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HM1LTOFS

ou r

.i"! 1 i"

Iii* UliJ. Oil

SOLD B
M.&E.J.AYLOTT,
30, South Grave East,
Mildmay Parle,
ISLINGTON.

ANTONALE

E T

E X
DONO

CHARLES
DE
S2ILASSY

DE

LAUSANNE
1971

THE

HAMILTONIAN

SYSTEM.

The Hamiltonian System furnishes the learner of an


unknown language with a literal interlinear translation ;
instead of leaving him to find out, at a very great loss of
time, the meaning of words by means of the Dictionary or
Lexicon. The following Books are already published :
French.
*. d.
Latin.
*.
Gospel of St. John
4
Gospel of St. John
4 0
Epitome Histori Sacra? 4
Florian's Fables
3
iEsop's Fables
4
Perrin's Fables
4 6
Phdrus' Fables
4
Recueil Choisi
5 6
Eutropius
4
Verbs
2 0
Aurelius Victor
4
French Grammar
2 6
Cornelius Nepos
6 Petit Jack
3 6
Selecte Profanis, 2 vols. 10 0 Tlmaque
5 6
Csesar's Commentaries . . 7 6 Elisabeth, ou les Exiles . . 6 0
Celsus de Medicina, 3 vols. 15
Edgeworth's Frank .... 1 6
Gregory's Conspectus, 2 v. 10
German.
Cicero's Four Orations
Gospel of St. John
4 0
against Catiline .... 4
Robinson der Jngere, 2 v. 10
Latin Verba
2
Edward
in
Scotland
....
4
6
Salbst
7
Virgil.First Four Books
Italian.
of yEneid
5
Gospel of St. John
4 0
Ovid's Metamorphoses . . 7
Silvio Pellico
4 0
Notti Romane
6 6
Greek.
di Favole
5 6
Gospel of St. John
6 0 Raccolta
Jerusalem Deli
Gospel of St. Matthew . . 6 0 Tasso's
vered
6 6
iEsop's Fables
6 0
2
Analecta Minora
6 0 Verbs
4 0
Aphorisms of Hippocrates 7 0 Novelle Morali
Spanish.
Xenophon's Memorabilia 6 0
Homer's Iliad
6 6 Gospel of St. John
4 0
The History, Principles, Practice, and Results ofthe Hamiltonian System.
By James Hamilton. 6d. sewed.
For the. Use of Medical Students, with an Interlinear and Analytical Translation.
Celsus, the Eight Books on Medicine. Adapted for Students. 3 vole.
12mo, cloth, 15s.
Gregory's Conspectus of the Theory of Medicine. 2 vols. 12mo, cloth, 10s.
Hippocrates, Aphorisms of, in the Original Greek. With an Interlinear and
Analytical Translation. For the use ofMedical Students. 12mo, cloth,7s.
Underwood's " Medical Student's Practical and Theoretical Guide to the
Translation and Composition ofLatin Prescriptions," &c. Price 5s. 6d.
** All the above bound in strong cloth, lettered in gold.
Published by W, AYLOTT & CO., 8, Paternoster Row, London.

6G574

FOSTER'S

PENCILLED COPY-BOOKS.

FOSTER'S PENCILLED COPY-BOOKS, FOR LADIES'


SCHOOLS. In Twelve Numbers, 4to post. Price 6d. each.
No. 1 to 3. Initiatory Exercises; ex. size. No. 10. Round and Small-hand.
No. 4 to 7.
Ditto ;
large text. No. 11. Small-hand Sentences.
No. 8 and 9. Large-text Copies.
No. 12. Large-text, Round, & Small-hand.
FOSTER'S PENCILLED COPY-BOOKS, FOR GEN
TLEMEN'S SCHOOLS. In 18 Numbers, 4to foolscap. 4d. each.
No. 1 to 3. Initiatory exercises ; ex size. No. 13 and 14. Large-text words.
No. 4 to 6.
Ditto ;
large-text. No. 15. Large-text, Text, and
No. 7. Capitals and Figures.
hand.
No. 8. Text; 9. Round ; 10. Small-hand. No. 16. Text-hand Sentences.
No. 11. Text, Round, and Small-hand. No. 17. Round-hand Sentences.
No. 18. Small-hand Sentences.
No. 12. Lessons in Current-hand.
THE NATIONAL SCHOOL COPY-BOOKS. In 16 Nos.
Price 2d. each.
No. 1 and 5. Large-text, Straight-strokes. No. 12. Text & Round, Capitals & Figs.
and Letters.
No. 13. Round-hand Sentences.
No. 1 to 6. Large-text, Letters.
No. 14. Small-hand Sentences.
No. 15. Large-text Sentences.
No. 7 and 8. Text, Letters.
o. 9. Large-text, Capitals and Figures. No. 16. Text, Round, and Small-hand
No. 10 and lb Text, Words.
FOSTER'S DOUBLE-ENTRY ELUCIDATED,-^JNew
System"of Teaching Book-keeping. To which is added, an Appendix
pn Partnership Settlements, Official Balance Sheets, Examination of
Government Clerks, &c. 4to, cloth, 8s.. 6d. Sixth Edition. The
.. 03"?11 f 'h*3 work is threefold :
' 1. To elucidate the immutable principles of Double Entry, and
. to disentangle them from forms with which they have too long
been confounded.
2. To point out radical defects in the prevalent modes of teach>'
ing Book-keeping, and to suggest the means whereby those defects
may be removed.
,>
3. To exemplify the modern improvements in the arrangement
of Accounts, and to exhibit the art as it is actually practised by the
most intelligent merchants at home and abroad.
FOSTER'S PENMANSHIP
EXPLAINED. 12mo, 2s. 6d.

ILLUSTRATED

AND
>

FOSTER'S COUNTING-HOUSE ASSISTANT. 12mo,5s.


FOSTER'S ORIGIN AND PROGRESS OF BOOKKEEPING-from 1543 to 1852. 8vo, Is.
Published by W. AYLOTT & CO., 8, Paternoster Row, London.

66574

THE

FABLES

OF

^SOP,

ADAPTED TO THE

HAMILTONIAN SYSTEM,
BT AN
ANALYTICAL AND INTERLINEAL TRANSLATION.

FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS AND PRIVATE LEARNERS.

BY
JAMES HAMILTON,
Author of the Hamiltonian System.

LONDON:
Printed for J. Souter and W. Aylott; and Published by
W. AYLOTT & CO., 8, PATERNOSTER' ROW,
WHKBE ALL THE HAMILTONIAN PUBLICATIONS MAY BE HAD.
SOLD ALSO BY . H. LAW, 131, FLEET STREET.

\\OTHEQOE CANTON <7\


4*7 M, vR S" t>^y

ADVERTISEMENT,
By way of Preface.

This day is published, by James Hamilton


(author of the Hamiltonian System), and to be had
of Messrs. Boosey if Sons, Old Broad Street ;
W. Joy, St. Paul's Churchyard ; and at the Hamil
tonian Establishments, St. Bride's Avenue, and
41, Leicester Square, London,
Fables of Esop - -- -- -- - -4s
Fables of Phdrus --------4s
De Viris Illustribus (by Aurelius Victor) 4s
Eutropius - -- -- -- ---4s
all neatly and strongly bound, so as to fit them for
Schools, for which they are intended.
Mr. Hamilton has already published for this
Language,
Gospel of St. John - .
4s Od
Epitome Historie Sacrae ------ 4s Od
Cornelius Nepos - -- -- -- - 6s 6d
Selectas Profanis, 2 vol.
. - 13s Od
Now in the press, and will appear in the course of
a very few months,
OvidVirgilHoraceSallustCsarLivy :
so that those who wish to use the Hamiltonian Sys
tem in their Schools may rely on being provided

iv

ADVERTISEMENT.

with a sufficient number to occupy the whole time of


the boy, and to enable him, without trouble to himself
or teacher, to acquire a better and more extensive
knowledge of this language in one year or eighteen
months, than has ever been hitherto attained before
the age of twenty ; or at least before the language
has been attacked with all the maturity of reason.
The author, of this system, unconnected with any
party, and unknown to all, unprotected by th
learned or the great, continues with success his un
aided efforts to stem the tide of prejudice, prescrip.
tion, and fear of change, which still pervade the
minds of many of his countrymen with regard to edu
cation ; and sees, with pleasure, the sale of his publi
cations to increase, and his system generally diffuse
its genial influence through the land with increasing
life, and light, and energy: though an old man, he
still hopes to see it adopted in every school in
Europe. It is impossible that the present system
should much longer resist the effulgence of that
intellectual light whose rays now penetrate the cot
of the labourer as well as the palace of the nobleman.
Real information, useful and extensive knowledge,
can be acquired by reading, and by reading
only ; nor will the most accurate knowledge of the
Greek particles, of Latin etymologies, of gram
matical distinctions, of nonsense verses, nor even
of prosody itself, pass much longer on mankind for

ADVERTISEMENT.

learning, divested, as they now but too often are,


of the knowledge of these languages. The rivalry
of the two new Universities will accelerate this
glorious consummation. A preparation for them
must consist in something else besides the pretended
rules of a language ; and if it be found necessary, to
be admitted into them, to possess some real acquaint
ance with the language itself, the Hamiltonian Sys
tem alone affords the means of accomplishing it.
Without any innovation on the general plan of his
school, the master may, as heretofore, prescribe a
task to his pupils, first classing them according to
their previous acquirements ; but instead of half a
page of grammar, as unintelligible to the boy as it
will be henceforth useless to the master, instead of
a dozen lines, given to translate by the help of a dic
tionary, the task will be from two to ten pages. The
boy translates, as heretofore, alone or in class, the
teacher reading the key while the boy construes,
in the very words of the key, from the text;
and thus a class of twenty boys may be accurately
examined in a few minutes, and a fresh task pre
scribed for the same day or the following, which will
be acquired, not as heretofore by force, or the fear
of shame, or not at all, but with readiness and
delight ; not only because the boy perceives he can
do it with facility, but because he feels its utility,
and perceives, with delight, his progress.

ADVERTISEMENT.
Each of the above books may be thus acquired, so
as to know every word in it, in one month : the whole
in one year, by boys of twelve years and upwards.
But if it be wished that they should acquire real in
formation, by reading in their own or some modern
language (for which Mr. Hamilton furnishes the
same facilities as for the Latin), they may then pro
long, without injury, the study of the Latin. The
great point is, that, whatever be the language which
they study, instead of attempting to extract it from
its syntax, which is just as easy as to extract sun
beams from cucumbers, they become fully per
suaded they can acquire it only by reading a num
ber of books in that language ; for there is no other
way under heaven by which a language can be ac
quired, whatever learned ignorance, learned pedan
try, learned prejudice, or learned knavery may say
to the contrary. It is of little importance to the
learner what the books are which he first reads, pro
vided the style be simple, natural, and clear. Let
him first read a number of easy books, and then
there will be none difficult. Let not the parent or
teacher think these books interfere with each other,
or that by reading some, the pupil may dispense with
others: this will be found a bad economythe
pupil cannot read too many easy books ; the time
required is small and well repaid, the cost trifling,
and the book, unlike the trash which has hitherto
filled the schools, is always fit for a library.

ADVERTISEMENT.

VU

These books, and these alone, teach grammar and


syntax; analytical translation being nothing else
but practical parsing ; and these, and these alone,
can therefore render wholly useless the grammar
and dictionary; but when a number of them are
known, the pupil may peruse a treatise on grammar,
in order to acquire the theory of what he already
knows the practice.
It cannot be too strongly impressed on the mind of
the heads of scholastic institutions, that the study
of any language can be successfully pursued only on
the plan here indicated ; and a short experience will
convince them, that it is their interest to have it pur
sued on this plan only. Let, then, the pupil be
spared the useless labour of writing what are called
exercises. When he has read a dozen volumes in
any language, he may then be directed to try his
power of writing it, and have his faults of gram
mar, syntax, or idiom, redressed by the oral in
structions of his Teacher ; thus he will be perfected
in grammar in a few lessons.
The getting by
heart the Latin poets is also worse than useless,
besides being an absolute deception. The being
able to repeat any author by heart supposes our
having become familiar with him by frequent read
ing for our pleasure, and not the getting portions
by heart through fear of punishment or shame.

ADVERTISEMENT.
Prosody ought not to be utterly neglected ; but to
devote the time now usually given to it, and that at
a period when we are unable to read a Latin poet,
so as to taste the beauties of the work, is prepos
terous in the highest degree. In these Works an
attempt is made to teach this art practically, and
without the intolerable drudgery of getting by heart
the innumerable rules of this pretended science.
The penltima usually determines the mode of pro
nouncing Latin words: the general rule in this lan
guage, as in the modern Italian, is to pronounce
that syllable long ; but the number of exceptions is
immense. Leaving, then, the general rule as above
described, the penltima is always marked, when it
is short ; and thus, by habit only, will the Pupil
form to himself, in a very short time, a practical
prosody, more to be relied on than that which is
obtained by the knowledge of a thousand rules.
London, October 1, 1828.

^asopi

FABULA.

FABULA I.
Aqula et Vulpes.

. . ;

AQUIL A et Vulpes itit1 amicit prp se invcem


habitare2 decreverunt,3 confirmationem amicit? facientes4
familiaritatem. Itque Aqula super alt arbore nidum
fixit.5 Vulpes ver in proxmis arbustis filos peprit.6
Ad pabulum igtur aliquando Vulpe profect,7 Aqula cbi
inop laborans,8 cm devolsset9 in arbusta et filos hujus
sustulisset,10 un cum sis pullis os devoravit.11 Vulpes,
ver reversa,12 et re cognt/3 non tam filiorum tristata'4 est
morte, qum vindict mop: qua nim terrestris esset,15
alatam persqui16 baud potrat.17 Quare procul stans,18
quod etam impotentbus est19 facle, inimic maledicebat.20
Non mult autem post, capram quibusdam in gro sacrificantbus,21 cm devolsset22 Aqula, partem victm cum
ignitis carbonbus rapit,23 et in nidum tulit.24 Vento
autem vehementer tunc fiante,25 et flamm excitat,2*
Aqul pulli, implumes adhuc cm essent,27 assati in
terram deciderunt.28 Vulpes ver, cm accurrisset,29 in
conspectu Aqul omnes devoravit.80
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat,31 os, qui amicitam. vilant,32 lcet
ab affectis33 injur fugant34 ultioncm ob impotentam,
divinum tamen supplicum non depulsuros.35
o shabito 3decerno
4facio figo 6pario 7proficiscor 'laboro 9devolo 10suffero "devoro 12revertor
13cognosco 14tristor 15sum 16persequor 17possum 18sto
"sum 20maledico 21sacrifico 22devolo 23rapio 24fero
5flo
26excito 27sum
28decido
29accurro
^devoro
31significo 32violo 33afficio 34f'ugio 35depello

JE S S.

FABULA .
Philomela et Accipter.
Philomela super arbore sdens1 de more canebat.2
Accipter autem am conspicatus,3 ac cbi indgens,4 cm
advolsset,5 corripit.6 Qu, quum peritura7 esset,8 orabat9
Acciptrem, ne devoraretur ;10 nque nim stis esse
dixit11 ad Acciptris ventrem implendum,12 sed oportere13
ipsum, cbo egentem,14 ad majores ves converti.15 Acci
pter autem, cm respondisset,16 it,17 Sed ego cert amens
sim,18 si, qui in manbus paratus19 est, cbo dimisso,20 qu
non uspam videntur,21 persquar.22
AFI'ABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, ut ex hominbus etam i sint23 inconsulti, qui spe majorum, qu incerta sunt,24 qu in manbus.
habentur,25 amittant.26
1sedeo 2cano 3conspicor 4iudigeo 5advolo scorripio
7pereo 8sum 9oro 10devoro udico 12impleo 13oportet
14egeo 15convertor 16respondeo 17aio 18sum
9paro ,
*edimitto 21videor 22persequor ^sum 24sum ^habeo
26amitto

FABULA III.
Vulpes et Hircus.
Vulpes et Hircus sitientes1 in putum descenderunt,2
sed postquam bibissent,3 Hirco indagante4 ascensum,
Vulpes it, Confide,5 utle quid, et in utriusque etam
salutem excogitavi ;6 si nim rectus stetris,7 et anteriores
pdes pariti applicuris,8 et cornua parter in anteriorem
Sartem inclinavris,9 quum percurrro10 ipsa per tos
umros et cornua, et extra putum illinc exiluro,11 et te
'sitio
7sto

2descendo
8applico

3bibo 4indago 5confido


9inclino
10percurro

6excogit
"exsilio

M S OP s.

posta extrham12 bine. Ab Hirco autem ad hoc prompte


officio prstto,13 illa, quum ex puto sic exiluisset, exultabat14 circum os lteta. Hircus autem ipsam accusabat,15
qud transgressa16 fuisset17 conventiones : IHa autem, Sed
si tot, inquit,18 mentes possideres,19 quot in barb plos,
non ant descendisses,20 qum de ascensu considerasses.21
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat,22 sic prudentem vrum oportere,23 pTis
fines alts considerare24 rerum, deind sic ipsas aggrdi.2*
12extraho 13prsto 14exulto
15accuso 16transgredior
17sum
18inquam . 19possideo 20descendo 21considero
^significo
^oportet
^considero
25aggredior

FABULA IV.
Vulpes et Lo.
Vulpes, quum nunquam vidisset1 Leonem, quum casu
quodam i occurrisset,2 primm sic timit,3 ut ferm
moreretur.4 Deinde, quum secund vidisset,5 timit''
cert, non tarnen ut prs : tertio autem quum ipsum
vidisset,7 sic contra um ausa8 est, ut accedret,8 et colloqueretur.10
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula sifinifcat,11 familiaritatem vel terribila accessu12
facila facre.13
Mdeo 2occurro 3timeo ^orior svideo 6timeo 7video
8audeo 9accedo 10colloquor dignifico 12accedo 13facio.

FABULA V.
Vulpes.
-Vulpes laquo capta,1 quum, absciss2 caud, evasisset,3
non vitalem pr pudore existimabat4 vitam : decrevit5 itque
'capio

2abscindo

3evado

4existimo

'decerno

JE S 0 P U S.

et alis Vulpbus hoc itdem persuadere;6 ut communi


relo sum celaret7 dedcus. Et jam, omnibus collectis,8
suadebat9 caudas abscindre10 qud non indcens solum hoc
membrum sit,11 sed et supervacum onus appensum.12 Resondens13 autem ex ipsis qudam, it:14 Heus tu, nsi tbi
oc conducret,15 nobis non consulres.18
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat,17 pravos homnes non pr benevolent
propinquis consulre,18 sed propter sam ipsorum utilitatem.
6persuadee
1appendo
I7significo

7celo 8colligo 9suadeo 10abscindo "sum


13respondeo
14aio
15conduco
16consulo
18consulo

FABULA VI.
Vulpes et Rubus.
Vulpes, sepe conscens,1 quum lapsa2 casura3 foret,4
apprehendit,5 in adjutorum, Rbum. Quamobrem, quum
pdes sos illius aculis cruentsset,6 et doleret,7 i dixit ;8
Hei mihi ! cm nim confugissem9 ad te, tanquam ad
auxiliatorem, tu pejus me tractsti.10 Sed errsti,11 heus
tu, inquit12 Rbus, qu me apprehendre13 voluisti,14 qui
omnes apprehendre solo.
AFFABUXATIO.
Fabula signifcat,15 sic et homnes esse16 stultos, qui ad
os auxili grat accurrunt,17 qubus mgis injur afficere18
natur instum est.19
'conscendo
2labor
3cado
4form
"apprehendo
"cruento
7doleo
8dico v 9confugio
"tracto
"erro
12inquam
13apprehendo
14volo
15significo
16sum
17accurro 18afficio 19sum.

M S 0 P s.
FABULA VII.
Gall i et Perd ix.

Gallos quidam hbens1 domi, emptam2 quque Perdicem, cum illis dimisit3 pasci :4 illis ver verberantbus5
ipsam, et expellentbus,6 illa tristabatur7 vald, existmans,8
ut alienignam, hc se pti9 Gallis. Quum vero paulo
pst et illos videret10 pugnare,11 et seipsos cdre,12 mrore
soluta,13 &it, Sed qudem postbac non tristabor,14 vdens15
et ipsos pugnare16 inter se.
AFFABXATIO.
Fabula signifcat, quod prudentes facl frant17 ab
alienis injurias, quum ipsos vidant18 nque sis
abstinere.19
'habeo !emo
3dimitto
4pasco
5verbero
6expello
7tristor 'existimo 9patior 10video "pugno l2cdo
13solvo
"tristor
'5video
16pugno
17fero
18video
l9abstineo

FABULA VIII.
Vulpes.
Vulpes in dmum profecta1 Mimi, et singula ipsius
vasa perscrutans,* invenit3 et cput larv ingeniose fabricatum,4 quo et accepte6 manbus, it, quale cput, et
cerebrum non habet !6
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula in vros, magnifcos quidem corpore, sed animo
inconsultos.
2perscrutor

^nvenio
a5

4fabricor

5accipio

PU S.

FABULA IX.
Carbonarus et Fullo.
Carbonabus in qudam habtans1 domo, rogabat2
Fullonem etam advenientem3 secum cohabitare.4 Fullo
autem respondens'
timo nim, ne, qu ego delavo,8 tu fuligme replasJ
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, omne dissimle esse10 insociable,
habito
6possum

2rogo
7facio

3advenio
4cohabito
'respondeo
8delavo
9repleo
10sum

FABULA X.
Piscatores.
Pise atores trahebant1 verriculum, quod quum grve
foret,2 gaudebant,3 et exultabant,4 multum inesse5 prd
existimantes ;6 sed quum. in litus ipsum traxissent,' piscesque paucos qudem, sed lapdem in o permagnum invenissent,8 tristari9 cperunt,10 et mrere,11 non tam ob
piscum paucitatem, qum quod et contraria ant anmo
prsumpsrant.12 Quidam autem inter os natu grandra
dixit ;13 Ne tristemur, soci ! nam voluptati, utr videtur,14
soror est13 tristita : et nos igtur oportebat,16 tantm ant
lsetatos, omnino alqu in re etam tristari.
AFFABULAT 10.
Fabula signifcat, non oportere tristari frustrat spe.
^raho
2forem
3gaudeo
4existimo
6existimo 7traho 8invenio "tristor 10cpi
12prsumo 13dico 14videor 15sum 16oportet

5insum
nmreo

M SO PU s.

FABULA XI.
Jactator.
Vir quidam peregrinatus,1 deinde in sam patram reversus,2 alaque multa in diversis virilter gessisse3 locis
jactabat,4 atqueetam Rhdi saltsse5 saltum, quem nullus
ejus loci poturit6 saltare :' ad hoc et testes, qui bi interfuerunt,7 dicebat8 se habere.9 Quidam autem ex is, qui
adrant,10 respondens11 it ;12 Hus tu, si verum hoc est,13
non est tibi opus testbus : En Ilhdus ; en et saltus.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, nsi prompta ri demonstratio sit,M
omnem sermonem supervacum esse.15
'peregrinor 2revertor 3gero 4jacto "salto. 6possum
7intersum 8dico 9habeo 10adsum llrespondeo 12aia
13sum 14sum lssum

FABULA XII.
Impossibila promitteus.1
Vir pauper grotans,2 et ml affectus,3 quum
medcis desperatus4 esset, Dos rogabat ;s si sanitatem sbi
rursus fecissent,6 centum boves ipsis se oblaturum7 esse
pollcens8 in sacrificum. Uxore autem ejus sciscitat,9 Et
bi tibi hc runt10 si convaluris ?" Ille it, Ptas12 nim
surgre13 me hinc, ut Di hc me reptant ?14
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, multos facl polliceri,15 qua: re perficre16 non sperent.17
^romitto 2groto 3afficio
Mespero
'rogo
7offero 8polliceor "sciscitor 10sum "convalesce
13surgo urepeto I5polliceor 16perficio 17spero .

6facio
12puto

S PU S.

FABULA XIII.
Malignus.
Vir malignus ad cum, qui in Delphis est,1 ivt2 Apollnem, tentare3 um vlens.4 Atque id, comprehenso*
passerculo mnu, et o veste contecto,6 sttit7que proxm
tripdem, ac rogavit8 Dum, dicens,9 Apollo, quod
manbus fero, utrum vivum est, an mortHum ?10 statens,11
si mortuum dicret,12 vivum ostendre13 passerculum ; sin
vivum, statim suffocatum14 mortuum illum proferre.15
Sed Dus, malign ipsius cognt16 mente, it, Utrum,
hus tu, vis17 facre,18 facto: pnes te nim est illd
facere, sive vivum, quod contnes,19 sive mortuum os
tendre.80
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, Dum nque decpi21 posse,*1 nque
quicquam um latere.23
'sum 2eo 3tento 4volo ecomprehendo 6contego 7sto
*rogo
9dico
10morior
nstatuo
12dico
13ostendo
"suffoco 15profero 16cognosco 17volo 18facio 19contineo
^ostendo 21decipior Opossum 23lateo.

FABULA XIV.
Piscatores^
Piscatoees egressi1 ad venationem, quum multo
tempore defatigati2 nihil cepissent,3 et admdum tristabantur,4 et discedre6 apparabant.6 Sed statim Thunnus,
maxmis petitus7 piscbus, in navigum ipsorum insilit :8 Dli vero, hoc capto,9 cum voluptate abire.10
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, sp qu ars non prbit,11 a donsse12 fortunam.
1egredior 2defatigo 3capio 4tristor Miscedo
7peto 8insilio 9capio '0abeo "prtebo 12dono

6apparo

S S.
FABULA XV.
Deceptor.

Vir pauper grotans51 vovebat2 Dis, si evadret,3 boves


centum m sacrificum se oblaturum ;4 sed Di, tentare5 um
volentes,6 morbo liberrunt.7 At ille refectus,8 quonam
bobus carebat,9 ex past boves centum se fqrmatos10 in
ar positos11 sacrificavit :12 sed Di statuentes13 um pu
nire,14 in somnis adstantes15 i, dixerunt :16 Abi17 ad litus
ad um locum : illic nim Attcas mille drachmas in
ventes.18 Ule autem excitatus,19 cum voluptate et alacritate ad demonstratum20 locum perrexit,21 aurum disquirens.22 Sed illic in piratas incdit,23 ab ipsisque comprehensus24 est. Captus25 ergo, ut dimitteretur26 piratas
orbat,27 mille auri talenta se daturum28 ipsis promittens.29
Sed quum non crederetur,30 abactus31 ab ipsis, divendtus3*
est mille drachmis.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat,33 mendacbus homimbus inimicum
esse34 Dum.
'groto
*reficio
I4punio
^capio
31abigo

2voveo 3evado 4offero 5tento 6volo 7libero


9careo 10formo "pono 12sacrifico
13statuo
15adsto
16dico
I7abeo
18invenio I9excito
,
^dimitto
27oro
^do
29promitto
^credo
^divendo ^significo ^sum.

