You are on page 1of 35

Advancing Security

Professionals
A discussion paper to identify the key actions required to
advance security professionals and their contribution to
Australia
Produced by the Interim Security Professionals Taskforce
5 March 2008

Your views are sought


Your views on the questions in this paper can be forward to the Taskforce via email
or in person at the Consultative Forums around Australia. For details, see
www.securityprofessionals.org.au
Dates of Consultative Forums are listed at
www.securityprofessionals.org.au/Your_views.html

The project is supported by the Australian Government Attorney-Generals Department.

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Taskforce information
Interim Security Professionals Taskforce Members
The members of the Interim Taskforce serve on the taskforce as knowledgeable individuals
and not as representatives of particular organisations.
Name

Email

Don Williams

donwilliams@grapevine.net.au

Brett McCall

brett@mccallsecurity.com.au

Julian Talbot

julian.talbot@jakeman.com.au

Michael Kinniburgh gtservices@iimetro.com.au


Peter Anderson

peterando@bigpond.com

Jason Brown

jason.brown@thalesgroup.com.au

Paul Murphy

paul.murphy@ghd.com.au .

Bruce Howard

bruce.howard@transgrid.com.au

Athol Yates

Athol.Yates@homelandsecurity.org.au

Brian Kelly

ceo@atmaacinternational.com

Steve Barlow

SBarlow@skm.com.au

Observers
Richard Clarke

richard.clarke@ag.gov.au

Peter Wythes

peter.wythes@ag.gov.au

Taskforce administration
Name

Email

Telephone

Athol Yates

Athol.Yates@homelandsecurity.org.au

02 6161 5143

Consultative Forums dates and locations


Timing
4-6pm

Date

State

Thursday, 27 March

Canberra

Tuesday, 1 April

Melbourne

Wednesday, 2 April

Hobart

Wednesday, 2 April

Sydney

Thursday, 3 April

Brisbane

Thursday, 17 April

Adelaide

Friday, 18 April

Perth

Wednesday, 16 April

Darwin

4-6pm
4-6pm
4-6pm
4-6pm
4-6pm

4-6pm
4-6pm

Location
Conference Room, Australian Homeland Security
Research Centre, First Floor, Australian Institute of
International Affairs Building, 32 Thesiger Court,
Deakin ACT 2600
McCall Security, Unit 3, 484 Graham Street, Port
Melbourne
Tasmania Division, Engineers Australia, Royal
Engineers Building, 2 Davey Street, Hobart
ATMAAC International, Level 1, 102 Bennelong
Road, Homebush Bay
Queensland Division, Engineers Australia, 447
Upper Edward St, Brisbane
Lincoln Rowe Room, South Australia Division,
Engineers Australia, 11 Bagot Street, North
Adelaide
Western Australia Division, Engineers Australia,
712 Murray Street, West Perth
Conference Room, Northern Division, Engineers
Australia, Survey House, 14 Shepherd Street,
Darwin

Registration is essential for catering and preparation reasons. To register, you can:
Email: admin@securityprofessionals.org.au
Tel: 02 6161 5143

Page 2

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Contents
Taskforce information ................................................................................................. 2
Interim Security Professionals Taskforce Members ............................................... 2
Taskforce administration......................................................................................... 2
Consultative Forums dates and locations ............................................................... 2
Overview .................................................................................................................... 4
1 Background ......................................................................................................... 6
2 Purpose of this paper .......................................................................................... 8
3 Defining security professionals ........................................................................... 9
4 Key standards for professional practice ............................................................ 11
Potential frameworks for professional practice standards..................................... 11
5 Improving the status and recognition of security professionals ......................... 13
6 The minimum standards, competence and continuing professional development
requirements for security professionals and their specialisations ............................. 15
7 A regulation / registration / licensing / accreditation system .............................. 16
8 Enhancing accountability of the work of security professionals ......................... 17
9 Advancing the views of security professionals to government, industry,
professional associations, the community and the media ........................................ 18
10 Feedback........................................................................................................ 20
Annex A
Elements of the security continuum ...................................................... 24
Annex B
Professionalism .................................................................................... 26
Annex C Elements of a Profession ...................................................................... 27
Annex D Qualification Frameworks ..................................................................... 29
Annex E
SWOT Analysis .................................................................................... 33
Annex F
Security and security-related professional and industry associations in
Australia
35

Page 3

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Overview
Security professionals are a group of security practitioners vital to the protection of
government, commercial organisations, non-government organisations and the community.
If the security continuum is considered as having personnel who work in the tactical,
operational and strategic sectors, then this discussion paper predominantly relates to those
working at the senior end of the operational sector and those in the strategic sector. These
personnel are referred as security professionals in this paper.1
Unfortunately security professionals have not been able to contribute their full potential to the
nations security and safety due to a number of reasons including:
a lack of understanding by security users of the difference between the quality and
capabilities expected of those providing front-line operational services, such as
manpower and technology, and those providing professional services security
advice, such as security advisors and security risk managers;
a lack of standards defining the expected knowledge, competency and ethical
behaviour of security professionals;
a lack of appropriate licensing, registration, accreditation and assessment of security
professionals;
a lack of a unified voice advocating the interests of security professionals.
Following the 2007 Security Professionals Congress where the problems were identified, an
Interim Security Professionals Taskforce was established to advance the security
profession.
The Taskforce has produced this paper which summaries the problems, proposes
statements for discussion, and asks questions of security stakeholders.
The purpose of this paper is to generate discussion on the major questions facing the
security professionals, and based on feedback from the paper, propose a way forward that
advances security professionals and their contribution to Australia.
Views on these proposed actions are sought from stakeholders including:
Security associations
Security consultants
Security consumers and purchasers
Security employers and contractors
Security managers
Security manpower staff
Security policy makers
Security regulators
All stakeholders are welcome to submit their views via email to
admin@securityprofessionals.org.au or in person at the Consultative Forums listed at
www.securityprofessionals.org.au/Your_views.html or on page2.
Following the feedback, the Interim Security Professionals Taskforce will prepare the final
report that will include draft recommendations for advancing the security profession, and a
draft action plan to implement the recommendations.

