Syllabus
13.1.9 Marketing Management Syllabus
13.1.10 Human Resources Management Syllabus
13.1.11 Customer Service Syllabus
13.1.12 Corporate Policy Syllabus
13.1.13 Financial Management Syllabus
13.1.14 Leadership Studies Syllabus
13.1.15 The International Business Environment Syllabus
13.1.16 Business Management Project Syllabus

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1

Introduction

The purpose of this Course Handbook is to provide you with general information about
studying with the Institute of Commercial Management (ICM). This Handbook should be read
in conjunction with other Guidelines available on the ICM website. The early pages of this
Handbook provide general information about ICM and its programmes. Later sections give
details about the equivalency of ICM Certificate (NQF* Level 4 qualifications), Diploma (NQF
Level 5 qualifications), Advanced Diploma (NQF Level 6 qualifications), Graduate Diploma
(NQF Level 6 qualifications) and Post Graduate Diploma Awards (NQF Level 7
qualifications). Please note that not all Levels are available for all programmes. The material
in this Handbook is as accurate as possible at the time of production.
*NQF: the UK National Qualifications Framework
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The Institute of Commercial Management (ICM)

Established in the early 1970s, the Institute of Commercial Management provides academic
and vocational qualifications which are well recognised globally.
In its capacity as a course developer and an examining and certifying Board, the Institute
offers a wide range of professional and vocational awards in Business, Management and
related vocational areas.
ICM programmes are designed to address the personal development and training needs of
those wishing to enter the commercial sector and to support the continued development and
workplace flexibility of those already in employment.
ICM’s global services include the design, development and certification of business
education and training programmes for education providers; the development and
certification of tailored education and training programmes for the corporate sector,
emerging industries and the global workforce and the examination, assessment and
certification of students undertaking business, management and related vocational education
programmes.
An acknowledged specialist in the design and development of progressive, practical and
multi-functional programmes of study, the Institute works with a range of public and private
sector clients including universities, business schools, colleges, training providers,
International Development Agencies, government agencies and local authorities.
ICM provides examinations in more than 200 subject areas ranging from accounting and
finance to tourism and hospitality and from marketing and advertising to project management
and examines and certifies candidates to an internationally consistent standard.
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ICM Articulation Agreements with Universities

The Institute has formal partnership arrangements with universities in the UK and overseas.
A full list of progression routes from ICM qualifications into Undergraduate and Post
Graduate courses at UK Universities is available from the ICM website.
Established articulation arrangements provide direct access to the second and final years of
a wide range of BA/BSc degrees for ICM Diploma qualifications (Level 5 Diploma) and

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Advanced Diploma qualifications (Level 6 Diploma). Access to Masters programmes also
exist for those with ICM Graduate Diplomas (Level 6) and ICM Post Graduate Diplomas
(Level 7). In addition, ICM Certificate (Level 4 Diploma) holders may be eligible for entry to
year 1 of appropriate degrees.
Subject to status and grades obtained, students holding ICM Diploma qualifications at levels
4, 5, 6 and 7 are accepted onto Undergraduate and Post Graduate degree programmes
offered by institutions in continents across the globe.
Our strategic partners have agreed that students can enter their degree programmes with
Advanced Standing, provided they possess the right Grade profile and are able to meet
other admissions criteria, such as language competence. The stated grade and points
requirements may be subject to local variations.
Entry to the First Year
Application for entry to the first year of a relevant degree programme will be considered for
those students who hold a relevant ICM Certificate Level Award.
Entry to the Second Year
Application for entry to the second year of an Honours degree programme will be considered
for students who have passed a relevant ICM Diploma (Level 5) programme and have met
the following requirements:
Ü obtained at least 24 Points from 8 subjects leading to the qualification
Ü obtained at least a Grade C in all subjects in the Diploma
Entry to the Final Year
Students who have passed a relevant ICM Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) programme
will be considered for final year entry if they have achieved the following:
Ü obtained at least 32 Points from 12 subjects leading to the Advanced Diploma
Ü obtained at least a Grade C in all subjects in the Advanced Diploma
Entry to the Post Graduate Year
Students who have passed a relevant ICM Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) programme
will be considered for entry to Masters programmes if they have achieved the following:
Ü obtained at least 12 Points from the final 4 subjects leading to the qualification
Ü obtained at least a Grade C in all subjects in the Graduate Diploma
Converting ICM subject grades into points
The following rules apply in relation to converting ICM subject grades into points:
Ü
Ü
Ü
Ü

an ‘A’ grade is awarded 6 points
a ‘B’ grade is awarded 4 points
a ‘C’ grade is awarded 2 points
a ‘D’ grade is awarded 0 points

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Progression Routes
Students wishing to progress to degree programmes should review the range of courses
available at our partner Universities. Information on appropriate university courses can be
obtained from our website.
The Institute’s qualifications are also recognised by leading professional examining bodies
for either subject exemption or registration purposes. Further details can be obtained from
the appropriate examination bodies.
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Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

Tuition in preparation for the Institute’s examinations takes place on a number of levels,
including lectures, seminars, class discussion and problem review and analysis.
Formal lectures provide a foundation of information, which students build on through directed
learning and self-managed study outside the classroom.
Students are actively encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material, fostering
a greater depth of learning experience.
4.1 Assessment
Assessment for the majority of programmes is based on final examinations. The Institute has
a traditional approach to assessment. Formative assessment is provided by ICM Teaching
Centres as and when appropriate and may include; essays, in-class tests, role play
exercises, presentations and projects. However, in terms of gaining a professional
qualification, and in order to maintain standards, ICM believes that students should be
formally assessed on the body of knowledge covered during the course and be examined as
individuals on the required learning outcomes.
4.2 Student Workload
In accordance with nationally accepted codes of practice in the UK, each 20 credit unit
represents a total of approximately 200 hours of learning. Typically, each ICM award at
undergraduate level comprises four units of 20 credits each. Students must complete four
units at each level leading to the awards of Certificate (Level 4 Diploma), Diploma (Level 5
Diploma), Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) and Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma).
Thus, for example, in order to gain an ICM Advanced Diploma, a student must have
completed the Certificate, Diploma and Advanced Diploma stages. The Post Graduate
Diploma (Level 7 Diploma) consists of 120 credits divided into six units.
The learning hours for each unit are subdivided into appropriate categories of learning
opportunities, such as lectures, seminars, preparation time, directed study, time spent on
assessment items and exam preparation. At least one quarter of this time is usually devoted
to formal contact time.
A further one quarter of this time is related to directed learning. The balance of workload is
comprised of individual, self-managed student learning and revision.

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Note that for a unit delivered in standard mode, the ICM examinations calendar
accommodates a teaching year of approximately 2 x 20 teaching weeks, and four weeks of
revision/end of year assessment.
Furthermore, each unit is assigned to a particular ‘Level’, with each Level corresponding to
the group of subjects contained within the programmes leading to the award of a Certificate
(Level 4 Diploma), Diploma (Level 5 Diploma), Advanced Diploma (Level 6 Diploma),
Graduate Diploma (Level 6 Diploma) or Post Graduate Diploma (Level 7 Diploma).
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ICM Qualifications and Progression

Understanding your qualification is important and the following guidelines outline how ICM
qualifications fit within the UK National Qualifications Framework and support vocational
learning.
ICM has benchmarked its qualifications against the UK National Qualifications Framework
(NQF). In recognition of the NQF levels and with reference to appropriate National
Occupational Standards, the Institute has produced the following level descriptors which
should be read in conjunction with the table provided in section 5.6.
5.1 ICM Certificates (equivalent to NQF Level 4 Diplomas)
ICM Certificates are awarded to those who have passed Part 1 (the first four or five subjects,
depending on the course) of an ICM Diploma programme. See below for ICM Diploma Entry
Requirements. ICM Certificates represent a level of qualification that recognises the ability to
gain, and where relevant apply a range of knowledge, skills and understanding.
ICM Certificate holders should be able to display competence in the application of
knowledge in the performance of a range of work activities, some of which may be routine
and predictable with some being complex or non-routine.
Learning at this level involves gaining knowledge and skills appropriate for individuals
working semi-independently, or receiving basic supervision and training from others in their
field of work.
Students should begin to develop a degree of individual responsibility or autonomy in their
study as well as the ability to collaborate with others, for example through participation in
work groups or teams.
Successful completion of the ICM Certificate enables entry to the first year of appropriate
degree programmes at a range of Universities. For a complete list of progression routes
please refer to the website.
5.2 ICM Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 5 Diplomas)
Entry to an ICM Diploma programme requires completion of secondary education or an
equivalent and recognised programme of study.
ICM Diplomas represent a level of qualification which recognises the ability to gain, and
where relevant apply a range of knowledge, skills and understanding.

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ICM Diploma holders should be able to display competence in the application of knowledge
in a broad range of varied work activities performed in a wide variety of contexts, most of
which are complex and non-routine.
Learning at this level involves obtaining detailed knowledge and skills appropriate for people
working independently, or providing basic supervision and training of others in their field of
work and people wishing to go to University.
Progression is available from the ICM Diploma to the second year of relevant degree
programmes at a range of Universities. For a complete list of progression routes please refer
to the website.
5.3 ICM Advanced Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas)
Entry to an ICM Advanced Diploma programme requires completion of the ICM Certificate
and Diploma in the selected programme. Students holding other relevant and equivalent
qualifications which contain ICM Diploma subjects could qualify for entry as well as subject
and Level exemptions.
ICM Advanced Diplomas represent a level of qualification which involves specialist learning
and detailed analysis of a high level of information, knowledge and skills in a specified area
of work or study.
Students undertaking an ICM Advanced Diploma should demonstrate the depth of
knowledge and understanding of an area of work or study to enable them to formulate
solutions and responses to complex problems and situations.
ICM Advanced Diplomas are appropriate for people working in positions such as Senior
Supervisors, Professionals or Managers. These individuals need to demonstrate significant
levels of knowledge, a high level of work expertise in job roles and competence in managing
and training others. Learning at this level is appropriate for people working in technical and
professional jobs, and/or managing and developing others.
The ICM Advanced Diploma is equivalent to NQF Level 6 and in terms of level and credit
value these qualifications are comparable to UK Intermediate Higher Education qualifications
such as HNDs, Diplomas of Higher Education and Foundation Degrees.
Progression is available from ICM Advanced Diplomas to the final year of relevant degree
programmes at a range of Universities. For a complete list of progression routes please refer
to the website.
5.4

ICM Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 6 Diplomas)

Entry to an ICM Graduate Diploma programme requires prior completion of the ICM Diploma
and Advanced Diploma in the selected programme.
Advanced Standing and Exemptions: Students holding relevant degrees and equivalent
qualifications which contain ICM Certificate, Diploma and Advanced Diploma subjects could
qualify for entry as well as subject and Level exemptions.
Students at this level study highly developed and complex levels of knowledge enabling the
development of in-depth and original responses to complicated and unpredictable problems
and situations.