FABULA XVI.
Ranae.
Ran^e d in palude pascebantur,1 state autem siccat2 palude, ill derelict,3 qurebant4 alam ; et qudem
profundum invenerunt5 putum. Quo viso,6 altera altri
'pasco

2sicco

3derelinquo

4quoero

5invenio

^ideo

10

M S P s.

inquit,7 Descendamus,8 hus tu, in hune putum. Illa


ver respondens9 it,10 Si igtur et hc qua arurit,11
quomdo ascendemus ?12
~j
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula declarat,13 non oportere14 inconsiderate res
aggrdi15
7inquam 8desceudo 9respondeo loaio nareo 12ascendo
"declaro 14oportet 15aggredior.

FABULA XVII.
Snex et Mors.
Senex, quondsm, sectis1 monte lignis, ac in humros
elevatis,2 ubi multam vam oneratus3 ivisset,4 defessus,5 et
deposait6 ligna, et Mortem ut veniret,7 invocabat.8 At,
Morte illc adstante,9 et causam rogante,10 qu se voesset ;u Snex it,12 Ut 8nus hoc sper humros imponres13
mihi.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, omnem homnem vit studiosum esse,
et lct, infinitis periclis immersus,14 videatur15 mortem
appetre,16 tamen vivre17 multo mgis qum mori18
eligre.19
1seco 2elevo 3onero 4eo 5defetiscor 6depono 7venio
8invoco
9adsto
10rogo
"voco
12aio
13impon<>
14immergo 15videor 16appeto 17vivo 18morior '9eligo

FABULA XVIII.

Anus et Medcus.
Muler anus dlens1 oeulos, conduxit2 Medcum quendani mercede, conventione fact,3 si se curarefc,4 pactams
'doleo

2conduco

3fio

4curo

5paciscor

SO PU s.

11

mercedem i se daturam ;6 sin autem minime, nihil daturam. Aggressus7 est igtur Medcus curam : quotide
vero recedens8 ad vetulam, et oculos i ungens,9 quum illa
nequaquam videre10 posset11 hor ob unctionem, ipse vas
alquod ex domo aufrens12 quotide discedebat.13 Anus
igtur sftam supellectlem videbat14 singulis diebus mini15
ad, ut tandem omnino Iii sanat16 nihil relinqueretur.17
At Medus quum jam pactam18 pecunam ab efflagitaret,19 ut qu pur jam videret,20 et testes adducret ;21
Mgis eert, it illa, nunc nihil vido : Nam quum oculis
laborabam,22 multa ma in m videbam23 domo ; nunc
autem, quum me tu videre inquis,24 nihil omnino ex illis
video.
'
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, pravos homnes, ex is, qu Ugant,25
ignaros contra seipsos argumentum afferre.26
6do 7aggredior 8recedo 9unguo 10video
12aufero "discedo 14video 15minuo 16sano
18paciscor
1Befflagito
^video
21adduco
^video 24inquam 25ago 26affero

"possum
17relinquo
^laboro

FABULA XIX.
Agrcola et Fili ipsius.
Agrcola quidam vit excessurus,1 ac vlens2 sos filos
periculum facre3 de agricultur, vocatis4 ipsis, it,8 Fili
mi, go jam vit discedo, vos autem, si qu in vin
me occultata6 sunt,7 qusieritis,8 invenietis9 omna. Uli
igtur, rti10 thesaurum illic defossum11 esse, omnem vin
terram post intertum ptris suffoderunt,12 et thesaurum
qudem non invenerunt,13 sed vina pulchr fossa multiplcem fructum redddit.14
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, laborem thesaurum esse hominbus.
Excedo 2volo 3facio 4voco 5aio 6occulto 7sum 8qua?ro
9invenio 10reor ndefodio 12suffodio 13invenio 14reddo

12

S OP U S.

FABULA XX.
Hcrus et Canes.
Vir quidam tempestate in so suburbio deprehensus,1
primm oves comedit,2 dehinc cpras. Tempestate autem
invalescente,3 et operarios bves jugulatos4 comedit. Cnes
ver, his visis8 dixerunt6 inter se, Sed fugiamus7 nos hinc.
Si nim operaris bobus Hrus noster non abstnet,8 quomdo nobis abstinebit?
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, os maxm fugre9 et cavere10 oportere,11 qui ne sis quidem abstinent.12
,
Reprehendo
2comedo
3invalesco
6dico
7fugio '8abstmeo 9f'ugio
12abstineo

4jugulo
5video
10caveo "oportet

FABULA XXI.
Muler et Gallina.
Muler qudam vida Gallinam habebat,1 singulis
diebus ovum sbi parientem :2 rata3 vero, si plus Gallin
hordi projicret,4 am bis parituram5 de, hoc fecit.6 Sed
Gallina pinguefacta,7 ne smel qudem die parre8
potit.9
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, os, qui ob avaritam plurum sunt1*
appetentes,11 et a, qu adsunt,12 amittre.13
^abeo
2pario
3i-eor
4projicio
5pario
6facio
7pinguefacio 8pario 9possum 10sum "appeto 12adsum
13amito

SOP us.

13

FABULA XXII.
Morsus Cane.
Moksus1 cne quidam medicaturum cireuibat2 qurens.3 Quum autem occurrisset4 quidam i, et cognoscret5 quod qurebat,6 Hus tu, it, si sanari7 vis,8 acepe9 panem, atque o sangunem vulnris sicca,10 et i,
qui momordit,11 cni ad edendum12 da :13 At is ridendo14
it,15 Sed si hoc fecro,16 oportebit17 me ab omnibus, qui
in urbe sunt,18 canbus morderi.19
AFFABLATIO.
Fabula signifcat,20 pravos etam hommes beneficio affectos,21 mgis ad inferendam22 injuram exaci.23
bordeo
2circumeo
3quro
4occurro
5cognosco
6quro 7sano 8volo 9accipio 10sicco nmordeo 12cdo
13do
14rideo
15aio
16facio
17oportet
18sum
19mordeo ^significo 21afficio ^infero 23exacuo

FABULA XXIII.
Adolescentuli et Cocus.
Do Adolescentuli Coco assidebant,1 et Coco in alquo
domestico opere occupato,2 alter horum partem quandam
carnum subreptam3" in alterus demisit4 snum. Converso5
autem Coco, et carnem qusrente,6 qui abstulrat,7 jurabat3
se non habere :9 qui autem habebat,10 se non abstulissc.11
Cocus ver, cognt12 malit ipsorum, it,13 Sed, etsi me
latuertis,14 pejeratum15 Dum non igtur latcbtis.16
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, qud lct homnes pej erantes17 lateamus,18 Dum tmen non latebmus.19
'assideo
2occupo
3subripio
4demitto
5convertQ
"quro
7aufero
8juro
9habeo
10habeo
"aufero
12cognosco 13aio
14lateo 15pejero
16lateo
17pejero
18lsteo 19lateo.

M. S OP s.

FABULA XXIV.
Inimici.
Do quidam inter se inimici in edem navi navigabant
quorum alter in puppi, alter in pror sedebat :2 Tempestate autem superveniente,3 et nave jam submergend,4 qui
erat5 in puppi gubernatorem rogabat,6 utra pars navigi
prs obruenda7 esset.8 Quumque ille proram dixisset,9
Sed mihi non est grve, it,10 mors, si visurus11 sum ante
me inimicum morientem.12
AFJ-ABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat,13 multos hommes nihil sum dam
num curare,14 si modo inimicos sos vidant15 ante se mle
affectos.16
^avigo 2sedeo 3supervenio 4submergo ssum 6rogo
7obruo - 8sum
9dico
10aio
uvideo
12morior
"significo 14curo "video 16afficio

FABULA XXV.
Felis et Mures.

In domo qudam quum multi essent1 Mures, Felis, eo


cognto,2 ivit3 o, ac eorum singulos captos4 devorabat.5 At
illi, quotide quum se absumi6 viderent.7 dixerunt8 inter se,
Ne postliac infra descendamus,9 ne pents intereamus.10
Nam si Felis non potest11 hue venire,12 nos salvi ermus.13
Sed Felis, non amplus Murbus descendentbus,14 statit14
per astutam os decipens16 evocare,17 et jam quum pesslum quendam conscendisset,18 de o se suspendit,19 et
mortum20 se esse simulabat.21 Ex Murbus autem quidam
acclinatus,22 viso23que o, it, Hus tu, etsi saccus fias,24
non te adibo.25
1sum 2cognosco 3eo 4capio sdcvoro 6absumo 7video
8dico , 9descendo 10intereo npossum 12venio 13sum
14descendo
15statuo
16decipio
17evoco
18conscendo
19suspendo 20morior 21simulo ^acclino 23video ^o S5adeo

M S P U S.

16

AFFABDXATID,
Fabla signifcat,28 prudentes hommes, quum aliquorum pravitatem experti27 fuernt,28 non amplus eorum
falli29 simulationbus.
26significo

^experior

28sum

29fallo

FABULA XXVI.
Vulpes et Simius.
In concilio quondam irrationabilum animalum saltavit1
Simus, et approbatus,2 Hex ab ipsis electus3 est. Vulpes
autem cm i invideret,4 quum in casse qudam carnem
vidisset,5 Simum secum sumptum6 illuc duxit,7 qud invenisset8 ipsa thesaurum illum, dicens,9 non tmen et se
uti10 o; quippe quum lex regi triburit :u atque hortata12
est ipsum, ut regem, thesaurum accipre.13 At ille inconsiderat profectus,14 et captus13 casse, ut qu decepisset,16 accusabat17 Vulpem. Illa autem i, Sime,
quum talem tu habeas18 stultitam, imperum in bruta
tenebis rw
AFFABTJLATIO.
Fabla signifcat,20 os, qui actiones alquas inconsult
aggrediuntur,21 in infortuna incidre.22
'salto 2approbo 3eligo 4invideo 8video 6sumo 7duco
8invenio
9dico
10utor
"tribuo 12hortor
13accipio
14proficiscor
lscapio
16decipio
17accuso
18habeo
19teneo 20significo 21aggredior ^incido

FABULA XXVII.
Thunnus et Delphin.
Thunnus Delphine cursu pressus,1 magnoque imptu
latus,2 quum capiendus3 esset,4 inscus ob vehementem
*o

2fero

3capio

4sum

16

M S 0 P s.

imptum decdit5 in insulam quandam, ab eodem ver


imptu et -Delphin cum o ejectus6 est. Thunuus autcm
conversus,7 et agentem8 anmam Delphinum conspicatus,9
it,10 Non ampls mihi mors molesta est, quum um
vidam,11 qui mihi causa fit12 ipsius, un mecum perire.13 AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat,14 facl miserias ferre15 hommes, os,
qui illarum auctores fuerunt,16 infelicter agre17 videntes.18
"decido 6ejicio 7converto 8ago 9conspicor 10aio
12sum 13pereo 14significo 15fero 16sum 17ago

"video
I8video

FABULA XXVIII.
Medcus et ./Egrotans.1
Medcus grotum curabat .? groto autem morfco,3
ille efferentbus4 dicebat ;5 Homo hic, si vino abstinuisset,6
et clysterbus usus7 fuisset,8 non interisset.9 Quidam
autem ex is qui adrant,10 respondens11 it, Optme,
non oportebat12 te he nunc dicre,13 quum nulla utiltas
est ; sed tunc admonere,14 quum his uti15 potrat.18
AFFABLATIO.
Fabula signifcat, oportere17 amicos tempore necessi
tatis prbere18 auxilia ; et non, cm jam de rebus desperatur,19 cavillari.20
'segroto 2curo ' 3morior 4effero 5dico 6abstineo 7utor
8sum "intereo 10adsum "respondeo 12oportet 13dico
I4admoneo
15utor
16possum
17oportet
18prbeo
19despero ^cavillor.

FABULA XXIX.
Auccps et Vipra.
ArjCEPS, visco accepte,1 et arundinbus, aucupatum'
'accipio

2aucupor

S S.

17

ext.3 Viso4 autem turdo sper alt arbore sedente,5 et


arundinbus inter se in longitudnem conjunctis,6 sursum ad
um capre7 vlens,8 suspiciebat.9 Cetrm ignarus Vipram dormientem10 sub pedbus conculcavit.11 Quum vero
irata12 momordsset13 ipsum, ille jam gens14 anmam dicebat ;15 Me misrum ! alum nim capre16 vlens,17 ipse
ab alio captus18 sum ad mortem.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, os, qui proxmis insidiantur,19 ignaros
sp ab alis id ipsum pti.20
3exeo
4video
'sedeo
6conjungo 7capio 8volo
9suspicio
lodormio
11conculco
12irascor
13mordeo
14ago 15dico 16capio 17volo 18capio 19insidior ^patior

FABULA XXX.
Can is et Cocus. .
Canis cum irrupisset1 in culinam, Coco occupato,2
corde arrepto,3 fugit.4 At Cocus conversus,8 ut vidit6
ipsum fugientem, mquit,7 Hus tu, sciio,8 bi furis,9 me
te observaturum :10 non nim mihi cor abstulisti,11 sed
mihi cor dedisti12 pots.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, spe nocumenta hominbus documenta
fieri.13
'irrumpo
7inquam
13fio

2occupo 3arripio 4fugio 'converto 6video


8scio
9sum
10observo
"aufero
12do

FABULA XXXI.
Cnis et Liipus.
Canis ante stabulum quoddam dormiebat
'dormio
5

quumque

18

JE S 0 P U S.

Lupus irrupisset,2 et cbum facturus3 um esset,4 rogabat,5


ne tune se mactaret.6 Nunc nim, inquit,7 tenis sum
et macilentus : si autem parumper expectavris,8 mi
ilomni facturi9 sunt10 nuptias, et ego tune, multa depastus,11
pinguor, ro,12 et tibi suavor cbus fiam.13 Lpus igtur
persuasus14 abit.15 Post aliquot vero des reversus,16 invenit17 supers sper doms tecto Cnem dormientem, et
stans18 infers ad se vocabat,19 admnens20 um fdris.
Et Cnis, At, Lpe, si posthac ante stabulum me
vidris21 dormientem, non ampls expectes22 nuptas.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, prudentes homines, quum alqu in
re perielitati,23 salvi facti24 furint,25 ab o, qumdu vixrint,26 cavere.27
2irrumpo
3facio
4sumi
5rogo
6macto
7inquam
8expecto
9facio
10sum
"depasco
12sum
13fio
14persuadeo 16abeo 16revertor 17invenio I8sto 19voco
20admoneo 21video ^expecto ^periclitar 24fio 25sum
^vivo 27caveo

FABULA XXXII.
Cnis et Gallus.
Canis et Gallus, rnt1 societate, iter faciebant.2 Vespr
autem superveniente,3 Gallus, conscens4 arbore, dormiebat,5 at Cnis ad radicem arboris cavitatem habentis.B
Quum vero Gallus, secundum consuetudnem, noctu cantsset,7 Vulpes, ut audivit,8 accurrit,9 et stans10 infers, ut
ad se descendret,11 rogabat:12 dixit13 nim, se cupre14
animal bonam ta vocem hbens13 complecti.16 Quum
autem is dixisset,17 ut janitorem prs excitaret,18 ad radi
cem dormientem,19 ut, quum ille aperuisset,20 descendret,21
o 2facio 3supervenio 4conscendo 5dormio 6habeo
7canto 8audio
9accurro
10sto ndescendo
12rogo
13dico 14cupio "habeo 16complector 17dico 18excito
19dormio ^aperio 21descendo

iESOPUS.

19

et ill qurente,22 ut ipsum vocaret,23 Cnis sttim prosilens24 am dilaceravit.25


AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, prudentes . homnes inimicos insul
tantes26 ad fortiores astu mittrc.27
^quro ^voco 24prosilio ^dilacero 2Cinsulto ^mitto

FABULA XXXIII.
Lo et Rana.
Leo audit1 aliquando Ran vald clamante,2 vertit3 se
ad. vocem, rtus4 magnum alquod animal esse ;5 cum
parumper autem expectsset,6 vidit7 ipsam stagno egressam,8 et accedens9 props proculcavit.1"
AFFABLATIO.
Fabula signifcat, non oportere,11 antequam vidas,1*
auditu solo perturbari.13
'audio 2clamo 3verto 4reor ssum 6expecto 7video
8egredior 9accedo 10proculco "oportet "video '3perturbo

FABULA XXXIV.
Lo, et Asnus, et Vulpes.
Leo, et Asnus, et Vulpes, societate int,1 egressi2 sunt3
ad .venandum. Mult igtur prxd capt,4 jussit5 Lo
Asno dividre6 sbi. At ille, trbus partbus factis7
qualter, ut eligrent8 os hortabatur.9 Et Leo, ir perctus,10 Asnum devoravit.11 Inde Vulpi, ut dividret,1*
jussit.13 111a ver, in unam partem omnibus congestis,14
sbi minmum quiddam reliquit.15 Tum Lo ipsi, Quis
o 2egredior 3sum 4capio sjubeo 6divido 7fio
8eligo 9hortor
10percieo
"devoro 12divido 13jubco
I4congero 15xelinquo

20

M S P U S.

te, optma, dividre16 sic docuit ?17 Ea vero, inquit,18


Asni calamtas.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabiila sigriifcat, castigamenta hominibus esse13 proximorum infortuna.
16divido l7doceo 18inquam 19sum

FABULA XXXV.
Lo et Ursus.
Leo et Ursus smul magnum hinnlum nacti,1 de o
pugnabant.2 Graviter igtur se invcem affecti,3 ado ut
ex mult pugn etwm vertigne corriperentur,4 deftigati5
jacebant.6 Vulpes autem circumirca eundo7 bi prostratos
os vidit,8 et hinnlum in medo jacentem,9 nunc, per
medos utrosque percurrens,10 rapit,11 fugiens^que abit.13
At illi videbani,14 qudem ipsam, non valentes15 vert Br
gere,16 Nos misros, dicebant,17 qud Vulpi laboravmus !18
AFFASULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, alis laborantbus, alios lucrari.19
'nanciscor 2pugno 3afficio 4corripio 5defatigo 6jaceo 7eo
8video 9jaceo 10percurro nrapio 12fugio I3abeo 14video
15valeo lesurgo I7dico 18laboro 19lucror

FABULA XXXVI.
Vates.
Vates in foro sdens1 disserebat.2 Quum autem supervenisset3 quidam derepent, et renuncisset,4 qud doms
ipsius fenestr apert5 omnes essent,6 et, qu intus rant,7
'sedeo 2dissero 3supervenio 4renuncio 8aperio 6sum 7sum

S OP U S.

21

ablata8 omnia, exilivit9 suspirans,10 et cursim ibat.11 At


currentem12 quidam ipsum conspicatus,13 Hus tu, inqut,14
qui alienas res prscire15 profteris,16 tas ipsius non pra>
vaticinabare !17
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla in eos, qui sam vitam prav gubernantes,18 quse
nihil ad se attnent19 prscire20 conantur.21
8aufero
9exilio
I0suspiro lleo 12curro 13conspicor
I4inquam 15prscio 16profiteor 17prvaticinor 18guberno
19attineo ^pTscio 21conor

FABULA XXXVH.
Formica et Columba.
Formica sitens1 descendit2 in fontem, ac tracta3 fluxu,
suffocabatur.4 CoVimba vero, hoc viso,5 ramutn arboris
decerptum6 in fontem projecit,7 sper quo sdens8 Formica
evasit.9 Auceps autem quidam post hoc, calmis compostis,10 ad Columbam comprehcndendam11 ibat.12 Hoc
autem viso,13 Formica aucupis pdem momordit ;14 ille
ver dolens,15 et calamos projecit,16 et, ut Columba sttim
fagret,17 auctor fit.18
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, oportere19 benefactorbus gratam
referre.20
'sitio 2descendo 3traho 4suffoco
5video
6decerpo
"projicio
8sedeo
9evado 10compono 11comprehendo
12eo 13video 14mordeo lsdoleo 16projicio 17fugia' 18sum
1!>oportet 20refero.

FABULA XXXVIII.
Vespertilio, et Rbus, et Mergus.
Vespertilio, et Rubus, et Mergus, societate int,1

22

JE S 0 P U S.

mercatoram decreverimt2 vitam agre.3 Itque Vesper


tilio argeiitum mutuatus,4 deposil5 in medium, Rubus
vestem seeuni accepit,0 Mergus tertus s, et enavigaverunt :7
Tempestate auteni vehementi obort,8 et navi evers,9
omnibus perdtis,10 ipsi in terram cvaserunt.11 Ex illo
igtur Mergus litorbus semper assdet,12 si quopam s
ejiat13 mre ; Vespertilio ver creditoree tmens,14 interdu
non apparet15 sed nocte ad pabulum exit.16 Hbus vero
prstereuntum17 vestem prehendit/3 sicubi sam cognoscat,19 qua;rens.20
AF,FA]3ULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, in a, quibus incumbmus,21 in posterum nos recidre.22
neo
2decerno
3ago
4mutuor
5depono
6accipio
7enavigo 8oborior 9everto I0perdo "evado 12assideo
"ejicio '4timco lSappareo 'eexeo 17prtereo Aprehendo
19cognosco 20quro 24ncumbo ^recido

FABULA XXXIX.
iEgrotus et Medicus.
jEceotaxs1 quidam, et Medco rogatus,2 quomdo
valuisset F3 Plus, ait,4 qum oporteret,5 sudsse.6 Ule
autem bnum it hoc esse.7 Secundo vero ab ipso itrum
rogatus,8 quomdo se habuisset,9 Horrore correptum,10
it, vald concussum11 fuisse.12 Ule ver et hoc bnum
esse it. Tertio rursum rogatus, quomdo valuisset ; it,
in Hydropem incidisse.13 Ule et hoc rursus bonum it
esse. Inde ex domestcis quodam ipsum rogante,14 Ut
hbes ?1S Ego, it, hus tu, pr bonis pero.16.
'groto
9habeo
15habeo

2rogo 3valeo 4aio 5oportet 6sudo 7sum 8rogo


10corripio uconcutio 12sum 13incido 14rogo
16pereo

JE S 0 P U S.

23

AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat,17 maxm ex hominbus nos odo os
habere,18 qui ad gratam semper lqui19 student.20
1?significo

18habeo

19loquor

20studo

FABULA XL.
Lignator et Mercurius.
Lignator quidam juxtafluvum sam amisit1 securim.
Inops igtur consili, juxta ripam sdens2 plorabat.3 Mer
curius autem, intellect4 caus, et miseratus8 homnem,
urinatus6 in fluvum, auram sustulit7 securim, et, an hc
esset,8 quam perdidrat,9 rogavit.10 Illo vero, non am
esse,11 dicente,12 itrum urinatus argentam sustlit.13
Illo vero, nque hanc esse sam, dicente, tertio urinatus,
illam ipsam sustulit.14 Illo vero, hanc ver esse deperdtam,15 dicente, Mercurius, probat10 ipsius quitate,
omnes i donavit.17 Ule vero profectus,18 omnia socis, quss
accidrant,19 narravit :m Quorum unus quidam cdem
facere21 decrevit,22 et ad fluvum profeetus,23 et suam secu
rim consulto demisit24 in fluvum, et plorans sedebat.
Apparit25 igtur Mercurus et illi, et, caus intellect
plorats, urinatus similter auram securim exilit,26 et
rogavit, an hanc'amisisset P27 Illo cum gaudo, et, Ver
hc est, dicente,23 perosus29 Dus tantam impudentam,
non solm illam detinit,30 sed ne propram qudem red
ddit.31
AFFAB0LATIO.
Fbula signifcat, quantum justis Dus auxiliatur,32
tantum injustis um esse33 contrarum.
'amitto 2sedeo 3ploro 4intelligo 5miseror 6urinor
7sufFero 8sum 9perdo 10rogo usum 12dico 13suffero
14suffero 15deperdo 16probo 17dono 18proficiscor 19accido
20narro 21facio ^decerno ^proficiscor 24demitto 25appareo
26effero 27amitto ^dico 29perodi ^detineo 31reddo
^auxilior ^sum

24

JE S 0 P U S.
FABULA XLI.
Asnus et Hortulanus.

A sinus servens1 olitori, quonam prm comedebat,*


plurmm ver laborabat,3 precatus4 est Jvem, ut, ab
olitore liberatus,5 altri venderetur6 dommo. Quum vero
Jupiter exoratus,7 jussisset8 ipsum figulo vendi,9 itrum
iniquo anmo ferebat,10 plura, qum prs, onra portans,11
et cnum et tegulas frens.12 Rursus igtur ut mutaret13
dommum rogavit,14 et coriaro venundatus15 est. Pejorem
itquc priorbus herum nactus,16 et vdens,17 qu ab o
fierent,18 cum suspiris it,19 Hei mihi misero ! melius rat2"
mihi pud priores hros manere ;21 hic nim, ut vido, et
pellem mam conficet.22
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signlfcat,23 qud tunc maxm priores dommos
famuli desidrant,24 quum de secundis periculum fecrint.25
'servio
2comedo
laboro
4precor
5libero
6vendo
7exoro 8jubeo 9vendo I0fero Hporto 12fero 13muto
14rogo 15venundo 1Bnanciscor
17video
18fio
19aio
^sum 21maneo ^conficio 23significo 24desidero ^facio

FABULA XLII.
Auceps et Galerita.
Aucf.ps avbus struxrat1 laquos : Galerita ver hune
procul conspicata, rogavit,2 quidnam faceret ?3 Eo urbem
se condere4 dicente ;5 deinde procul regresso,6 et abscondto,7 Galerita, vri verbis credens,8 accessit9 ad cassem, et
capta10 est ; at, aucpe accurrente,11 illa dixit,12 Hus tu,
si talem urbem condes,13 non multos invenes14 incolentes.15
'struo 2rogo 3facio 4condo 5dic 6regredior 7abscondo
8credo
"accedo
u'capio
"accurro
12dico
13condo MinVenio 15incolo

;E S OP U S.

25

AFFABULATIO.