For details of the roles of personnel working in the tactical, operational and strategic sectors, see
page 29.
Page 4

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

This will be refined on the:


25 May 2008, Melbourne, at the Security Professional Association meeting on the
day prior to the 2008 Security Professionals Congress
26-27 May 2008, Melbourne, at the 2008 Security Professionals Congress
Information at www.securityprofessionalscongress.org.au/.
The Congress will debate, select and refine the final recommendations and action plan.
A formal Security Professionals Taskforce will be selected at the Congress to implement the
recommendations.

Page 5

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Background

Security professions (defined as those working at the senior end of the operational sector
and in the strategic sector of the security industry) is a critical group which supports the
protection of government, commercial organisations, non-government organisations and the
community.
Unfortunately it is a group that has not been able to contribute its full potential to the nations
security and safety primarily due to the fact that there is no clear understanding of the
security profession, and there is no common voice, partly because of the disparate origins of
members of the profession. This problem is compounded by the fragmentation within the
security profession, lack of relevant qualifications and accreditation, and regulatory
confusion between it and the much broader security industry (which includes providers of
guards, equipment installers and vendors).
Over the last few years there has been increased discussion at meetings, conferences and
seminars on the need to define and promote the professional end of the security services
continuum. To assist this discussion, a Security Professionals Congress was held in
Melbourne in May 2007. The Congress was attended by approximately 150 delegates
representing all aspects of the security profession including in-house security managers
(from the public and private sectors), consultants, ITC specialists, physical security
consultants, security engineers, procedural specialists, facility managers, risk managers,
emergency managers, business continuity consultants, academics and educationalists.
Organisations participating in the Congress were:
ASIS International ACT, Victoria, NSW & New Zealand Chapters
Australian Homeland Security Research Centre
Australian Information Security Association
Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers
Engineers Australia
Information Systems Security Australia
Institute of Security Executives
International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators Australian
Chapter
Risk Management Institution of Australia
SECIA
Victorian Security Institute
The Congress was based on a series of presentations by senior security professionals and
six workshops where delegates were required to review specific topics related to defining
and promoting the security profession and making recommendations on the way ahead. The
main concerns identified during the Congress were:
1. Professional standards for practice
2. Qualifications and training
3. Registration system based on competence
4. Status and recognition
5. Accountability based on a code of ethics
6. Commonality and standards across security professional specialisations
It was of interest to note that three common themes emerged from all workshops:
1. a requirement to formalise qualifications, certifications and professional recognition;
2. the need to alter the perception of the security profession; this was portrayed as
differentiating between the security profession and the security industry which
provides important services and products, and contains professional members, but is
not the security profession;
6

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

3. the need to establish a group representing the security profession. It was recognised
that such a body should provide the forum to address the other two key issues.
On the day prior to the Congress, there was a meeting of professional associations
representing security professionals. Representatives of twelve associations attended,
representing Australian-based and international organisations, and there were also
representatives from New Zealand. This was the first such meeting. The Australian
Homeland Security Research Centre (AHSRC) partially funded the attendance of these
groups to the meeting.
The key topic of the professional associations meeting was the ability to work together to
promote the security profession. It was recognised that no one body represents the needs of
all security professionals or speaks on behalf of the broader profession. A recommendation
from the meeting was the investigation of the feasibility of establishing a peak body.
The Australian Homeland Security Research Centre (AHSRC) organised, coordinated and
hosted the Congress and the meeting of associations in May. It paid for the accommodation
of key representatives of the security professionals to engage them in the activity. The
AHSRC has stated that it is not interested in becoming a peak group; however, it strongly
supports enhancing the security profession to ensure that it makes a greater contribution to
national security and community safety. Don Williams CPP coordinated the Congress
program and facilitated the Congress.

Funding
This project is supported by the Australian Government Attorney-Generals Department.

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Purpose of this paper

The purpose of this paper is to generate discussion on the following major questions facing
the security professionals.
How are security professionals defined?
What are the key standards for professional practice?
How can the status and recognition of security professionals be improved?
What should be the minimum standards, qualifications and continuing professional
development requirements for security professionals and their specialisations?
What is an appropriate regulation/registration/licensing/accreditation system?
What are the best ways to enhance accountability for the work of security
professionals?
How can the voice of security professionals be best represented to government,
industry, professional associations, the community and the media?

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Defining security professionals

People who work in the security industry can be divided into many categories.2 Typical
categories include:
Business continuity professionals
Crowd controllers
Facility managers
Intelligence professionals
Investigators
Security advisors
Security equipment installers
Security manpower providers
Security researchers
Security risk managers
However, a category which is not normally identified is security professionals.
This term is quite distinct from security professionalism that encapsulates the professional
delivery of a security product or service. The term security professional in no way implies
that security professionalism is limited to security professionals.
A key characteristic of security professionals is that they are required to take responsibility
for security projects and programs in the most far-reaching sense. They provide significant
input into the shaping of security decisions and the environment in which the security system
functions.
This requires that they:
understand the requirements of clients and of society as a whole;
work to optimise social, environmental and economic outcomes over the lifetime of
the product or program;
interact effectively with the other disciplines, professions and people involved;
ensure that the security contribution is properly integrated into the totality of the
undertaking.
The work of security professionals is predominantly intellectual in nature.
Security professionals have a particular responsibility for ensuring that all aspects of their
work are soundly based in theory and established practice.
One hallmark of a security professional is the capacity to break new ground in an informed
and responsible way.
Security professionals may lead or manage teams appropriate to these activities, and may
establish their own companies or move into senior management roles in security and related
enterprises.
For the security profession to be considered a profession in its own right, it is required to
have, as other professions, the following characteristics:
Distinct body of knowledge
Agreed and enforced standards of behaviour/ethics
Standards of education
Formal requirement for professional development
College of peers
2

See Annex A for a list of elements of the security continuum.