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Learning at the Graduate Diploma level involves the demonstration of high level specialist
professional knowledge appropriate for senior professionals and managers. Indicative
competencies involve the application of a range of fundamental principles across a wide and
often unpredictable variety of contexts as well as the ability to perform technical or
professional work activities in a variety of contexts with a substantial degree of personal
responsibility and autonomy.
A qualification at this level is appropriate for people working as knowledge-based
professionals or in professional management positions. This qualification is equivalent to a
Bachelors degree, and progression is available from the ICM Graduate Diploma to Post
Graduate programmes such as Masters degrees.
5.5 ICM Post Graduate Diplomas (equivalent to NQF Level 7 Diplomas)
Entry to an ICM Post Graduate Diploma programme requires completion of an ICM
Graduate Diploma, another Level 6 award, or a degree level qualification in an appropriate
discipline.
Refer to Section 6 for Advanced Standing arrangements for mature candidates.
Students at this level of study should display a mastery of high level knowledge and skills
and have professional and research-based skills.
This qualification is equivalent to two thirds of a Masters degree (MBA or MA) and advanced
standing can be given onto a range of Masters degrees. For a complete list of progression
routes please refer to the website.
5.6

Relative Positioning of ICM Qualifications

The following table gives an indication of the relative positioning of ICM awards, compared
with other types of qualifications and levels. Reference is made to levels in the UK National
Qualifications Framework and example qualifications at each level. In addition, the final
column in the table (FHEQ) shows the ‘equivalent’ qualifications commonly being developed
and delivered in the University sector. For example, these indicate that the ICM Advanced
Diploma equates to an intermediate level award (in terms of credit accumulation this ICM
qualification equates to a Higher National Diploma). Furthermore, the ICM Graduate Diploma
equates to a Bachelors degree level qualification and the ICM Post Graduate Diploma
equates to a Masters degree level qualification.

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Relative Positioning of ICM Qualifications

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6

Student Registration & Course/Level Entry Requirements

6.1 Student Registration
In order to undertake any ICM examination candidates must be Registered ICM Student
Members.
Student Membership can be obtained by completing the appropriate Student Registration
Application form and returning the form and the Student Registration Fee to the Institute.
Details of Student Registration Fees can be found on the ICM website.
The Student Registration fee is valid for one year and can be renewed annually.
Important Note: All students wishing to register for any ICM Advanced Diploma
programme or above, MUST complete and attach an Academic History form to their
Student Registration form. Copies of all qualifications and Awards obtained by the
student must also accompany the Academic History form.
The Academic History form is used to ensure that students are qualified to commence
their studies at the Level they have selected.
6.2 Student Registration Fees
Student Registration fees for standard ICM Awards and programmes are based on the
country in which you will undertake your examinations. The current fees levels are as
follows:
Group 1: If you are based in Europe, and EU Member State, North America, a Gulf
State, India, the Middle East, Australasia, Singapore, South Africa, China,
Hong Kong or Malaysia your Registration Fee will be £50.00.
Group 2: If you are based in sub-Saharan Africa, Central or South America,
Pakistan, Bangladesh, the Caribbean or North Africa your Registration
Fee will be £25.00.
Group 3: A special rate exists for students in countries which have (a) emerged
from conflict (b) countries in which the general population is subject to
great poverty and (c) countries in which the UN acknowledge that the level
of economic activity and national per capita income is unacceptably low.

6.3

Course/Level Entry Requirements

ICM professional programmes are structured in ‘Levels’. These Levels are designed to
provide a structured and progressive level of knowledge.
All students are required to commence their studies at the Diploma Level of all programmes
unless they are able to claim subject-for-subject or Level exemptions.
Subject-for-subject exemptions can be applied for if the student has (a) been examined, in
the subject, by another recognised Awarding body and (b) has passed the examination/s set
by the alternate body.

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The Institute operates an 'Open Entry' policy in respect of most of its Diploma Level
vocational programmes, subject to appropriate work experience, but prospective students
should note that the following qualifications are recommended for those wishing to undertake
ICM Diploma Level programmes:
Entry to an ICM Diploma Level Programme (NQF Level 5)
Entry to an ICM Diploma programme requires completion of secondary education or
equivalent. For example:
Ü One GCE A-level plus three GCSEs (or equivalents) or 5 GCSEs
Ü A suitable BTEC National Award
Ü Any qualification equivalent to one or more of the above
The minimum age for registration for the majority of programmes is 18. Applicants over the
age of 20 who do not hold one of the recommended entry qualifications may also register for
some Diploma Level programmes providing they have been in full-time employment for a
minimum of two years and can produce a letter from their employer to confirm this.
Entry to an ICM Advanced Diploma Programme (NQF Level 6)
Entry to an ICM Advanced Diploma programme requires completion of the ICM Diploma
Level of the selected programme.
Entry to an ICM Graduate Diploma Programme (NQF Level 6)
Entry to an ICM Graduate Diploma requires completion of the ICM Diploma and Advanced
Diploma in the selected programme.
Entry to an ICM Post Graduate Diploma Programme (NQF Level 7)
Registration for an ICM Post Graduate Diploma is accepted from those:
Ü who have completed an ICM Graduate Diploma
Ü who hold any Level 6 business or management Award
Ü holders of business and management degree level qualifications.
Mature Candidates. Applications from those over the age of 25 who do not meet the
standard Entry Requirements will also be considered providing they:
Ü Are over the age of 25
Ü Have been in employment for 5 years – a letter of support is required from the
applicant’s employer; and
Ü Hold a management or senior supervisory position.

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7

Examinations and Results

7.1 Examinations
In order to achieve a consistent global standard the Institute sets all examination papers and
all candidate scripts are returned to the Institute for marking.
Invigilation of examinations is undertaken either by external Invigilators who are appointed
by the Institute or by the British Council. Examinations are held in March, June, September
and December and the Examination Timetable can be found on the ICM website.
Candidates must be registered and paid-up Student Members of the Institute at the time they
undertake their examinations. Examination papers are securely distributed to ICM Approved
Centres and scripts are assessed and moderated in the UK by ICM Appointed Examiners.
Full details of Examination dates can be found on the ICM website.
7.2 Examination Entry Fees and Forms
Examination Entry fees are shown on the appropriate Examination Entry form for the
subject/programme you are undertaking. In general, the standard Examination fee is £26.00
per subject. There are however some specialist programmes where a higher subject fee may
be payable. If you have any queries relating to fees please contact your Teaching Centre.
In order to undertake any ICM Professional or Single Subject examination you must be a
Registered and paid-up ICM Student Member.
To enter for an examination you need to complete the relevant Examination Entry form and
submit it to the Institute.
7.3 Examination Timetable
ICM examinations take place four times each year, in March, June, September and
December. The Timetable for each year states the Closing Date for receipt of entries for
each examination Series. Please visit the website to view the ICM examination timetable.
7.4

Examination grades and re-marking

You can request that your examination script is re-marked if you are unhappy with your
result.
The fee for this is GBP £35.00 per script. The Institute operates a triple marking and
moderation system. In the event that the moderator increases the original marks awarded,
the fee for re-marking your script will be refunded to you. Should the Grade awarded remain
the same, you will be issued with a full Examiner’s Report detailing your examination
performance. The Institute retains answer scripts for a maximum period of six months.
Examination scripts/answer books are not returned to candidates under any circumstances.

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7.5

Examination re-sits

Although ICM Examinations are held every twelve weeks it should be noted that it takes an
average of twelve weeks to mark the scripts after each Examination Series.
If you sit, for example, for one or more subjects in March you will not receive your results
until June. This means that if you were to fail a subject in March, you would not be able to resit the subject in June, as you will have missed the Closing Date for the June Series.
Our advice is that you try to split your subject examinations between two consecutive
Examination Series e.g. If your programme has four subjects you could take two subjects in
one series and two in another series.
On this basis, were you to fail one subject in March you would be able to re-sit it in
September, giving you plenty of time for revision.
7.6

Examination Closing Dates

There is a Closing Date for receipt of Examination Entries and candidates entering for
examinations must ensure that their completed Examination Entry forms and fees reach the
Institute before the Closing Date for each Examination Series. Examination Timetables
indicate the closing date for receipt of entries for each sitting and this information also
appears on the ICM website. Entries received after the Closing Date are automatically
carried forward to the next Examination Series.
7.7

Examination Results

Results are distributed within twelve weeks from receipt of scripts. Candidates are advised
not to telephone the Institute for results as this information is confidential and cannot be
disclosed over the telephone.
7.8

Examination Grades

Should you wish to re-sit any examination to improve your previous Grade, please note that
the latest Grade you obtain will stand.
7.9

Transcript of Academic Results

You may request a transcript of your Academic Results, however please note there is a
charge of GBP £15 for each Award transcript requested.
7.10 Replacement Certificates
Replacement certificates are available on payment of a fee of GBP £20.00 per certificate.
Please include your Student Registration Number together with your current postal address
and indicate which certificate is required.

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7.11 Deferrals
There is a fee of GBP £10.00 per subject should you wish to defer your examinations to
another Series for health or for any other reason. If you are unable to undertake your
examinations, it is essential you advise ICM before the appropriate examination date,
otherwise the full entry fee of GBP £26.00 will be applicable. Please note that you may only
defer examinations on one occasion. The full entry fee of GBP £26.00 per subject will
become due if you defer on more than one occasion.
7.12 Subject Exemptions for Professional Programmes
Students holding relevant recognised qualifications from other professional bodies or
recognised Higher Education institutions may apply for Subject Exemptions, on a subject-forsubject basis. It may also be possible, subject to qualifications held, to obtain exemption
from a Level within a programme. Documentary evidence is required before any decision
can be made in connection with the granting of Subject/Level Exemptions. No exemptions
are given for case studies or assignments. Internally awarded school certificates and
diplomas are not accepted for exemption purposes.
7.13 Single Subject Candidates
Registered ICM students who do not want to complete a full ICM programme may study
individual subjects. Single Subject candidates receive a Single Subject Diploma on
successful completion of the relevant subject examination. Single Subjects qualify, on a
subject-for-subject basis, for subject exemptions from ICM professional programmes.
Note: 1. Case Studies, Assignments and Projects, including ALL subjects in any Post
Graduate programme, do not qualify for Single Subject Awards.
2. A student who undertakes, on a Single Subject basis, subjects within a Diploma,
Advanced Diploma, Graduate Diploma or Post Graduate ICM programme will not
be entitled to a professional Award unless they are exempted from or have
completed all lower Levels of that Award.
3. In order to comply with UKBA requirements, overseas students studying in the UK
(excluding those from EU countries) are not permitted to undertake Single
Subjects and must undertake a professional programme.
8

Subject advice, educational guidance and student support

You are expected to be independent and to take responsibility for your own academic and
personal life. However, your study centre should also provide appropriate help and
assistance. Your tutors will direct your studies and ensure that you know what work you
need to cover in any given unit. Seek advice from academic staff either during or after class
or try to see them during their office hours.

8.1 Study Methods
Teaching Centres are provided with a detailed syllabus and reading list for each subject
area. Each Unit Syllabus clearly defines the areas that you will be required to cover for each
subject and your examination questions will be based on the areas and topics detailed for

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each unit. It is important to ensure that you obtain a copy of each unit syllabus from your
Teaching Centre. Alternatively, this information can be obtained online at
www.icm.education, in the ‘Single Subject’ section.
Each Unit Syllabus is normally linked to one main textbook and the examiners base their
questions on the contents of the nominated core text.
The Unit Syllabuses also give details of 'Alternative Texts' and texts recommended for
further reading. It is advised that you should refer to the 'Alternative Texts' in order to
develop your skills and broaden your knowledge of the subject area.
8.2 Payment Methods
Registration and Examination fees can be paid by any one of the following methods:
Sterling Bank Draft
Sterling Money Order
Sterling Postal Order
Sterling Cheque (if drawn on a UK Bank). Cheques should be made payable to ICM
Sterling Cash (this needs to be registered – this option is available in the UK ONLY)
Credit Card - you may download this form from our website
http://www.icm.education/forms. (Please be aware there is a £5.00 Pounds Sterling
Administration Charge for this service and this form can only be accepted as a hard
copy by post)
Ü Western Union - if you wish to use Western Union you may utilise one of the
following payee's names:
‘Jackie Cleaver’
'Adair Somerville Ford’
‘Alistair Somerville Ford’
It is ESSENTIAL that you provide us with the Money Transfer Control Number
(MTCN) you are given by Western Union. If payment is made for examinations, the
Money Transfer Control Number MUST be clearly written on your examination
entry form. If you propose to send your fees through Western Union please confirm
by email to info@icm.education that payment has been made by this method.
Ü
Ü
Ü
Ü
Ü
Ü

Please note that it is not ICM policy to provide our Bank account details, and you are
therefore requested to use one of the above accepted payment methods.
8.3 Choosing your course of study
As an ICM Student Member you can work towards obtaining either a recognised
Professional qualification or study for one or more of the 200 Single Subject Awards from the
list of subjects offered by the Institute. The choice is yours.
8.4 ICM Approved Centres
Tuition leading to the Institute’s examinations can only be provided by Institutions which
have been granted ICM ‘Approved Centre’ status. Please note that some ICM Teaching
Centres specialise in particular subject areas and not all ICM Centres will necessarily offer
tuition for every ICM course programme. Visit the website to find an ICM Approved Centre
near you.