Fabla signifcat, tune maxm domos et urbes deso


ari,16 quum prfecti molesti furint.17
16desolo

17sum

FABULA XLIII.
Viator.
Viator, mult confect1 v, vovit,2 si quod invenisset,3
dimidum Mercuro ejus se dedicaturum.4 Nactus5 igtur
peram plenam cariotarum et amygdalarum, atque accept,6 as comedit :7 Sed cariotarum ossa, et amygdalarum
cortces, sper quodam imposit8 altari, inquens,9 Hbes,10
Mercuri, votum : nam ri inventss exteriora et interiora
dividendo11 tibi dono.12
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla in vrum avarum, et Dos ob cupiditatem fallentem.13
'conficio 2voveo 3invenio 4dedico "nanciscor 6accipio
7comedo 8impono 9inquam 10habeo "divido udono 13fallo

FABULA XLIV.
Plier et Mater.
PER ex literatoro ludo condiscipuli librum furatus,1
tulit2 matri. Quum a ver non reprehendisset,3 sed potus amplexata4 fuisset,5 provectus6 tate cpit7 et majora
furari.8 In ipso autem furto aliquando deprehensus,9 ducebatur10 rect ad mortem. At sequente11 et lugente12
matre, ille carnifces orabat,13 ut pauca qudam matri col
orer 2fero Reprehendo 4amplexor 5sum 6proveho
7cpi 8furor 9deprehendo 10duco usequor 12lugeo l3oro

26

JE & . TU S.

loquereturH in aurem. Qu, quum illico ori fili se admovisset,13 ille aurem dentbus demorsam abscdit:16
Matre autem, et ajis accusantbus,17 quia non solum
furatus18 fuisset,19 sed jam et in matrem impus esset,20
ille it,21 Hc nim mihi pqrditionis fit22 causa. Si
nim, quum librum furatus23 fuissem,24 me reprehendisset,25
non, ad hc usque progressus,26 nunc ducrer27 ad mortem.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, eorum, qui non in principio puniuntur,28 in majus augeri29 mla.
14colloquor , 15admoveo
16abscindo 17accuso
18furor
19sum ^sum 21aio ^sum ^furor ^sum 25reprehendo
S6progredior ^duco ^punio S9augeo

FABULA XLV.
Pastor et Mre.
Pastor' in maritmo loco grgem pascns,1 viso2 tran
quillo mri, desideravit3 navigare4 ad mercaturam : Ven'dtis5 igtur ovbus, et palmarum fructibus emptis,6 solvit.7
Tempestate vero vehementi facta,8 et navis in ericulo
quum esset,9 ne submergeretur,10 omni onere ejecto11 in
mre, vix vac navi evasit12 incolmis. Post ver des
non paucos, transente13 qudam, et mris (erat14 enim id
fort tranquillum) quietem admirante,15 suscepto16 ser
mone, hic it,17 Cariotas itrum, ut videtur,18 desidrat19
mre, et proptera videtur20 quietum.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, calamitates hominbus documenta
fieri.21
'pasco 2video 3desidero 4navigo 8vendo 6emo 7solvo
8fio 9sum 10submergo "ejicio 12evado 13transeo 14sum
15admiror 16suspicio 17aio 18videor 19desidero ^ideor 21fio

JES PUS.

27

FABULA XLVI.
Punca et Malue.
Punca et Malus de pulchritudne contendebant.'
Multis vero contentionbus interim fectis,3 Rbus ex
proxm sepe audens,3 Desinamus,4 it,s amic, aliquando pugnare.8
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat,7 in prstantiorum seditionbus, vilissmos etam conari8 esse9 alquos.
'contendo 2fio
8conor 9sum

3audio

4desino

5aio 6pugno 7signifco

FABULA XLVII.
Talpa.
Tai.pa ccum anmal est.1 Dicit2 igtur aliquando
matri, Morum, mater, vido : deinde rursus it3 Thuris
odore plena sum : et terto itrum, JEri, inquit,4 lapilli
fragorem audo.5 Mater vero respondns8 it, O filia, ut
jam percipo, non solm visu privata7 es,8 secl et auditu et
olfactu.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat,9 nonnullos jactabundos10 impossibila
profiteri,11 et in minimis redargi.'2
'sum 2dico 3aio 4nquam 'audio erespondeo 7privo
8sum 9significo 'ejacto ''profiteer '2redarguo

FABULA XLVIII.
Vespse et Perdices.
Vesp^ et Perdices sti laborantes1 ad agriclam iverunt.2
ab o rogantes3 potum, promittentes4 pro Squ se hanc
'laborp

2eo

3rogo

4promitto

28

JE S P U S.

gratam reddituras:5 Perdices qudem fodre6 vinas:


Vesp autem, circumcirca eundo7 aculis arcere8 fures.
At agrcla inquit,9 Sed mihi sunt10 do bves, qui, nihil
promittentes,11 omnia facunt.12 Melius igtur est13 Ulis
dre,14 qum vobis.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula in vros perniciosos, promittentes qudem juvare,'8
ldentes10 autem admdm.
5reddo 6fodio 7eo 8arceo 9inquam
12facio 13sum 14do 15juvo I6Ido

10sum

"promitto

FABULA XLIX.
Pavo et Monedla.
AvBUS volentbus1 creare2 regem, Pavo rogabat,3 ut se
ob pulchritudnem eligrent.4 Eligentbus autem um
omnibus, Monedula, suscepto5 sermone, it,6 Sed si, te
regnante,7 Aqula nospersqui8 aggressa9 furit,10 quomdo
nobis pem fres ?u
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, principes non mdo propter pulchri
tudnem, sed et fortitudnem, et prudentam, eligre12 oportere.13
H-olo 2creo 3rogo 4eligo 5suscipio
6aio
7regno
^ersequor 9aggredior 10sum nfero 12eligo "oportet

FABULA L.
A per et Vulpes.
Aper, cuidam adstans1 arbori, dentes acuebat.2 Vulpe
autem rogante3 causam, quare, null propost4 necessitate,
'adsto

2acuo 3rogo

4propono

JE S 0 P U S.

29

dentes acuret ? inquit ;s Non sme caus hoc faco : nam


si me periculum invasrit,6 minm me tune acuendis7
dentbus occupatum8 esse9 oportebit,10 sed pots paratis11
uti.12
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, adversus periclum prparatum13 esse
oportere.14
, .
5inquam 6invado 7acuo 8occupo 9sum 10oportet nparo
12utor 13prparo 14oportet

FABULA LI.
Cassta.
Cassta, laqueo capta,1 plorans2 dicebat,3 Hei mihi
misr et infelici volucri ! Non aurum surripi4 cujusquam, non argentum, non aliud quicquam pretiosum ;
granum autem tritci parvum mortem mihi conciliavit.5
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla in os, qui ob vile lucrum, magnum subunte
periculum.
"capio 2ploro 3dico 4surripio sconcilio Bsubeo

FABULA LU.
Hinniilus.

HiXNLus aliquando Cervo it,1 Pter, tu natus2 es3


et major et celeror canbus, et corna prtera ingenta
gestas4 ad vindictam ; curnam igtur sic os times Et
ule ridens6 it,7 Vera qudem hc inquis,8 fili : unum
ver sco, qud quum cnis latratum audivro,9 sttim ad
fgam, neseo quomdo effror.10
'aio 2nascor %um 4gcsto 5timeo eridep 7aio 8iaquam
9audio 10efferor
.
c5

90

iE S P U S.

AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, qud natur timdos nulla admonito
confirmt.11
"confirmo

FABULA LUI.
Lepres et Ran.
Lepres aliquando congregad,1 si ipsorum deplorabant2 vitam, qud foret3 periculis obnoxia, et timoris
plena ; etnim ab omnibus, et canbus, et aqulis, et alis
multis consumebantur.4 Melius itque esse5 mori6 smel
dixerunt,7 qum toto vit tempore timere.8 Hc igtur
confirmato,9 imptum fecerunt10 smul in paludem, qusi
in am delapsuri11 et suffocandi.12 Sed quum Ran, quse
circum paludem sedebant,13 curss streptu percepto,14 illico
in hanc insiluissent,15 ex Leporbus quidam, sagacor esse
visus18 alis, it, Sistte,17 soci, nihil grave in vos ipsos
molimni :18 jam nim, ut videtis,19 et nobis ala sunt20
animala timidiora.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, miseros ab alis, graviora patientbus,21
recreari.22
'congrego 2deploro 3forem 4consumo 8sum 6morior
7dico 8timeo 9confirmo 10facio "delabor 12suflbco
13sedeo 14percipio 15insilio 16videor 17sisto 18molior
19video 20sum 21patior ^recreo

FABULA LIV.
Asniis et Equus.
Asnus Equum beatum putabat,1 utpote abunde nutritum,2 et accurat, quum ipse nque palearum stis
'puto

2nutrio

JE S P U S.

31

haberet,3 idque, plurmm defatigatus.4 Quum autem


tempus instaret5 belli, et miles armatus6 ascendisset7
Equum, hue illuc ipsum impellens,8 et insper in medos
hostes insiluisset,9 et Equus vulneratus10 jacebat :11 His
visis,12 Asnus Equum, mutat13 sentent, misrum existimabat.14
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, non oportere15 principbus et divitbus
invidere :16 sed in illos invid et periclo considerars,17
paupertatem amare.18
3habeo 4defatigo 5insto 6armo 7ascendo 'impelio
9insilio '"vulnero "jaceo "video 13muto 14existimo
"oportet 16invideo 17considero 18amo.

FABULA LV.
Avarus.
AvARus quidam, quum omnia sa bona in pecunam
vertisset,1 et auram massam fecisset,2 in loco quodam defodit,3 un defosso illic et animo so, ct mente ; atque
quotide eundo4 ipsam videbat.5 Quum autem ex ope
raras quidam um observsset,6 et quod factum7 erat8
cognovisset,9 refossam10 massam sustulit.11 Post hc et
ille profectus,12 et vacuum locum conspicatus,13 lugere14
coepit,15 et capillos evellre.16 Hunc vero quum quidam
vidisset17 sic plorantem, et causam audivisset,18 Ne sic,
it19 hus tu, tristare,20 nque nim hbens21 aurum habebas : Lapdem igtur pro auro acceptum22 reconde23 et pta
tbi aurum esse:24 eundem nim tbi prsestabit25 usum.
Ut vido nim, nque, quum aurum rat,26 in usu ras
possessionis.
'verto 2facio 3defodio 4eo 5video
cobservo 'fio
8sum 9cognosco I0refodio "suffero 12proficiscor 13conspicor 14lugeo I5cpi 16evello 17video 18audio 19aio
^tristor 21habeo ^accipio 23recondo 24sum a"'prsto
26 sum

32

JE S 0 P U S.

AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, nihil esse possessionem, nsi usus
adfurit.27
27adsum.

FABULA LVI.
Ansres et Griies.
Anseees et Gres in eodem prato pascebantur.1 Venatorbus autem visis,2 Gres, qud essent3 leves, sttim avolaverunt :4 Ansres ver, ob onus corporum, quum mansissent,5 capti6 fuerunt 7
AFFABLATIO.
Fabla signifcat, et in expugnatione urbis inopes facle
fugre,8 divtes ver servire9 captos.10
'pascor 2videor 3sum
8fugio 9servio 10capio.

4avolo

5maneo

6capio

7sum

FABULA LVII.
Testudo et Aqula.
Testudo orabat1 Aqulam, ut se volare2 doceret.3 E
autm admonente,4 procul hoc natur ipsius esse,5 illa
mgis precbus instabat.6 Accepit7 ergo ipsam ungubus,
et in altum sustlit,8 inde demisit.9 Hc autem in petras
cecdit,10 et contrita11 est.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat,12 multos, qua in contentionbus pru
dentiores non audirint,13 seipsos lsisse.14
*oro Bvolo 3doceo 4admoneo 5sum 6insto 7ccipio
8suffero 9demitto 10cado "contero "significo 13audio
14ldo.

S S.

33

FABULA LVIH.
Pulex.
Pulex, aliquando cm saltsset,1 vri pde insedit.'
Hic autem Herculem in auxilum invocabat :3 at, quum
illinc rursus saltsset,4 suspirans5 it,e O Hercules, si con
tra Pulcem non auxiliatus7 es,8 quomdo contra majores
adversarios adjuvabis ?9
AFFABCLATIO.
Fabla signifcat, non oportere10 in minimis Dum ro
gare,11 sed in necessars.
^alto 4nsideo 3invoco 4salto 5suspiro
8sum 9adjuvo "oportet "rogo.

6aio 7auxilior

FABULA LIX.
Cerva.
Ce EVA, altero obccato1 oclo, in Iitore pascebatur8
sanum oculum ad terram propter venatores hbens,3 altrum ver ad mre, unde nihil suspicabatur :4 prternavigantes5 autem quidam, et hoc conjectantes,6 ipsam sagittarunt,7 Ha?c autem seipsam lugebat,8 ut qu, unde
timurat,9 nihil passa10 foret
quod vero non putabat12
mlum allaturum,13 ab o prodta14 fret.1"
AFFAEULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, spe qu nobis noxa videntur,1G
utila fieri ;17 qu ver utila, noxa.
'obcco
2pasco
3habeo
4suspicor
'prternavigo
6conjecto 7sagitto 8lugeo 9timeo 10patior "forem
12puto 13affero 14prodo lsforem 16video 17fio.

34

JE S U S.
FABULA LX.
-

Cerva et Leo.

Cerva venatores fugcns in speluncam ingressa1 est : in


Leonem autem cum bi incidisset,2 ab o comprehensa3 est :
morens4 autem dicebat,5 Hei mihi ! qud, homnes fugens,6 in ferarum immitissmum incdi.7
AFFABULATIO.

Fabula signifcat, multos homines, dum parva pericula


fugunt.8 in magna incurrre.9
'ingredior
2incido
3comprehendo
6fugio 7incido 8fugio "incurro.

4morior

sdico

FABULA LXI.
Cerva et Vitis.
Cerva venatores fugens,1 sub vite delitit.2 Quum
>rterissent3 autem parumper illi, Cerva, prorsus jam
atere4 arbitrata,5 vitis folia despasci* incepit.7 lilis vero
agitatis,8 venatores conversi,9 et quod erat10 verum arbitrati,11 animal alquod sub folis occultari,12 sagittis confecerunt13 Cervam. autem morens14 tala dicebat :15
J usta passa18 sum, non nim offendre17 oportebat18 am,
qu me servrat.19
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, os, qui injur benefactores afficunt,20 Do puniri21
^ugio 2deliteo ^rtereo 4lateo 5arbitror 6depascor
7incipio 8agito 9converto 10sum 11arbitror 12occultO
13conficio 14morior 15dico 16patior 17ofFendo 18oportet
19servo ^afficio 21punio

JE S P U S.

35

FABULA LXII.
Asnus et Lo.
Asno Gallus aliquando pascebatur i1 Leone autem
aggresso2 Asnum, Gallus exclamavit,3 et Lo (aunt4
nim hune Galli vocem timere)5 fugit.6 At Asnus
rtus7 um propter se rugisse,8 aggressus9 est statim
Leonem : Ut vero preul hune persecutus10 est, qu non
amplus Galli perveniebat11 vox, conversus12 Lo, um
devoravit.13 Hic ver morens14 clamabat,15 Me misrum
et dementem ! ex pugnacbus nim non natus16 parentbus,
cujus grat in acem irriii ?17
AFFABULATIO.
- Fabla signifcat, plerosque homnes inimicos, qui se
de industr humiliarunt,18 aggrdi,19 atque ta ab illis
occidi.20
1pasco 2aggredior 3exclamo 4aio 5timeo 6fugio 7reor
8lugio 9aggredior 10persequor "pervenio 12converto
13devoro 14morior 15clamo 16nascor I7irruo 18humilio
I9aggredior ^occido

FABULA LXIII.
Oltor et Cnis.
Olitokis Cnis in putum decdit :l Oltor autem,
vlens2 ipsum illinc extrahre,3 descendit4 et ipse in pu- \
tum. Ktus5 autem Cnis, um ut se inferus mgis
accessisse6 obruret,7 Olitorem conversus8 momordit.9 Hic
autem cum dolore reversus,10 Justa, inquit,11 pator ; nam
cur unquam si interfectorem servare12 studi ?13
AFFABLATIO.
Fabla in injustos, et ingratos.
'decido 2volo 3extraho 4descendo 5reor 6accedo 7obruo
8converto , 9mordeo 10revertor "inquam 12servo 13studeo

36

JE S 0 P U S.
FABULA LXIV.
Sus et Cnis.

Ses et Cnis muto convitiabantur.1 Et Sus jurabat2


per Venrem, procul-dub dentbus se discissuram3
Cnem. Cnis vero ad hc per ironam dixit,4 Bn per
Venrem nobis juras.5 significas6 nim ab ips vehementer
te amari,7 qu impuras tas carnes degustantem,8 nullo
pacto in sacellum admittit.9 Et Sus, Propter hoc igtur
mgis se fert10 Da amare11 me : nam occidentem,12
aut alio quovis mdo ldentem,13 omnino aversatur :14 til
tmen mle les,15 et viva et morta.16
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, prudentes oratores, qu ab inimicis
objiciuntur17 convicta, artificiose in laudem convertre.18
'convitior 2juro 3discindo 4dico 5juro dignifico
7amo 8degusto 9admitto 10fero "amo 12occido 13ldo
14aversor 15oleo 16morior 17objicio '8converto

FABULA LXV.
Sus et Cnis.
Sos et Cnis de fcunditate certabant.1 Dixit autem
Cnis fcundam se esse2 maxm pedestrum omnum
animalum : et Sus occurrens3 ad hc inquit,4 Sed quum
hoc dicis,5 scito6 et ccos tos te catulos parre.7
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, non celeritate res, sed perfectione,
judicari.8
'certo sum
"judico

3occurro

4inquam

5dico

escio

7pario

JE S 0 P U S.

37

FABULA LXVI.
Serpens et Cancer.
Serpens un cum Cancro vivebat,1 int cum o
socictate. Itque Cancer simplex morbus, ut et ille
mutaret,2 admonebat,3 astutam : hic autem minime se
prabiit4 obedientem.8 Quum observsset6 igtur Cancer
ipsum dormientem,7 et pro viribus compressisset,8 occdit.9
At, Serpente post mortem extenso,10 ille it,11 Sic oportebat12 antehac rectum et simplcem esse;13 nque nim
han pnam dedisses^14
AFFABULA TIO.
Fabula signifcat, qui cum dolo amicos adunt,15 ipsos
potus offendi.16
'vivo 2muto 3admoneo 4prbeo 5obedio
7dormio 8comprimo 9occido 10extendo naio
"sum. 14do 15adeo 16offendo.

6observo
12oportet

FABULA LXVII.
Pastor et Liipus.
Pastor nuper natum Lpi catulum reprit1 sustulit,2 unque cum canbus nutrivit.3 At, quum adolevisset,4 si quando Lupus ovem rapuisset,5 cum canbus
et ipse persequebatur.6 Quum cnes ver aliquando non
possent* assqui8 Lpum, atque id reverterentur,9 ille
sequebatur10 donec, quum ipsum assecutus11 esset,12 utpote
Lpus, partceps foret13 venationis, deinde redibat.14 Sin
autem Lpus extra non rapuisset15 vem, ipse, clm
occdens,16 un cum canbus comcdebat,17 donec Pastor,
quum cohjectsset,18 et intellexisset19 rem, de arbore ipsum
suspendit,20 et occdit.21 ...
,
'reperio 2suffero 3nutrio 4adlesco 5rapio epersequor
7possum "assequor 9revertor 10sequor "assequor 12sum
13forem 14redeo 15rapio 16occido 7comedo 13conjecto
19intelligo ^suspendo 2'occido.
D

38

iE S 0 P U S.

AFFABULATIO.
- Fabula signifcat, naturam pravam bonos mores non
nutrire.22
^nutrio.

FABULA LXVIII.
Lo et Liipus.
Leo, quum consennisset,1 grotabat,2 jcens3 in antro.
Accesserunt4 autem visitatura5 regem, prter Vulpem,
ctra, animala. Lpus igtur, capt occasione, accusabat6
pud Leonem Vulpem, qusi nihil facientem7 sum
omnium dommum, et proptera nque ad visitationem
profectam.8 Interim adfit9 et Vulpes, et ultima audivit10
Lpi verba. Lo igtur contra am infremit ;u sed
defensionis tempore petito,12 Et quis, inquit,13 eorum, qui
convenerunt,14 tantm profit,15 quantm go, qu in
omnem partem circuivi,16 et medicamentum pro te medco
qusivi,17 et didci ?18Quum autem Lo sttim, ut medi
camentum dicret,19 impersset,20 illa inquit, Si, Lpo
vivente21 excoriato,22 ipsius caldam pellem induris.23 Et,
Lpo sttim morto24 jacente,25 Vulpes ridens26 it,27
Sic non oportet28 dommum ad malevolentam movere,29 sed
ad benevolentam.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signfcat um, qui contra alum machinatur,30
in seipsum laquum vertere.31
^onsenesco 2groto 3jaceo 4accedo 5visito
7facio 8proficiscor 9adsum I0audio ninfremo
13inquam 14convenio
l8prosum
16circumeo
18disco
19dico
^impero
21vivo
^excorio
24morior
25jaceo
^rideo 27aio ^oportet
^machinor 31verto.

6accuso
12peto
17quro
^induo
^moveo

JE S O P S.

39

FABULA LXIX.
Muler.
Mu Lier qudam vrum ebrum habebat1 : ipsum autem
morbo liberare2 vlens,3 tale quid comminisctur.4 Gravatum5 nim ipsum ab ebrietate quum observsset,6 et
morti7 instar insensatum,8 in humeros elevatum9 in sepulcretum10 allatum11 deposit,12 et abit.13 Quum vero
ipsum jam sobrum esse14 conjectata15 esset,16 janam
pulsavit17 sepulcreti : ille autem quum dicret,18 Quis est,
qui puist19 janam ? Uxor respondit,20 Mortis cibara
comsse,22 sed
bibre,23 opttne, pots affer :24 molestus nim mihi es,25
quum cbi, non pots meministi.26 Hc autem, pectore
percusso,27 Hi mihi misr ! inquit :28 nam nque astu
profi :29 tu nim, vir, non solum non emendatus30 es, sed
pejor quoque te ipso evasisti,31 cm in habtum tibi deductus32 sit33 morbus.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, non oportere34 mlis actbus immorari:35 nam aliquando etam nolentem36 homnem con
suetude invadit.37
'habeo 2libero 3volo 4comminiscor 5gravo 6observo
7morior
einsenso
9elevo
10from sepelio
"affero
12depono 13abeo 14sum
15conjecto
16sum
17pulso
18dico 19pulso ^respondeo
21fero 22comedo ^bibo
^affero 25sum ^memini 27percutio 28inquam 29prosum
^emendo 31evado ^deduco "sum ^oportet oo
^nolo ^invado.
FABULA LXX.
Cygnus.
Vie dives et Ansrem smul et Cygnum nutriebat,1 non
ad edem tmen, sed altrum cants, altrum mens gra'nutrio

-30

JE S P U S.

t. Quum autem oporteret2 Ansrem a pti,3 quorum


causa nutriebatur,4 nox erat,5 discernre6 tempus non
permisit7 utrumque. Cygnus autem pro Ansre abductus,8 cantat9 cantum quendam, mortis exordum : cantu
qudem exprmit10 naturam, mortem ver efugit11 suavitate canendi.12
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, spe muscen differre13 mortem.
> 2oportet
8abduco

3patior 4nutrio
9canto '"exprimo

ssum 6discerno 7permitto


"effugio 12cano 13differo.

FABULA LXXI.
jEthiops.
iETUiorEM quidam emit,1 talem i colorem inesse2
rtus,3 negligent ejus, qui prs habit.4 Ac assumpto5
in dmum omnes adhibuit6 abstersiones, omnbusque lavacris tentavit7 mundare:8 et colorem qudem transmutare9
non potit,10 sed morbum vexato paravit."
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, manere12 naturas, ut principo provenerunt.13
'emo 2insum 3reor 4habeo 8assumo 6adhibeo 7tento
"mundo
"transmuto
10possum
uparo
12maneo
,3provenio.
FABULA LXXII.
Hirundo et Cornix.
Hibundo et Cornix de pulchritudne contendebant.1
Respondens2 autem Cornix i dixit,3 Sed ta pulchritudo
'contendo

2respondeo

3dico

M S P U S.

41

verno tempore floret ;4 mum ver corpus etam hyme


durat.5
AFFABU LATIO.
Fabla signifcat, durationem corporis decore meliorem
esse.6
4floreo
sduro
6sum.

FABULA LXXIII.
Butalis.
Butalis qudam fenestr pendebat :l Vespertilio
autem, cum accessisset,2 rogavit3 causam, quare de qudem
slet,4 nocte vero canit ?5 E vero non temer hoc facre,6
dicente ;7 nam de cnens, olim capta8 furat,8 et proptera
ex illo prudens evasit :10 Vespertilio Sit,11 Sed non te cavere12
nunc oportet,13 quum nulla utiltas est, sed antequam capereris.14
affabulatio.
Fabula signifcat, in infortunis inutlem esse15 pnitentam.
'pendeo 2accedo 3rogo 4sleo 5cano 6facio 7dico
8capio 9sum 10evado naio 12aveo 13oportet 14capio
15sum.

FABULA LXXIV.
Cochleae.
Rustci filus assabat1 Cochlas : quum autem audiret2
as stridentes,3 it,4 pessm animantes, dombus vestris
incensis,5 vos cantis ?6
'asso

2audio

3strideo

4aio
D5

8incendo

6cano

42

M S P U S.
y
AFFABULATIO.

Fabula signifcat, omne intempestiv factum vitupera


ble esse.7
'sum.

FABULA LXXV.
Muler et Ancillae.
Muleb, vida operosa ancillas hbens,1 has solebat2
noctu excitare3 ad opra, ad Gallorum cantus. His vero
assdu defatigatis4 labore, visum5 est oportere6 domestcum
occidre7 Galium, tanquam ilium, qui noctu excitaret8 hram. Evenit9 autem ipsis, hoc facto,10 ut in grandiora incidrent11 mla. Nam hra, ignorans12 Gallorum horam,
magis de nocte as excitabat.13
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, plerisque hominbus consila malorum
causas esse.14
%o
2soleo
7occido 8excito
cito 14sum.

3excito
4defatigo
svideo
6oportet
9evenio 10fio nincido 12ignoro. "ex

FABULA LXXVI.
Muler venefica.
Muler venefica et divinarum irarum propulsiones
promittens,1 multa perseverabat2 facre,3 et lucrum inde
facre.4 Quidam ver accusaverunt5 am impietatis et
convicerunt,6 et damnatam7 ducebant8 ad mortem. Con
'promitto 2persevero 3facio 4facio saccuso 6convinco
7damno
8duco

S U S.

43

spicatus9 autem quidam eam duci,10 it,11 Tu, qu Deorum iras avertre12 promittebas,13 quomdo eque homnum consilum mutare14 potuisti ?15
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, multos magna promittre,16 ne parva
qudem facere17 valentes.18
9conspicor 10duco naio 12averto "promitto
15possum 16promitto 17facio 18valeo.

14muto

FABULA LXXVII.
Mustela.
Mustela in officinam ingressa1 ferari, bi jacentem*
circumlambebat3 limam.
Ras4 autem lingu, sanguis
multus ferebatur.-5 Hc autem ltabatur,6 rta ex ferro
alquid auferre,7 doee pents totam linguam absumpsisset.8
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula in os, qui contentionbus seipsos offendunt.9
4ngredior 2jaceo 3circumlambo
7aufero 8absumo 9offendo.