9

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Statements for discussion


A security profession is defined as the group composed of those who provide advice to
senior managers as in-house security advisors, security managers or external security
consultants, and who have or provide:
the highest standards of professionalism;
leadership;
up-to-date expertise;
quality and safety;
independent and quality advice.
In Australia, the characteristics of the security profession are assessed as:

Distinct bodies of knowledge


Agreed and enforced standards of behaviour/ethics
Standards of education
Formal requirement for professional development
College of peers

9
8
?
?
8

Questions
1. Do you agree with the definition of security profession and if not, how would you
define it?
2. Do you agree with the assessment of the characteristics of the security profession?

10

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Key standards for professional practice

Professional practice standards are those standards which security professionals need to
comply with in order:
to uphold the public interest;
to ensure the integrity of the work for which they are responsible;
to discharge their professional obligations.
Standards are concerned both with professional competencies and with working methods,
practices and procedures.

Professional practice standards are divided into the following areas:


Professional knowledge
Professional practice
Professional engagement

They should all contribute to the following objectives:


Independence and Objectivity
Confidentiality
Proficiency
Due professional care
Maintaining up-to-date expertise
Continual improvement
Ethical behaviour
Responsibility to society and the environment
Responsibility to the client or employer
Professional practice standards enable security practitioners to:
assess their own performance;
demonstrate professional standing against agreed criteria to their stakeholders;
identify areas where improvement is needed;
re-assess their performance after changes have been implemented.
Key issues in professional practice standards are:
competence versus quality standards;
continuing professional development;
development of standards.

Potential frameworks for professional practice standards


A number of frameworks exist already for describing the skills, competencies, knowledge
and abilities of a given profession or industry.
The four key frameworks are:
1. alignment with the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF);
2. certification levels based on responsibility and competence;
3. role-based requirements framework;
4. alignment with Security Risk Management Body of Knowledge (SRMBOK) Practice
Areas and Activity Areas.
These frameworks are outlined in Annex C.

11

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Statements for discussion


Security professionals require professional practice standards in the following areas:
Professional knowledge
Professional practice
Professional engagement
Some of these standards already exist but are not sufficiently unified or coherent.
The frameworks to create professional practice standards are:
alignment with the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF);
certification levels based on responsibility and competence;
role-based requirements framework;
alignment with defined and recognised practice areas.

Questions
3. From your specialisation or perspective, what are the key existing professional
practice standards in the areas of:
professional knowledge;
professional practice;
professional engagement.
4. What are the best frameworks to create professional practice standards?

12

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Improving the status and recognition of


security professionals

Professionals enjoy a high social status, regard and esteem conferred upon them by society.
This status is not an inherent right, but is granted by society. It arises primarily from:
higher social function of their work, regarded as vital to society as a whole and thus
of having a special and valuable nature;
existence of technical, specialised and highly-skilled work often referred to as
professional expertise;
training involving obtaining specialist education and qualifications;
restricted entry to the profession based on competence;
training requiring regular updating of skills.
For professionals, maintenance of public status depends on the public's belief that
professionals are trustworthy and provide the level of expertise expected of them.
Where there is no consensus on how to raise the status of professionals, there appear to be
two distinct groups of thought.
A series of actions to raise the status of a profession.
No overt action can be effective in raising the status of a profession as recognition of
a professions importance. This will occur naturally if the professional produces
unique and valued high quality work, and makes a significant contribution to society.
If action is effective in raising the status and recognition of a profession, below are the key
actions that are normally taken.
Increase in positive media coverage of security professionals
Introduction of awards for security professionals
Increase in remuneration
Encourage more women to become security professionals
Security professionals featuring in media programs, notably news broadcasts and
documentaries
Representation of the concerns of security professionals to politicians
Security professionals giving talks to non-security groups
Security professionals informing other professional groups (e.g. engineers and
project managers) of the work of security professionals
Increase in entry standards for security professionals
Increase in the inter-personal skills of security professionals so that they can better
communicate in the workplace, industry and to the community
Protection of term security professional
Introduction of specific licensing requirement for security professionals
Promoting a security professional post nominal
Creation of a representative voice for security professionals
Inviting non-security practitioners to meetings of security professionals

13

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Statements for discussion


Security professionals have low status and recognition due to:
a lack of understanding of the specialised knowledge required by security
professionals;
confusion in the publics understanding of the difference between security manpower
staff and security professionals.

Questions
5. Are you satisfied with the status, trust and recognition of security professionals?
6. Do the levels of professional status, trust and recognition of security professionals
need to be addressed?
7. What are the key initiatives to raise the status, trust and recognition of security
professionals?

14

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

The minimum standards, competence and


continuing professional development
requirements for security professionals and
their specialisations

For some specialisations of security professionals, there are standards, qualifications and
continuing professional development requirements. For others there are none.
The reasons for the standards, competence and continuing professional development
requirements include:
protection of the consumer from poor service and goods;
protection of the consumer by providing guidance on the quality of professionals.
The standards, qualifications and continuing professional development requirements
specified for security professionals need to conform to the framework selected for
professional practice standards as listed in Section 4.
That is, the standards can be based on:
educational qualification;
competence;
experience;
roles.