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Textbooks

The recommended textbooks for each subject are shown on each subject syllabus.
Examiners base their questions on the contents of the recommended texts and it is therefore
important for you to ensure that you have access to the appropriate texts. You can obtain the
full list of books available to purchase from ICM and/or place orders by either contacting your
Centre or complete the Book Order Form and send it to ICM’s Book Sales Manager at:
info@icm.education .
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Students with specific learning difficulties

If you are diagnosed with a specific learning difficulty you may be granted special
arrangements for your examination/s. We will require a copy of an Assessment Report
issued within the last three years. The amount of additional time and any other
arrangements will be determined on the basis of the Report relating to your circumstances. It
is possible that you may be granted permission to use a computer or laptop without internet
connection in your examinations.
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Copies of past examination papers and other forms of assessment

The ICM website, www.icm.education, provides a database of recent examination papers,
assignments and Case Studies. These can be found in the Student Resources section of the
website.
12

Unit Information

Covering all the major business studies areas and topics, the ICM Diploma and Advanced
Diploma programmes have, over a fifteen year period, achieved international recognition and
are currently undertaken by students in over 40 countries.
In addition to providing a comprehensive knowledge of each of the major business functions,
the structure of the course ensures that students have the widest possible range of career,
employment and higher education options open to them on successful completion of their
studies.

12.1 Programme Objectives
To provide prospective business and management students with a body of knowledge which
will:
Ü increase their employment opportunities
Ü prepare them for supervisory and management careers in industry and commerce
and;
Ü provide them with a qualification which will enable them to progress to higher level
general management or specialised business programmes at a later stage in their
business or academic careers.

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The ICM Diploma in Business Studies programme is also suitable for working supervisors
and managers who require recognised business qualifications for career advancement or
promotion purposes.

12.2 Recommended Course Duration
To help calculate the duration of the programme, please refer to the section entitled ‘Student
Work Load’ in section 4.2 of this handbook.
It is expected that a student will need at least 18 months to 2 years of full-time study at an
ICM Approved Centre to complete the full Advanced Diploma programme.
Examination Grades
Grade A - Distinction
Grade B - Credit
Grade C - Pass
Grade D - Pass
Grade F - Fail

70% and above
60% to 69%
50% to 59%
40% to 49%
39% and under

Certification
On successful completion of all the examinations in Part 1, students are awarded the ICM
Certificate in Business Studies. Similarly, on successful completion of all the examinations in
Parts 1 & 2 students are awarded the ICM Diploma in Business Studies. On successful
completion of all 12 subjects, students are awarded the ICM Advanced Diploma in Business
Studies.

12.3 Continuing Education
The Business Studies programme will serve as an excellent route for students who
ultimately seek full professional status and will provide first class underpinning knowledge for
the mainstream UK degrees in Business Studies and Business Management. Holders of an
ICM Diploma in Business Studies may enter the ICM Advanced Diploma programme and
completion of this will enable entry to the final year of appropriate Honours degree
programmes.

12.4 Entry Requirements
Students holding relevant recognised qualifications from other institutions or professional
examining bodies may apply for exemptions on a subject-for-subject basis.
The Institute operates an 'Open Access' policy in respect of many of its vocational
programmes but prospective students should note that the following entrance qualifications
are recommended for those wishing to undertake the ICM Diploma programme:
Ü The ICM Certificate in Commercial Studies
Ü One GCE A-level plus Three GCSEs (or equivalents)

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Ü A suitable BTEC National Award
Ü Any qualification equivalent to one or more of the above.
The minimum age for registration for this programme is 18.
Applicants over the age of 20 who do not hold one of the recommended entrance
qualifications may also register for the programme providing they have been in full-time
employment for a minimum of two years.
Advanced Diploma in Business Studies
The minimum age for registration for this programme is 18.
Ü The ICM Diploma in Business Studies(or an equivalent level business studies
qualification)
Ü A suitable BTEC National Award
Ü Any business studies qualification equivalent to one of the above.

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13

Course Structure

The Graduate Diploma in Business Management
1. Business Management & Administration
2. Numeracy and Statistics
3. Marketing
4. Accounting
5. Economics for Business
6. Business Law
7. Organisational Behaviour
8. Strategic Management
9. Marketing Management
10. Human Resources Management
11. Customer Service
12. Corporate Policy*
13. Financial Management
14. Leadership Studies
15. The International Business Environment
16. Business Management Project
* The Corporate Policy unit is examined by means of a Research Project and a Report –
A submission form is available on the ICM website for ICM to approve project proposals.
The Graduate Diploma in Business Management is awarded on completion of all sixteen
subjects

13.1 Unit Syllabuses
Syllabuses for this programme are contained in the following sections.

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13.1.1 Business Management & Administration Syllabus

Unit Title

Business Management & Administration

Unit Code

BMA-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

GW

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
The unit introduces the student to a range of studies which are useful in understanding people in the
workplace. It examines the concept of management within the global business environment and
through the appraisal of business cases, a variety of approaches are considered.
The unit prepares students for their likely future roles as managers in organisations. It encourages
them to synthesize knowledge and experience gained in other units by considering competing
perspectives on the nature of management. It encourages them to reflect upon the contribution that
they might make as individuals to the management process, and to explore their own skills as
potential managers, within the context of their peer group. The unit touches practical, moral and
ethical dimensions of the management role and examines the key problems and dilemmas that may
emerge for stakeholders in contemporary organisations.
Main Topics of Study:
The Organisational Background to Business Administration
The Management Framework to Business Administration
► What are Business Administration and Management?
► The Board of Directors
► Functions within an Organisation
► The 'Systems' Approach to Organisation
► Planning-Control Feedback Cycles
Characteristic Features of Organisations
► The Structure of Organisations and the Need for Authority
► The Features of Bureaucratic and Non-Bureaucratic Organisations
► Traditional Principles and Types of Organisation
► More about Systems & Subsystems
The Structure of Business Enterprises
► The Pattern of Organisations
► Business Types including; Sole-Trader Enterprises, Partnerships, Limited Partnerships, The
Limited Liability Company, Non-Profit-Making Units (Clubs & Societies), Public Enterprises
► Public Sector Organisations; Autonomous Public Corporations, Nationalised Industries, Local
Government Institutions, Central Government Departments
Functions within Organisations
The Production Function
► The Production Process and Types of Production
► Site Selection & Factory Planning

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► Plant & Equipment
► Materials & Materials Handling
► Production Administration
► Costing Aspects of Production
► Work Study
► Maintenance & Production
► CAD, CAM & CIM
The Purchasing Function
► The Nature of Purchasing and the Role of the Purchasing Officer
► Purchasing Department Procedures, Inventory Control, Stores Control and Economic Order
Quantity
The Research & Development Function
► The Functions of the Research & Development Department
► Basic Research
► Problem-Based Research
► Ideas Generation
► Applied Research & Development
► Patents, Trade Marks & Service Marks
► Research & Development in the Business Organisation
The Marketing Function
► Introduction to Marketing and the Marketing Philosophy
► Market Analysis & Research
► Promotion, Publicity & Public Relations
► Pricing Policy
► Credit Control
► Sales Administration
► Transport & Distribution (Logistics)
► Export Marketing
Personnel Department
► The Need for Staff
► The Functions of the Personnel Department and a Personnel Policy
► Employee Records
► Promotion, Transfer, Termination & Dismissal
► Industrial Relations Practice
► The Remuneration of Staff
The Administrative Officer’s Role
Office Administration
► The Role of the Administrative Officer
► Facilities Management - The 'New-Look' Office Administrator
► The Office & its Functions

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► The Clerical Function, Business Correspondence, Mail Inwards, Mail Outwards, Systems for
Producing Business Correspondence
► Meetings, Conferences, Functions and Delegation
Other Responsibilities of the Administrative Office
► The Organisation & Methods Department
► Security Aspects of Business
► Risk Management
► The Environment of Organisations
► What is a Claimant?
► Assessing the Impact of Claimants
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Provide critical evaluation of the major functional areas of a business and describe their
interrelationship.

2.

Evaluate competing perspectives on the nature of management as both a function and process
within organisations.

3.

Discuss the concept of managerial power and authority, in the context of the work of individual
managers, and organisations within their social and cultural contexts.

4.

Discuss models of managerial decision-making.

5.

Discuss the development of organisations in their historical, social and cultural contexts, and
the choices that this creates for the management of organisations.

6.

Explain the process of organisational change and development.

7.

Discuss management as a moral and ethical process.

8.

Demonstrate an appreciation of the role of the Administrator as part of the Managerial process.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive & Group
Skills

1-8

1,2,4,7

1,2

1,2,7,8

-

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem
Solving

Communication &
Presentation

Other skills (please
specify):

-

-

1,2

1-8

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the
learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

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Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main text
Business Management & Administration, Whitehead, G. & Whitehall, G., ICM
Alternative Texts and Further Reading
Modern Business Administration, Appleby, R.C., Pitman
The Structure of Business, Buckley, M., Pitman
Students should also be prepared to read other suitable accounting text books
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.2 Numeracy & Statistics Syllabus

Unit Title

Numeracy & Statistics

Unit Code

NS-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

GW

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
The aims of this unit are to equip students with the necessary skills to interpret information, carry out
calculation and interpret the results of that information and later, to equip students with some of the
analytical skills that are relevant to the study of Business Management as a whole.
Main Topics of Study:
Using a Calculator
► Approximations
► Estimation
► Degrees of Accuracy
► The Keys of a Calculator
► Standard Form
Fractions
► Types of Fraction
► Equivalent Fractions
► Operations Involving Fractions
► The Conversion Between Fractions & Decimal Fractions
Ratio and Proportion
► Ratio
► Division in a Given Ratio
► Direct Proportion
► Scale Diagrams & Models
Measurement
► Metric and Imperial Units
► Conversion Between Metric & Imperial Units
Percentages
► Percentages
► Finding a Percentage of an Amount
► Increasing & Decreasing an Amount by a Given Percentage
► Expressing One Quantity as a Percentage of Another
Wages & Salaries
► Basic Pay

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► Overtime Rates
► Commission
► Piecework
► Deductions from Pay
Travel
► Foreign Currency
► Time
► Timetables
Sampling, Surveys, Questionnaires
► Surveys
► Censuses
► Samples
► Sampling Methods
► Bias
► Questionnaires
► Pilot Surveys
► Hypothesis Testing
Classification & Tabulation of Data
► Tabulation
► Classification of Data
► Tally Charts
► Frequency Tables
Statistics on Display
► Pictorial Representation of Data
► Pictograms
► Bar Charts
► Pie Charts
► Line Graphs
► Frequency Polygons
► Drawing Inferences from Diagrams
Averages & Range
► The Arithmetic Mean
► The Mode
► The Median
► The Use of Mean, Mode & Median
► The Mean & Median of a Frequency Distribution
► Range
Cumulative Frequency
► The Cumulative Frequency Curve (or Ogive)
► The Median

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► The Interquartile Range
► Percentiles
Probability
► Introduction
► Probability From Theory and Experiment
► Simple Probabilities
► Simple Laws of Addition
► Possibility Space
Networks & Decision Trees
► Networks
► Decision Trees
Algebra
► The Basics of Algebra
► Indices
► Brackets
► Common Factors
► Equations
► Harder Equations
► Trial & Improvement
► Flow Diagrams
► Sequences
► Formulae
Graphs
► Graphs & Curves
► The Interpretation of Graphs
► Graph Plotting
► Conversion Graphs
► Cartesian Coordinates
► Straight Line Graphs
► Gradients & Intercepts
Geometrical Shapes
► Lines & Angles
► Polygons
► Circles & Angles
► Tessellations
► 2D Representation of 3D Objects
Mensuration
► Perimeters of Polygons
► Area
► The Circumference and Area of a Circle

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► Volume
Time & Travel Graphs
► Distance-Time Graphs with Straight Lines
► Distance-Time Graphs with Curves
► Velocity-Time Graphs
► Growth & Decay
Further Algebra
► Simultaneous Equations
► Inequalities
► Removing Brackets
► Rearranging Formulae
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Identify appropriate types of quantitative information and their sources.