4rado

5fero

6ltor

FABULA LXXVIII.
Agrcola.
Agkicla quidam fodens,1 aurum reprit ;2 quotide
igtur terram, ut ab beneficio affectus3 coronabat.4 Huic
autem Fortuna adstans,5 inquit,6 Hus tu, cur terr ma
munra attribuis,7 qu go tibi ddi,8 ditare9 te vlens ?10
tfodio

2reperio
3afficio
4corono
7attribuo
8do
9dito

5adsto
10volo

6inquam

44

M S 0 P U S

nam si tempus immutetur,11 et in alias mnus hoc tuu'ta


aurum venat,12 sco te tune me, Fortunam, aceusaturum.13
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, oportere14 benefactorem cognoscre,1'
atque huic gratam referre.16
"immuto
lerefero

lsvenio

13accuso

14oportet

I5cognosco

FABULA LXXIX.
Viatores.
Do quidam un iter faciebant.1 Et quum alter securim reperisset,2 alter, qui non invenrat,3 admonebat4 ipsum, ne dicret,8 Inveni,6 sed Invenmus. Sed paulo
post, quum obvam venissent7 ipsis illi, qui securim perdidrant,8 qui habebat9 illam cursu pressus,10 cui non inve
nrat, comti dicebat,11 Perimus.12 Hic autem it,13
Peri14 die,15 non Perimus : etnim et tune, quum securim
invenisti,16 Inveni, dixisti,17 non Invenmus.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, os, qui non fuerunt18 particpes felicitatum, nque in calamitatbus firmos esse19 amicos.
1facio 2reperio 3invenio 4admoneo 5dico 6invenio
7venio 8perdo. 9habeo 10premo udico 12pereo !3aio
I4pereo 15dico 16invenio 17dico 18sum 19sum.

FABULA LXXX.
Ranae.
Dm Ran vicin sbi rant.1 Pascebantur2 autem,
altra in profundo, et procul v stagno ; altra in v,
'sum

2pasco

M S 0 P U S.

45

prum qu hbens.3 Verm, quum qu in stagno erat,4


alteram admoneret,5 ut ad se migraret,6 ut tutiore cbo
frueretur,7 illa non parit,8 dicens,9 Firmissm teneri10
hujusce loci consuetudne, usque dum obtigret,11 currum
prtereuntem12 ipsam contundre.13
. '
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat,14 hommes quque, prava aggredientes,15 citus mori,16 qum in melius mutari.17
3habeo 4sum 5admoneo 6migro 7fruor 8pareo 9dico
10teneo
"obtingo
12prtereo 13contundo 14significo
15aggredior 16morior 17muto.
FABULA LXXXI.
'

1
Apiarus.
In mellarum ingressus1 quidam, domno absente, fvum
abstulit.2 Hic autem reversus,3 ut alvelos vidit4 inanes, *
stabat,5 quod in his erat,6 perscrutans.7 Apes autem
pastu redeuntes,8 ut deprehenderunt9 ipsum, aculis percutiebant,10 pessmque tractabant.11
Hic autem is
dixit12 pessm animantes, furatum13 vestros fvos
illsum dimisistis,14 me vero satagentem15 vestri percuttis !16
AFFABULATIO.
. Fabula signifcat, sic homnum quosdam per imprudentatn inimicos non caventes,17 amicos, ut insidiatores,
repelire.18
4ngredior 2aufero 3revertor 4video 5sto 6sum 7perscrutor 8redeo Reprehendo 10percutio "tracto 12dico
13furor 14dimitto 15satago iepercutio 17caveo 18repello.

FABULA LXXXII.
Alcedo.
Alcedo vis est1 solitara, semper in mSri vitam de'sum

. -

46

M SOP s.

gens.2 Hanc aunt,3 homnum venationes caventem,4 irr


scopulis maritniis nidum dificare;5 et aliquando jam
paritura,e nidum fecit.7 Egress8 autem ad pablum,
evenit9 mre, vehementi concitatum10 vento, elevatum11
supra nidum fuisse,12 atque, hoc submerso,13 pullos perdidisse.14 Hc ver reversa,15 re cognt,16 ait,17 Me misram ! qu terram, ut insidiatricem, cvens,18 ad hoc confugi,19 quod mihi long est insidus.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, hommes etam quosdam ab inimicis
cavendo,20 ignaros in multo graviores inimicis amicos incidre.21
2dego 3aio 4caveo 5difico 6pario 7facio 8egredior
9evenio 10concito "elevo 12sum 13submergo 14perdo
15revertor 16cognosco 17aio 10caveo 19confugio 20caveo
2ncido.

FABULA LXXXIII.
Piscator.
Piscatob, in fluvo qudam piscabatur.1 Extensis2
autem retbus, et fluxu comprehenso3 utrinque, funi alligato4 lapide, quam verberabat,8 ut pisces, fugientes6 in
caut, in reta incidrent.7 Cm quidam vero ex is, qui
circa locum habitabant8, id um facere9 videret,10 increpabat,11 utpte fluvum turbantem,12 et claram quam non
sinentem13 bibre.14 Et is respondit,15 Sed, nsi sic fluvus perturbetur,16. me oportebit17 esurientem18 mri.19
AFFABLATIO.
Fabla signifcat, civitatum etam rectores tune maxm
qustum facere,20 quum ptras in seditionem induxrint.21
'piscor 2extendo 3comprehendo 4alligo 8verbero 6fugio
7incido 8habito 9facio 10video "increpo 12turbo 13smo
14bibo
15respondeo
16perturbo
^oportet
18eSUrio
19morior 20facio 2nduco,

47

JE S P U S.

FABULA LXXXIV.
Simus et Delphis.
Mos quum esset1 navigantbus,2 Melitenses catulos et
Simios adducre3 in solamen navigationis, navgans quidam
habebat4 secum et Simum. Quum autem pervenissent5
ad Sunum, Attc Promontorium, tempestatem vehemen
tem contgit6 fieri.7 Navi, autem evers,8 et omnibus enatantbus,9 natabat et Simus ; Delphis autem alquis ipsum
conspicatus,10 et homnem esse11 rtus12 suppostus13 sustinebat,14 perfrens15 ad terram. Ut vero in Piro fit,16
Atheniensum navale, rogavit17 Simum, an genere esset18
Atheniensis ? Quum autem hic dicret19 se esse, et claris
ibi esse parentbus ; rogavit,20 an et Pirum nsset ?21
"Rtus autem Simus de nomme um dicre, it,22 Et
vald amicum esse i, et familiarem : et Delphis, tanto
mendaco indignatus,23 submergens,24 ipsum occdit.25
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla in vros, qui, veritatem ignorantes,26 decipre27
sperant.28
'sum 2navigo 3adduco 4habeo spervenio 6contingo
7fio 8everto 9enato 10conspicor "sum 12reor 13suppono 14sustineo 15perfero 16sum 17rogo 18sum 19dico
^rogo 21nosco ^aio 23indignor ^submerge ^occido
^ignoro 27decipio 28spero.

FABULA LXXXV.
Muscae.
In cell qudam melle effuso,1 Musc advolantes2
comedebant.3 Implictis4 autem earum pedbus, evolare5
leffundo

2advolo

'comedo

implico

5evolo

48

JE S P U S.

non potrant.6 Quum ver suffocarentur,7 dicebant,8


Misr nos, quia ob modcum cbum perimus !9
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, multis gulam multorum malorum
causam esse.10
6possum

7suffoco

8dico

9pereo

10sum.

FABULA LXXXVI.
Mercurus et Statuarius.
Meucurus scire1 vlens,2 in quanto honore pud
homnes esset,3 ivit4 in Statuari domum, cm se assimilsset5 homni, et vis6 stat Jvis, rogabat,7 Quanti
quis ipsam emre8 posset ?9 Hic autem quum dixisset,10
Drachma, risit :u et, Quanti am Junonis, it ?12 quum
dixisset, Pluris : vis et s ipsius stata, ac opinatus13
quum nuntus sit14 Deorum, et lucro prsit,15 maxmam de
se apud homnes haberi16 rationem, rogavit17 de .
Statuarus ver it, Si hasce emris,18 et hanc additamentum tbi do.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula in vrum gloriosum, qui in nullo pud alios est
honore.
'scio 2volo 3sum 4eo 5assimilo 6video 7rogo "emo
9possum
10dico
11rideo
12aio
13opinor
I4sum
"prsum 16habeo 17rogo "emo.

FABULA LXXXVII.
Mercurus et Tiresias.
Meucurus vlens1 Tires vaticinum, an verum esset,2
cognoscre,3 furatus4 ipsius boves ex rure, venit5 ad ipsum
H'olo

2sum

3cognosc

4furor

5venio

ESOPUS.

in urbem, similis factus6 homing et ad ipsum divertit.*


Bm autem amissione renunciata8 Tires,
ille,
assumpto9 Mercurio, exivit,10 augurum alquod de fiire
consideraturus,11 et huic jbet12 dicre13 sbi, quamnam
avem vidrit ?14 Mercurus autem, primm conspicatus15
Aqulam sinistris ad dextram volantem,18 i dixit.17 Hic,
non ad se am attinere,18 quum dixisset, secundo, Cornicem
vidit19 super arbore qudam sedentem,20 et modo superus
aspicientem,21 mdo ad terram declinatam, et vati rfert.22
Et is, re cognt,23 inquit ;24 Sed hc Cornix jurat25 et
Clum, et Terram, si tu vlis,26 mas me recepturum27
boves.
AFFABULATIO.
Hoc sermone uti28 quispam potrit29 adversus vram
furacem.
6fio 7diverto 'renuncio "assumo laexeo "considero 12jubeo
lSdico 14video 15conspicor 16volo 17dico I8attineo 19video
"'sedeo 21aspicio ^refero 23cognosco ^nquam 25juro
^volo ^recipio ^utor Opossum.
FABULA LXXXVIII.
Canes.
Habens1 quidam duos Cnes, altrum venari2 docit,8
altrum dSmum servare.4 Cetrum, si quando venatcus
capret8 alquid, et doms custos partceps rat6 un cum
o dpis. Egr ferente7 autem venatco, et illi objiciente"
qud ipse quotide laboraret,9 ille ver nihil laborans,10
sis nutriretur11 laborbus ; respondens12 ipse it,13 Non
me, sed hrum reprehende,14 qui non laborare15 me docit,18
sed labores alienos comedesse.17
AFFABULATIO.
; Fabula signifcat, adolescentes qui nihil scunt,18 haud
esse reprehendendos,19 quum os parentes sic educavrint.2*
'babeo
2venor
3doceo 4servo 5capio 6sum 7fen>
^bjicio 9laboro 10laboro 11nutrio 12respondeo 13aio
'^reprehendo
15laboro
I6doceo
i7cotoedo
i8sci*
'9reprehendo ^educo.
s

50

JE S P U S.

FABULA LXXXIX.
Maritus et Uxor.
Habens1 quidam uxorem, qu domestcis omnibus
inimica rat,2 volit3 scire,4 an etam erga paternos do
mesticos ta afficeretur :s quapropter cum rationabli prtextu ad sum ipsam mittit6 ptrem. Paucis ver post
diebus revers,7 rogavit,8 Quomdo erga illos se
habuissct.9 Hc ver quum dixisset,10 Qud bubulci, et
pastores me suspectabant,11 it,12 Sed, uxor, si is odiosa
es,13 qui man grges gunt,14 sero autem revertuntur,wquid sperare16 oportet17 de is, qubuscum toto conversaris18
die ?
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, sic spe ex parvis magna, et ex
manifestis incerta cognosci.19
'habeo 2sum 3volo 4scio 5afficio 6mitto 7revertor 8rogo
shabeo 10dico nsuspecto 12aio 13sum 14ago 15revertor
16spcro 17oportet 18conversor '9cognosco.

FABULA XC.
Hdus et Lupus.
Hdus derelictus1 grge, agitabatur2 Lpo. Conversus3 ver ad um dixit,4 Lpe, quonam persuasus5
sum, me tum cbum futurum,6 ne injucunde morar,7
cane8 tib primm, ut saltem.9 Lpo autem canente.
tib, atque Hdo saltante, canes, quum audivissent,w
Lpum persecuti11 sunt.12 Hic ver conversus, Hdo
inquit,13 Mert hc mihi accdunt ;14 oportebat15 nim
me, cquus quum sim,16 tibicnem non imitari.17
Merelinquo 2agito 3converto 4dico 5persuadeo 6sum
7morior 8cano 9salto 10audio "persequor 12sum 13inquam
14accido "oportet 16sum 17imitor
, :

iESOPUS.

si

AFJFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, os, qui a, qubus natur apti sunt,
neglgunt, qu ver aliorum sunt, exercere18 conantur,19 in
infortuna incidre.20
"exerceo

19conor

^incido.

FABULA XCI.
Cancer et Vu I pes.
Cancer mri quum ascendisset,1 in quodam pascebatur2 loco. Vulpes ver esurens,3 ut conspexisset,4
accessit,5 ac um rapuit.6 Ule vero devorandus,7 it,8 Sed
go justa pator, qui, marinus quum sim,9 terrestris voliii10
esse.11
affabulato.
Fabula signifcat, ex hominbus etiam os, qui propris
derelictis12 exercitis, a, qu nihil convenunt,13 aggrediuntur,14 mert infortunato3 esse.1
^scendo 2pasco 3esurio 4conspicio 5accedo
7devoro 8aio "sum I0volo "sum 12derelinquo
venio 14aggredior 15sum.

6rapio
13con-

FABULA XCII.
Cithardus.
Cithaedus rdis in dmo calce incrustat,1 ut solebat,2 canens,3 et contr resonante4 in se voce, putabats*vald
canorus esse :6 itque elatus7 ob id, cogitavit8 oportere9
etam theatro sese committre.10 Profectus11 vero ad se
'incrusto 2soleo 3cano 4resono 5puto 6sum
8cogito 9oportet 10committo "proficiscor

7effero

62

JE S OP S.

ostendendum,12 quum ml admdum canret,13 lapidbus


ipsum explosum14 abegerunt.15
' AFFABULATION 1
Fabla signifcat, sic ex rbetorbus quosdam, qui in
schlis videntur16 esse alqui, quum ad res publicas venrint,17 nullius preti esse.
12ostendo

13cano

14explodo

wabigo

ievideor

'7venio.

FABULA XCIII.
Fu res.
Fuees in domum quandam ingressi,1 nihil invenerunt,*
nsi gallum ; atque, hoc capto,3 abierunt.4 Hic ver ab
eis occidendus5 rogabat,6 ut se dimittrent,7 dicens,8 se
utlem esse9 hominbus, noctu os ad opra excitantem.10
Hi ver dixerunt,11 Sed propter hoc te tant magis occidmus :12 illos nim exctans,13 furari14 nos non snis.15
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, a maxm pravis esse16 adversa, quse
bonis sunt17 beneficia.
'ingredior
2invenio
3capio
4abeo
5occido
"rogo
7dimitto 8dico 9sum 10excito ndico l2occido 13excito
14furor 15sino 16sum 17sum.

FABULA XCIV.
Cornil et Corvus.
Coenix Corvo invdens,1 quod is per augura hominbus
vaticinaretur,2 ob idque crederetur,3 ti futura prdicens,4
conspicata5 viatores quosdam prtereuntes,6 vit7 super
'irivideo S-aticinor 3credo 4prdico sconspicor 6prtereo
7eo
>.

M S P s.

quandam arborem, stans8que vald crocitavit.9 Ulis ver


ad vocem conversis,10 et stupefactis ;n re cognt,12 q\iidam
inquit,13 Abeamus,14 hus vos, Cornix nim est qu cro
citavit, et augurum non hbet.15
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, eodem mdo et hommes cum prstantiorbus certantes,16 prterquam qud non ad qua pervenunt,17 risu quoque dignos esse.
*sto 9crocito 10converto "stupefio 12cognosco 13inquam
14abeo 15habeo 16certo 17pervenio.

FABULA XCV.
Cornix et Can is.
Cornix Minerves sacrificans,1 cnem ad eplas invitavit.2 Ille ver dixit,3 Quid frustr sacrifica absumis ?*
Da nim ad te odit,5 ut ex conviventbus* tecum avbus
fdem4ustulrit.7 Cui Cornix ; Ob id mgis i sacrifico,
ut reconcilietur8 mihi.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, plerosque, ob lucrum inimicos, beneficis prosequi9 non vereri.10
'sacrifico 2invito 3dic 4absumo 5odi 6convivo 7suffero
'reconcilio 9prosequor 10vereor.

FABULA XCVI.
Corvus et Serpens.
Corvus cbi indgens,1 ut vidisset2 in quodam aprico
lco Serpentem dormientem,3 hune, devolando,4 rapit.8
Hic ver, quum se vertisset,6 atque momordisset7 ipsum,
'indigeo zvideo 3dormio 4devolo srapio 6verto
E5

7mordeo

54

S U S.

Corvus moriturus8 dixit,9 Me misrum ! qui tale reppri10


lucrum, ex quo etam pero.
AVFABULATIO.
Fabula in vrum, qui, ob thesaurorum inventionem, de
salute periclitatus11 sit.
8mqrior

9dico

10reperio

11periclitdr.

FABULA XCVII.
Moiiedla et Columbas.
Monedula in quodam columbario Columbas conspicata1
bene nutritas,2 dealbavit3 sese, ivit4que, ut et ipsa eodem
cbo impertiretur.s H ver, donec tacebat,6 rat7 Columbam am esse,8 admiserunt.9 Sed quum aliquandu
oblita10 vocem emisisset,11 tunc, ejus cognt,12 natur, expulerunt13 percutientes ;14 eque, privata15 o cbo, redit18
ad Monedlas rursum. Et ill, ob colorem quum ipsam
non nssent,17 so cbo abegerunt,18 ta.ut, duorum apptens,19 neutro potiretur.20
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, oportere21 et nos nostris contentos
esse, considerantes,22 habendi23 cupiditatem, prterquam
qud nhil jvat,24 auferre25 et qu adsunt26 bona spe.
^nspicor 2nutrio 3dealbo 4eo 5impertior
6taceo
7reor 'sum. 9admitto 10obliviscor "emitto 12cognosco
"expello I4percutio lsprivo 16redeo 17nosco 18abigo
19appeto 20potior 21oportet 22considero 23habeo 24juvo
Maufero ^adsum.

FABULA XCVIII.
MonediHa.
Monedulam quum quis cepisset,1 et alligsset2 pdem
filo, suo traddit3 filo. Hc ver, non passa4 inter
'capio
2alligo
atrado
4patior

JE S P U S.
hommes victum,5 ubi parumper libertatem nacta6 est,
fugit,7 in sumque nidum se contulit.8 Circumvoluto9
ver vinculo ramis, evolare10 haud vlens,11 quum mori
tura12 esset,13 secum loquebatur,14 Me misram ! qu pud
hommes non passa15 servitutem, incaut me vit privavi.16
AFFABULATIO/
Fabula signifcat, quosdam tionnunquam, dum se
mediocrbus perculis student17 liberare,18 in majora incidere.19
Rictus 6nanciscor 7fugio 8confero 9circumvolvo 10evolo
nvaleo
12morior 13sum 14loquor
15patior
leprivo
17studeo 18libero 19incido.

FABULA XCIX.
Jupiter et Mercurus.
Jupiter Mercurio jussit,1 ut omnibus artificbus mendaci medicamentum infundret.2 Hic ver, eo trito,3 et
ad mensuram facto,4 quabilter singulis infudit.5 Quum
ver, solo sutore relicto,6 multum superesset7 medicamenti,
totum acceptum8 reortarum i infudit.9 Atque hinc
contgit,10 artifices omnes mentiri,11 maxm ver omnum
sutores.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla in mendaces artifces.
'jubeo infundo 3tero 4fio "infundo 6relinquo
persum 8accipio 9infundo 10contingo "mentior.

7su-

FABULA C.
Jupiter.
Jupiter nuptas celbrans,1 omnia animala convivio
excipiebat.2 Sol ver testudne ser profect,3 admiratus4
Celebro

2excipio

3proficiscor

4admiror

56

S U S.

causam tarditats, rogavit5 eam, quamobrem ipsa ad convivum non accessisset.6 Quum vero he dixisset,7 Dotius
chara, domus optma ; iratus8 ipsi, damnavit,9 ut domurft
bajulans10 circumferret.11
AFFABDLATIO.
Fabula signifcat, plerosque hommes eligre12 pots
parce pud se vivre,13 qum pud alios laut.
5rogo
6accedo 7dico
8irascor
"damno
I0bajulo
ncircumfero 12eligo 13vivo.

FABULA CI.
Lupus et Ovis.
Lupus canbus morsus,1 et ml affectus,2 abjectus3
jacebat.4 Cbi ver indgens,5 conspicatus6 vem, rogabat,7
ut potum ex prterfluente8 flumne sbi afferret :9 Si nim
tu mihi, inquit,10 dedris11 potum, ego cbum mihi ipsi
invenam.12 Illa ver respondit13 etait, Sed, si ego potum
dedro14 tbi, tu et cbo me uteris.15
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula in vrum malefcum per simulationem insidiantem.
'mordeo 2afEcio 3abjicio 4jaceo 5indigeo 6conspicor
7rogo 'prterfluo 9affero 10inquam ndo I2invenio
13respondeo 14do 15utor.

FABULA CH.
Lepres.
Lepres olim, belligerantes1 cum Aqulis, invocrunt2
in auxilum Vulpes : Hss autem dixerunt,3 Non auxilia'belligero

2invoco

3dico

/
S P U S.

57

remur* vbis, nisi sciremus,5 qui vos estis,6 et cum quiibus


bellamni ?7
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, eos, qui cum prstantiorbus certant,*
sam salutem contemnre.9
4auxilior

5scio

6sum

7bellor

8certo

"contemno.

FABULA CHI.
Formica.
Foemica qu nunc est, olim homo fit,1 et agricul
tur assid incumbens,2 non propris erat3 contentus
laborbus, sed et vicinorum fructus surripiebat.4 Jupiter
autem indignatus5 hujus habendi8 cupiditate, transmutavit7 um in hoc animal, qua? Formica appellatur.8 Ve
rum, quum mutsset9 formam, non et affectum mutavit :M
Nam hucusque arva circumeundo,11 aliorum labores collgit,1* et sbi ipsi recondit.13
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, natura pravos, ut maxm specem
transmutavrint,14 mores non mutare.
'sum 2incumbo 3sum 4surripio 5indignor *habeo
7transmuto 8appello 9muto 10muto "circumeo ^colligo
13recondo 14transmuto.

FABULA CIV.
Vespertilio et Mustela.
Vespetilo, in terram cm cecidisset,1 Mustel
capta8 est, et quum occidenda3 foret,4 pro salute rogabat.'
'cado

2capio

3occido

4forem _ ^ogo - '

58

' f

M S O P U S.

Hc vero dicente,6 non posse7 ipsam dimittre,8 qud


natur volucrbus omnibus inimica foret ;9 illa it,10 Non
Avem, sed Murem esse :u et sic dimissa12 est. Postremo
autem, quum itrum cecidisset,13 et ab al capta Mustel
fuisset,14 ne voraretur,15 orabat.16 Hc autem dicente,
cunctis inimicam esse murbus ; se non Murem, sed Vespertilionem dicebat17 esse :18 et rursus dimissa est. Atque
ta evenit,19 bis mutato20 nomne, am salutem consecutam21
fuisse.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat,22 nque nos oportere,23 in eisdem
semper permanere, considerantes,24 os qui ad tempusmutantur25 plerumque pericula effugre.26
6dico 7possum 8dimitto 9forem 10aio "sum 12dimitto
13cado 14sum 16voro 16oro 17dico 18sum 19evenio
^muto 21consequor
^significo 23oportet 24considero
25muto 26effugio.
FABULA CV.
Viatores.
Viatores juxta littus quoddam ter facientes,1 venerunt2 in speculam quandam ; et illinc conspicti3 sarmenta
procul natanta,4 navem esse5 magnum existimrunt :6
quamobrem expectrunt,7 tnquam appulsura8 a esset.
Quum ver vento lata9 sarmenta props forent,10 non
navem amplus, sed scapham videbantur11 videre. Advect12 autem ill, quum sarmenta esse vidissent, inter se
dixerunt,13 Ut igtur frustr nos, quod nihil est, expectabamus !14
AFFABITLATI.
Fabla signifcat, nonnullos hommes, ex improviso
terribles esse visos, quum periculum fecris,15 nullius
inveniri16 esse preti.
'facio 2venio 3conspicor 4nato 5sum 6existimo 7expecto 8appello (3rd con.) 9fero 10forem 1'videor 12adveho
13dico 14expecto 15facio 16invenio.

M S P s.

59

FABULA .
Asnus Sylvestris.
Askus sylvestris Asnum conspicatus1 domestcum in
quodam aprico loco, profectus2 ad ipsum, beatum dicebat,3
et corporis bon habitudne, et cbi perceptione. Deinde
ver, quum vidisset4 um ferentem5 onra, et agasonejn
tergo sequentem,6 et baculis ipsum percutientem,7 ait,8
Ast ego non amplus beatum te existimo ; vido nim,'
qud non sme mlis magnis felicitatem hbes.9
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, non esse mulanda,10 cum periculis
et miseris, lucra.
'eonspicor 2proficiscor 3dico 4video
'percutio 8aio 9habeo 10a?mulo.

sfero

6sequor

FABULA CVII.
Asnus et Vulpes.
Asnus indutus1 pelle Leonis circuibat,2 relqua bruta
perterrens.3 Cetrm conspicatus4 Vulpem, tentavit5 et
dentem7 audivrat8) i it,9 Sed bene scito,18 qud et ego
te timuissem,11 nsi rudentem audivissem.12
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, nonnullos indoctos, qui videntur13
extris alqui esse,14 ex sa loquacitate redarg.15
4nduo 2circumeo 3perterreo 4conspicor stento 6perterrefacio 7rudo 8audio 9aio 10scio "timeo 12audio
"videor 14sum "redargue.

60

S OP s.

FABULA CVIII.
Asnus et Ranas.
Asnus ligna frens1 pertransibat2 quandam paludem.
Lapsijs3 autem, ut decdit,4 surgre5 non vlens,6 lamentabatur,7 ac suspirabat.8 Ban autem, qu rant9 in palude, suspiris ejus auditis,10 Heus tu, dixerunt,11 et quid
facres,12 si tanto hic tempore mansisses,13 quanto nos,
quum, quia in brve tempus lapsus14 sis, sic lamentaris ?15
AFFABULATIO.
Hoc sermone uti potrit16 quisquam in vrum segnem,
qui ob minmos labores tristatur,17 quum ipse majorbus
facile resistt.18
o *pertranseo 3labor 4decido 5surgo 6valeo mentor 8suspiro 9snm 10audio ndico 12facio 13maneo
14labor "lamenter 16possum 17tristor I8resisto.

FABULA CIX.
Asnus et Corvus.
Asntjs, ulcerato1 dorso, in quodam prato pascebatur.2
Corvo autem incidente3 i, et ulcus percutiente,4 Asnus
rudebat,5 ac saltabat.6 Sed agasone prcul staute,7
ridente,8 Lupus prterens9 ipsum vidit,10 et dixit,11 Misri
nos ! qui, si tantm videamur,12 agitamur,13 autem
rident.14
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, malefcos hommes, si tantm apparant,15 dignosci.16
'ulcero ^asco 3incido 4percutio 8njdo 6salto 7sto
*rideo "prtereo 10video "dico 12videor 13agito 14rideo
"appareo 16dignosco.

si

M s p s.
FABULA CX.
Asnus et Vulpes.