Statements for discussion


Referring to Section 4, there are four main frameworks that will drive any requirements for
minimum standards, competence and continuing professional development requirements for
security professionals and their specialisations.

Questions
8. For the security profession as a whole, do you believe that minimum standards,
competence and continuing professional development requirements are needed? If
so, what should they be?
9. For specialisations, do you believe that minimum standards, competence and
continuing professional development requirements are needed? If so, what should
they be?

15

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

A regulation / registration / licensing /


accreditation system

The regulation/registration/licensing/accreditation systems vary across State and Territory


jurisdictions and elements of the security industry.
The system for certain elements of the security industry is well developed and targeted in
areas such as crowd controllers and installers.
However, for security professionals, the systems are mostly irrelevant as they either do not
apply to groups of security professionals, or they provide no indication of competence (or
other public good benefit).
Examples of the former are that the systems do not apply to information security consultants
and government security advisors.
Examples of the latter are that the systems provide no indication of competence when
selecting professionals in security facility design and blast design.

Statements for discussion


A security regulation/registration/licensing/accreditation system is of value to security
professionals, security consumers and society.
The existing security regulation/registration/licensing/accreditation systems of the
States/Territories are mostly irrelevant to security professionals.
Security professionals should not be required to be part of the States/Territories systems.
A national system should be developed or alternatively, specialisations of security
professionals should fall under existing national schemes.

Questions
10. Do you believe that the existing security regulation/registration/licensing/accreditation
systems of the States and Territories are irrelevant to security professionals?
11. Can you suggest an ideal system for the regulation of security professionals and
specialisation?

16

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Enhancing accountability of the work of


security professionals

Currently, it is difficult to determine how individual practitioners can be held accountable


given that there are currently few, if any, minimum standards against which security
professionals can be judged.
The licensing regimes for consultants in some jurisdictions set standards for qualifications
(usually a Cert IV) and for registration as a business, insurance coverage, etc, but these do
not directly reflect standards for ethical or professional behaviour.
Most of the security-related industry or professional organisations have codes of conduct. A
common concern is that disciplining members for codes of conduct breaches is done
infrequently by the organisations as it results in members resigning before disciplinary action
is finished. Enforcement also results in lost membership fees for the organisation.
Some contracts require minimum levels of Professional Indemnity (PI) insurance but the
relevance of the insurance cover to the work undertaken is not often verified. PI coverage
should reflect that the applicant has demonstrated to the insurance provider that they are an
acceptable risk in terms of qualifications, experience and business practices for the work
they undertake. Requiring participants to demonstrate PI coverage for the work undertaken
would help make them more accountable.

Statements for discussion


There are poor formal mechanisms for accountability for security professionals as there are
few minimum standards against which security professionals can be judged.
Existing codes of conduct and enforcement mechanisms are limited in benefit for security
consumers to take action against security professionals.
Security professionals require either:

a whole-of-profession code of conduct that is enforced by a party that does not


depend on membership fees with disciplinary action is linked to licensing, or
existing codes of conduct and enforcement mechanisms are strengthened.

Questions
12. Do you believe that formal mechanisms for accountability for security professionals
need to be improved?
13. What do you suggest are the best ways to improve accountability?

17

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Advancing the views of security


professionals to government, industry,
professional associations, the community
and the media

There is no single voice speaking on behalf of security professionals. However, there is a


range of industry and professional bodies that represent elements of the security continuum.
For example:
ASIAL, ISE, VSI and other security-specific organisations represent elements of the
security industry.
ASIS International represents individual security consultants and managers.
Other associations represent specific areas of expertise such as ITC security, risk
analysis and bomb security.
Non-security associations represent those who also work in related fields such as
Emergency Management, OH&S and Facility Management.
The number of security-related organisations makes it difficult to promote a common image.
Non-security professional groups, such as Facility Management and Emergency
Management, do not have as many representative bodies and hence have a more cohesive
set of guidelines, expectations and public information capabilities.
Government policy makers and regulators currently have no organisation that they can seek
guidance from in relation to the security profession.
There are six options for advancing the voice of security professionals to government,
industry, professional associations, the community and the media.
Below is a table identifying the options.
Option
Status quo
Regular, informal
meetings of
security
professionals
An association of
associations
Lead association

An associated
society

A new security
professional
institute

Explanation
Continue with the current situation
Regular informal meetings of professionals could be held to discuss topics
of interest and concern. This could be achieved through an annual
congress.
An association of associations could be formed where security-related
professional bodies meet and discuss topics of interest and concern, and
develop collegiate responses.
A lead association could be appointed to represent others. This option,
while providing a single point of contact, may suffer from extended
discussion over which organisation is best suited to lead.
An associated society could be created within an existing parent body
such as Engineers Australia. The associated society would invite
individual members and a prerequisite could be membership of an existing
security-related professional body. An associated society would adopt the
codes of conduct, compliance and accountability standards of the parent
organisation.
A new security professional institute could be formed that would require
minimum standards for members, possibly including membership of an
existing security-related professional body. An institute could have subgroups/colleges for each specialisation representing the specific
requirements of each sector. An institute could attain standing as a
recognised professional body with membership being respected by clients
and peers.
18

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Annex E contains a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis for
each option.

Statements for discussion


The views of security professionals are not consistently or effectively heard by government,
industry, professional associations, the community and the media.
Improvements to advancing the views of security professionals need to be made.
The key mechanism to advancing the views is to develop a unified voice on topics of
concern (which may be different from concerns of other elements of the security continuum).
The options are:
Regular, informal meetings of security professionals
An association of associations
A lead association
An associated society
A new security professional institute

Questions
14. Do you believe that the views of security professionals are not consistently or
effectively heard by government, industry, professional associations, the community
and the media?
15. Do you think that a more unified voice of security professionals is required?
16. If so, which option is preferred?