2.

Rationalise and structure that information.

3.

Use and analyse information that is presented in numerical form in an appropriate method to
extract all relevant trends, patterns and points of importance.

4.

Present the results and data informative and attractive manners including in diagrammatic form
to clients, partners and business colleagues.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

1-3

3

3,4

1,2,3

-

-

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem
Solving

Communication
& Presentation

Practical/Psycho
-motor Skills

Other skills
(please
specify):

-

1-4

4

4

-

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Business Essentials – Business Maths: Study Text, BPP Learning Media

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Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.3 Marketing Syllabus

Unit Title

Marketing

Unit Code

MK-0905

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

BHW

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
To provide students with a foundation for the analysis of marketing within organizations including
decision making processes, segmentation, the role of information and the marketing information
system, the marketing mix, internal and external influences affecting strategy, competitor analysis
and positioning.
Main Topics of Study:
Concept & Process of Marketing
The Marketing Concept
► Evolution of Marketing
► Business Orientations
► Societal Issues & Emergent Philosophies
► Customer & Competitor Orientation
► Efficiency & Effectiveness
► Limitations of the Marketing Concept
Marketing process overview
► Marketing Audit
► Integrated marketing
► Environmental Analysis
► SWOT Analysis
► Marketing Objectives
► Constraints
► Options
► Marketing planning
Costs and benefits
► Benefits of Building Customer Satisfaction
► Service and Customer Care
► Relationship Marketing
► Customer Retention
► Customer Profitability
► Total Quality Marketing
Segmentation, Targeting & Positioning
Macro-environment
► Environment Scanning

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► Political, Legal, Economic
► Socio-cultural, Ecological & Technological Factors
Micro-environment
► Stakeholders (Organisation's Own Employees, Suppliers, Customers, Intermediaries,
Owner's Financiers, Local Residents, Pressure Groups & Competitors)
► Direct & Indirect Competitors
► Porter's Competitive Forces
Buyer Behaviour
► Dimensions of Buyer Behaviour
► Environmental Influences
► Personal Variables - Demographic, Sociological, Psychological-motivation, Perception &
Learning
► Social Factors
► Psychological Stimuli
► Attitudes
► Other Lifestyle & Life Cycle Variables
► Consumer & Organisational Buying
Segmentation
► Process of Market Selection
► Macro & Micro Segmentation
► Bases for Segmenting Markets: Geographical, Demographic, Psychographic & Behavioural
► Multivariable Segmentation & Typologies
► Benefits of Segmentation
► Evaluation of Segments & Targeting Strategies
► Positioning
► Segmenting Industrial Markets
► Size
► Value
► Standards
► Industrial Classification
Marketing mix
Products
► Products & Brands - Features, Advantages & Benefits
► The Total Product Concept
► Product Mix
► Product Life-cycle & Its Effect on Other Elements of the Marketing Mix
► Product Strategy
► New Product Development
► Adoption Process

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Place
► Customer Convenience & Availability
► Definition of Channels
► Types & Functions of Intermediaries
► Channel Selection
► Integration & Distribution Systems
► Franchising
► Physical Distribution Management & Logistics
► Ethical Issues
Price
► Perceived Value
► Pricing Context & Process
► Pricing Strategies
► Demand Elasticity
► Competition
► Costs
► Psychological
► Discriminatory
► Ethical Issues
Promotion
► Awareness & Image
► Effective Communication
► Integrated Communication Process
► Promotional Mix Elements
► Push & Pull Strategies
► Advertising Above & Below the Line
► Packaging
► Public Relations & Sponsorship
► Sales Promotion
► Direct Marketing & Personal Selling
► Branding
► On-line Marketing
Different Marketing Segments & Contexts
Consumer Markets
► Fast-moving Consumer Goods
► Consumer Durables
► Co-ordinated Marketing Mix to Achieve Objectives
Organisational Markets
► Differences From Consumer Markets
► Adding Value Through Service

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► Industrial
► Non-profit Making
► Government
► Re-seller
Services
► Nature & Characteristics of Service Products - Intangibility, Ownership, Inseparability,
Perishability, Variability
► Heterogeneity - the 7Ps
► Strategies
► Service Quality
► Elements of Physical Product Marketing
► Tangible & Intangible Benefits
International Markets
► Globalisation
► Standardisation Versus Adaptation
► The EU/Benefits & Risks
► Market Attractiveness
► International Marketing Mix Strategies
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Understand the marketing environment and the scope of tasks undertaken in marketing in the
context of different organizational situations in which marketing is applied.

2.

Understand the decision making processes within consumer and organizational buying
situations explain the ways in which market segments are defined and recognise the
importance of information in decisions concerning customers and markets.

3.

Assess the role of the marketing mix within the context of marketing decision making.

4.

Examine various marketing strategies used within different organizations and competitive
situations.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1-4

3,4

3,4

3,4

-

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem Solving

Communication &
Presentation

Other skills
(please
specify):

-

-

3,4

1-4

-

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.

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Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Business Essentials: Marketing Principles, BP Learning Media Ltd
Alternative Texts and Further Reading
Fundamentals of Marketing, Leader, W.G. & Kyritsis, N., Stanley Thorne
Marketing Principles and Practice, Adcock, D., Pearson Publishing
Principles of Marketing, Kotler, P., Prentice Hall
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.4 Accounting Syllabus

Unit Title

Accounting

Unit Code

AC1-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

JWC

Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
This unit introduces the fundamentals of accounting theory and practice and develops the accounting
techniques and skills necessary to provide a foundation for further study and practical experience.
Main Topics of Study:
Introduction to Accounting
► What is Accounting?
► Business Organisations and Sources of Finance
► Introducing Financial Statements: The Profit and Loss Account and the Balance Sheet
► The Role of the Accountant and the Accounts Office
Supply Information for Management Control
► The Purpose of Management Information
► The Use of Cost Centres and Coding of Costs
► Providing Comparisons on Costs and Income
► A Brief Introduction to Wages
► Control Accounts: Sales and Purchase Ledger Control
The Construction of Financial Statements
► Financial Statements: The Calculation of Profits
► Adjustments: Accruals, Prepayments and Drawings
► Adjustments: Bad Debts and Provisions for Debtors
► Depreciation of Fixed Assets
► Partnership Accounts
► Company Accounts
► Accounts of Clubs and Societies
► The Extended Trial Balance
Using Accounting Information
► Accounting Ratios and Preparing Reports
► Accounting Standards: Statements of Standard Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting
Statements (SSAPs and FRSs)
► Accounting for Stocks
► Manufacturing Accounts
► Marginal Costing
► Budgeting

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Learning Outcomes for the Unit :
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Understand key concepts and techniques useful in recording and analysing accounting
information.

2.

Produce solutions to accounting problems, which make appropriate use of accounting
practice and principles and which are well organised and clearly stated.

3.

Prepare statements reporting the financial performance and financial position of business
entities.

4.

Analyse accounting data and accounting reports using appropriate tools and techniques.

5.

Demonstrate an awareness of the context within which accounting operates and through
which it relates to the business environment.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1,5

4

3

4

-

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem Solving

Communication &
Presentation

Other skills
(please specify):

5

1-5

2

3

-

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

EXAMINER’S NOTE:
The only ratios that will be tested in the Accounting exam are: profitability, liquidity
(short-term solvency) and efficiency ratios.
Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Finance & Accounting, Giles, R., ICM – Chapters 1-4, 17-21, 22-27, 29-30, 31-33, 35-37 and 40.
Alternative Texts and Further Reading
A Complete Course in Business Accounting, Giles, R., Nelson Thornes
Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 1, Wood, F. & Sangster, A., Pitman
Note: Students should also be prepared to read other suitable accounting text books.

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Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.5 Economics for Business Syllabus

Unit Title

Economics for Business

Unit Code

EB-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

BF

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
This unit examines the main concepts of economic theory and their importance within a business
framework. Throughout the unit the emphasis will be on the applicability of business and the external
circumstances under which business operates. The aim is to provide the necessary knowledge, tools
and understanding of economics as a basis for the study of business.
Main Topics of Study:
The Nature & Scope of Economics
► The Development of Economic Society
► The Economic Problem: Scarcity Choice and Opportunity Cost
► Alternative Economic Systems
Production
► The Economic Background to Production
► Specialisation and the Division of Labour
► Business Organisations
► Factors of Production
► The Scale of Production and Economies of Scale
► The Location of Production
The Theory of Price Determination
► Demand
► Supply
► Price Determination
► Concept of Elasticity
► Applications of the Demand and Supply Model
Market Structures
► Competitive Markets – the Institutions where Price is Decided
► Monopoly

Oligopoly

Imperfect Competition (Monopolistic Competition)

► Public Policy Towards Competition
Factor Markets and Rewards to Factors
► Rewards to Factors: Distribution Theory

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► Land & Rent
► Labour & Wages
► Capital & Interest
► Entrepreneurship & Profit
► Economic Rent
Market Failure
► Market Imperfections
► Externalities
► Public Goods and Merit Goods
► Imperfect Information
► Dealing with Market Failure
Money & Banking
► Functions of Money
► Financial Institutions
► Central Banking
Macroeconomics
► Basic National Income Accounting
► Use of National Income Statistics
► Economic Policy
► Circular Flow Analysis
► Consumption, Savings and Investment
► National Income Equilibrium
► Multiplier and Accelerator
Unemployment & Inflation
► Types of Unemployment
► Costs of Unemployment
► Causes of Inflation
► Costs of Inflation
Economic Policy Instruments
► Taxation, Government Spending and Budgets
► Fiscal Policies
► Money and Monetary Policy
► Supply Side Measures and Privatisation
International Trade
► Absolute & Comparative Advantage
► The Principle of Free Trade
► Protection – Types and Causes
► Free Trade, Customs Unions and Single Markets
► The European Union and Other Free Trade Areas
► GATT and WTO

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► Balance of Trade and Payments
► Dealing with Balance of Payments Problems
Globalisation and International Monetary Issues
► Exchange Rate Determination
► Fixed and Floating Exchange Rate Systems
► Trade and Economic Development
► Transnational Enterprises
► Globalisation
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Demonstrate an understanding of the main economic theories about the firm and its market.

2.

Critically evaluate the usefulness of these theories in understanding the operation of business.

3.