Asnus et Vulpes, societate int1 inter se, exiverunt*


ad venationem. Lo ver quum occurrisset3 ipsis, Vulpes,
immnens4 vdens5 periculum, profeca6 ad Leonem, se
tradituram7 i Asnum pollicta8 est, si sihi impunitatem
promisrit.9 Qui quum se dimissurum10 am dixisset,11
illa, adducto12 Asno in casses quosdam, ut incidret,13
fecit.14 Sed Lo vdens illum fugre15 minm posse,18
primam Vulpem comprehendit,17 deinde sic ad Asnum
versus18 est.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, os, qui socis insidiantur,19 sp et
seipsos perdre.20
o 2exeo. 3occurro 4immineo "video eproficiscor
7trado 8polliceor 9promitto 10dimitto "dico 12adduco
13incido 14facio Efugio 16possum , 17comprehendo 18verto
19insidior ^perdo.

FABULA CXI.
Gallina et Hirundo.
Gallina, Serpentis ovis inventis,1 diligenter calefacta2
excludit.3 Hirundo autem, quum am vidisset,4 it,5
demens, quid hc nutris, qu cm excrevrint,6 te prima
injuram auspicabuntur ?7 AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, implacablem esse8 pravitatem, lct
afficiatur9 maxmis beneficas.
'invenio
7auspicor

zcalefio
3excludo
8sum "afficio.
F

4video

5aio

6excresco

62

s p s.

FABULA CXII.
Camelus.
Quum primm visa1 est Camelus, hommes perterrti,2
et magnitudnem admirati,3 fugiebant:4 bi ver, pro
cedente5 tempore, cognoverunt ipsius mansuetudnem,
confisi7 sunt8 usque, ut ad am accedrent.9 At intellecto10 paulo post, Bellam non bilem habere,11 e contempts ire,12 ut et frna i imponrent,13 et puris
agendam tradrent.14
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, ut terribles res consuetude contemptibles facat.15
1video 2perterreo 3admiror 4fugio 5procedo 6cognosco
7confido 8sum 9accedo 10intelligo 11habeo 12eo 13impono 14trado 15facio.

FABULA CXIII.
Serpens.
Serpens multis hominbus conculcatus1 Jvem supplex adit.2 Jupiter autem i dixit :3 Sed, si, qui pror
conculcavit,4 pupugisses,5 nequaquam secundus id facere6
aggressus7 fuisset.8
- 4
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, os, qui prs invadentbus9 resistunt,10
alis formidolosos firi.11
Conculco 2adeo 3dico 4conculco spungo
gredior 8sum invado 10resisto 11fio.

6facio

7ag-

M S 0 P U S.

63

FABULA CXIV.
Columba.
Columba sti correpta,1 ut vidit2 in quodam loco poclum qu depictum,3 putavit4 esse5 verum, atque, multo
imptu allata,6 imprudens in tabulam offendit,7 ut, ,et
pennis ipsius perfractis,8 in terram decidret,9 atque
quodam occurrentum10 caperetur.11
AFFABULATO.
Fabula signifcat, nonnullos hommes, ob vehementem
alacritatem, inconsulto res aggredientes,12 injicre13 sese in
pernicem.
1corripio 2video 3depingo 4puto ssum 6affero 7ofFendo
8perfringo "decido I0occurro "capio 12aggredior 13injicio.
FABULA CXV.
Columba et Comix.
Columba, in quodam columbario nutrita,1 fcunditate
superbiebat.2 Cornix ver, audit,3 it :4 Sed, hus tu,
desne5 hc re gloriari ;e nam quo plures paries,7 o plures
dolores accumulas.8
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, ex famulis quque os infelicissmos
esse,9 qui in Servitute multos libros procreant.10
hmtro 2superbio saudio 4aio sdesino 6glorior 7pario
"accumulo 9sum 10procreo.

FABULA CXVI.
Dives.
Dives das filias habens,1 altr mort,2 prfcas cnduxit :3 altr ver fil dicente,4 Ut nos miser, qu ipste,
'habeo
zmorlor
3conduco
4dico

64

M S P U S.

quarum est dlor, lamentari5 nescimus,8 h ver non necessar sic vehementer plangunt ?7 Mater it,8 Ne mirare,'
fila, si h ta lamentatur,10 nam nummorum grat id
gunt.11
. , ..
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, nonnullos homines, propter pecun
amorem, non dubitare12 ex alienis calamitatbus qustum
facre.13
5lamentor 6nescio 7plango
"ago I2dubito 13facio.

8aio

9miror

10lamentor

FABULA CXVII,
Pastor.
Pastor, actis1 in quercetum quoddam ovbus, strata1
sub quercu veste, ascendit,3 et fructum decutiebat.4 Oves
ver edentes5 glandes, nesc et vestes un devorrunt.6
At, quum pastor descendisset,7 et, quod rat8 factum,9
vidisset ;10 pessma, it,11 animala, vos ctris vellera
ad vestes prbetis,12 me ver, qui vos nutro, etam
vestem surripuistis.13
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, plerosque homines, ob stultitam,
os, qui nihil ad se attnent,14 beneficio afficientes15 in
domesticos ml tractare.16
'ago 2sterno 3ascendo 4decutio 5edo 6devoro 7descendo 8sum 9fio 10video naio 12prbeo 13surripio
14attineo 15afficio ietracto.

FABULA CXVIII.
Piscator et Cerrus.
Piscator, demisso1 reti in mre, rettulit2 Cerrum :
qui, parvus quum esset,3 supplicter rogabat4 ipsum, tune
'demitto
2refero
3sum
4rogo

JE S P U S.

C5

ne qudem se capret,8 sed dimittret,6 qud parvus esset :


At, quum crevro,7 et magnus, inquit,8 evasro,9 me
capre10 potris,11 quonam et majori tibi ero12 utilitati.
Et Piscator it,13 Sed ego demens furim,14 si, quod in
manbus est, misso lucro, lct sit15 parvum, expectatum,16
lct magnum furit,17 sperem.18
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, inconsideratum esse,19 qui, spe majoris
ri, qu in manbus sunt20 amittat,21 quod parva sint.82
5capio
"dimitto 7cresco 8inquam
9evado 10capio
1 'possum
l2sum
13aio 14sum 15sum
ielict conj.
17sum 18spero 19sum ^sum 21amitto ^sum.

FABULA CXIX.
Equus et Asnus.
H8mo quidam habebat1 Equum et Asnum. Quum
autem ter facrent2 in v, Rit3 Asnus Equo, Toile4
partem ex mo onre, si vis5 esse6 me salvum. lile vero
non persuasus7 est. Asnus vero cecdit,8 atque labore
mortus9 est. Ab hro autem omnibus impostis10 i, et
ips Asni pelle, conqurens11 Equus clamabat,12 Hei mihi
misenmo ! quid mihi evenit18 afflicto ?14 qua nim noli15
parm onris accipre,16 ecce omna gesto, et pellem !
AFFABLATIO.
Fabla signifcat, si magni cum parvis jungantur,'7
utrosque servari18 in vit.
'habeo 2facio 3aio 4tollo 5volo esum 7persuadeo
8cado 9morior 10impono "conqueror 12clamo 13evenio
14affligo 15nolo 16accipio 17jungo 18servo.

66

S P s.

'FABULA CXX.
Homo et Satyrus.
Homo quidam, cum Satyro int1 societate, un cum
o comedebat.2 Hyems ver, et frigus quum accessisset,'
homo mnus sas admvens4 ori afflabat.5 Sciscitato6
autem Satyro, quam ob causam hoc facret ?7 it,8 Mnus
mas calefaco propter frigus. Sed paulo post, edulo
calido allato,9 homo admvens ori insufflabat10 ipsum.
Jiogante11 vero rursus Satyro, quare id facret ?12 it,13
Ferculum frigefaco. Suscepto14 vero sermone, Satyrus,
Sed ego, it, posthac renuncio tam amicitam ; quia ex
eodem ore et caldum et frigdum emittis.13
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, oportere16 fugre17 nos amicitas,
quarum anceps est affecto.
o acomedo 3accedo 4admoveo -5afflo 6sciscitor
7facio eaio 9affro 10insufflo "rogo lsfacio 13aio
14suscipio 15emitto ieoportet 17fugio.

FABULA CXXI.
Vulpes et Lignator.
Vulpes venatores fugens,1 et in deserto mult decurs*
, vrum lignatorem invenit3 in o, cui supplicabat,4 ut
se abscondret.5 A quo i ostenso6 so tuguro, ingressa7
delitit8 in angilis. Ac venatorbus profectis,9 et rogantbus10 vrum, hic voce qudem negabat11 quidquam scire,12
sed manu s locum demonstraba^13 Hi ver, quum non
advertissent,14 abire15 confestim. Ut igtur vidit16 eos
^ugio 2decurro 3invenio 4supplico 5abscondo 6ostendo
7ingredior 8deliteo 9proficiscor 10rogo 11nego 12scio
13demcnstrj 14adverto 15abeo 16video

JE S U S.

67

Vulpes prterisse,17 exivit18 nihil allocuta.19 Accusante*0


autcm ipsam illo, qud, servata21 se, gratas sbi non
agret,22 Vulpes conversa23 inquit,24 Hus tu, go ver
egissem28 tibi gratas, si verbis simles manum gestus et
mores habuisses.26
. .
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla in os, qui utila qudem promittunt27 verbis,
sed contra facunt28 rebus.
17prtereo 18exeo I9alloquor ^accuso 2Iservo Mago
23converto
24inquam
2,r'ago
26habeo
27promitto
28facio.

FABULA 1.
Homo Perfractor Statae.
Hmo quidam, lignum hbens1 dum, quum pauper
esset,2 supplicabat,3 ut sbi benefacret.4 Quum igtur
hc facret,5 et nihilomnus in paupertate dcgret,6 iratus7
elevatum8 ipsum crurbus projecit9 in pavimentum. Illiso10
igtur capte, ac sttim diffracto,11 suri effluxit12 quamplurmum ; quod ille jam collgens13 exclamabat,14 Perversus
es,15 ut pto, et ingratus : colentile nim te mihi nequa
quam profuisti,17 verberantem18 autem te multis bonis
remuneravisti 19
AFFABULATIO.
Fablasignifcat, non profuturum00 te tbi, honorantem"
pravum homnem, sed verberantem22 ipsum mgis profuturum.
'habeo
2sum ' 3supplico
4benefacio
5facio
"dego
7irascor 8elevo 9projicio 10illido "diffringo 12effluo
I3colligo 14exclamo lssum IBcolo 17prosum 18verbero
19remunero 20prosum 21honoro ^verbero.

68

JE S 0 P U S.

FABULA CXXIII.
Homo et Cnis.
quidam parabat1 cnam, accepturus2 quendam
amicorum suorum, et familiarum. Cnis vero ipsius
alum cnem invitavit,3 dicens,4 amice, vni,s cna un
mecum. Is ver, quum accessisset,6 ltus adstabat,7
spectans8 magnam cnam, clamans9 in corde so, Pap,
quanta mihi ltita nuper derepent oblata10 est ! nam et
nutrar,11 et ad satietatem cnabo,12 ado ut crs nullo
mdo esuriro.13 Hc secum dicente14 cane, smulque
movente15 caudam, ut qui jam amico fidret,16 cquus, ut
vidit17 ipsum hue et illuc caudam circumagentem,18 arreptis19 ipsius crurbus, ejecit20 sttim de fenestris. At is,
quum decidisset,21 abibat22 vehementer exclamans.23 Sed
quidam cnum, illi in v occurrentum,24 percontabatur,25
Ut belle cnatus26 es,27 amice ? Ule ver respondens28 i
dixit,29 Multo potu inebriatus30 supra satietatem, ne ipsam
qudem vam, qu egressus31 sum, novi.32
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, non oportere33 confidre34 is, qui ex
alienis benefacre35 pollicentur.36
'paro
8specto
l4dico
^ejicio
26cno
^nosco

2accipio 3invito 4dico *venio 6accedo 7adsto


9clamo
10offero
"nutrio 12cno 13esurio
15moveo 16fido 17video 18circumago 19arripio
21decido Mabeo ^exclamo ^occurro 25percontor
^sum 28respondeo 29dico ^inebrio 31egredior
^oportet ^confido ^benefacio ^polliceor.

FABULA CXXIV.
Piscator.
Piscator, piscandi1 rdis, acceptis2 tibis ac retbus,
perrexit3 ad mre, et stans4 sper quandam petram, primm
'piscor
2accipio
3pergo
4sto

M S 0 P s.

69

qudem sonabat5 tibis, existmans,6 ad vocis suavitatem


pisces assilire.7 Ut. vero, multm contendens,8 proficret9
nihil, depostis10 tibis, assumit11 rete, jacto12 in quam,
multm piscum cepit.13 Cm vero ejecisse14 illos reti,
ut salientes15 vidit,16 it, pessm animantes, quum
sonabam17 tib, non saltabatis ;18 quum vero cessavi,19 id
agtis.20
AFFABULAIO.
Fabla in os, qui prter rationem, et inopportun,
alquid gunt.21
5sono 6existimo 7assilio 8contendo 9proficio l0depono
nassumo 12jacio 13capio 14ejicio 15saho 16video 17sono
18salto 1!)cesso 20ago 2'ago.

FABULA CXXV.
Bubulcus.
Bubdlcus armentum taurorum pascens1 amisit2 vitulum.
Cm ver lustrsset3 omnem solitudnem, moram traxit4
qurens.5 Ubi autem nihil invenire6 potit,7 votum fecit8
Jvi, si, qui cepisset9 vitulum, furem ostendret,10 hdum
in sacrificum se oblaturum.11 Cetrm proficiscens12 in
quoddam quercetum, invenit13 leonem devorantem14 vit
lum. Trepdus igtur factus,15 et vald terrtus,16 elevatis17
manbus sis in clum, it,18 Domme Jupiter, promisram19 tibi hdum me daturum20 esse,21 si furem invenirem ; nunc autem taurum tbi pollicor sacrificaturum,23
si hujus mnus efTugro.24
'pasco
2amitto
3lustro
4traho
5quro
6invenio
7possum "facio 9capio 10ostendo "offero 12proficiscor
?3invenio 14devoto 15fio 16terreo 17elevo 18aio 19promitto 20do
21sum
22invenio
23sacrifico
24effugio

70

M S P U S.
AFFABULATIO.

Fabiila in hommes infortunatos, qui, dum crent,28 ut


inventant,26 precantur s27 quum vero invenrint, qurunt*8
effugre.29
^careo

26invenio

27precor

^quro

^effugio.

FABULA CXXVI.
Corvus.
Corvus grotans1 it2 matri, Mater, precare3 Dum,
nec lamentare.4 Ea vero respondens,5 it, Quis ti,
fili, Deorum miserebtur ?6 cujus nim carnes non te
surrept7 fuerunt ?8
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, qui multos inimicos in vit hbent,9
os nemnem amicum in necessitate inventuros.10
'groto 2aio 'precor 4lamentor 5respondeo
7surripio 8sum 9habeo 10invenio.

emisereor

FABULA CXXVII.
Aqula.
Super petram Aqula sedebat,1 Leporem capre2 quav
rens.3 Hanc autem quidam percussit4 sagitt, et sagitta
qudem ipsam ingressa5 est. Sed crena cum pennis ante
oclos stabat :6 illa ver conspicata7 inquit,8 Et hc mihi
altra mstita, qud propris pennis interam.9
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, durum esse,10 quum quis sis
periculum pattur.11
'sedeo
2capio
3quro percutio
*ingredior
6sto
7conspicor 8inquam 9intereo l0sum "patior.

iE S P U S.

71

FABULA CXXVIII.
Cicada et Formicas.
HySmis tempre, tritco madente,1 Formicst ventilabant.2 Cicada autem esurens3 rogabat4 as cbum. For
mica vero dixerunt5 i Cur state non colligebas6 aliraentum ? Hc ver it7 Non ram8 otiosa, sed canebam9 musc. Tum h ridentes10 dixerunt,11 Si statis tempore
modulabaris,12 hyme salta.13
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, non oportere14 quenquam esse15 negligentem in alqu re, ne mrat16 ac perielitetur.17
'madeo 2ventiIo 3esurio 4rogo 5dico 6colligo 7aiq
'sum 9cano 10rideo ndico 12modulor 13salto 14oportet
15sum 16mreo 17periclitor.
FABULA CXXJX.
Vermis et Vulpes.
Qui sub cno celabatur1 Vermis, sper terram egressus,2
dicebat3 omnibus animalbus, Medcus sum, medicamnum
doctus,4 qualis est Pon, Deorum medcus. Et, quomdo,
it5 Vulpes, alios curans,6 teipsum claudum non curavisti ?7
AFFABULATIO.
Fabiila signifcat, nsi prst experienta furit,8 emne
verbum inane esse.9
'celo
segredior 3dico 4doceo
5aio
6curp
7curo
8sum 9sum.
FABULA CXXX.
Gallina Auripra.
Gallinam quidam habebat,1 ova aura parientem,2 et
latus3 intra ipsam, massam auri esse,4 occisam5 reprit5
'habeo

2pario

3reor

4sum

5occido

6reperio

72

M S P U S.

simlem alis gallinis. Hic vero, multum divitiarum sperans7 se inventurum,8 etam exigis privatus9 est illis.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, oportere10 prsentibus contentum
esse,11 et insatiabilitatem fugre.12
7spero

8invenio

9privo

10oportet

"sum

12fugio.

FABULA CXXXI.
Lo et Vulpes.
Leo seno confectus,1 et non Valens2 suppeditare3 sbi
cbum, decrevit4 astu alquid facere.5 ltque profectus6
in antrum quoddam, et inclusus,7 simulabat8 se grotare.9
Advenienta igtur animala, visitationis grat, comprehendens,10 devoravit.11 Multis igtur animalbus absumptis,12 Vulpes, arte cognt,13 accessit14 ad ipsum, et,
stansls extra speluncam, rogabat,16 quomdo se haberet.17
Quum autem is dixisset,18 Ml ; causamque rogaret,19
quamobrem non ingrederetur ;20 Vulpes it,21 Quia vido
vestigia multorum intrountum,22 paucorum ver exeuntum.23
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, prudentes homnes, ex conjecturis
providentes24 pericula, evitare.25
^onficio 2valeo 3suppedito 4decerno 5facio 6proficiscor
7includo
8simulo 9groto
10comprehendo
"devoro
12absumo 13cognosco 14accedo 15sto 16rogo 17h3beo
18dico
19rogo
20ingredior
21aio
^introeo
^exeo
Mprvideo 25evito.

FABULA CXXXII.
Lupus et Vetla.
Lupus esurens1 clrcumibat,2 qurens3 cbum. Profectus4 autem ad fcum quendam, audivit5 puerulum lugen'esurio

2circumeo

3quro

4proficiscor

5audio

S O P U S.

73

tem,6 et Anum dicentem7 , Desne8 plorare9 : sin mmus,


hc hor tradam10 te Lupo. Rtus11 igtur Lupus, qud
ser loquitur12 anicula, sttit13 multam expectans14 horam.
Sed quum oppressisset15 vespra, audit16 rursus Anum
blandientem17 puerulo, ac dicentem18 i, Si venrit19 Lpus
hue, interficimus,20 fli, um. His auditis,21 Lpus
abivit,22 dicens, In hoc tugurio, aliud dicunt,23 aliud ver
facunt.24
AFABUXATIO.
Fabula in homines, qui facta verbis non hbent25 simila.
6lugeo 7dico 8desino 9ploro 10trado ureor 12loquor 13sto
14expecto l8opprimo 16audio 17blandior 18dico 19venio
20interficio 21audio ^abeo ^dico ^acio s5habeo.
FABULA CXXXIII.
Hdus et Lpus.
Hdus sper qudam tecto stans,1 cum Lpum prtereuntem2 videret,3 conviciabatur4 et mordebat5 ipsum.
Sed Lpus it,* Hus tu, non tu mihi conviciaris,7 sed
locus.
AFFABULATIO.
Fabla signifcat, qud plerumque et locus, et tempus,
prbet8 audacam adversus prstantiores.
^to
2prtereo
^ideo
7convicior ^rbeo.

4convicior

8mordeo

6aio

FABULA CXXXIV.
Mulus.
Mulus hordo pinguefactus,1 lasciviebat2 clamans,3 ac
dicens,4 Pater meus est quus cursor, et go i totus sum
similis. Atque aliquando, quum necesse esset5 i currre,6
ut curso cessavrat,7 patris Asni sttim recordatus8 est.
^inguefacio 2lascivio 3clamo 4dico ssum
6curro
7cesso 8recordor

74

S U S.

AFFABLATIO.
Fabla signifcat, etsi tempus ad gloram promovat9
alquem, non su tmen ipsius fortun obliviscatur10: instablis enim est vita hace
9promoveo

10obliviscor.
FABULA CXXXV.

Serpens et Agricla.
Sehpens in .Agricl vestiblis antrum hbens,1 sustulit2 ejus infantem puerulum. Luctus autem parentbus
fit3 magnus. At pter, pr mrore securi accept4 egressum5 Serpentem occisurus* erat.7 Ut ver inclinavit8 se
parumper festinans9 Agricla, ut ipsum percutret,10
erravit,11 tantm percusso12 forammis orificio. Digresso13
autem Serpente, Agricla rtus14 Serpentem non amplu
injuri meminisse, aeeepit16 panem et slero, apposit 17
que in foramme. Sed Serpens, tenui siblo, it,18 Non
rit19 nobis post hac fides, vel amieita, quamuu ego lapdem vido, tu ver tumulum fili ti.
AFFABLATIO.
Fabla signifcat, nullum odi, aut vindict, oblivisci,20
quamdu vdet21 monimentum, quo tristatus22 est. ,
'habeo 2suffero 3sum
4accipio
5egredior
6occido
7sum o 9festino 10percutio "erro 12percutio
13digredior 14reor 15memini 16accipio 17appono I8aio
19sum ^obliviscor 21video ^tristor.
FABULA CXXXVI.
Tubicen.
Tubicen, exeretu congregato,1 ac superatus2 ab host
bus, clamabat,3 Ne occidte4 me, vri, temer et frustra :
non nim vestrm quemquam occido5 nam, prter s hoc,
1congrego
2supero
3clamo
4occido
soccido

iE S P U S.

75

nihil aliud possido. Hi vero illi dixere,6 Ob hoc mgis


morieris,7 qui, quum nequas8 ipse pugnare,9 omnes ad
pugnam excitas.10
AFFABLATIO.
Fabula signifcat, os pls peccare,11 qui mlos grves
principes conctant12 ad ml agendum.13
6dico
7morior
12concito 13ago.

8nequeo

spugno

10excito

"peeco

FABULA CXXXVII.
Arundo et Oliva.
De tolerant, et virbus, et quiete, Arundo et Oliva
contendebant.1 Arundne ver conviens affect2 ab Oliv,
utpote imbecill, facle cedente3 ventis omnibus, Arundo
tcens4 nihil locuta5 est. Ac parumper prstolata,6 bi
acer afflavit7 ventus, Arundo succussa8 et declinata9 ventis,
facl evasit.10 Oliva autem, quum ventis restitisset,11 diffracta12 est vi.
AFFABLATIO.
Fabula signifcat os, qui tempori, prstantiorbus
non resistunt,13 meliores esse14 is, qui cum potentiorbus
contendunt.18
'contendo 2afficio 3cedo 4taceo
7afflo 8succutio 9declino 10evado
13resisto 14sum 16contendo.

5loquor
"resisto

6prstoIor
12diffringo

FABULA CXXXVIII.
Lupus et Grus.
Lupi gutturi os infixum1 rat.2 Ule vero Gri mercedem se prbiturum3 dixit,4 si, capte injecto5, os ex guttre
Hnfigo

2sum

3prbeo

4dico

5injicio

76

S O P U S.

sbi extraxrit :6 hc autem, o extracto,7 quippe qu pro


cero esset8 eolio, mercedem efflagitabat :9 qui subridendo,10
dentesque exacuendo,11 Sufficit12 tbi, it, hoc solum, qud
ex Lpi ore, et dentbus, exemris13 cput salvum, nihil
mli passum.14
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula in vros, qui, periculo servati,15 bn de se
mertis am refrunt16 gratam.
6extraho 7extraho 8sum 9efflagito 10subrideo "exacuo
12sufficio 13eximo 14patior lsservo 16refero.

FABULA CXXXIX.
Snex et Mors.
Senex olim, sectis1 lignis, et a frens2, multam ibat3
vam, ac ob multum laborem, deposito4 in loco qudam
onre, Mortem invocabat.8 Sed, Morte prsente, et ro
gante6 causam, propter quam se vocaret,7 perterrefactus8
Snex it,9 Ut mum onus attollas.10
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula signifcat, omnem homnem esse" vit studiosum, lct infortunatus sit,12 et mendicus.
1seco 2fero 3eo 4depono 'invoco 6rogo
terrefacio 9aio 10attollo "sum 12sum.

7voco

8per-

FABULA CXL.
Ranae.
Ranj; du, siccat1 palude ubi habitabant,2 circumibant3
quserentes4 bi manerent ;5 ac profectse6 ad profundum pu'sicco ahabito 3circumeo

4qusero

''maneo

*proficiscor

M S 0 P s.

77

tum, et acclinat7 deorsum, conspicat8 quam, altera


monebat,9 ut saltarent10 contino deorsum : altera ver ait,11
Si et hic arurit,12 quomdo potermus13 ascendre ?14
AFFABLATIO.
Fabula signifcat, sne consilo ut nequid gas.15
7acclino
13possum

8conspicor
9oo
14ascendo 15ago.

10salto

uaio

12areo

FABULA CXLI.
Agnus et Lupus.
Agnus in alto lifco stans1 Lpum inferus prtereuntem2
vam maledictis insectabatur,3 et fram mlatn appellabat,4
et crudivoram. Sed Lpus conversus5 it6 illi, Non tu
conviciaris7 mihi, sed turris, in qu stas.8

AFFABLATIO.
Fabula ad os, qui frunt9 injurias ab indignis hominbus, mtu sublimiorum.
'sto 2prtereo
3insector
7convicior 8sto ^ero.

4appello

5converto

6aio

FABULA CXLII.
Clex et Lo.
Culex ad Leonem profectus1 it,2 Nque timo te, neque fortor me es.3 Sin mmus, quid tibi est robur ? qud
laceras4 ungubus, et mordes5 dentbus ? hoc et fmna,
cum vro pugnans,6 fcit.7 Ego ver long sum te fortor.
'profciscor
7facio

2aio

3sum

4lacero

5mordeo

epugno

78

JE S P U S.

Si vero vis,8 veniamus9 ad pugnam. Et quum tub cecinisset,10 Culex inhsit,11 mordens12 circa nares ipsius nudas
gnas. Lo autem propris ungubus dilaniavit13 seipsum,
donec indignatus14 est. Culex autem, victo15 Leone, quum
sonuisset16 tb, et carmen triumphale cecinisset,17 avolavit.18 Aran vero vinculo implictus,10 quum devoraretur,20 lamentabatur,21 qud cum maxmis pugnans,22 vili
animali, Aran, occideretur.23
AFFABULATIO.
Fabula in eos, qui presternum24 magnos, et parvis
prosternuntur.
"volo 9venio 10cano "inhreo 12mordeo 13dilanio
'4indignor 15vinco lssono I7cano 18avolo 19implico
20devoro 21lamentor Opugno 23occido 24prosterno.