19

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

10

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Feedback

Feedback on all aspects of this discussion paper is actively sought, particularly in relation to
the Statements for Discussions and the Questions at the end of each section.
Feedback can be provided via email to admin@securityprofessionals.org.au or by attending
one of the Consultative Forums.

ConsultativeForumsdatesandlocations
Timing
4-6pm

Date

State

Thursday, 27 March

Canberra

Tuesday, 1 April

Melbourne

Wednesday, 2 April

Hobart

Wednesday, 2 April

Sydney

Thursday, 3 April

Brisbane

Thursday, 17 April

Adelaide

Friday, 18 April

Perth

Wednesday, 16 April

Darwin

4-6pm
4-6pm
4-6pm
4-6pm
4-6pm

4-6pm
4-6pm

Location
Conference Room, Australian Homeland Security
Research Centre, First Floor, Australian Institute of
International Affairs Building, 32 Thesiger Court,
Deakin ACT 2600
McCall Security, Unit 3, 484 Graham Street, Port
Melbourne
Tasmania Division, Engineers Australia, Royal
Engineers Building, 2 Davey Street, Hobart
ATMAAC International, Level 1, 102 Bennelong
Road, Homebush Bay
Queensland Division, Engineers Australia, 447
Upper Edward St, Brisbane
Lincoln Rowe Room, South Australia Division,
Engineers Australia, 11 Bagot Street, North
Adelaide
Western Australia Division, Engineers Australia,
712 Murray Street, West Perth
Conference Room, Northern Division, Engineers
Australia, Survey House, 14 Shepherd Street,
Darwin

Registration is essential for catering and preparation reasons. To register, you can:
Email: admin@securityprofessionals.org.au
Tel: 02 6161 5143

20

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Feedback Response Table


The following table may be used to answer the specific questions raised in this paper. Additional comments and suggestions are sought.
Please complete and fax to 02 6161 5144.

Question
Do you agree with the definition of security
profession and if not, how would you define
it?

Do you agree with the assessment of the


characteristics of the security profession?

For your specialisation or perspective, what


are the key existing professional practice
standards in the areas of

Response

Professional Knowledge
Professional Practice
Professional Engagement
4

What are the best frameworks to create


professional practice standards?

Are you satisfied with the status, trust and


recognition of security professionals?

21

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

Does the level of professional status, trust


and recognition of security professionals
need to be addressed?

What are the key initiatives to raise the


status, trust and recognition of security
professionals?

For the security profession as a whole, do


you believe minimum standards,
competence and continuing professional
development requirements are needed? If
so, what should they be?
For specialisations, do you believe minimum
standards, competence and continuing
professional development requirements are
need? If so, what should they be?
Do you believe that the existing security
regulation/registration/licensing/accreditation
systems of the States and Territories are
irrelevant to security professionals?
Can you suggest an ideal system for the
regulation of security professionals and
specialisation?

10

11

12

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Do you believe that formal mechanisms for


accountability for security professionals
need to be improved?

22

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

13

What do you suggest is the best ways to


improve accountability?

14

Do you believe that the views of security


professionals are not consistently or
effectively heard by government, industry,
professional associations, the community
and the media?
Do you think that a more unified voice of
security professionals is required?

15

16

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

If so, which option is preferred?

Additional comments

OPTIONAL - Name and email address: ___________________________________________________


Please complete and fax to 02 6161 5144.

23

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

Annex A

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Elements of the security continuum

The following is an indicative list of those involved in providing security products and
services.

SecurityServices

Guarding
Armed guards (uniformed and plain clothed)
Bodyguards
Casual guarding (eg major event)
Crowd controllers
Patrol services
Security drivers
Security guard dog handlers
Uniformed security officers

SecurityManagementServices
Audit & compliance
Business continuity management
Crisis & emergency management
Enterprise security planning & assessment
Intelligence planning, provision or analysis
Red teaming
Risk compliance
Risk management
Scenario planning
Security management benchmarking or
analysis
Security policy, plans, documentation
Security project management
Security risk management
Threat analysis
Vulnerability analysis

gap

Physicalsecurityservices
Access control system design
Alarm system design
Architecture
Blast modelling
CCTV system design
Communication system design
Correctional and detention facilities design
Crime prevention through environmental design
Critical asset identification
Engineering vulnerability analysis
Facility hardening
Fire and safety
Forensic
Perimeter security design
Physical security assessments
Physical security reviews
Security systems design
Specification writing
Systems integration
Technical surveillance counter measures (e.g. debugging)

Personnelsecurity
Close protection
Drug testing
Executive and close personnel protection
Kidnap, ransom and extortion support
Overseas travel security support
Personnel screening and vetting
Polygraph services
Private investigators
Surveillance and counter-surveillance
Training & education

Lossprevention
Fraud prevention
Loss and prevention

Physicalsecurityproducts
General
Access control
Alarms
Baggage and freight screening
Biological detectors
Biometrics
Cameras
CCTV
Chemical detectors
Detection and control devices
Document or product identification
Doors and locks
EOD and UXO
Fencing and perimeter security
Gates
Guard houses
ID systems
Incident management software
Jammers
Locks and hardware
Mail screening
Safes and record protection
Signage
Smart cards
Surveillance and monitoring systems
Turnstiles
Vehicle barriers
Vehicle ID systems
Video intercoms
Weapons and munitions

24

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

PersonnelSystemsandEquipment
Body armour
Goggles and glasses
Hygiene
Less-than-lethal weapons
Navigation and GPS
NBC clothing
Night vision
Protective clothing
Weapons

Communications
Command and control
Communications security
Frequency hopping
Hand-held
Intercom
Mobile internet
Satellite
Secure communications
Tactical
Video conferencing
Voice Over IP (VoIP)