Demonstrate knowledge of the relationship between economics and management.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

Selfappraisal/
Reflection
on Practice

1-3

1

2

2

-

-

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem
Solving

Communication
& Presentation

Practical/Psycho
-motor Skills

Other skills
(please
specify):

-

-

-

-

-

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Economics: A background text, Forster, B. and Whitehead, G., ICM
Student Handbook for Economics: A background text, Forster, B. and Whitehead, G., ICM
Alternative texts and Further Reading
Business Basics in Economics for first year degree students, BPP Publishing
Essentials of Economics, Sloman, J., Prentice Hall

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Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.6 Business Law Syllabus

Unit Title

Business Law

Unit Code

BL-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

IC

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
This unit aims to introduce the student to a study of the law in the business environment. It introduces
sources of law and legal method, business organisations and legal relationships, contracts including
the supply of goods and services, agency agreements and civil wrongs in the business environment
including negligence and nuisance.
An understanding of the rights and responsibilities of organisations is an essential requirement in the
study of business operations at home and those involved in international business transactions and
trade.
Main Topics of Study:
Contracts
Formation of Contract
► What is a Contract?
► The Intention to Create Legal Relations
► Offer
► Termination of an Offer
► Acceptance
► Agreement without Offer & Acceptance
► The Nature of Consideration
► Executory, Executed & Past Consideration
► Sufficiency of Consideration
► Privity of Contract
Terms of Contract
► The Terms of Contract
► Incomplete Contracts Conditions & Warranties
► Oral Evidence Relating to Contracts in Writing
► Representations & Contract Terms
► Implied Terms
► The Required Form of Contracts
► Exclusion Clauses
► The Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977
► The Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations 1994

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Vitiating Factors
► Contractual Capacity
► Mistake
► Misrepresentation
► Duress
► Undue Influence
► Void & Illegal Contracts
Discharge of Contract
► How a Contract Comes to an End
► Performance
► Agreement
► Breach of Contract
► Frustration
► Remedies Available for Breach of Contract
► Damages
► Action for the Price
► Equitable Remedies
► Limitation to Actions for Breach
► Quasi-Contract
Agency
► The Creation of Agency
► The Duties of an Agent
► The Rights of an Agent
► The Authority of an Agent
► Liability of the Parties
► Agents Acting for Undisclosed Principals
► Termination of Agency
► Special Types of Agent
Sale of Goods
Definition of a Contract for the ‘Sale of Goods’
► Types of Goods
► The Price
► Terms Implied by the Sale of Goods Act 1979 & Changes made by the Sales & Supply of
Goods Act 1994 (S.14)
► Time of Performance
► Seller's Title
► Description of the Goods
► Sale by Sample
► Satisfactory Quality & Fitness for Purpose
► Passing of Property & Risk

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► Nemo Dat Quod Non Habet
► Delivery
► Acceptance & Rejection
► Remedies of the Parties, Romalpa Clauses
► The Supply of Goods & Services Act 1982
Consumer Credit and Protection
Consumer Credit
► Forms of Consumer Credit
► What is a Regulated Agreement?
► The Classification of Regulated Agreements
► The Protection of Debtors
► Lenders Liability
► Termination of Credit Agreements
► Extortionate Credit Bargains
► Consumer Credit Licensing, Advertising & Canvassing
► Credit Cards
Consumer Protection
► Consumer Protection
► Trade Descriptions
► Consumer Safety
► Product Liability
Tort and Negligence
Tort
► Tort & Other Wrongs
► Wrong & Damage Distinguished
► Remoteness of Damage
► Vicarious Liability
► Strict Liability
► Defences to an Action in Tort
► Contributory Negligence
► Remedies in Tort
► Conversion
► Nuisance
► Defamation
► Definition
► Libel and slander
► Action and defences

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Negligence
► Negligence
► Duty of Care
► Breach of Duty of Care
► Res Ipsa Loquitur Consequential Harm
► Negligent Mis-statement
Company Law
The Nature of a Company
► The Company as a Legal Entity
► The Veil of Incorporation
► Companies & Partnerships
► A Company's Liability in Tort & Crime
► Public & Private Companies
► Holding & Subsidiary Companies
Formation of a Company
► Promoters & Pre-Incorporation Contracts
► Registration Procedures
► Commencement of Business
► Company Contracts
Memorandum & Articles
► Purpose & Contents of the Memorandum
► The Company Name
► Registered Office
► Objects
► Articles of Association
► Alteration of the Articles
► The Memorandum & Articles as Contracts
Meetings
► Types of Meeting
► Convening a Meeting
► Proxies
► Types of Resolution
► The Assent Principle
Liquidations & Other Insolvency Procedures
► Methods of Dissolution
► Liquidations
► Compulsory Liquidation
► Voluntary Liquidation
► Liquidation Committee

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► Contributories
► Powers of Liquidators
► Duties of Liquidators
► Alternatives to Liquidation
► Administration Orders
► Voluntary Arrangements
Directors
► Appointment
► Shareholdings
► Termination of office
► Disqualification
► Powers and dealings
Partnerships
► Definition
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Explain the law making process.

2.

Identify the legal issues in a variety of business situations.

3.

Analyse and apply the legal rules to resolve factual problem situations.

4.

Demonstrate an appreciation of the British and European perspectives.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1-4

2-3

-

-

-

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem
Solving

Communication &
Presentation

Other skills
(please specify):

-

-

3

-

-

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

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Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Business Law, Keenan & Riches, 7th Edition, Longman
Alternative Texts and Further Reading
Business & Commercial Law, Kadar, A. Hoyle, K. & Whitehead, G., Heinemann
Essentials of lrish Business Law, Keenan, A., Gill & MacmiIlan
Basic English Law, Major, W.T., Macmillan
Business Law, Abbott, K.R., Pendlebury, N. & Wardman, K., DP Publications
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.7 Organisational Behaviour Syllabus

Unit Title

Organisational Behaviour

Unit Code

OB 06-05

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
This unit will contribute towards students' analysis of, and effectiveness within, a range of work
organisations. The unit examines approaches to enhancing personal and organisational
effectiveness through focusing on the internal nature of organisations, identifying alternative
structures and common patterns of behaviour. The involvement of the host organisations in the work
of the unit provides an important commercial background to the overall programme, and the
extensive research element provides an opportunity for students to develop their research, planning
and organisational skills.
Main Topics of Study:
Introduction to Organisations
Organisation Structure
► Structural Perspective
► Elements of Organisation Structure
► Types of Job
► Line, Staff & Functional Structures
► Formal & Informal Organisations
► Designing Organisation Structure
► Centralisation & Decentralisation.
Management
Scientific Management
► Taylorism
► Gilbreth
► Gantt
► Fordism
Bureaucracy & Roles
► Organisational Structuring
► Rules
► Roles
► Bureaucracy or Adhocracy
Classical Management Theory
► Henri Fayol
► Applicability of Theory
► Modern Classical Management Theory

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Contingency Approach
► Contingency & Organisational Structure
► Determinism Versus Strategic Choice
► Technological Determinism
► Environmental Determinism
► Strategic Choice
► Environmental Strategic Choice
People in Organisations
Communication & Perception
► Interpersonal Communication
► Perception
► Non-Verbal Communication
Motivation
► Motives as Goals of Human Behaviour
► Motives as Individual Decision-Making Processes
► Social Process of Motivating Others
► Empowerment
Learning
► Learning Process
► Behaviourist Approach to Learning
► Cognitive Approach to Learning
► Behaviour Modification Techniques
► Socialisation & Feedback
Personality
► Definition
► Personality Types & Traits
► Stress & its Management
► Development of the Self
► Nomothetic & Idiographic
► Psychometrics
Groups and Teams in Organisations
Group Formation
► Group Level Analysis of Organisational Behaviour
► Historical Background to study of Groups
► Concept of a Group
► Formal & Informal Groups
► Homans Theory of Group Formation
► Stages of Group Development

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Group Structure & Process
► Group Structure
► Status Structure
► Power Structure
► Linking Structure
► Role Structure
► Group Structure & Group Process
► Leadership Structure
► Communication Structure
Group Control
► Group Influences on Individuals’ Motivations
► Group Influences on Individuals’ Perceptions
► Group Socialisation of Members
► Group Influences on Individuals’ Attitudes & Behaviours
► Conformity to & Rebellion Against Authority
Group Effectiveness
► Effectiveness, Productivity & Satisfaction
► Factors Affecting Group Behaviour
► Making Groups Perform
► Group Cohesion
Development and Change: Issues and Challenges
Organisational Change
► The Contemporary Imperative
► Project Management & Participative Management
► Resistance to Change
► Understanding Change
► Business Process Re-Engineering
► Change Agent
Organisation Development
► Goals & Processes
► Levels & Models of Intervention
► OD Techniques
► OD Applications
► OD Consultant
Corporate Culture
► Rise of Corporate Culture Concept
► Models of Corporate Culture
► Corporate Culture & Economic Performance
► Changing Cultures

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► Corporate Culture & Management Control
► National Cultures
Technology & Change
► Definitions & Predictions
► Determinism or Choice
► Politics of Technology
► Characteristics of Mass Production
► Socio-Technical Systems Analysis & Design
► Competing Socio-Technical Paradigms
► Advanced Technology & the Changing Nature of Work
Management Power and Control
Leadership & Management Style
► Functions of Leaders & Managers
► Leaders as Special People
► Leaders & Followers
► Context
► Culture
► Changing Leadership Style
Managing Conflict
► Perspectives on Organisational Conflict
► Functional & Dysfunctional Conflict
► Coordination & Conflict
Organisational Power & Politics
► Organisations – Rational or Political
► Organisational Politics
► Organisational Power
► Power & Influence
Management Control
► Perspectives on Management Control
► Nature of Management Control Mechanisms
► Strategies & Problems of Management Control
► Psychological Need for Control
► Social Control
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Identify mechanisms for the setting of organisational goals and their achievement.

2.

Identify the causal determinants of organisational structures.

3.

Compare and contrast the nature of management in historical and contemporary contexts.

4.

Put current debates about the nature of organisational control in a historical context.

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5.

Use a variety of models of organisational effectiveness to suggest changes to an organisation.

6.

Discuss approaches to management power and control within different organisational settings.

7.