T. C. Hansard, Printer, 32, Paternogfer-row, London.

FABLES

of jESOP.

FABLE I.
Aqula et
Vulpes.
The Eagle and Fox.
. Aqula et
Vulpes, amiciti
int
An Eagle and a Fox,
friendship being entered-into
decreverunt invcem
habitare prpe se
determined
mutually to dwell
near
themselves,
fcientes
familiaritatem confirmationem atnicit.
making
familiarity
a confirmation offriendship,
Itque
Aqula fixit nidum sper alt arbore.
Therefore the Eagle fixed a nest
upon a high tree.
Ver
Vulpes peprit
filos in proxmis
But
the Fox
brought-forth sons in nearest '
arbustis. Tgtur
aliquando
Vulpes
profeca
shrubs.
Therefore sometime the Fox having departed
ad pabulum
Aqula laboranS
inop
cbi,
to food,
the Eagle labouring with want offood,
cm
davolsset
(devolavisset) .
when she might have flown-down (she had flown down)
in
arbusta
et
sustulisset
into the shrubs
and might have borne-away (had
filos
hujus, devoravit
os
borne-awayJ the sons
of this,
devoured
them
un
cum sis pullis.
Vero
Vulpes
together with her young-ones. But
the Fox
reversa et
re
cognt, tristata-est
having returned, and the thing being known, was-grieved
non . . tm
morte
filiorum, qum
inop
not so by the death
of sons,
as
by the want
vindicta: nim qua
, esset
terrestris
of revenge: for. because -she might be (was) eartidy

M S P U S. .

potrat haud persqui alatam.


Quare
she was able
not to pursue her winged.
Wherefore
stans
procul,
quod
est
facle etam
standing afar-off, which is
easy
also
to the
impotentbus,
maledicebat
inmic. Autemnon
weak,
she did curse
to enemy. But
not
mult post, quibusdam
sacrificantbus capram
much after, certain persons sacrificing
a she-goat
in agro cm
Aqula
devolsset
in afield when the Eagle might havefiown-down (had
(devolavisset)
rapit partem
victm cum
fiown-down) she seized part
of the victim
with the
ignitis carbonbus et
tulit in
nidum.
Autem,
lighted coals
and bore into nest.
But,
vento fiante
tunc vehementer et
flamm
the wind blowing then vehemently and theflame
excitat,
pulli
Aqul,
cm
being excited,
the young-ones of the Eagle,
when
essent
adhuc
implumes, assati
they might be (were)
as yet
featherless, roasted
deciderunt in
terram. Vero"
Viilpes, cm
fell-down
unto earth. But
the Fox,
when she
accurrisset
devoravit omnes
might have run-to (had run to them) devoured all
in conspectu
Aqul.
in sight
of the Eagle.
Application.
Fabula
signfcat, eos,
qui vilant amicitam
The Fable
signifies,
those, who violate friendship
lct
fugnt ultionem ab
afPectis
although they may avoid
revenge from those affected
injuria ob
impotentam, tamen non
with injury
through weakness,
yet
not aboutdepulsuros
divinum supplicium.
to-repel (they shall not escape) divine
punishment.

M S 0 P s.

FABLE IL
. Philomela
et
Accipter.
The Nightingale and the Hawk.
Philomela
sdens siper
arbore canebat deA Nightingale sitting upon a tree
did sing after
more.
Autem
Accipter
conspicatus eam
manner. But
a Hawk
having viewed
her
ac indgens
cbi, cm
advolsset
and wanting
offood, when he might have flown-to
(advolavisset)
corripit.
Qu qum
(had flown to her) seized her. Who when she
esset
peritura,
orabat Acciptrem
might be (wasJ about-to-perish, did pray the Hawk
ne
devoraretur; enim dixit neque
esse
lest she might be devoured ; for she said neither to be
stis
ad
ventrem
Acciptris
implendum,.
enough to the belli/
of a Hawk
to befilled,
sed
oportere ipsum egentem cbo
converti
but to behove
himself wanting food to be turned
ad majores ves.
Autem
Accipter
cm
to greater birds.
But
the Hawk,
when
respondisset
ait, Sed ego
he might have answered (had answered), says, But I
cert
sim
amens,
si,
cbo
certainly may be (should be) foolish, if,
the food
dimisso,
qui
est paratus
in manbus,
being dismissed, which is
prepared in hands,
persquar
qu
videntur non
I may pursue
(the things) which are seen
not
uspam.
any where.
Application.
Fabula signfcat
ut
etam
i
x
The Fable
signifies
that also
those out-of

M S 0 P U S.

homnbus
sint
inconsulti, qui
spe
met
may be (are) indiscreet, who in the hope
majorum,
qu
sunt incerta
amittant
ofgreater things, zvhich are
uncertain, may lose
qu
habentur in
manbus.
(lose) the things which are had
in the hands.

FABLE III.
Vulpes et
Hircus.
The Fox
and the He-goat.
Vulpes et
A Fox
and a
putum, sed
a well,
but

Hircus sitientes, descenderunt in


He-goat thirsting, descended
into
postquam
bibissent
after-that
they might have drunk
Hirco
indagante
ascensum,
(had drunk), the He-goat searching-out an ascent,
Vulpes it, Confide,
excogitavi quid
the Fox
says, Trust, I have devised
some tbing
utle,
et
etam in
salutem
utrusque>
useful, and also
unta
the safety
of each,
enim si
sttris et
for
if thou shalt have stood
and
shalt have
applicuris
anteriores
pedes
parti,
et
applied
thefore
feet
to the wall,
c(nd
inclinaveris pariter
corna
in
shalt have inclined
likewise the horns
unto the
anteriorem
partem,
qum
ipsa
fore
.
part,
when
1 myself shall have
percurrro
per
tuos
humrOs
et
eornta
run-over
through thy
shoulders and
horns
et
exilro
illinc extra
putum ;
and shall have leaped-out
thence out-of the well ;
posta
extrham
et
te
hinc.
afterwards I will draw-out
and (also) thee henoe.

JE S 0 P U S.
prompt
ad hoc
prstto
Autem, officio
being afforded
readily
to
this
But,
duty
qum
illa
ab
Hirco,
exiluisset
might have leuped-out
she
by the He-goat, when
ex
puto
sic
(had leaped-out) out-of the well
thus,
she did
cxultabat
beta circum
os.
Autem
leap-about
glad around the mouth.
But
the
Hircus
accusabat ipsam, qud
He-goat did accuse
her,
because she might have
transgressa-fuisset
conventiones ;
transgressed (she had transgressed)
the agreements;
autem
ilia
inquit,
Si
possideres
but
she
says,
If thou mightst possess (didst
tot
mentes
quot
plos
in
possess) so-many minds
as-many-as hairs
in
barb,
descendisses
non ante
beard,
thou wouldst have descended
not
before
qum
considerasses (consideravisses)
than
thou mightst have considered
( hadst considered)
de
ascensu.
concerning the ascent.
Application.
Fabula
signfcat,
sic
oportere
the
to behove
The Fable
signifies,
thus
prudentem vrum
considerare prus
fines
prudent
man
to consider
before the ends of
rerum
altus deinde
sic
aggrdi ipsas.
things more-highly, afterwards thus to attempt them.
FABLE IV.
Vulpes et
Lo.
The Fox
and the Lion.
Qum
Vulpes
vidisset
When a Fox
might have seen (had seen)
a5

nunquam
never

JE S 0 P U S.

Leonem,
a o+

qum
occurrisset
tSi
when she might have met (had met)
, to
quodam
casu,
primm
timit
Un by a certain
accident? first
she feared
sic, ut
moreretur
ferm.
Deindc
so, that she might die (did die) almost.
Afterwards
qum
vidisset'
secundo,
timit
when she might have seen (had seen) secondly, shefeared
cert
tmcn non ut prias :
autem
qum
certainly
yet
not es before : but
ruhen
vidisset
ipsum
tertfo,
she might have seen (had seen) him
thirdly, she
ausa est sic contra
um, ut
accedret
dared
so against him, that she might approach
et
colloqureturv
(did approach) and might converse ( did converse}.
Application.
FabMa signfeat, familiaritatem
facere vel
The Fable
signifies^ familiarity
to make even
terribilta
facila
accessu.
frightful things easy
to be approached.

FABLE V.
Vufpes.
The Foxes.
Vulpes
capta
hquo,
qum
A Fox
being taken
in a snare,
when she might
evasisset,
caud
absciss,
have escaped (had escaped) tail
being cut-off,
did
existimabat
vitam
non
vitalem
prse
pudore :
think
Uf
not
liveable for
shame :
itque
decrevit
et
persuadere
hoc
therefore she determined also to persuade
this

S U S.

itdem
alis Vulpbus, ut , >
celaret
likewise to the other Foxes,
that she might conceal
sum
dedeus
communi mlo. Et jam,
her-own disgrace by the common evil.
-And a/ready
omnibus
colleetis .
suadebat
abscindre
all
being collected, she did .persuade
to cut off
caudas, qud hoc membrum
sit
non solum
tails,
because this member
may be (is) not only
indcens,
sed
supervacum onus
appensum.
unbecoming, but a superfluous
burthen appended.
Atttem qudam
ex
ipsis respondens ait :
But
a certain one out of them answering
says :
Heus tu,
nisi
hoc
conducret
Hol thou, unless this might profit (did profit)
tbi,
consideres non
nobis.
thee, thou wouldst advise it
not to us.
Application.
Fabula
signfcat,
pravos
hommes non
The Fable
signifies,
wicked
men
not
consulere
propinquis
pr benevolent,
sed
to advise
to neighbours for
good-will,
but
propter
sam
utilitatem
ipsorum.
on-account-of their-own
advantage .
of themselves.

FABLE VI.
Vutpes et
Rbus.
The Fox
and the Bramble.
Vulpes,
sepe
consccns,
qum
A Fox,
a hedge being mounted,
when, having
lapsa
foret
casura, apprehendit
slipped she might be (was) about-to-fall,
seized
liubum
in
adjutoium.
Quamobrem, qum
a Bramble unto assistance.
Wherefore
when

S U S.

cruentsset (cruentavisset)
sos pdes
she might have made-bloody (had made bloody) her feet
aculis
ejus
et
doleret,
with the prickles of it and might suffer (did suffer),
dixit
ei, Hei mihi, nim cum
she said toit, Alas tome, for
when I might have
confugissem ad te,
tanqum ad auxiliatorem tu
fled (hadfled) to thee, as-if
to a helper
thou
tractsti (tractavisti) me pejus. Sed heus ! tu,
hast treated
me worse. But ho !
thou,
inquit
Rbus,
qu voluisti
apprehendre me,
says the Bramble, who wishedst to seize
me,
qui
solo
apprehendre omnes.
who am accustomed to seize
all.
Application.
Fabula signfcat sic homines et
esse stultos,
The Fable
signifies
so men
also to be foolish,
qui accurrunt ad ills, grat
auxili,
who run-to
to them, for-the-sake of help,
to
qubus
est instum

natur mgis
affcre
whom it is
implanted by nature more to affect
injuria.
with injury.

FABLE VII.
Galli et
Perdix.
The Cocks and the Partridge.
Quidam
hbens Gallos
dmi, dimisit
A Certain man
having Cocks at home, dismissed
quoque
emptam Perdicem
pasci cum illis :
also
a bought Partridge to befed
with them ;
ver
illis verberantbus et
expellentbus ipsam,
but
they beating
and expelling
her,

JE S OP US.

illa
tristabatur valde
existmans Se
ut
she was grieved
very-much thinlcing herself
as
aliengnam
pti
hc

Gallis.
an alien
to suffer these things from the Cocks.
Vero qum paulo post
videret
But when a little after she might see
(did see)
et
illos
pugnare et
' cdre seipsos,
also them tofight
and to beat
themselves, being
soluta
inrore
it, Sed, quidem,
freed from grief she says, But, indeed, I will be
tristabor non posthc,
vdens et - ipsos
pugnare
grieved
not hereafter, seeing also them tofight
inter
se.
among themselves.
Application.
Fabula signfcat, qud
prudentes
frant
The Fable
signifies,
that the prudent
may bear
facle injurias,
ab
alienis,
qum
(bear) easily injuries, from strangers, when they
vidant
nque
ipsos
abstinare
may see (set) neither themselves to abstain
front
suis.
(heir-own.
FBLE VIII.
Vulpes.
The Fox.
Vulpes
profeca
m
domum
A Fox
having proceeded into the house
of a
Mimi, et
perscrutans
singula vasa
Mimic, and searching-thoroughly the several vessels
ipsius, invenit et
cput
larv fabrictum
of him,
found
also the head of a mask wrought
ingenios
et
quo accepto
manbus
ingeniously, and
which being taken-up in hands

10

M S P s.

it,

she says,
cerebrum !
brain !

quale
what

caput,
a head,

et
and

habet
it has

non
not

Application.
Fabula
(est scripta)
in
vros magnficos
The Fable
(is written)
unto men magnificent
quidem
corpore, sed inconsultos
animo.
indeed in body,
but indiscreet
in mind.

FABLE IX.
Carbonanus et
Fullo.
The Collier
and the Fuller.
Carbonarus habtans
in
qudam domo,
A Collier
dwelling
in a certain
house, did
rogabat
Fullonem etam advenientem,
cohabitare
ask ,
a Fuller
also coming-to him, to dwell
cum se.
Autem
Fullo respondens
-together with himself. But
the Fuller answering
it, Sed ego
possem non facere hoc, enim
says, But 1
would be able
not to do
this, for
timo ne tu
replas
fuligne
Jfear
lest thou mayst fill-again with soot
the
qu
ego delavo.
things which 1
wash-out.

Fabula
The Fable
insociable.
unsociable.

Application.
signfcat, omne
signifies,
every thing

dissimle esse
unlike
to be

S S.

II

FABLE X.
Piscatores.
The Fishermen.
Piscatores
trahebant
verriclum, quod qum
Fishermen did draw
a drag-net,
which when
foret
grve
gaudebant et
it might be (was) heavy they did rejoice
and did
exultabant existimantes multm
prd
inesse;
exult
thinking
much
of prey
to be-in it ;
sed qum
traxissent
ipsum-in
but when they might have drawn ( had drawn) it
unto
litus
que
invenissent
paucos
the shore and might havefound (hadfound) few
pisces quidem,
sed
permagnum
lapdem in o,
fishes indeed,
but a very-great
stone
in it,
cperunt
tristari
et
mrere, non tam
they began
to be grieved
and to mourn, not so
ob
paucitatem
piscum, qum quod
for thefewness
of thefishes,
as
because they
prsumpsrant et
contraria
an t
had anticipated
also contrary things
before in
animo. .A utem
quidam
grandor
natu
mind. But
a certain-one greater
by birth (older)
inter
os
dixit,
ne-tristemur,
among them said,
we may not be grieved,

soci,
nam, ut
videtur, tristita est
companions, for, as it is seen,
sorrow is the
soror
voluptati, et
oportebat nos igtur
sister to pleasure,
and it did behove
us therefore
ltatos tantum ante,
tristari
etara
having rejoiced so much before, to be grieved also
omnino
in aliqu re.
altogether in some
thing.

12

M S P U S.

Application.
Fabula signfcat,
opottere
The Fable
signifies,
to behove
spe
frustrate.
hope being frustrated.

' . FABLE

non
tristari,
not to be grieved,

XL

Jactator.
The Boaster.
Quidam vir,
peregrinatus
deinde
certain man, having travelled-abroad afterwards
reversus in
sam
patram,
jactabat
having returned into
his own country, did boast
que
gessisse
multa alia
virilter
both to have performed many other things manfully
in diversis . Ipcis,
atque
etam
saltasse,
in different places,
and
ao
to have leaped,
(saltavisse)
saltum
hdi, quem nullus
ejus
a leap at Rhodes, which no-one ofthat
loci
poturit
saltare ; et '
place may have been able
to leap ;
and he did
dicebat se
habere testes
ad hoc, qui
say
himself to have
wit?iesses to th, those who
interfuerunt bi.
Autem quidam ex
tis qui
were present
tker. Sut some-one out of those who
adrant, respondens Sit,
Heus ! tu,
si hoc
were present, answering says, Ho!
thou, if ihis
est verum,
est non opus
tibi
is
true,
(there) is
not need to thee with
testbus :
en
Rhdus : en
et
saltus.
witnesses: behold Rhodes : behold also the leap.
Application.
Fabula signfcat, nisi
prompta demonstratio
The Fable signifies, unless a ready demonstration

vESOPUS.
ri
sit, omnem
of, a thing may be, all
supervacuum.
superfluous.

13
sermonem
speech

esse
to be
.

FABLE XII.
Promittens
One promising

impossiblia.
impossible things.

Pauper Vir
segrotans et affectus mle,
A Poor
Man being-sick,
and affected ill,
qutn
desperatus
esset,
when
he might have been despaired-of (had been

medcis
rogabat
despaired of) by the physicians,
did ask
the
Dos, pofficens
se
esse
oblaturum
Gods, promising himself to be about- to-offer
in
sacrificum
ipsis
eentum bves,
si
into
sacrifice
to them a hundred oxen,
if
fecissent
sanitatem rursus
they might have made (would make) health
again
sbi.
Autem
uxore
ejus
sciscitat,
to himself. But the wife of him having inquired,
et
bi
runt haec
tbi si
and where will be
these things to thee if thou
convaluris, ille it, nim
ptas
shalt have recovered, he says, for dost thou think
me
surgre hinc, ut
Di
reptant
me to rise
hence, that the Gods may seek-back
haec

me. >
these things from me.
Fabula
The Fable

Application.
signfcat, multos
polliceri
signifies,
many
to promise

facl$
easily

14

ifiSPS.

qu
the things which
perfcre
re.
perform in fact.

'
spefent
they niay hope (hope)

non
not

to

FABbE XIU.
:
'

Malignuz.
the Malig

Malignus
Vir
ivit
ad
um
Apollnem
A MagnUnt Mh wmt to
thdt
Apotlo
qui est In Delphis
vlens
tentare
um.
buho is
in Dephi
willing to try
him.
Atque d
passerculo
comprehenso
And therefore a little-sparrow being seized
mnu, et
o
contecto
veste
in hand, and it being covered
with garment
que
sttit
proxm
tripdem

both he tood very-near


the tripod
and
rogavit
Dum dicens, O Apollo,
utrum
asked
the God
saying, O Apollo,
whether
est quod fero in manbus vivum an mortum ?
(s 'what I bear in -hands
-alive -or dead?
statiets
si
dicret mortum, stendre
determining if he should say
dead,
to show
passerclum
vivum;
sin
vivum
khe little-sparrow
alive ;
but-if
alive, to
proferre ilium
sbcatum mortum.
Sed
product him
being suffocated dead.
But
Dus,
maligna
mente
ipsius
the God,
the malignant mind
of him
being
cognt,
Sit,
Heus ! tu,
facto utrum
Tcnown,
says, He!
thou, do thou
whether
va
foc&te:
Siiim
est
.of^ihe-two
tfmtu wiliest to do-:
for
-it is

8U&

I*

pnes
te
facre illud,
sive
in-the-power-of thee to do
that,
either
to
ostendre quod
contina vivum sive mortum.
show
what thou holdest alive or
dead.
Application.
Fabula signfcat, Dum nque
posse
The Fable signifies, God neither to be able to be
decpi,
nque
qulcqum
latere
um.
deceived,
nor
any tAng to be hid-from him.
FABLE XIK
Piscatoree.
The Fishermen.
Piecatore
egress!
ad venationem, qum
Fishermen having gone-out to hunting,
when
>defatigati
multo tempore
being wearied
in much time
they might have
cepisen*
>. tihil,
t
tristabantur
taken (had taken) nothing, both were grieved
admSdum
et
apparabant
discedre.
Sed
very*mah and did prepare
to depart.
But
stXtitn
Thunnus
petitus

immediately
a Thunny
sought (pursued)
by
maxmis piscbus, insilit
in
navgium
very^great
fishes,
leaped-in into the vessel
ipsorum: ver hoe
capto, illi
abire
/ them :
but
this being taken, they departed
ciW' voluptate.
with pleasure. ,
: :
isV.js^A^
.V .'.i4 . Application. . ..
mir Fabula signfcat, fortnam
donste
Th. fable
signifies,
fortune
to have given
saep
a
quse
arg
{dontisse) often those things which art has
preebit non.))
afforded noti >. %.... )........ ..-..-Vi
v. .. . .

16

iE S 0 P U S.

FABLE XV.
Deceptor.
The Deceiver.
Pauper vir
segrotans
vovebat
se
A poor
man being-sick,
did vow
himself
(esse)
oblaturum centum bves in
(to be) about-to-offer
a hundred oxen
unto
sacrifium
Diis, si
evadret; sed
sacrifice
to the Gods, if he might escape ;
but
Di
volentes
tentare
um,
liberrunt
the Gods
wishing
to try
him, freed him
(liberaverunt)
morbo.
At
ille
from disease.
But he
being
refectus, quonam
carebat bbus,
sacrificavit
restored, because
he wanted oxen,
sacrificed
centum bves formatos se
ex
past
a hundred oxen formed by himself out-of paste
psitos in
ar :
sed
Di statuentes
placed upon the altar : but the Gods determining
punire um, adatantes
i
in somnis
to punish him, , standing-near to him in dreams
dixerunt, Abi
ad
litus
ad um lcum :
said,
depart to the shore
to that place :
nim
inventes illic
mille
Attcas
for thou shalt find
there a thousand Attic
Drachmas.
Autem ille
exctatus, perrexit
Drachma.
But
he being roused,
proceeded
cum voluptate
et
alacritate
ad
locum
with pleasure
and alacrity
to the place
demonstratum, disquirens
aurum. Sed
pointed-out,
seeking-diligently the gold.
But he
incdit in
piratas illic, que
comprehensus-est
fell-in upon pirates there, and was seized

: s op s.

it

ab
by

ipsie.
Ergo
captue,
orabat
them.
Therefore being taken, he did pray .
piratas ut
demitteretur, promittens
the pirates that lie might be dismissed,
promising
se
(esse)
datufum ipsis
mille
himself (to be) about-to-give to them a thonsand
talenta
auri, sed qum
crederetur
talents ofgold, but when he might be believed
non,
abactue
ab ipsis,
(was believed) not, being driven-away by them,
divendtus-est
mille
drachmis.
he was sold
for thousand drachma,
Application.
Fabula signfcat, Dum
esse inimicum
The fable signifies,
God
to be
hostile
mendacbus hominbas.
lying
men.

FABLE XVt.
Ranas.
The Frogs.
D Hanae
pascebantr in
palude, autem
Two I<rogs were fed
ht a marsh, but
palude
siccat
state,
ll .
the marsh being dried, in summer, that (marsh)
dreKct,
quaerebant
alam ;
et
being abandoned,
they did seek
another; und
qdem
invnerunt ptui. Quo
viso,
indeed they found
a well.
Which being seen,
altra
inqut
altSrse, Hus tu,
the other (one) says to the other, Hark thou, letdescendamuB in
pututn. Ver illa
us-desend
into this
well.
But
she
65

JE S OP U S.
respondens it,
Si igtur
et
qua
answering says, If therefore and the water shall
-, '^arurit hc,
quomdo
ascendemus ?
have dried
hei e, how
shall We ascend ? . . t .
Application.
Fabla declart, non
oportere
aggrdi
The Fable declares, not to behove (us) to attempt
res
inconsiderat.
' .things inconsiderately.
FABLE XVII.
Snex
The Old-Man

et
and

Mors.
Death.

Snex
quondam, lignis
sectis
An old-Man formerly, logs, being cut
from a
monte,

elevatis in
humros, bi
mountain, and being lifted upon theshoulders, when
bisset
oneratus multam vam,
he might have gone (hadgone) loaded much
way,
defessus, et
deposit,
ligna,
et
being wearied, and laid-down
the logs,
and
invocabat Mortem ut
veniret. At morte
did invoke
Death that he would come. But death
illico
adstante,
et
rogante
causam,
immediately standing-by, and asking the reason,
qu
vocsset
. . . .se;
by which he might have called (had called) himself;
Snex
it, Ut
imponres hoc
the old-Man says, That thou mightest place
this
onus
super
humros
mhi.
burthen upon the shoulders to me.
,
..Application. ., . \ s.-;
Fabula signifcat omnm
homnem esse
The Fable signifies, all (everyJ man . to be

! S OP U 5.

19

studiosum vitae, et lct


immersus^ infinitis
fond
of life, and although plunged in infinite
periclis,
. videatur appetre mortem, tmen
dangers, he may seem to seek
death, however
eligere
mult mgis
vivre quam
mori.
to choose by-much more to live
than to die.

FABLE XVIII.
Anus
The Old-woman

et
and

the

Medcus.
Physician.

Muler
anus
d81ens
A Woman (being) an old-woman grieving (ill)
oculos conduxit
quendam
medeum
(as to the) eyes,
hired
a certain
physician
mercede, conventione
fact, si
with reward, agreement being made, if he might
curaret
se,
se
daturam
cure (did cure) herself, herself about-to-give the
pactam
mercedem i ;
autem sin minime
bargained reward
to him; but
if by-no-means
daturam .
nihil.
Igtur
(cured) about to give nothing.
Therefore the
Medcus
aggressus-est
curam :
vero
Physician
attempted
the care (cure) :
but
recedens
quotide ad
vetulam,
et ungens
going-back daily
to the old-woman, and anointing
oculos
i, quum' ilia
posset
the eyes for her, when she might be able (was able)
neququam
videre
hor
ob
by-no-means to see in that hour on-account-of the
unctionem, ipse f aufrens
quotide alquod
anointing, hiinself bearing-away daily
some
vas
ex
dmo,
discedebat. Igtur , -->
vessel; out-of the house, did depart.
Therefore the

20

* s p V a.

Snus
videbat sam supellectlem
old-woman did see
f,er furniture
tobe
mini
ado
singulis diebus ut
tandem
diminished thus in each
days,
that aUlength
nhil
relinqueretur
Uli sanatse. At
nothing might be left (was left) to her healed, But
quum jam
medcus
efflagitaret
when now the physician might demand (did demand)
ab

pecunam pactam,
ut quse
from her the money
agreed-on, as who might
vidret
jam pur,
et
adducret
see (did see) now clearly, and might bring (did bring)
testes ;
Mgis cert, it , vido nihil
witnesses) Rather surely, says she, I see nothing
nunc. Nam qum
laborabam
oculis,
now. For
when I did labour with (my) eyes, I
videbam multa ma
in m dftmo; autem
did see many my (things) in my house } but
nunc, qum
inquis me
videre,
vido
now, when (thou) sayest me to see,
I see
nihU
omnino ex
Ulis.
nothing at~all
out-of them.
Application.
Fabla signifcat pravos homnes, ignaros
The Fable Signifies corrupt men,
unknowing
afierre '
argumentum contra seipsos,
tobring (bring) an argument
against themselves,
ex
s
quse
gant.
out-of those (things) which they may do (they do).
FABLE XIX.
Agrcola ,.
et .
. Fil
ipsius.
Th Husbandman and the Sons of himself
Quidam agrictfla excessnrus
"
vit
A certain husbandman about~to-depart from iifh

JE S 0 P S.