Medical
Decontamination
First Aid equipment and supplies
Medical services
Mobile hospitals
Stretchers and litters

Informationsecurity
Computer forensics
Computer systems security and privacy
Encryption
IT security policy, plans and documentation
IT security contract management
IT security management
Software engineering
System & product design
Virus and malware

Relateddisciplines
Emergency management
OH&S
Facility management
Risk management
Security academics
Human resource management

25

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

Annex B

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Professionalism

The Shorter Oxford Dictionary defines 'profession' as 'a vocation, a calling, especially one
requiring advanced knowledge or training in some branch of learning or science'. Further it
describes a professional as 'having or showing the skill of a professional person, competent'
and 'professionalism' as 'the body of qualities characteristic of a profession or professional'.
Similarly the Macquarie Dictionary defines the noun 'profession' as 'a vocation requiring
knowledge of some department of learning or science, especially one of the three vocations
of theology, law, and medicine (formerly known specifically as the professions or the learned
professions): a lawyer by profession'. Secondarily as 'any vocation, occupation, etc'. Thirdly,
as 'the body of persons engaged in an occupation or calling: to be respected by the medical
profession'. It further defines professionalism as 'someone belonging to one of the learned or
skilled professions'.
Similarly the Accounting Professional & Ethical Standards Board identified fundamental
principles that must be upheld for a person to be considered a professional accountant.
These are:

(a) Integrity
(b) Objectivity
(c) Professional competence and due care
(d) Confidentiality
(e) Professional behaviour
The Australian Library and Information Association has developed standards of professional
excellence for teacher/librarians. These are: Professional Knowledge, Professional Practice,
Professional Commitment. Each of these has four subsets of practice or behaviour that
specifically identify the measure of excellence that identifies professional behaviour.
The principles embodied in these above definitions appear in various forms throughout the
body of literature attempting to define profession or its attributes. In considering these and a
multitude of other definitions of 'profession' across such occupations as legal practice,
medicine, education and pharmacy, a number of key elements can be identified as
necessary to be present for an area of employment to be considered a discrete profession.
Another opinion is tha security practitioners support and implement the vision of their
communities, employers and clients through advocating and building effective protective
security programs that contribute to societal security. A security professional holds
recognised security qualifications, defined as eligibility for membership of a security
association. Within the broad fields of security and risk management, security professionals
are uniquely qualified to select and apply a broad range of protective security measures.

26

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

Annex C

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Elements of a Profession

Distinct body of knowledge


The first principle in determining the existence of an independent profession is having a
distinct body of knowledge relevant to the profession.
The practice of security in the areas of personnel; physical, electronic, information and
communication technology; and security management demonstrate that this body of
knowledge exists and is fundamental to good practice. This body of knowledge in any
profession is both academic and practical and is supported by research development and
application. This is the case for the security profession.

Standards
In the discussions concerning professionalism the term Standards is used in two contexts:
standards as measures of values-based ethical behaviour and standards as a measure of
performance or quality of work, process or technology. All the professions surveyed address
both types of definition of standards and most have national or internationally articulated
quality, process and performance standards.
The security profession readily demonstrates adherence to standards in the latter definition.
First and foremost are international and domestic process standards or technical standards,
provided by the International Standards organisation (ISO) and Standards Australia, which
form the backbone around which security professionals practise their profession.
Standards Australia and the National Centre for Security Standards has effectively mapped
the security and associated quality standards applicable to the security profession. Similarly,
ASIS International has an international Standards and Guidelines Commission and is a
category A liaison to the ISO.
The security profession can readily demonstrate the existence and the fundamental position
of standards of this type in the profession.

Competence
Professionalism in all cases is attested to by the competency of those who claim to practise
the profession. Competence in this case is best defined as the demonstrated skills and
knowledge to practise the profession. Competence is derived from training, on the job and
institutionally, and education, and the demonstrated application of such skill and knowledge
to the tasks or challenges of the endeavour.
Demonstrating competence is the measure by which most persons will measure the
profession. Measures and standards for competence form an integral part of any profession
and are partly articulated in some of the education, training and national licensing regimes.
Professional competence is also generally a requirement for membership of professional
associations.

Professional development
All professions surveyed consider that ongoing professional development is a prerequisite
for considering an individual to be a professional and therefore accepted as member of a
profession association. Further, Engineers Australia and the Risk Management Institution of
Australasia, amongst many professional bodies, consider it to be a significant criterion for
ongoing recognition as a member of such an association.

27

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

College of peers
All professions have as the basis for their recognition of their professional grouping
arrangements that link peers together and recognise other practitioners of the discipline as
their fellows. The college can be informal or formal, but need to be sufficient delineated so
that members recognise each other through the attributes of the profession they practise. A
college can generally accept or reject members on grounds of incompetence or poor
behaviour and therefore establish standards as described above and as also addressed
under Ethics below.
Groups such as ASIS International, SecMan and the International Security Managers
Association maintain a peer relationship for their members.

Ethics
In discussing standards above, the behavioural standards that have been adopted by the
medical, legal, engineering and accountancy professions provide guidance on how this issue
needs to be approached. Rather than adopt any existing Security values, ethics or
behavioural standards statements, it is appropriate that this be a matter for considerable
discussion and debate.