Discuss organisational issues related to group dynamics by reflecting on group structures and
processes raised in the unit.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1-7

1-7

4

2-7

-

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem Solving

Communication &
Presentation

Other skills
(please specify):

-

-

6,7

1-7

-

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Organisational Behaviour: An Introductory Text, Buchanan, David & Huczynski, Andrej, Prentice Hall
Alternative Texts and Further Reading
Management and Organisational Behaviour, Mullins, Laurie J., Prentice Hall
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.8 Strategic Management Syllabus

Unit Title

Strategic Management

Unit Code

SM-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
This unit aims to develop understanding of the operational and strategic dimensions of organisations
and raise awareness of the current discourse in strategic management theory.
Main Topics of Study:
Nature of Strategic Management
► Definitions
► Stages of Strategic Management
► Key Terms in Strategic Management
► Strategic Management Model
► Benefits of Strategic Management
► Business Ethics & Strategic Management
► Business & Military strategy
Strategies in Action
► Types of Strategies
► Integration Strategies
► Intensive Strategies
► Diversification Strategies
► Defensive Strategies
► Guidelines for Pursuing Strategies
► Mergers & Leveraged Buyouts
► Generic Strategies
► Strategic Management in Governmental Organisations
► Strategic Management in Small Firms
Business Mission
► Importance of a Clear Mission
► Nature of a Business Mission
► Components of a Mission Statement
► Writing & Evaluating Mission Statements
External Assessment
► Nature of an External Audit
► Economic Forces
► Social, Cultural, Demographic & Environmental Forces

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► Political, Governmental & Legal Forces
► Technological Forces
► Competitive Forces
► Sources of External Information
► Forecasting Tools & Techniques
► Competitive Analysis
► Industry Analysis
Internal Assessment
► Nature of an Internal Audit
► Relationships Among Functional Areas
► Management
► Marketing
► Finance
► Productions/Operations
► R&D
► Computer Information Systems
► Internal Audit Checks
► Internal Factor Evaluation Matrix
Strategy Analysis & Choice
► Nature of Strategy Analysis & Choice
► Long Term Objectives
► Comprehensive Strategy Formulation Framework
► Input Stage
► Matching Stage
► Decision Stage
► Cultural Aspects of Strategy Choice
► Politics of Strategy Choice
► Role of Board of Directors
Strategy Implementation, Management Issues
► Nature of Strategy Implementation
► Annual Objectives
► Policies
► Resource Allocation
► Managing Conflict
► Matching Structure with Strategy
► Restructuring & Reengineering
► Linking Performance & Pay to Strategies
► Managing Resistance to Change
► Managing the Natural Environment
► Creating a Strategy-Supportive Culture

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► Production/Operations Concerns when Implementing Strategies
► Human Resource Concerns when Implementing Strategies
Implementing Strategies, Other Issues
► Nature of Strategy Implementation
► Marketing Issues
► Finance Issues
► R&D Issues
► Computing Information Systems Issues
Strategy Review, Evaluation & Control
► Nature of Strategy Evaluation
► Strategy-Evaluation Framework
► Published Sources of Strategy-Evaluation Information
► Characteristics of an Effective Evaluation System
► Contingency Planning
► Auditing
► Using Computers to Evaluate Strategies
► Guidelines for Effective Strategic Management
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Provide a critical appreciation of the key concepts, models and paradigms that are central to
contemporary strategic management theory.

2.

Demonstrate a critical understanding of the complex and dynamic nature of strategic decision
making.

3.

Communicate succinctly and clearly in what ways strategic management can influence the
allocation of resources, impact on organisational competence and alter an organisation's
direction.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1-3

3

3

1-3

-

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem Solving

Communication &
Presentation

Other skills
(please specify):

-

-

3

3

-

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.

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Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Strategic Management, David, Fred R., Prentice Hall
Alternative Texts and Further Reading
Exploring Corporate Strategy, Johnson, Gerry & Scholes, Kevin, Prentice Hall
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.9 Marketing Management Syllabus

Unit Title

Marketing Management

Unit Code

MM-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

NK

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
This is an introductory course in Marketing that will explore marketing decision making within an
organisation using an applied framework of marketing planning and control.
Main Topics of Study:
Marketing Management
► The Critical Role of Marketing in Organisations & Society
► Laying the Groundwork through Strategic Planning
► Managing the Marketing Process & Marketing Planning
Analysing Marketing Opportunities
► Marketing Information Systems & Marketing Research
► Analysing the Marketing Environment Analysing Consumer Markets & Buyer Behaviour
► Analysing Business Markets & Organisational Buying Behaviour Analysing Competitors
Researching & Selecting Target Markets
► Measuring & Forecasting Market Demand
► Identifying Market Segmentation & Selecting Target Markets
Designing Marketing Strategies
► Marketing Strategies for Differentiating & Positioning the Marketing Offer
► Developing, Testing & Launching New Products & Services
► Managing Products through their Product Life Cycle
► Deciding on International Market Entry
► Methods of Entry
► International Marketing programmes
Planning Marketing Programmes
► Managing Product Lines, Brands & Packaging
► Managing Service Business & Ancillary Services
► Designing Pricing Strategies & Programmes
► Selecting & Managing Marketing Channels
► Managing Retailing & Wholesaling
► Designing Communication & Promotion-Mix Strategies
► Designing Effective Advertising Programmes
► Designing Direct Marketing, Sales-Promotion & Public Relations Programmes
► Managing the Sales force

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► Managing Direct Marketing Operations
► Implementing Marketing Programmes
► Controlling Marketing Activities
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Understand the theory and practice of marketing decision making.

2.

Formulate solutions to case studies, practical examples and exercises.

3.

Apply marketing decision making principles to a wide variety of contexts within the non-profit
and private sectors from small as well as large enterprises and from services and industrial
markets as well as the traditional area of consumer marketing.

4.

Develop a marketing plan for a product or service.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Marketing Management, Kotler, Philip, Prentice Hall
Alternative Texts and Further Reading
Go International, Monk, Keith, McGraw Hill
Essentials of Marketing, Lancaster, G. & Massingham, L., McGraw Hill
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.10 Human Resources Management Syllabus

Unit Title

Human Resources Management

Unit Code

HRM-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

BT

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
Human Resources Management is principally about identifying and making effective use of a range
of methods and techniques for providing human resources for an organisation and ensuring their
optimum utilisation whilst Human Resource Development is principally about enabling individuals to
plan, conduct and evaluate a range of development interventions effectively within their own
organisation.
This unit aims to develop students’ knowledge and understanding, from both an academic and a
practitioner perspective, of the critical role human resources play in the achievement of
organisational objectives and the issues and processes involved in effectively managing those
human resources. The unit will seek to show the likely importance to organisations in adopting a
true/soft Human Resource Management approach to the management of its people.
Main Topics of Study:
Introduction
► What is Human Resource Management?
Individuals & Groups
► Individual Differences
► Perceptions
► Communications
► Motivation
► Industrial Psychology
► Behavioural Theories
► Research Studies
► Groups
► Group Dynamics
► Personal & Group Goals
Manpower Planning
► Recruitment & Selection
► Interviewing
► Selection Testing
► Validation of Testing Procedures
► Training
► Systems Approach to Training
► On-Job Vs Off-Job
► Induction Programmes

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► Personnel Records
► Use of Computers
Job Analysis
► Job Description
► Job Specification
► Person Specification
► Job Rotation
► Job Enlargement
► Job Enrichment
► Job Evaluation
Development of a Human Relations Approach
► Role of Personnel Department
► Nurturing Human Assets in a Business
► Career Development
► Counselling
► Welfare
► Participating in Decision-Making
► Supportive Management Styles
Industrial Relations
► The Role of the Trade Union
► Moves toward Industrial Democracy
► Strikes, Cause, Effect & Avoidance
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Distinguish between different approaches to the management of human resources.

2.

Understand the potential strategic role of the Personnel/Human Resource Management
department.

3.

Appreciate key forces at work in any attempt to achieve equality in the workplace.

4.

Develop a detailed plan for the effective resourcing of an organization's human requirements.

5.

Identify and evaluate the ways in which performance management systems contribute to the
development of the individual and enhance organizational performance.

6.

Discuss how effective working relationships, with employees and/or their representative bodies,
are created, maintained and enhanced with an understanding of organisational pressures
associated with these organisational relationships.

7.

Critically assess the effectiveness of human resource policies and practices in their
organisational setting.

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The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1-6

4,7

4,6

3,5,7

-

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management
of Learning

Problem
Solving

Communication &
Presentation

Other skills
(please
specify):

6

4

4

4,5

-

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Management & Organisational Behaviour, Mullins, L., Pitman
Alternative Texts and Further Reading
Human Resources Management: Perspectives & Issues, Ferris, G. & Rowland, K., Allyn & Bacon
Human Resource Planning, Bramham, John, l P M
Personnel Management, Tyson, S. & York, A., Heinemann
Management & Motivation, Vroom & Deci, Penguin
People in Organisations, Armstrong, P. & Dawson, C., Elm
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.11 Customer Service Syllabus

Unit Title

Customer Service

Unit Code

CS-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
This unit stresses that excellent customer service is considered as a prerequisite for any successful
company. The unit aims to clarify what this means for the customer service manager or supervisor, in
practical terms.
A concise introduction to the business reasons for building good relationships with customers is
presented as well as an examination of the management framework of customer service.
The customer service manager’s role is explained and techniques offered that are easy to implement
and will improve customer service.
Main Topics of Study:
Introduction
What is Customer Service?
► Importance of Customer Service
► Understanding Customer Satisfaction
► Excellent Customer Service
► Five Needs of Every Customer
► Cost of Losing a Customer
Challenges and Solutions
Challenges of Customer Service
► Elements of Success
► Barriers to Excellent Customer Service
► Power of Perceptions
► Understanding Expectations
► Levels of Expectations
► Scope of Influence
► Reputation Management
► Techniques for Exceeding Customer Expectations
► Keys to Credibility
► Importance of Values
► Ethics in Customer Service
► Current Status of Customer Service
► New Trends in Customer Service
Problem Solving
► Role of Problem Solving in Customer Service

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► Creativity & Problem Solving
► Problems as Opportunities
► Confronting Conflict
► Problem Solving Process
► Problem Solving Strategies
► Development of Negotiation Skills
► Professional Approaches to Apologising & Conveying Bad News
► Barriers to Problem Solving & Decision Making
► Importance of Follow Up
Management and Strategy
Strategy & Formulating a Plan for Success
► Why a Strategy
► Planning
► Importance of Infrastructure
► Culture
► High Touch & Low Touch Customers
► Segmenting the Market
► Developing a Strategy
Empowerment
► Importance of Mission & Purpose Statement
► Steps to Empowering Customer Service Providers
► Co-Production of Customer Service
► Why Co-Production Works
► Design of Systems
Communications
Communications in Customer Service
► Building Customer Intelligence
► Methods of Communication
► Listening
► Voice Inflection as a Customer Service Tool
► Telephones & Customer Service
► Words to Use/Avoid
► Power Phrases
► Power of Eye Contact
► Appeal to the Senses
► Communication & Technology
Managing Difficult Customers
Coping with Challenging Customers
► Who are Challenging Customers
► Why they are Challenging

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► Characteristics of Challenging Customers
► Respect
► Empathy
► Accepting Mistakes
► Benefits from Dealing with Challenging Customers
Motivation and Leadership
Motivation
► What is Motivation
► Needs & Wants
► Motivating Factors
► Understanding Morale
► Self-Concept & Motivation
► Improving Self-Concept
► Power of Self Motivation
► Teamwork
► Motivating Others
Leadership in Customer Service
► Leadership Defined
► Knowing Yourself
► Formal & Informal Leaders
► Coach or Counsellor
► Characteristics of Excellent Leaders
► Leadership & Goals
► Creating a Customer Service Culture
► Benefit of Job Aids
► Leadership without Position
► The Boss as a Customer
Customer Retention & Measurement of Satisfaction
► What is Customer Retention
► Value of Existing Customers
► Churn
► Developing & Improving the Customer Retention Programme
► Measurement of Satisfaction
► Sources of Information
► Benefits of Measuring your Effectiveness
► Determining your Effectiveness
► Surveys & Reality
► Business Benefits from Measuring Satisfaction
Customer Service in a Changing Marketplace
► Today’s Changing Marketplace

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► The Customer of the twenty-first century
► New Technology
► Call Centres
► The Internet
► Enhancing Service Experiences & Building Customer Loyalty
Excellence in Customer Service
► Excellence as the Goal
► Getting Started
► Rewards of Excellent Customer Service
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Describe a range of types of customer and how customer service provision meets their needs
and different ways of exceeding customer expectations.

2.

Describe actions that can be taken to support improvements to customer service.

3.

Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of how effective customer service relates to different
types of customer in the organisation.

4.

Explain why it is important to make improvements to customer service provision.

5.

Present detailed analysis, supported by examples from organisations, of how effective
customer service relates to different types of customers.

6.