21

TSiens
sos filos
facre periculum de
and willing his
sons to make trial
of
agricultura, ipsis
vocatis,
Sit,
mi
agriculture, themselves being called, he says, my
Fili, go discedo jam
vit, autem si vos
Sons, I
depart now from life, but
if ye
quaesieritis
quae
shall have sought (the things)
which
have been
occultata-sunt
me in
vin,
concealed
by me in the vineyard, ye shall
invenietis omnia. Uli
igtur,
rti
find
all.
They therefore, having thought
thesaurum
defossum-esse
illic
suffoderunt
a treasure
to have been buried there, dug-up
omnem
terram
vinae
post intertum
all
the earth of th vineyard after death
patris,
et
invenerunt non qudem
of (their) father, and found
not
indeed
thesaurum, sed
vina
pulchr
fossa
a treasure,
but the vineyard beautifully dug
redddit multiplcem fructum.
returned many-fold fruit.
Application.
Fabula signifcat laborem
esse
thesaurum
The Fable signifies labour to be
a treasure
hpminbus.
to men.
FABLE XX. .
lf i,,
IJrus
et
;.. Canes,
.. ou The Master and (his) Dogs.
Quidam vir
deprehensus tempestate
Acertain man being caught
by a tempest
in SO
suburbo, primum comedit
ves,
in his-own suburb
first
eat-up the sheep,

22

S OPUS.

dehirw
copras, Autcm
temperate invaleacente, .
next thegovts. But the tempest
strengthening,
comedia et
operarios bves
jugulates.
he eat-up also the working oxen being strangled.
Yero
Sues, his
visis, dixejrunt
But the dogs, these (things) being seen, said
inter
se,
. . , Sed nos
fugiamus hinc.
among themselves, But we let (us) flee
hence*
Enim si noster Hrus abstnet
non
for
if our
Master refrains not from the
operariis bbus, quomdo
abstinebit
nobis
working oxen, how
will he refrain from us?
Application.
Fabula signifcat
oportere
fugre
The fable signifies to behove (us) to flee
cavere
os
maxm qui abstinent ne
beware-of those chiefly who refrain not
sis.
(not even) from their-own. .' ,

et
and to
qudem
indeed

H
. ""
1 .
. \- . ' . '. . . . .
FABLE XXI.
Mulier
The Woman

et
and

Galling
(her) Hen.

Qudam vida muler


habebat
Gallmam
A certain widow woman did have
a Hen
parientem
ovum
sbi
singulis diebus: ver
producing an egg
to her in edch
days : but
rta,
si
projicret
plus
having thought, if she might cast (did cast) more of
hordi
Gallinse, m parituram -jiv v
barley to the Hen,
her about-to-produce (an egg)
bie
de,
fecit hoc.
Sed
Gallina
twice in the day, she did this. But the Hen

M SO PU S.
pinguefacta,
potit
being -fattened,
teat able
qudem smel
die,
indeed once
in the day.

23
parere
to produce (it)

ne
net

Application*
Fabila gniffcat Sos,
qui
ob
The Fable
signifies those, who on-ttocotttt-of
avaritam sunt appetentes
plurum,
amittere
avarice
are coveting
ofmore,
to lose
et
a
quse
adsunt.
also those (things) which are present (they have).

FABLE XXIL
Morsus
(One) kitten
by

Cne
a Dog.

Quidam
morsus
cne cireuibat
A certain (person) bitten
by a dog went^-about
qusereiis
m&caturum.
Autem qum
seeking (one) about-to-heal (him). But
when a
quidam
oecrriaset
i, et
.certain (person) might hve met (had met) to him, and
-cgnoscferet quod
quaerebat, Heus tu,
would know
what he did seek,
Hark thou,
it,
%i
vis
sana, acp partem
says (he), if (thou) wilt to be healed, receive bread,
atque sicca
sahgtinem
yulnris
o,
and dry the blood
ofthe ttotnd with that,
et
da
i
can, qui
momordit
ad
and give (it) t&fhat dog, which has bitten (thee) to
edndum. At is "Sit . tdendo, Sed si 1 "
to be eaten.
But he says 'ihaughing, But $f IshaH
,fecro
bki oportebit me
inordefi
,have done ibis, it-WH-bhoti.mImust) to-S-bitten

24

m S P s.

ab omnibus
canbus, qui
sunt in
urbe.
by all
the dogs,
which are in the city.
Application.
Fabula
signfcat pravos
hommes
The Fable
signifies
corrupt men
affectos
beneficio,
exaci
affected (loaded) by kindness, to be sharpened
ad
injuram
inferendam.
to an injury
to be brought-on.

etam
even
mgis
more

FABLE XXIII.
Adolescentuli et
The Young-lads
and

Ccus.
the Cook.

Do adolescentuli
assidebant
, et
Two young-lads did sit-near
to a Cook, and
Cco
occupato in alquo domestico opere,
the Cook being engaged in some domestic
work,
alter
horum demisit in
snum
the other (one) of these let-down into the bosom (lap)
alterus quandam partem
carnum
of the other a certain
part
of thefleshes (meat)
eubreptam. Autem

converso et
stolen.
But
the Cook being turned,
and
quserente
carnem,
qui
abstulrat
seeking
theflesh,
(he) who had borne-away (it)
jurabat se
non
habere :
autem
qui
did swear himself not to have (it): but (he) who
habebat,
se
non
abstulisse.
did have (it), himself not to have borne-away.
Vero
Ccus,
malit
ipsorum
cognt,
But the Cook, the malice of them
being known;
ait,
Sed etsi
, ;. - , latuertis
me,
says, But although ye may have escaped
me,

S U S.
latebtis
escape

Don igtur
Dum
not therefore God

25
pejeratum.
forsworn.

Application;
Fabla signifcat quod lct
pejerantes
The fable
signifies
that
although forswearing
latamus hommes, tarnen
latebmus
we may escape
men,
however we shall escape
non Dum.
not God.

FABLE XXIV.
Inimici.
The Enemies.
Duo quidam Inimici inter
se
navigabant
Two certain Enemies between themselves did sail
edem navi ;
alter
quorum
sedebat
in
in the same ship ; the other (one) of whom did sit
in
Puppi
a^ter
prora: auteni
on the poop (stern ) the other on the prow : but
tempestate superveniente et
navejam submergenda,
a storm
coming-on
and the ship now about-to-be sunk,
qui rat in
puppi
rogabat
gubernatorem,
(he) who was on the stern did askthe
pilot,
utra
pars
navigi
esset
whether (of two)
part
of the vessel
might be
obruenda
prus.
Que
cum
ille
to-be-overwhelmed
before (first).
And
when he
dixisset proram: Sed, ait,
mors est
might have said
the prow : Bat, saj/s (he) death is
non
grve
mihi, si
sum visurus
not a heavy (thing) to me,
if (I) am about-tq-see
inimicum moricntem ant
me.
(my) enemy
dying
before me.

26;

M S O P U S.
Application.

Fabla signifcat, multos hommes curare sutn


Thefable signifies, many men
to regard their-own
damnum nihil,
si mdo
vidant sos
loss
nothing,
if only they may see
their
inimicos mle affectos ant
se.
enemies badly injured before themselves.

FABLE XXV.
Felis et
Mures.
The Cat and the Mice.
Qummulti Mures
essent
in qudamdmo,
When many Mice might be (were) in a certain house,
o
cognto,
Felis ivit ,

devorabat
that being known, a Cat went thither and did devour
singulos
eorum captos. At
illi dixerunt inter
each
of them taken. But they said
between
se,
qum
viderent
se
themselves, when they might see (did see)
tkemselve
absumi,
Ne-descendamus, infra posthac,
ne
to be consumed, Let us not-descend below henceforth, lest
pereamus pentus. Nam si
Felis potest
we may perish
utterly. For if the Cat
is-able
non venire hue, nos ermus salvi. Sed
Murbus
not to come hither, we shall, be safe. But the Mice
descendentbus non amplus, Felis statit
evocare
descending
not more, the Cat
resolved to call- out
decipens os
per astutam, et
qum
(them) deceiving them
by cunning, and when
conscendisset
quendam pessulum,
he might have mounted (had mounted) a certain bolt,
suspendit
se
de
o,
et
simulabat
he suspended
himself from that, and did pretend

JE S 0 P U S.

2?

se
esse mortum. Autem
quidam
ex
himself to be
dead.
But
a certain-one out-of
Murbus
acclinatus, que o
viso, it,
the Mice
being bent,
and he being seen, says,
Hus ! tu etsi
fias
Hark ! thou, although thou mayest be made (mayest become)
saccus,
adibo
te non.
a bag,
I will approach thee not.
Application.
Fabula
signifcat, qum prudentes homines
The Fable
signifies,
when prudent
men
experti-furint pravitatem
aliquorum non
may have experienced the depravity
of some,
not
fall
amplus simulationbus
eorum.
tobe deceived more
by pretences
of them.
i
FABLE XXVI.
VulpeSt
Sirhius.
The Fox
and the Ape.
Sirmus
saltavit
quondam
ia
concilia
An Ape
danced
formerly
in
an assembly
irrationabilum animalum
et
approbatus,
of irrational
animals
and being approved,
electus-est Rex
ab ipsis. Autem cum
Vulpes
uas elected King by them. But
when a Fox
invideret 1
i,
qum
vidisset
might envy (did envy) to him, when he might have seen
carnem in quodam casse,
duxit Simum
(had seen) flesh
in a certain net, he led the Ape
sumptum illuc
secum,
dicens
qudd ipsa
taken
thither with-hiin, saying that
herself
invenisset
ilium thesaurum
et
might have found (had found) that
treasure
and

28

JE. S P U S.

tarnen ' se
non
uti o ; quippe qum
however himself not to use that ; because when (since)
lex
triburet
reg': atque
hortata-est
the law would grant (it) to the king : and she exhorted
ipsum ut regem accipre
thesaurum. At ille
himself as king to receive the treasure.
But he
profectus inconsiderate, et captus
casse,
having set-out
inconsiderately, and caught by the net,
accusabat
Vulpem, ut qu
decepisset
did accuse
the Fox,
as who might have deceived
Autem ilia
i,
Sime,
(had deceived). Bul
she (says) to him, Ape,
qum
tu
habeas
talem stultitam,
when
thou
maycst have (hast) such foolishness,
tenebie imperium in
bruta ?
shalt thou hold power
in (over) the brute (animals) ?
Application.
Fabla signifcat,os, qui aggrediuntur alquas
Thefable signifies, those, who attempt
some (any)
actines inconsult,
incidre in
infortima.
actions unthinkingly, tofall
into misfortunes.

FABLE XXVII.
Thunnus et
Delphin:
The Tunny-fish and the Dolphin.
Thunnus
pressus
cursu
Delphino,
A Tunny-fish being pressed in (his) course by a Dolphin,
que latus
magno imptu, qum
esset
and borne with great violence, when he might be (was)
capiendus,
inscus
,
decdit in
to-be-caught,
ignorant (unawares) hefell
upon
quandam insulam ob
vehementem imptum,
certain
island on-acount-of excessive
force,

S U S.

29

ver
Delphin et
ejectus-est cum o ab
but the Dolphin also was cast-out
with him from
eodem imptu. Autem Thunnus
conversus
the same force.
But the Tunny-fish being turned
et
conspicatus
Delphinum
agentem
and
having beheld
the Dolphin
acting
,
anmam,
it;
Mors
est
non
(breathing out) life,
says,
Death is
not
molesta
mihi
amplus,
qum
troublesome
tome
more,
when (since)
vidam
um,
qui
fit
causa
/ may see (I see) him,
who
has been
the cause
ipsius mihi, perire una
mecum.
of it to me, to perish together with me.
Application.
f
Fabula
signifcat,
homines fcl
ferre
The fable
signifies,
men
easily
to bear
miserias, videntes os
agre infelicter,
qui
miseries, seeing
those to act
unfortwiately,
fuerunt
actores
illarum.
have been
the authors
of them.

FABLE XXVIII.
Medcus
et
^grotans.
The Physician and (one) being Sick.
Medcus
curabat
JSgrotum : autem iEgrote
A Physician did attend (one) Sick :
but the Sick
morto, ille
dicebat
efFerentbus ;
having died,
he
did say to (those) carrying- out
Si hie homo
abstinuisset
(burying him) ; If this man might have abstained .
vino, et
usus-fuisset
(had abstained) from wine, and might have used (had used)
5

30

iE S P U S.

clysterbus,
interisset non.
Autem
clysters,
he might have perished
not.
But
quidam
ex is,
qui
adrant,
a certain (person) out-of those, who were present,
respomlens it,
Optme,
oportebat non te
answering
says, Best, it did behove
not
thee
dicre hc nunc, qum
est nulla utiltas;
to say
these now, when thereJ is no
use;
sed
admonere tunc, qum
potrat uti his.
but to admonish then, zehen he was able
to use them.
Application.
Fabiila sigmfcat, oportere amicos
Thefable signifies, to behove friends (thatfriends ought}
prbere auxilia
tempore necessitatis ; et
non
to afford
aids
in time
of necessity ;
and not
cavillari,
cum
desperatur jam
de
tofind-fault, when it is despaired already concerning
rebus.
(his) affairs.

FABLE

XXIX.

Auceps
et
Vipra.
The Birdcatcher and the Viper.
Auceps,
visco
accepto et arundinbus,
A Birdcatcher, bird-lime being taken and reeds (also)
exit
aucupatum. Autem
turdo
viso
went-out
to catch-birds.
But
a thrush being- seen
sedente
sper alt arbore, et
arundinbus
sitting (perched^ upon a lofty tree,
and the reeds
conjunctis in longitudnem inter
se,
beingjoined
in length
between themselves,
suspiciebat sursum ad Sum vlens
capre.
he did look-up
upwards to him willing to take (him).

.ESOPUS.

31

Cetrum ignarus
conculcavit Vipram dormientem,
But
ignorant he trampled a Viper
sleeping
sub
pedbus.
Ver
qum
irata
.under (his) feet.
But
when
being enraged
momordisset
ipsum, ille
jam
she might have bitten (had bitten) kirn,
he
now
gens
anmam
dicebat ; Misrum
acting (breathing out) life
did say ;
Wretched
me !
nim
vlens
capre
alum,
ipse
ne !
for
willing
to catch
another, myself
captus-sum ad mortem ab alio.
have been caught
to death
by another.
Application.
Fabula
signifcat,
os,
qui
insidiantur
Thefable
signifies,
those,
who
plot
proxmis
ignaros
sp
for the nearest (neighbours) ignorant (unexpectedly) often
pti
id
ipsum
ab
alis.
to suffer that self (the very thing) from others.

FABLE XXX.

Cnis
The Dog

et
Cocus.
and the Cook.

Cum
Cnis
irrupisset
When
a Dog
might have broken-in (had broken-in)
in
culinam,
Coco
occupato,
corde
into
a kitchen,
the Cook
being engaged,
a heart
arrepto,
fugit. At
Cocus
conversus,
being snatched-up, he fed. But the Cook being turned,
ut
vidit ipsum fugientem,
inquit, Hus !
when he saw him
fleeing,
(he) says,
Hark

32

S U S.

tu, scito me
observaturum te, bi
thou, know me about to watch
thee, where (wherever)
furis : nim
abstulisti
non
thou shalt have been : for
thou hast carried-away not
cor
mihi,
sed potus
dedisti
the heart for me (from me), but rather thou hast given
cor
mihi.
a heart to me.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, nocumenta spe
Thefable
signifies,
injuries
often
documenta
hominbus.
instructions to men.

firi
to become

FABLE XXXI.
Cnis et
Lupus.
The Dog
and the Wolf.
Cnis
dormiebat ante
quoddam stabulum :
A Dog
did sleep
before a certain
stable :
que qum Lpus
irrupisset
and when a Wolf might have broken-in (had broken in)
et
esset
facturus
um
cibum,
and
might be (was)
about-to-
him
food,
rogabat
ne-mactaret
se
he did ask (him)
(that) he would not-sacrifice
himself
tunc. Enim, inquit,
sum nunc tenis et
then.
For,
says (he), I am now
slender and
macilentus :
autem
si
expectaveris
lean:
but
if thou wilt have waited
parumper^ mi domni
sunt facturi
nuptas,
a-liltle,
my masters are about-to- nuptials,
et
ego tunc
depastus multa
ero
and I
then havingfed.
many (much) shall be

JE S O P S.

33

pinguor, et
fiam
suavor
cbus
tibi.
fatter,
and
will become
sweeter food
to thee.
Igtur
Lpus
persuasus abit.
Vero
Therefore the Wolf being persuaded departed. But
post
aliquot
des
reversus,
invenit
after
some
days
having returned,
hefound,
Cnem dormientem superus super
tectum
the Dog
sleeping
higher
upon the roof
doms, et
stans
infers,
vocabat
of the house,
and standing lower,
he did call (him)
ad se,
admonens
um
foederis.
Et
to himself, reminding him of the agreement. And
Cnis,
At, O Lpe, si
vidris
the Dog (says), But, Wolf, if thou shalt have seen
me
posthac
dormientem ant
stabulum,
me
hereafter
sleeping
before
the stable,
expectes
nuptas non amplus.
you may await
the nuptials not more.
Application.
Fabula signifcat prudentes hommes
cavere
Thefable
signifies prudent
men
to beware
ab
o, quamdu
vixrint,
qum,
from it, as-long-as they shall have lived,
when,
periclitti
in
alqu re,
having endangered (themselves)
in
some
thing,
furint facti salvi.
they shall have been
made safe.

FABLE XXXII.
Canis
The Dog
Cnis et
A Dog and

et
Gallus.
and the Cock.

Gallus, societate
int,
a Cock, partnership being entered-into,

34

S P S.

faciebant iter.
Autem vespr superveniente,
did make
a journey. But
evening coming-on,
Gallus, arbore
conscens,
dormiebat, at
the Cock, a tree
being mounted, did sleep,
but
Canis ad
radicem
arboris habentis cavitatem.
the Dog at the root
of a tree
having a cavity.
Ver quii
Gallus
cantsset
But
when
the Cock
might have sung (had sung)
noctu, secundum consuetudnem, Vulpes accurrit,
by night, according-to custom,
a Fox ran-to(him),
ut
audivit,
et
stans
inferus,
rogabat
when he heard,
and standing lower,
did ask
. ut
descendret ad se ;
nim
dixit,
that he would descend
to himself} fot
ht said,
se
cupre
complecti
animal hbens ta
himself to desire to embrace
an animal hating so
bnam voeem. Autem qum is
dixisset,
good a voice. But
when he might have said (hadsaid),
ut
excitaret
janitorem
prs
that he should rouse
the gatekeeper
before (first)
dortnientem ad
radicem,
ut,
qum
ille
sleeping
at
the root,
that,
when
he
aperuisset
descendret, et
might have opened (had opened), he would come-down, and
ill quserente
ut
-vocaret ipsum,
Cnis
she seeking
that she might call
him,
tht Dog
prosilens
sttim
dilaceravit
eam,
leapingforth immediately tore-in-pizces her.
Application.
Fabula signiYcat, prudentes hommes
mittre
The Fable signifies,
prudent
men
to send
astu
inimicos insultantes
ad fortiores.
by craft (their) enemies insulting (them) to stronger
(persons).

S O P"U S.

35

FABLE XXXIII.
Leo
The Lion

et
Ran.
and the Frog.

Lo,
Ran
aliquando
audit
vald
A Lion,
a Frog
sometime
being heard
greatly
clamante,
vertit
se.
ad
vocem,
crying-out,
turned himself to
the voice (sound),
rtus
esse alquod magnum animal ; autcm
having thought (it) tobe some great
animal; but
m
.
expectsset
parumper, vidit
when he might have waited (had waited) a-little, he saw
ipsam
egressam
stagno et accedens
her
having come-out from the pond and approaching
propus proculcavit.
nearer trampled (her) .
Application.
Fablasignificat,non oportere
, ,
The Fable signifies, not tobehove (thee) (that you ought not)
perturbari auditu solo, antequam
vidas.
tobedisturbed by hearing alone, before- that thoumay'stsee.

FABLE XXXIV.
Lo, et
Asnus, et
Vulpes.
The Lion, and the Ass,
and the Fox.
Lo,
et
Asnus, et
Vulpes, societate'
A Lion, and an Ass,
and a Foj,
partnership
int, egressi-sunt ad venandum. Igtur
mult
being entered) went-out
to to hunt.
T/ierefore much
praed
capt,.
Lo jussit
A smo
booty
being taken, the Lion commanded to the Ass

36

M S P s.

dividre
sbi.
At
ille, tribus partbus
to divide
for themselves. But he,
three parts
factis
qualter,
hortabatur
os,
ut
being made
equally,
did encourage
them,
that
elig/ent. Et
Lo perctus
ir
they might choose.
And the Lion roused with anger
devoravit
Asnum. Inde
jussit
Vulpi,
devoured the Ass.
Then he commanded to the Fox,
ut
dividret. Vero illa, omnibus congestis
that she would divide.
But she, all being heaped
in unam partem, reliquit quiddam minimum
into one
part,
left
some
very-little (portion*)
sbi.
Tum
Lo
ipsi, Quis,
for herself. Then the Lion (says) to her, Who,
optma
dociit te
dividre sic ? Ea
best (creature) has taught thee to divide
thus f That
calamtas
Asni, ver,
inquit.
calamity of the Ass,
truly, says she.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, infortuna
proximorum
The Fable signifies, the misfortunes ofthe nearest (persons")
esse castigamenta
hominbus.
to be
corrections to men.

FABLE .
Lo et
Ursus.
The Lion and the Bear.
Lo
et
Ursus
nacti
magnum
A Lion and a Bear
having got
a great (large)
hinnlum smul,
pugnabant de
o. Igtur
fawn
together, didfight
concerning it. Therefore
affecti
graviter se
invcem,
being affected (punished) severely by themselves mutuallyy

SSOPUS.

37

ado ut
corriperentur
vertigne
so
that they might be seized (were seized) with giddiness
ex
mult pugii,
jacebant dcfatigati. Autem
from much fight,
they lay-down spent.
But
ibi
Vulpes
eundo
circumcirca
vidit os
when a Fox
by going
round-about
saw them
prostratos, et
hin nulum jacenem in
medo
prostrated, and the fawn
lying
in the middle,
percurrens
per
medos
utrosque
running-through
through
the middle-(of)
each
rapit
que fugens abit.
At
illi
he snatchcd-it
and fleeing went-away. But they
videbant ipsam qudem, ver non valentes
surgere,
did see
her indeed, but not being-able to rise,
dicebant, Miseros nos, qod
laboravmus
did say,
Wretched us, because we have laboured,
Vulpi !
for the Fox !
Application.
Fabla signifcat alis laborantbus, alios
The Fable signifies others labouring,
others (some)
lucrari.
to gain (by it).

F4BLE XXXVI.
Vates.
The Prophet.
Vates
sdens in foro
disserebat. Autem
A Prophet sitting in the forum did discourse. But
cjum
quidam
supervenissct
when
a certain (person) might have come (had come)
derepent et
renuncisset
quod
suddenly and might have announced (had announced) that
d

38

iESOPS.

omnes
fenestr
tfohs ipsius
essent
all
the Windows of the house of him might be (wer)
aperte, et
omnia, cru*
Srant itfts, ablata,
opened, and all,
vohith were within -carrie-away,
suspirans
exilivit,
t ibat
ttirgim.
At
sighing
he prang-forth, and Went hastily.
St
quidam
cnspicatus ipsum currentem,
a tftain (person) having beheld
him
running,
itiquit, Hus tu, qui profiteris
prscire alienas
says,
Hark thou, who professest to fore-know others'
res,
prarvaticinabare non tas
ipsius.
affairs, didst prophecy
not thine (oten) of thyself.
Application.
Fabula in
os, qui gubernantes sam
vitam
A Fable against those, who conducting their-own life
prav,
conantur
prscire,
qu attnent
corruptly, endeavour to foreknow (things), which belong
nihil
ad se.
nothing to themselves.

FABLE XXXVII.
Formica et
Columba.
The Ant
and the Dove.
Formica sitens
descendit
in
fontem ac
An Ant
thirsting wenudown unto afountain and
tracta

flux,
suffocabatur.
Vero
dragged by the stream, was strangled (nearly). But
Columba,
hoc
viso,
projecit
ramura
a Dove,
this being seen,
cast
a bough
arboris decerptum in
fontem, sdens sper
of a tree
plucked-qff into thefountain, sitting upon
quo
Formica evasit. Autem quidam auceps
which the Ant
escaped. But a certain bird-catcher

M q V S.

39

post
hoc,
calamis
composais, ibat
ad
after this, (hisgreeds
being arranged* did go
Columbam comprehendendam. Autem hoc
viso,
theJPove
to-be-seined.,
But
this being seen,
Formica, momordit
pedem
aucpis;
the Ant
bit
thefoof
of the bird-catcher ;
vr ille dolens
et projecit
calamos,
buf he grieving (in pain) both cast-away the reeds,
et fuit
auctor,
ut
Columba
fogret
and mas, the author, (cause} that the Dove might fly
stim.
(didfly) immediately.
Application.
Fabula signifcat
oportere
referre gratam
Thefable
signifies, to behove (us) to repay afavour
benefactorbus. .
>.
to (our) benefactors.
'

II'

UN 111

...

..I

FABLE XXXVIII.
Vespertilio,
The Bat,

et
Rbus, et
and the Brier, and the

Mergus.
Cormorant.
Vespertilio, et
Rbus, et
Mergus, societate
A Bat,
and a Brier, and a Cormorant, partnership
int,
decreverunt agre
mercatoram
being entered-into, determined to act (lead) a mercantile
vitam.
Itque
Vespertilio
mutuatus
life.
Therefore the Bat
having borrowed
argentum
deposit i
medium,
Rbus,
silver
laid (it) down
in the middle,
the Brier,
accepit vestem secum,
Mergus
tertius
took
clothing with-him, the Cormorant third (took)

40

M S P S.

s,
et
enavigaverunt. Autem
vehement!
brass, and they sailed-away.
But
a violent
tempestate
obort, et
navi
evers,
tempest
having arisen, and the ship being overturned,
omnbus
perdtis, ipsi
evaserunt in terram.
all
being lost,
themselves escaped
unto land.
Ex
illo
igtur
Mergus
semper
From that (time) therefore the Cormorant
always
assdet
litorbus, si
mre
ejicat
sits-near to the shores,
if the sea
may cast-out (his)
s
quopam ;
ver
Vespertilio timens
brass any-where ;
but the Bat
fearing (his)
creditores, apparet non interdu, sed exit
nocte
creditors, appears not by-day, but goes-out by-night
ad pabulum. Vero
Rbus prehendit
vestem
to food.
But
the Brier
seizes
the garment
prtereuntum,
qurens
sicbi
of (those) passing-by,
seeking
if-any where
cognoscat sam.
it may recognize Ws-own (clothing).
Application.
Fabula significat, nos
recidre in postrum
The Fable signifies, us to fall-back in subsequent
in
a,
qubus
incumbmus.
(time) upon those (things), to which we lean-on (we
devote ourselves).