28

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

Annex D

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Qualification Frameworks

A: Qualifications-based
Table 1 below illustrates the alignment of the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) with
Security Practice Areas.3

Table 1: Aligning the AQF with security Practice Areas


AQF

Qual

Physical

People

Management

Information

ICT

11

PhD

Technical Specialist or Senior Consultant

10

Masters
Degree

Chief Security Officer (CSO) or Senior Consultant

Graduate
Diploma

Chief Security Officer (CSO) or Senior Consultant

Graduate
Certificate

Physical
Security
Consultant

Personnel
Security
Consultant

Security Risk
Management
Consultant

Information
Specialist

ICT
Security
Specialist

Bachelor
Degree

Security
Manager

Vetting
Manager

Security
Manager

Intelligence
Manager

ICT
Security
Manager

(Certification
e.g. CPP)

Operations
Manager

Vetting
Manager

Security
Manager

Intelligence
Analyst

Diploma

Agency
Security
Adviser

Vetting
Supervisor

Team Leader

Intelligence
Collector

ICT
Security
Adviser

Certificate IV

Installer

Senior
Vetting
Officer

Supervisor

Intelligence
Operative

Security
Admin

Certificate III

Control
Room
Operator

Vetting
Officer

Team Leader

Certificate II

Guards*

Advanced
Diploma
6

* In Victoria Cert III is the entry level qualification for a security guard.

As defined in the Security Risk Management Body of Knowledge (SRMBOK), Risk Management Institute of
Australia, 2008
Page 29

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

B: Certifications-based
Professional associations commonly use a certification-based framework based on members
reaching certain standards.
For example, a three-tiered certification approach has been adopted by the Australian Institute of
Project Management. The levels are:

QPP (for those who have been certified at Level 4, Qualified Project Practitioner);
RPM (for those who have been certified at Level 5, Registered Project Manager);
MPD (for those who have been certified at Level 6; Master Project Director).

The Facility Management Association (FMA) similarly recognises three levels of accredited Facility
Manager (AFM). These levels are:
AFM1 (Practice),
AFM2 (Manage) and
AFM3 (Lead).
Adopting a similar approach in the security area might provide a similar approach as illustrated in
Table 2. The example below is provided for illustration and discussion only but it illustrates that
there are many pathways to achieving relevant experience and the required professional abilities.
The Direct, Manage and Practice levels of the security professional are (in this example)
underpinned by a Technician level leading to a four-tiered certification framework.
Points
Required

Quals

Min in
security

Experience

Example

Security
Director

22

AQF
8+

AQF 5

10 years

B SecSc (7) + 15 years experience (15) =


22
points
or
PhD (11) + 11 years experience (11) = 22

Security
Manager

15

AQF
7+

AQF 5

5 years

B SecSc (7) + 8 years experience (8) = 15


or
M SecSc (10) + 5 years experience (5) = 15

Security
Practitioner

13

AQF
5+

AQF 4

5 years

Cert IV security (4) + Cert IV Frontline mgmt


(4) + 6 years experience (6) = 14

Security
Technician

AQF
3+

AQF 3

3 years

Cert III security (3) + Trade Certificate (3) +


3 years experience (3) = 9

Table 2: Example of a Tiered Professional Practice Certification Standard

Page 30

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

C: Role-based Standards Frameworks


Role-based standards frameworks are based on the roles and responsibilities of security professionals and how they are categorised into
Strategic, Operational or Tactical responsibilities across a number of job requirements.
Chief Security
Officer

Activities
Responsibilities

Supervisors

Shift Leaders

Security Staff

OPERATIONS

TACTICAL

Strategy and Planning

Implementation and Development

Compliance and Operations

Strategic Planning & Sec


Mgmt Systems

< 12 months

Standard Setting

< 3 months

Quality Assurance

Rostering

Assessment of systems

Analysis of activities (Eg:


GCS, Supervisor Activity
Plans, Compliance with
SOP's)

Performance Agreements
Stakeholders

<30 days
Oversight day to day
operations
Liaison at local level

Standard development and Ensure consistency of


Ensure security staff work
implementations
operations across all sites to Standards & SOP's
and all shifts
Monitor maintenance and
administrative activities

1 to 3 shifts

Less than duration of one


shift

Facilitate smooth operation


of security activities
Security audits
Conduct QA checks and
remedial training
Staff duties as required

Access Control
Customer Service
Emergency response,
disaster recovery, business
continuity
Troubleshooting
Security taks (patrolling,
sysadmin, etc)

Leadership of operational
units

Compliance with SOP's

Ensure compliance with


standards

Personal discipline and


presentation
Knowledge of SOP's

Implement and report on


Group plans
Approval & resourcing
Training Plan

Training

Security Operations
Manager

STRATEGY

1 to 3 year

Briefings to Supervisors
Delivery of strategic and
specialist training
Division Heads and CSuite

Interfaces

Security Manager

Development and updating Coordinate training


Training Plan
activities

Develop training material


Maintain Training Register Develop training materials and aids
and monitor plan for
compliance
Ensure logistics and
competent instructors
Monitor Quality of Trg

Train small groups and one Participate in training


on one OJT
Feedback & Improvement
Contribute to development suggestions to trainers
of training program
Personal training and
development at posts and
in own time

Regional external Groups


(Regional Police and
Government officials and
group, etc)

Day to day follow up of


Customers, clients and
tasks with supervisors and visitors to site
admin personnel from
other internal groups

Senior external groups


(Government, Senior Law
Enforcement Officials, etc) Internal middle
management
Suppliers & Contractors

Train large groups

Local external groups


Supervisors in other
(Police, Community groups departments and
etc)
contracting companies
Administrative personnel

Table 3: Example of security Roles Categorisation (Example based on Physical security - Guarding)

31

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

D: Practice Area-based Framework


The work of security professionals can also be categorised and assessed according to the Practice Areas which they are involved in and the
phase of security activities (pre-event or post-event) as illustrated below.