Critically examine the importance to customers, the employee and the organisation of
exceeding customer expectations.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1-6

4,5

3,4

6

-

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem Solving

Communication &
Presentation

Other skills
(please specify):

-

-

-

1,2,4,5

-

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

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Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Customer Service: A Practical Approach, Harris, Elaine K., Prentice Hall
Alternative Texts and Further Reading
Managing Customer Service, Hayes, Jenny & Dredge, Frances, Gower
Once a Customer, Always a Customer, Daffy, Chris, Oak Tree Press
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.12 Corporate Policy Syllabus

Course Title

Corporate Policy

Unit Code

CP-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

SB

Pre-requisites

A project proposal is required to be submitted to ICM

Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
The aims of this module are to enable students to develop an integrated strategic approach to
organisational decision making; assess the need for long-term change and identify how to plan for
effective implementation; apply the theory of strategic management to the reality of organisational
complexity, as represented in case studies and in live situations, such as the student's own
organisation.
Main Topics of Study:
Corporate Strategy
► The Characteristics of Strategic Decisions
► Levels of Strategy
► Strategic Analyses
► Strategic Choice
► Strategic Implementation
► A Summary of the Strategic Management Process
► Developing a Strategic Perspective
► Coping with Change
► Strategy in the Public Sector & Not-For-Profit Organisations
Strategic Decision Making in Practice
► Incremental Strategic Management
► Planning & Strategic Management
► Problem Awareness
► Problem Diagnosis
► The Development of Solutions
► The Selection of a Solution
► Cure & Strategy
► The Recipe & the Cultural Web
► Cultural View of Patterns of Strategic Change
► The Implications for Exploring Corporate Strategy
Analysing the Environment
► Auditing Environmental Influences On Organisations
► Understanding simple/ static Conditions
► Understanding Dynamic Conditions

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► Understanding Complex Conditions
► The Nature of the Environment (The use of the Prospective)
► The Threat Of Entry
► The Power of Buyers & suppliers
► The Threat of Substitutes
► The Extent of Competitive Rivalry
► Life Cycle Models & the Nature of Markets
► Strategic Group Analysis
► Market Structures & Market Power
► SWOT Analysis
Analysing Resources
► The Value System
► Value Chain Activities
► The Resource Audit
► Resource Utilisation
► Control of Resources
► Financial Analysis
► Historical Analysis
► Comparison with Industry Norms
► The Experience Curve
► Portfolio Analysis
► skills Analysis
► Flexibility Analysis
► Identification of Key Issues
Expectations, Objectives & Power
► External Influences
► Nature Of Business
► Organisational Culture
► Conflicts of Expectations
► Identifying Coalitions
► Sources of Power Within Organisations
► Sources of Power for External Stockholders
► Methods of Assessing Power
► Mission
► Corporate Objectives
► Unit Objectives
► The Precision of Objectives
► Social Responsibility

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Strategic Options
► Cost Leadership
► Differentiation
► Focus
► 'Do Nothing'
► Withdrawal
► Consolidation
► Market Penetration
► Product Development
► Market Development
► Diversification
► Related Diversification
► Unrelated Diversification
► internal Development
► Acquisition
► Joint Development
Strategy Evaluation (Criteria & Approaches)
► Suitability
► Feasibility
► Acceptability
► Strategic Logic
► Strategy & Performance
► Cultural Fit
Strategy Evaluation (Techniques)
► Bases for Comparison
► Scoring Methods
► Decision Trees
► Scenarios
► Profitability Analysis
► Cost/Benefit Analysis
► Financial Ratio Projections
► Sensitivity Analysis
► Decision Matrices
► Simulation Modelling
► Heuristic Models
► Stockholder Reactions
► Funds Flow Analysis
► Break-Even Analysis
► Other Assessments of Feasibility

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► Selection Against Objectives
► Referral to a Higher Authority
► Outside Agencies
Planning & Allocating Resources
► Few Resource Changes
► Allocating Business Growth
► Allocating Resources in Static or Declining Situations
► Resource Sharing/Overlap
► Central Questions in Resource Planning
► Inbound Logistics
► Operations
► Outbound Logistics
► Marketing & sales Services
► Key Resources in Implementing Generic Strategies
► Priorities & Key Tasks
► The Plan of Action
► The Recognition & Testing of Key Assumptions
► Financial Planning & Budgeting
► Network Analysis
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Identify and discuss models for the appraisal of the competitive situation of a business in its
environment.

2.

Explain ways to assess resources and capabilities of an organisation.

3.

Identify and explain strategies for the evaluation, choice and implementation of routes to long
term organisational change.

4.

Evaluate the competitive and collaborative environment in an industry/market.

5.

Analyse the far environment and its impact on an organisation's ability to achieve its strategic
objectives.

6.

Assess and develop the resources and competences that will deliver sustainable competitive
advantage.

7.

Identify key strategic issues and assess the options available to deal with them.

8.

Plan and manage the required change, within an effective strategic assignment.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above module learning outcomes are
related to particular cognitive and key skills.
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1-3

4,5

4-8

6

1-8

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem Solving

Communication
& Presentation

Other skills
(please specify):

4-8

8

4-8

8

-

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Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Case Study Report

100%

Corporate Policy is examined by means of a Case Study Report. Students
undertaking this subject are required to conduct Research on an agreed topic and to
submit a Report to the Institute, based on that Research. The purpose of the
Research and the Report is to establish that students have the ability to identify,
analyse and recommend solutions to an identifiable management problem or situation
within a company, corporation, government or other department. Students’ are
required to complete this Case Study within 12 months from entry of the examination
series.
NOTE: Please complete an Approval Request Form (download from our website) so
that we may review your proposed topic and advise you if it is acceptable.
Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Exploring Corporate strategy, Johnson & Scholes, Prentice Hall
Business Case study Handbook, Curran, ICM
Alternative Texts and Further Reading
Readings in Business Policy from Business Week, Glueck, McGraw Hill
Cases in Strategic Management, Stopford, Channon and Constable, Wiley
Management Problem Solving, Margerison, McGraw Hill
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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The Case Study/Research Project
No business or industry is ever static and every organisation is subject to continual change. This
change provides challenges, problems, threats and opportunities. It is these challenges, threats and
opportunities which managers are required to deal with and which provide the ultimate test of
management ability. In order to conduct the Case Study/Research Project students will need the cooperation of their current employer. If they are not currently employed the onus will be on them to find
a company which will co-operate with them.
Students should contact their own, or another employer and explain that they are required to:
a

Identify a problem area, threat or opportunity within the business.

b

Analyse the problem, threat or opportunity.

c

Produce a Report suggesting ways of dealing with the situation.

There are numerous areas for students to explore and their Research could cover, for example,
activities within any one of the following areas: Personnel, Sales, Marketing, Production, Finance,
Quality Control, Purchasing, Transportation, Administration or Management.
The Report

The Report must exceed 4,000 words in length (20-25 pages is an ideal length)
and must be typed and bound. Two copies should be produced; one copy is to
be submitted to the Institute, the other should be retained.

The Report Layout
The Report should be produced as if it were to be presented to Senior Management. A suggested
layout is as follows:
Introduction

This will cover the company, organisation or the department which is the
subject of the report. The Introduction must detail the nature of the
organisation's/department's activities and structure. Where possible,
information about the historical, current and future activities should be given. If
there is a problem with confidentiality students should obviously not name the
company and should seek advice from the company on this.

The Problem Area
or Situation

This must explain the area and nature of the problem, threat or opportunity in
as much detail as possible and should include appropriate graphs, figures and
statistics.

Recommendation/s

In this section students should detail their suggestions and solutions to the
situation.

Appendix

Depending on the nature of the Report, it may be appropriate to list any
reference material or other sources of information referred to in the main body
of the Report.

Previous Reports

The following are titles of Reports produced by former managers and students.
The titles give an idea of the types of areas covered. Please remember that
each of the following Reports refer to a specific problem within a named
company, corporation or government department:
Ü Improving the Profitability of Rural Bus Services.
Ü Reducing Housekeeping Labour Turnover Rates.
Ü Developing a Quality Control System to Reduce Waste.
Ü Product Training for Telesales Staff.
Ü Introducing Financial Incentives for Line Managers.
Ü Developing a Corporate Policy Team.
Ü Restructuring the Research & Development Department.

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13.1.13 Financial Management Syllabus

Course Title

Financial Management

Unit Code

FM-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

JWC

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
The course examines the theory and practice of corporate financial management, including decisions
company managers make in relation to sources and uses of funds, disclosure and the valuation
implications arising. Where possible, topics will be considered in the context of the local financial
environment and actual business practice.
Main Topics of Study:
The Construction of Financial Statements
► Company Accounts
► Cash-Flow Statements
Using Accounting Information
► Accounting Ratios
► Accounting Standards
Management Accounting
► Marginal Costing
► Budgeting
► Capital Investment Appraisal
Sources of Business Finance
► Long-term sources of finance
► Short-term sources of finance
Mergers and Takeovers
► Reasons for Growth via Horizontal, Vertical, or Conglomerate Integration
► Financing of Growth
► The Construction of Basic Group Accounts
Capital Markets
► The Function of Stock Exchanges
► Share & Bond Issues
► Rights & Bonus Issues

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Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Module, students will be able to:
1.

Have gained an understanding of the main decision areas in corporate finance, the issues
arising and the financial environment in which these decisions are made.

2.

Demonstrate an understanding of the current treatment of investment and financing in
situations of certainty and uncertainty, and have acquired the knowledge and skills to be able
to apply a number of techniques to assist the decision making process.

3.

Be able to analyse, interpret and evaluate financial information as discussed in the course
and previous courses.

4.

Have become acquainted with current issues and developments in the area of corporate
financial management.

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Assignment One:

0%

Assessment Two:

0%

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Note: There is no single textbook that covers the syllabus. Finance and Accounting by Richard Giles
can be used as a basic source book but must be supplemented by further reading from websites or
textbooks such as Accounting for Non-Accounting Students (J R Dyson) and Business Accounting (F
Wood).
Main Text
Finance & Accounting, Giles, R., ICM
Further Reading
Accounting for Non-Accounting Students, Dyson,J.R., Prentice Hall
Frank Wood’s Business Accounting 2, Wood, F. & Sangster, A., Pitman
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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13.1.14 Leadership Studies Syllabus

Course Title

Leadership Studies

Unit Code

LS-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
This module course is designed to engage students in essential intellectual questions relating to the
study and practice of leadership including what is leadership, what is good leadership, how do people
become effective leaders and/or effective followers? How do tools and methods of different academic
disciplines provide insights into leadership phenomena? How do factors of race, gender, education,
and class relate to leadership? The various components of the course are intended to challenge
students to think critically and imaginatively about the foundations of leadership.
Main Topics of Study:
The Nature of Leadership
► Definitions of Leadership
► Leadership Effectiveness
► Major Research Approaches
► Conceptualising Leadership
► Comparing Leadership Theories
Nature of Managerial Work
► Activity Patterns of Managerial Work
► Content of Managerial Work
► Theory of Demands, Constraints, Choices
► Research on Situational Determinants
► The Changing Nature of Managerial Work
► Managerial Discretion
► Descriptive Research
► Application for Managers
Perspectives on Effective Leadership Behaviour
► Ohio State Leadership Studies
► Michigan Leadership Studies
► Limitations of Survey Research
► Experiments on Task & Relations Behaviour
► Research using Critical Incidents
► High-High Leader
► Leadership Behaviour Taxonomies
► Specific Task Behaviours
► Specific Relations Behaviours

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► Evaluating the Behaviour Approach
Participative Leadership, Delegation & Empowerment
► Nature of Participative Leadership
► Consequences of Participation
► Research on Effects of Participative Leadership
► Normative Decision Model
► Guidelines for Participative Research
► Delegation
► Guidelines for Delegating
► Empowerment
Dyadic Role-Making Theories
► Leader-Member Exchange Theory
► Leader Attributions about Subordinates
► Follower Attributions & Implicit Theories
► Follower Contributions to Effective Leadership
► Self-Management
► Integrating Leader & Follower Roles
Power & Influence
► Conceptions of Power & Authority
► Power Types & Sources
► Acquiring & Losing Power
► Consequences of Position & Personal Power
► Types of Influence Behaviour
► Power & Influence Behaviour
► Research on Influence Tactics
Managerial Traits & Skills
► Nature of Traits & Skills
► Early Research on Leader Traits & Skills
► Major research Programmes of Research on Leader Traits
► Managerial Traits & Effectiveness
► Managerial Skills & Effectiveness
► Other Relevant Competencies
► Situational Relevance of Skills
► Evaluation of Trait Research
► Application Guidelines
Contingency Theories of Effective Leadership
► LPC Contingency Model
► Path-Goal Theory of Leadership
► Leadership Substitutes Theory

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► The Multiple-Linkage Model
► Cognitive Resources Theory
► Evaluation of Contingency Theories
► Application Guidelines
Charismatic & Transformational Leadership
► Early Theories
► Attribution theory of charismatic Leadership
► Self-concept Theory of Charismatic Leadership
► Other conceptions of charisma; consequences of Charismatic Leadership
► Transformational Leadership
► Research on theories; transformational versus Charismatic Leadership
► Evaluation of Theories
► Guidelines for transformational Leadership
Leading Change in Organisations
► Change Processes
► Different Types of Organisational Change
► Influencing Organisational Culture
► Developing a Vision
► Implementing Change
► Increasing Innovation & Learning
Leadership in Teams & Decision Groups
► Nature of Teams
► Functional Teams
► Cross-Functional Teams
► Self-Managed Work Teams
► Self-Defining Teams
► Virtual Teams
► Procedures for Facilitating Team Learning
► Guidelines for Team Building
► Decision Making in Groups
► Leadership Functions in Meetings
► Guidelines for Leading Meetings
Strategic Leadership
► Constraints on Executive Discretion
► Attributions about Chief Executives
► Research on Effects of Leadership Succession
► Evolutionary Change & Strategic Leadership
► Political Power & Strategic Leadership
► Executive Tenure & Strategic Leadership

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► Executive Teams
► Competing Values in Strategic Leadership
► Monitoring the Environment
► Formulating Strategy
Developing Leadership Skills
► Leadership Training Programmes
► Designing Effective Training
► Techniques for Leadership Training
► Learning from Experience
► Developmental Activities
► Self-Help Activities
► Facilitating Conditions for Leadership Development
► Systems Perspective on Leadership Development
Ethical Leadership & Diversity
► Ethical Leadership
► Gender & Leadership
► Leadership in Different Cultures
► Managing Diversity
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Demonstrate a broad and sophisticated understanding of leadership theories, definitions, and
concepts.

2.

Apply theories, definitions, and concepts to leadership situations in case study work, their
own work situations and current events.

3.

Discuss the multidisciplinary approaches to leadership.

4.

Demonstrate critical and analytical thinking skills.

The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above module learning outcomes are
related to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1

2-4

2

2-4

0

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem Solving

Communication
& Presentation

Other skills
(please specify):

-

1-4

2

1-4

0

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
Learning takes place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem
review and analysis. Formal lectures provide a foundation of information on which the student builds
through directed learning and self managed learning outside of the class. The students are actively
encouraged to form study groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning
experience.

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Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the
learning outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
Leadership in Organisations, Yukl, Gary, Prentice Hall
Supplementary Reading
Leadership Theories
Not Bosses But Leaders, Adair, John, Talbot Adair
On Becoming a Leader, Bennis, Warren, Century
The Leadership Factor, Kotter, J., Free Press
Leadership, Burns, J.M., Harper & Row
Leading Minds, Gardner, H., Harper Collins
Leading Change, Kotter, J., Harvard Business School Press
Making it Happen: Reflections on Leadership, Harvey-Jones, John, Fontana
Super leadership, Manz C. & Sims, H., Prentice Hall
Practical Leadership
Developing Leaders, Adair, John, Talbot Adair
Management Teams, Why They Succeed or Fail, Belbin, R. Meredith, Heinemann
The Wisdom of Teams, Katzenbach Jon & Smith, Douglas, Harvard Business School
Understanding Motivation, Adair, John, Talbot Adair
Games People Play, Berne, Eric, Penguin
Leadership & Change
Intelligent Leadership: Creating a Passion for Change, Hooper, Alan & Potter, J., Random House
The Coming Shape of Organisations, Belbin, R. Meredith, Butterworth Heinemann
Rethinking Organisation: New Directions in Organisation Theory & Analysis, Reed, M. & Hughes, M.,
Sage
Managing Today & Tomorrow, Stewart, R., Macmillan
The Future of Leadership, White, R.P., Hodgson, P. & Crainer, C., Pitman
Beyond Certainty, Handy, Charles, Arrow Business Books
The Fifth Discipline, Senge, P., Doubleday/Currency
Competing for the Future, Hamel G. & Prahalad, C.K., Harvard Business School Press
Students are strongly encouraged to read a daily newspaper, in printed form or online, in order to
follow stories that provide concrete examples for the study of leadership.

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Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college
according to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the
tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or
libraries.

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13.1.15 The International Business Environment Syllabus

Course Title

The International Business Environment

Unit Code

IBE-0605

Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

KE

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
This course seeks to provide an understanding of the complex and dynamic nature of corporate
environment in today’s globalised economy in which the business and its external environment are
not clearly separated.
One of the most important functions of management is decision making and in order to perform
effectively managers need to be informed.
Students must therefore be familiar with, and aware of, all major international political, economic,
cultural, religious and financial issues of the day.
Political, economic and financial events in one country can create threats, as well as opportunities for
other countries and it is essential that managers are able to relate international events, and their
consequences, to their own business environments.
Students are required to critically analyse current topics concerning important management and
policy issues facing business and industry. Critical evaluations of current readings from business
literature will be used as assessment items.
At each examination series reference will be made to six contemporary issues which have made
International news headlines in the four months preceding the examinations. Candidates will be
asked to select any three of the issues or topics and comment on them.
This is a self-paced, self-study course and motivated self-starters will enjoy this format.
Main Topics of Study:
Self study - See above
► Corporate environment in the global economy
► Current issues in business including political, economic, cultural, religious and financial
aspects
► Business and the impact of international current affairs
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Discuss current issues management and its policy implications.

2.

Understand current issues and trends from a managerial perspective.

3.

Integrate current business scholarly literature in their arguments.

4.

Provide analytical perspectives of current problems and trends.

5.

Demonstrate a proactive rather than reactive approach to management.

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The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above module learning outcomes are
related to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1,2

3,4

3-5

4,5

0

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem Solving

Communication
& Presentation

Other skills
(please specify):

3,4

1-5

3-5

-

0

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
This is a self-paced, self-study course that is suited to motivated self-starters. Learning takes can
take place on a number of levels through lectures, class discussion including problem review and
analysis however this is not specifically designed for formal lectures.
Contemporary readings provide the foundation of information on which the student builds through
critical analysis of articles outside of the class. The students are actively encouraged to form study
groups to discuss course material which fosters a greater depth learning experience.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Examination: 3 hours duration

100%

Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Main Text
The Economist
Additional Source of Information
CNN News
Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
0 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college
according to local needs and wishes.

100 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the
tutor and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or
libraries.

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13.1.16 Business Management Project

Unit Title

Business Management Project

Unit Code
Level

6 Diploma

Credits

20

Unit Leader

JC

Pre-requisites
Main Aim(s) of the Unit:
The unit provides the opportunity for students to demonstrate, in a real world environment, what they
have already learned about specific aspects of business and management. It also enables them to
develop useful consultancy skills.
Appropriate assignments are obtained in advance based on local private/public sector organisations.
On allocation of the projects, an appropriate area of academic theory is identified in consultation with
the project tutor. The student is then required to carry out a piece of independent academic research
into the relevant area. This gives students the opportunity to synthesize existing knowledge with the
research undertaken and based on their research a client report addressing the selected issue is
produced.
This unit is student-centred and requires students to effectively develop, manage and co-ordinate
their work from inception to completion.
Main Topics of Study:
► Identification of essential/useful consultancy skills.
► Establishing the problem or opportunity to be investigated.
► Preparation and agreement of consultancy proposal.
► Appropriate methods of approaching assignments and suitable research methodologies.
► Analysis and presentation of findings, conclusions and recommendations.
► The consultancy report.
► Methods of conducting secondary research, synthesizing literature and presenting findings.
Learning Outcomes for the Unit:
At the end of this Unit, students will be able to:
1.

Demonstrate understanding of one or more specific areas of business and management, both
theoretical and applied.

2.

Demonstrate the ability to critically analyse and evaluate theoretical and research findings.

3.

Critically assess stated client problems and requirements and develop an appropriate
methodology to investigate these.

4.

Demonstrate the ability to develop arguments analytically and coherently.

5.

Synthesize knowledge from appropriate areas of commercial management theory and
practice.

6.

Demonstrate skills in time-management, self-organisation and self-discipline.

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The numbers in the boxes below show which of the above unit learning outcomes are related
to particular cognitive and key skills:
Knowledge &
Understanding

Analysis

Synthesis
/Creativity

Evaluation

Interactive &
Group Skills

1-6

4,5

3,4

6

-

Self-appraisal/
Reflection on
Practice

Planning and
Management of
Learning

Problem Solving

Communication &
Presentation

Other skills
(please specify):

-

-

-

1,2,4,5

-

Learning and teaching methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning
outcomes:
During the early stages of the unit, contact time will combine lectures and discussion with tutors.
Contact time will be used to identify the key approaches and components of consultancy work,
methods of problem identification and research, and techniques for conducting academic research.
The need for appropriate professional and practical skills and effective communication techniques will
also be addressed. Tutor contact will focus on providing support and advice for the particular project
undertaken.
Over the following weeks, students should make regular appointments with their supervision tutor to
discuss their individual academic research and their project. At the same time, the students may be
developing their consultancy and communication skills through regular meetings and contact with the
target organisation where appropriate.
Assessment methods which enable the student to demonstrate the learning
outcomes for the Unit:

Weighting:

Written report (4,000 words)

100%

(Incorporating the project proposal, literature review, methodology, results,
conclusions and specific recommendations)
Indicative Reading for this Unit:
Note: There is no single recommended text for this unit. Most importantly, reading should incorporate
the latest information on the target organisation where appropriate.
Main Text
The Commercial Manager, Boyce, T. & Lake, C., ICM
Additional Sources of Information
Synthesising Research: A Guide for Literature Reviews, 3rd ed., Cooper, H. (1998), Sage
Research Methods for Managers, Gill, J. & Johnson, P. (1991), Paul Chapman
The Top Consultant – Developing your Skills for Greater Effectiveness, 4th ed., Markham, C. (2004),
Kogan Page
Management Consulting, Wickham, P.A. (1999), Pitman
Website references
A variety of associated websites on areas such as consulting including:
http://www.mckinsey.com/locations/london/index.asp
http://www.consultant-news.com/BCG.asp
http://www.adl.com/insights/prism/
http://www.environment-risk.com/

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Guideline for Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit):
50 hours

Lectures / Seminars / Tutorials / Workshops
Tutorial support includes feedback on assignments and may vary by college according
to local needs and wishes.

50 hours

Directed learning
Advance reading and preparation / Class preparation / Background reading / Group
study / Portfolio / Diary etc.

100 hours

Self managed learning
Working through the course text and completing assignments as required will take up
the bulk of the learning time. In addition students are expected to engage with the tutor
and other students and to undertake further reading using the web and/or libraries.

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