ActivityAreas
Areas
Activity
INTELLIGENCE

PROTECTIVE
SECURITY

INCIDENT
RESPONSE

RECOVERY &
CONTINUITY

PracticeAreas
Areas
Practice
Physical
Security

Information
Security

Security
Management

People
Security

ICT
Security

Investigators

Close Personal
Protection

Firefighter

Reconstruction

Fraud Analysts

IT Security
Advisers

Public Affairs

Recover
Documents

Intelligence
Professionals

Chief Security
Officer

Incident
Control

Project
Management

Custodial
Officers

Vetting Officer

First Aid

Peer Support
Counselling

Decryption
Specialists

Firewall
Programmer

Emergency
Comms

Network
Restoration

Figure3: Example of Categorisation of Practice Areas against Activity Areas4

Practice Areas and Activity Areas as defined in Security Risk Management Body of Knowledge (SRMBOK)
32

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

Annex E

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

SWOT Analysis

This annex provides a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis
for each option.

Status quo
Strengths
No costs, time or effort in establishing new
structure.
No minimum standards for entry of participation
other than those legislated.

Opportunities
Security profession open to any who wish to
join.

Weaknesses
No improvement over current situation.
Security profession remains fragmented.
No minimum standards for entry of
participation other than those legislated.
No minimum standards for behaviour or
ethics.
No increase in the status of the security
profession.
Threats
Ongoing desire by participants to change the
status quo.
Clients not seeing improvement in
professionalism of security practitioners.

Regular, informal meetings of security professionals


Strengths
Opportunity for participants to meet and discuss
issues.
Opportunity to present a united front on
discussed issues to government, etc.

Opportunities
Open to all participants.
Not seen as representing a particular
organisation or group.

Weaknesses
Attended only by some of the participants.
Only programmed issues discussed.
No minimum standards for entry of
participation other than those legislated.
No minimum standards for behaviour or
ethics.
Threats
Cost to attend.
Needs coordination and planning by an
interested body (currently AHSRC).
Not seen as being truly representative.
May be boycotted by an organisation or
sector.

An association of associations
Strengths
Provides focal point for security organisations.
Seen as representing wide range of security
participants.
Can be a single voice for the profession.
Opportunities
Identification of issues of mutual concern.
May be able to argue for self-governance.
Funding from member associations.

Weaknesses
Only reflects members so those
organisations represented.
Some start up costs.
Threats
Inability to gain agreement on issues.
Ability for association representatives to
meet.

33

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Lead association
Strengths
Single point of contact.
Seen as representing wide range of security
participants.
Can be a single voice for the profession.
Minimal start-up costs.
Opportunities
May be able to argue for self-governance.

Weaknesses
May not been seen as truly representative.
Issues for lead association may differ from
the others.

Threats
Possible extended discussion over which
organisation is best suited to lead.
Other associations not willing to participate.

An associated society
Strengths
Seen as part of parent body with associated
status.
Limited start-up costs.
Opportunities
Parent body able to provide secretarial,
administrative support, etc.
Membership and behaviour laid down by parent
body.
Adoption of accountability standards of the
parent organisation
May be able to argue for self-governance.
Could make membership of existing body a
prerequisite as it reflects technical acceptance
in a speciality.

Weaknesses
Need to raise the society for association.
Need to convince the parent association to
accept affiliation.
Threats
May not be acceptable to a parent body.
Need to meet parent body requirements for
entry, qualifications, professional
development, etc.

A new security professional institute


Strengths
Can set minimum standards for members,
possibly including membership of an existing
security-related professional body.
Can become a recognised and respected
professional body.
Can set audit compliance and enforce code of
conduct.
Opportunities
Establish colleges/subgroups to represent
specialisations, e.g. IT, physical, in-house
security managers, government security
advisors.
Membership can become a mark of professional
acceptance.
Can become single point of contact for security
professional issues.
Could be aligned to Engineers Australia or
similar body.
Could make membership of existing body a
prerequisite as it reflects technical acceptance
in a speciality.
May be able to argue for self-governance.

Weaknesses
Will require the establishment of a permanent
office/staff.
Will take some time to establish.
Will require costs to run = membership fees.

Threats
Opposition
from
existing
industry
organisations.
May meet opposition from existing security
organisations.

34

Advancing Security Professionals: Discussion Paper

www.securityprofessionals.org.au

Annex F Security and security-related professional


and industry associations in Australia
Below is a (non-exhaustive) list of security and security related professional bodies and
associations in Australia:
ASIS International
Australian Information Security Association
Australian Institute of Private Detectives
Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers
Australian Security Industry Association Limited
Business Continuity Institute
eSecurity Innovation and Awareness (SECIA)
Facility Management Association
Information Systems Security Australia
Institute of Security Executives
International Association of Arson Investigators
International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators
International Association of Certified Fraud Examiners
International Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design Association
National Australian Security Providers Association
National Security Association Australia
Risk Management Institution of Australasia
Security Agents Institute WA
Venue Management Association/International Association of Arena Managers
Victorian Security Institute

Advanced Notice
Security Professionals Congress 2008
Incorporating Security Associations Meeting 25 May 2008
Security Professionals Congress 26 & 27 May 2008
The Congress will focus on the report of the Interim
Security Professionals Taskforce. The Taskforce is
supported by the Australian Governments
Attorney-Generals Department.

Key topics
Increasing the status of the profession
Setting minimum competency standards
Identifying education and articulation paths
Forming a representative body
Drafting a code of ethics and enforcement
mechanism

25 - 27 May 2008
Melbourne
Information: 02 6161 5143

Who should attend


Security professionals in all industries
Risk, intelligence & business continuity
professionals
Security policy and regulatory authorities
Your views matter
The Congress will provide you with the following
opportunities to share your views and knowledge on
the future direction of security professionals:
Discussion and debates
Workshops and small group discussion
Voting and ballots

Register now for early bird discount


www.securityprofessionalscongress.org.au

35