FABLE XXXIX.
iEgrotus
et
Medcus.
The Sick (man) and the Physician.
Quidam
grotans, et
rogatus
A certain (person) being-sick, and being asked by (his)

M S) Q P U S-

41

Medco, quomdo
valuisset?
Sit,
Physician, how
he might hqve been- in-health ? he says,
sudsse
pls quam
oporteret.
to have perspired more than it might behove (he ought).
Autem ille it
hoc
esse bnum. Ver secund,
But
he says this to be good. But secondly,
rogatus ab ipso itrum, quomdo
habuisset
being asked by him again, how
he might have had
se
Ait,
correptum horrore
(he had had) himself. He says, being seized with shivering
fuisse vald
concussum. Vero ille it
hoc
to have been
greatly shaken.
But he says this
et
esse bonum.
Rogatus rursum terto,
also to be
good.
Being asked
again
thirdly,
quomdo
valuisset ;
it,
how
he might have been-in-health ;
he says,
incidisse in
hydropem. Ille it
hoc et
to havefallen
into a dropsy.
He says this also
rursus esse bonum. Inde
quodam
ex
again tobe good.
Then a certain (person) out-of{his)
domestcis rogante ipsum, Ut
hbes ?
Ego,
domestics asking him, How thou hast (thyself)? I,
hus tu,
it, pero pr
bonis.
hark thou, says he, perish before (through) good (things).
Application.
Fabula siguifcat nos
habere
odio
os
The Fable
signifies
us to have
in hatred those
maxm ex
hominbus, qui student
semper
chiefly out-of men,
who study (endeavour) always
lqui ad
gratam.
to speak to (gain) favour.

d 5

42

M S P s.

FABLE XL.
Lignator
et Mercurus.
The Wood-cutter and Mercury.
Quidam Lignator
amisit sam securim juxta
A certain
Wood-cutter lost
his
axe
near
fluvum. Tgtur
nops
consili
plorabat,
a river.
Therefore destitute of counsel he did lament,
sdens juxta
ripam. Autem Mercurus,
causa
silting near the bank. But
Mercury, (his) cause
intellcct, et
miseratus homnem,
(cas) being understood, and having pitied the man,
urinatus in
fluvum, sustulit
auram
having dived
into the river,
brought-up a golden
securim, et rogavit, an
hc
esset,
quam
axe,
and asked, whether this might be (that), which
perdidrat. Ver illo dicente eam non esse,
he had lost.
But he saying that not tobe,\it)
urinatus itrum,
sustulit
argentam.
having dived
again, he brought-up a silver (axe).
Vero
illo dicente,
hanc neque
esse sam,
But
he
saying,
this
neither to be
his,
urinatus tertio,
sustulit
illam ipsam.
having dived
thirdly, he brought-up that
itself.
Ver illo dicente hanc
esse ver
deperdtam,
But he saying this to be
truly (that) lost,
Mercurus,
quitate
ipsius
probat, donavit
Mercury, the equity of him being approved, presented
omnes
i.
Ver
ille
profectus
narravit
all
to him. But
he having set-out
related
socis
omnia qu
accidrant : quidam
to (his) companions all
which had happened : a certain
unus quorum decrevit
facere edem
et
one of whom determined to do the same (things) and

JE S 0 P U i,

profectus ad
fluvum,
et demisit sam
having set-out
to the river,
also let-down his
securim consulto
in
fluvum, et
sedebat
axe
designedly into the river,
and did sit
plorans.
Igtur
Mercurus appaiit et
illi, et
weeping. Therefore Mercury appeared also to him, and
caus
plorats
intellect,
the cause
of (his) weeping
being understood,
urinatus similiter
extulit
auram
having dived
similarly
he brought-up
a golden
securim, et rogavit,
an
amisisset
axe,
and asked (him), whether he might have lost
hanc ? Illo dicente cum gaudo, et . ver
(had lost) this ? He saying with joy,
and truly
hc est,
Dus
perosus tantam impudentam,
this is (if), the God utterly-hating so-great impudence,
non solum detinit illam, sed ne qudem
reddidit
not only kept
that, but not indeed (even) restored
propram.
his-own.
Application.
Fabula
signifcat, quantum
Dus auxiliatur
The Fable
signifies,
how-much God
aids
justis, tantum euro esse contrarum
injustis.
to the just, so-much him to be opposed
to the unjust.
FABLE XLI.
Asnus et
Hortnlanus.
The Ass
and the Gardener.
Asnus servens
olitori,
precatus-est
An Ass
serving to a market-gardener, prayed-lo
Jvem, ut
liberatus ab
olitore,
Jupiter, that beingfreed
from the market-gardener,
venderetur
altri
domno, quonam.
he might be sold
to another master, since

<4

iE SOP 9.

omedebat parum, vero


laboraWt plurmum.
he did eat
little, bul did lahwr
very-muck.
Ver qum Jupter
exoratus
But when Jupiter being entreated (prevailed-on)
jussisset
ipsum
vendi
might have ordered (had ordered} him
to be sold
figulo,
ferebat
iniquo
to a potter, he did bear (it) with uneven (impatienJ)
animo itrm, portans plura onra
quam prus,
mind again, carrying more burthens than before,
et ferens cnum et tegulas. Igtur
rogavit
and bearing mud and tiles. Therefore he entreated
rursus, ut
mutaret
dommum, et
again, that he might change (his) master,
and
[venundtus-est
coriaro.
Itque
was sold
to a tanner.
Therefore
- nactus pejorem herum
priorhus,
having got
a worse
master (than) the former,
et vdens, quse
firent
and seeing, what (things) might be done (were done)
ab So,
it, cum suspiris, Hei
mihi misero !
by him, he says, with sighs,
TVoe to me wretched !
rat melius
mihi
manere &pud
priores
it was better for me to remain with (my) former
heros ; nini hic,
ut video,
conficet et
master ; for this (one), as I see, willnish
also
mam pellem.
my
hide.
Application.
Fabul signifcat, quod famuli desidrant
The Fable signifies, that servants want
(their)
priores
domnos
tunc
maxm,
qum
former
masters
then
mostly,
when
fecrint
periclum de
secundis.
they shall have made
trial
of the second.

45

M S 0 P s.
FABLE XLII.
Auceps
et
Galerita.
The Bird-catcher and the Lark.

Auceps
struxrat
laquos
avbus :
A Bird-catcher had constructed pit-falls for birds :
vero Galerita
conspicata hunc
procul,
but a Lark
having espied
him at-a- distance,
rogavit
quidnam
facret ?
Eo
asked (him)
what
he might do (did do) ? He
dicente se
condre
urbem ; deinde
saying himself to build
a city ;
afterwards
regresso
procul
et
abscondto,
having returned at-a-distance, and being hidden,
Galerita
credens
verbis
vri
the Lark
believing
to the words
of the man
accessit
ad
cassem et
capta- est; at
approached to the net
and was taken ;
but
Aucpe
accurrente, ilia dixit, Hus ! tu,
the Bird-catcher running-up, she said, Ho ! thou,
si
condes talem urbem,
invenes
if thou wilt build such a city, thou shaltfind
non multos incolentes.
not many inhabiting (it).
Application.
Fabula signifcat, domos et
The Fable
signifies,
houses and
desolari
maxime,
qum
to be desolated
most,
when
furint molesti.
shall have been
troublesome.

urbes tum
cities then
preefecti
governors

M S 0 P s.
FABLE XLIH.
Viator.
Tlie Traveller.
Viator
mult v
confect, wvitj
si
A Traveller, much way beingfinished, vowed, if
invenisset
quod,
se
he might have found (had found) any \thing)x himself
dedicaturum
dimidum
ejus
Mercuro.
about-to-devote the half
of it
to Mercury.
Igtur
nactus peram plenam cariotarum
Therefore havinggot
a bag full
ofdates
et amygdalarunijatque
acceptt
comedit
and almonds,
and that being received, he ate-up
as.
Sed
imposit
ossa
them.
But
he placed
the bones (stones)
cariotarum et
cortices
amygdalajura
ofthedates
and therind (shells)ofthe almonds
super
quodam
altari,
inquens,
Babes
upon
a certain
altar,
saying, Thou hast
votum, O Mercri ! nam
dividendo exteriora
(my) vow, Mercury : for by dividing the outer
et
interiora
ri
inventae, dono
and the inner (parts) of the thing found, Ipresent
tbi.
them) to thee.
Application.
Fabla in
avarum
vrum, et fallentem
A Fable against an avaricious man, and deceiving
Dos ob
cupiditatem,
the Gods on-account-of covetousness.

S S.

47

FABLE XLW.
Per et
Mater.
The Boy and (his) Mother.
Per
Ftfrtus librum
condiscipuli ex
A Boy having stolen a book of a schoolfellow from
literario ludo,
tulit
Matri.
a literary play (a school), brought (it) to (his) Mother.
Ver qum a
reprehendisset
But when she might have rebuked (him) (hadrebuked)
non, sed potus
amplexata-fuisset
not, but rather might have embraced (had embraced
potus,
provectus
aetate
cpit t
him) rather, being advanced in age he began also
furari majora.
Autem
deprehensus
to steal greater (things) . But
being caught
aliquando in
furto,
ducebatur rect
some-time in the theft, he was led
straightway
ad mortem. At
Matre
sequente
et
to death.
But (his) Mother following and
lgenTe,
ille
orabat
carnifces,
ut
mourning,
he did pray the executioners, that
colloqueretur
pauca
queedam
he might discourse
a few
certain (things)
Matri
in
aurem.
Quse
cm
to (his) Mother into (her) ear.
Who when
admovisset
se
illico
she might haveapplied (hadpplied) herself immediately
ori
fili, ille abscdit
aurem
to the mouth of (her) son, he cut-off (her) ear
demorsam
dentbus : autem
Matre
bitt&n-off with (his) teeth :
but (his) Mother
et
alis
accusantbus,
quia
non solum
and others accusing (Mm), because not only
.furatus-tfisset
sed jam
et
he might have stolen (had stolen), but now also

48

S U S.

esset
impus in
Matrem, ille it
might be (was) impious unto (his) Mother, he says,
Enim hc
fit
causa
perditionis
mihi.
For she has been the cause of destruction tome.
Enim, si
reprehendisset
me,
For, if she might have rebuked (had rebuked) me,
qum
furatus-fuissem
librum,
when I might have stolen ( had stolen) the book,
progressus
usque ad haec,
having advanced
until to
these (things),
ducrer non nunc ad mortem.
/ should be led
not now to death,
Application.
Fabula signifcat
mala
eorum, qui
The Fable signifies the evil (deeds) of those, who
puniuntur non in
principio,
augeri
are punished not in the beginning, to be increased
in
majus.
unto greater.

FABLE XLV.
Pastor
et
Mre.
The Shepherd and the Sea.
Pastor
pascens gregem in martimo lco,
A Shepherd feeding aflock
in a maritime place,
Mri,
viso tranquillo, desideravit navigare
the Sea being seen calm,
longed
to sail
ad mercaturam. Igtur
ovbus
vendtis,
to traffic.
Therefore (his) sheep being sold,
et
fructbus palmarum
emptis,
solvit.
and the fruits
ofpalm-trees being bought, he loosed
Ver vehementi tempestate
facta, et
(anchor). But a violent
tempest being made, and

M S P U S.

49

qum
when

navis
esset
periculo, ne
the ship might be (was) in danger, lest
submergeretur,omni onre
ejecto
shemightbesunk,
all theburden beingcast-out
in
mre,
evasit
vix
incolmis
vac
into the sea, he escaped hardly safe in the empty
navi. Ver post non-paucos
des, quodam
ship. But after not-few (many) days, a certain (person)
transente, et admirante
quietem
mris
passing-by, and admiring the tranquillity ofthesea
(nim id ratfort
tranquillum)hic,
(for that was by-chance calm)
he(the shepherd)
sermone
suscepto, it.
Mre desidrat
the discourse being taken-up, says, Tlie Sea wants
cariotas itrum, ut
videtur, et proptera videtur
dates
again, as it seems, and therefore seems
quietum.
still.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, calamitates firi
documenta
The Fable signifies, misfortunes tobecome instrtcctions
hominbus.
to men.

FABLE XLYI.
Pumca
et
Malus.
The Pomegranate and the Apple.
Punca
et
Malus
contendebant
A Pomegranate and an Apple did contend
de
pulchritudne. Vero multis contentionbus
concerning beauty.
But many disputes
factis, intrim,
Rbus audens
ex
being made, mean-while, a Briar hearing (them) from
e

50

S S.

proxm sepe,
ait,
Desinamus, amicse,
the nearest
hedge, says, JLet-us-cease, friends,
aliquando
pugnare.
some-time toJight.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, etam
vilissmos conari
The Fable signifies, even the meanest to endeavour
esse alquos
in
seditionbus
to be some (remarkable) in the disturbances of the
praestantiorum.
more- excellent.
FABLE XL VII.
Tal pa.
The Mole.
Talpa est animal. Igtur
dicit
The Mole is a blind animal. Therefore she says
aliquando
matri, Mater,
vido morum:
some-time to (her) mother, Mother, Isee a mulberry :
deinde
it rursus, Sum plena
odore
afterwards she says again, I am full (of) the scent
thuris :
et inquit itrum terto,
Audo
offrankincense : and says
again thirdly, I hear
fragorem aeri
lapilli.
Ver
mater
the noise of a brazen precious-stone. But the mother
respondens, it, O filia,
ut
percipo jam,
answering, says, daughter, as Iperceive now,
es non solum privata
visu, sed et
(thou) art not only deprived (of) sight, but also
auditu et olfactu.
(of) hearing and smelling.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, nonnullus jactabundos
The Fable signifies, some
boastful (fellows)

M S 0 P S.

&I

profiteri impossibila,
et
1 redarg in
to profess impossible (things), and to be confuted in
minimis.
the least.

FABLE XL Fill.
Vespae et
Perdices.
The Wasps and the Partridges.
Vespse et Perdices
laborantes'
sti
iverunt
Wasps and Partridges labouring with thirst went
ad
agriclam,
rogantes potum ab
o,
to a husbandman, asking
drink from
him,
promittentes se
. reddituras
hanc gratam
promising
themselves about-to-return this favour
pro
qu ;
Perdices
qudem
fodre
for the water : The Partridges indeed to dig the
vinas : autem Vespse
eundo circumcirca
vines : but the Wasps by going round-about to
arcere
fures.
At
agrcla
inquit,
drive-away the thieves. But the husbandman says,
Sed do bves sunt mihi, qui
promittentes nihil
But two oxen are to me, which promising nothing
facunt omnia. Igtur
est melius
dre
do
all.
Therefore it is better to give fit)
illis quam vobis.
to them than to you.
Application.
Fabula in
perniciosos vros, promittentes qudem
A Fable against pernicious men, promising indeed
juvare, autem lsedentes admdum.
to assist, but injuring very-much.

52

iE S PU S.

FABLE XLIX.
Pavo et
Monedula.
The Peacock and the Jackdaw.
Avbus volentbus creare regem, Pavo
The Birds willing to create a king, a Peacock did
rogabat ut
eligrent se
ob
ask
that they would elect
himself on-account-of
pulchri t udnem .Autem omnibus elegentbus um,
(his) beauty.
But all
electing
him,
Monedula,
sermone
suscepto, it, Sed
a Jackdaw, the discourse being taken-up, says, But
si, te regnante,
Aqula
agressa-furit
if, thee reigning, the Eagle shall have attempted 4
persqui nos, quomdo
fres opem
nobis?
topursue us, how wilt thou bring assistance tous?
Application.
Fabula signifcat,
oportere
eligre
The Fable signifies, to behove people) to elect
principes non modo propter
pulchritudnem,
chiefs
not only on-account-of(their) beauty,
sed et
fortitudnem et prudentam.
but also (their) bravery
and prudence.

FABLE L.
A per
et
Vulpes.
The Wild-boar and the Fox.
Aper
adstans
cuidam arbri, acuebat
A Wild-boar standing-by to a certain tree, did whet
dentes. Autem Vulpe rogante
causam, quare,
(his) teeth. But a Fox asking the cause, why,

JE S 0 P U S.

53

null necessitate
propost,
acuret dentes ?
no
necessity being proposed, he should whet (bis) teeth ?
Faco hoc, inquit,
non sine
causa: nam si
I do
this, says he, not without reason : for if
periculum
invasrit me,
oportebit me
danger shall have attacked me, it will behove
me
minime
esse tunc occupatum dentbus acuendis,
by-no-means to be then engaged in teeth to be whetted,
sed potus uti
paratis.
but rather to use (them) prepared.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, oportere
esse preparatum
The Fable signifies, to behove (one) to be prepared-before
adversus periculum.
against danger.

FABLE LI.
Cassta.
The Lark.
Cassta
capta
laquo, plorans
dicebat,
A Lark being taken by a snare, lamenting did say,
Hei
mihi miser et infelici
volcri !
Woe to me wretched and unfortunate bird! I have
Surripi non
aurum cujusquam, non quicquam aliud
stolen
not the gold of any-one,
not any
other
pretiosum ;
autem parvum granum
tritci
precious (thing) ; but a little
grain of wheat has
conciliavit mortem mihi.
procured death to me.
Application.
Fabula in
os qui subunt magnum periculum
A Fable against those who undergo great
danger
ob
vile lucrum.
on-account-of mean gain.
e5

54

iE S ITS.

FABLE LU.
Hinnlus.
The Fawn.
Hinnulus lt aliquando
Cervo, Pter tu
A Fawn
says some-time to a Stag, Father thou hast
natus-es et major et celeror
canbus, et
been born
both greater and swifter (than) dogs,
and
prterea
gestas ingenta corna ad vindictam ;
besides thou carriest great
horns
to revenge ;
curnam igtur
times
os sic ? Et ille ridens
why-then thereforefearest thou them thus? And he laughing
it, Qudem,fili,
inquis hc
vera; ver
says, Indeed, son, thou sayest these (things) true ; but I
scio unum,
quod qum
audivro latratum
know one (thing), that when I shall have heard the barking
cnis,
efleror
sttim
ad fugam, nesco
of a dog, I am borne-away immediately to flight, I know-not
quomdo.
how.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, qud nulla admonito confirmat
The Fable signifies, that no
advice
strengthens
timdos natura.
(those) timid by nature.

FABLE LIIL
Lepres et
Ranae.
The Hares and the Frogs.
J^epores aliquando
congregati,
deplorabant vitam
Hares some-time being assembled, did lament the life of
sui-ipsorum, qud
foret
obnoxia periculis,
themselves, because it might be (was) liable to dangers,

JE S 0 P U S.

-55

et plena timoris; etnim


consumebantur ab omnibus,
and full offear; for they were devoured
by all,
et canbus, et aqulis, et multisalis. Itque
both dogs,
and eagles, and many others. Therefore they
dixerunt esse melius mori srnel, qum timere
toto
said to be better to die once, than to fear in the whole
tempre vita?. Igtur
hoc
confirmato,
fecerunt
time of life. Therefore this being determined, they made a
imptumsmul in paludem, quasi
delapsuri in
rush
together into a lake,
as-if about-to-slip
into
earn et
suffocandi. Sed qum Ran, qu
it
and to be choaked.
But when Frogs, which did
sedebant circum
paludem streptu
curss
sit
about the lake, the noise of the running being
percepto,
insiluissent
iffico
perceived, might have leaped-in (had leaped-in) immediately
in banc, quidam
ex
leporbus,
visus
into this, a certain-one out-of the hares, having seemed to
esse sagacor
alis it,
Sistte,
be
more-sagacious (than) the others says, Stop,

soci
molimni nihil grave
in
vos
companions, devise
nothing heavy (ruinous) against you
ipsos : nim, ut videtis jam, alia animala et sunt
selves : for,
as ye see
now, other animals also are
timidiora
nobis.
more-timid (than) we.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, miseros
recrean
The Fable signifies, wretched (persons) to be relieved
ab alis patientbus graviora.
by others suffering
heavier (things).

56

S U 3.
FABLE LIV.
Asnuset
Equus.
The Ass
and the Horse.

Asnus putabat Equum beatum, utpote


nutritum
An Ass did think a Horse happy, forsooth beingfed
abund,
et accurate, qum ipse
haberet
abundantly, and carefully, when himself might have (had)
neque stis
palearum queid plurmum defatigatus.
neither enough ofstraws and that mostly being wearied.
Autem qum
tempus belli
instaret
But
when the time of war might press-on {did press-on)
et
miles armatus
ascendisset
and a soldier armed might have mounted (had mounted) the
Equum, impellensipsum hue
illuc,
msper
Horse, urging him hither (and) thither, and moreover
insiluisset
in
medos
he might have leaped-in (had leaped-in) into the middle
hostes, et
Equus jacebat vulneratus: His
enemies, and the Horse did lie
wounded : These (things)
visis,
Asnus,
sentent
mutat,
being seen,
the Ass, (his) opinion being changed, did
existimabat Equum miserum.
think
the Horse miserable.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, non
oportere
invidere
The Fable signifies,
not to behove (us) to envy
principbus et
divitbus ; sed
invid et perico
to princes
and the rich;
but the envy and danger
in
illos
consideratis, amare paupertatem.
against them being considered, to love poverty.

ES OPUS.

57

FABLE LV.
Avarus.
The Covetous (man).
Qum quidam A varus
vertisset
When a certain Covetous (man) might have turned (had
omnia sua bona in pecunam et
turned) all
his goods into money
and might have
fecisset
auram msssam,
defodit
in
made (had made) a golden lump,
he buried (it) in a
quodam lco, et so anmo et mente
defosso illic
certain place, and his soul and mind being buried there
un ;
atque
eundo quotide
videbat
together (with it) ; and by going daily
he did see
ipsam. Autem qum quidam
ex
operaris
it.
But
when a certain (person) out-qf the working
observsset um, et
(men) might have observed
(him), and might have
recognovisset
quod
factum-rat,
recognized (had recognized) what had been done,
he
sustulit
massam refossam. Post hc
ffle et
bore-away the lump dug-up. After these (things) he also
profectus, et
conspicatus iScum vacuum,
having gone,
and having espied
theplace empty,
cpit
lugere, et
evellre
capillos. Vero
began to lament, and to pluck-out (his) hairs.
But
qum quidam
vidisset
hunc
when a certain (person) might have seen (had seen) him
plorantem sic, et
audivisset
bewailing thus, and might have heard (had heard) the
causam, Hus tu, it,
Ne-tristare sic, nim hbens
reason, Hark thou, says he, Grieve-not thus, for having
aurum, nque
habebas : Igtur
reconde
the gold, neither didst thou have (it) : Therefore hide-up
lapdem acceptum pro
auro, et puta
a stone
taken
for (instead of) the gold, and think (it)

58

S P U S.

esse aurum
to be gold
usum tibi.
use to thee.
neque
(there) neither

tibi: nira
prstabit
eundem
to thee : for it will afford
the same
Enim, ut video, qum
aurum rat
For, as I see,
when the gold was
eras
in
usu
possessionis.
zeast thou in the use of the possession.
Application.

Fabla signifcat, possessionem esse nihil,


nisi
The Fable signifies, possession
tobe nothing, unless
usus
adfurit.
the use (enjoyment) shall have beenpresent.

FABLE LVI.
Ansres et
Grues.
The Geese
and the Cranes.
Ansres et Gres
pascebantur in
eodem prato.
Geese and Cranes werefed
in the same meadow.
Autem Venatorbus
visis,
Gres sttim
But
Huntsmen being seen, the Cranes immediately
avolaverunt, qud
essent
lves : ver
flew-away, because they might be (were) light : but the
Ansres, qum
mansissent
Geese,
when they might have remained (had remained)
ob
onus
corporum, fuerunt capti.
on-account-of the weight of (their) bodies,
were
tafeen.
Application.
Fabula signifcat
inopes fugre facl et
The Fable signifies the poor toflee
easily and (even)
' in
expugnatione
urbis, ver
divtes
captos
in the storming
of a city, but the rich
being taken
servire.
to be-slaves.

JE S P U S.

69

FABLE LVII.
Testudo et
Aqula.
The Tortoise and the Eagle.
Testudo
orabat
Aqulam, ut
docerct
A Tortoise did pray an Eagle,
that she would teach
se
volare. Autem admonente,
hoc esse
herself tofly.
But she admonishing (her) , this to be
prcul
natura
ipsius, illa
instabat
magis
Jar from the nature of her, she did urge
the more
precbus. Ergo
accepit ipsam
ungubus,
byprayers. Therefore she took her in (her) talons,
et sustulit in altum, inde
demisit.
Autem
and bore-up on high, thence let (her) fall-down. But
hc cecdit in ptras, et
contrita-est.
she fell
upon rocks, and was crushed.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, multos
The Fable signifies, viany to have
quia
audirint
because they may have heard (heard)
in
contentionbus.
(persons) in (their) contentions.

lsisse seipsos,
injured themselves,
non prudentiores
not more-prudent

FABLE LVIII.
Pulex.
The Flea.
Cum
Pulex
saltsset
aliquando,
When a Flea might have leaped (had leaped) some-time,
insedit
pde
vri. Autem hic
invoeabat
he settled (on) thefoot of aman. But
he did invoke
Herculem in auxilum : at qum
saltsset
Hercules unto assistance : but when he might have leaped

60

JE S P U S.

rursus illinc, suspirans it, Hercules,


(had leaped) again thence, sighing he says, Hercules,
si
auxiliatus-es non contra
Pilcem, quomdo
if thou hast assisted
not against a Flea,
how
adjuvabis contra majores adversarios ?
wilt thou assist
against greater adversaries ?
Application.
Fabla signifcat, non oportere
rogare Dum
The Fable signifies, not to behove (us) to entreat God
in
minimis
sed in necessaris.
m the least (things) but in necessary (things).

FABLE LIX.
Cerva.
The Hind.
Cerva, altro
oculo
obccato, pascebatur
A Hind, the other (one) eye being blinded, wasfed
in
litore, hbens
sanum oclum ad terram
ore the shore, having the sound eye
to land
propter
venatores, vero
altrum ad mre, unde
on-account-of huntsmen, but the other to the sea, whence
suspicabatur nihil:
autem quidam
she did suspect
nothing : but
certain (persons)
prternavigantes, et conjectantes hoc, sagittrunt ipsam.
sailing-by,
and guessing
this, shot
her.
Autem hc
lugebat seipsam, ut
qu
But
she did mourn herself, as (one) who might Iiave
passa-foret
nihil
unde
timuerat ;
suffered (had suffered) nothing whence she hadfeared ;
ver
prodta-foret
ab o,
but might have been betrayed (had been betrayed) by that,
quod
putabat non allaturum
malum.
which she did think
not about-to-bring evil.

S S.

61

A\yplication.
Fabula signifcat,
quse videntur sp
The Fable
signifies (that things) which seem
often
noxTa
, nobis, fieri utila; vero qu
utila,
injurious to us,
to become useful ; but which (seem) useful
noxa.
injurious.
FABLE LX.
Cerva et
Leo.
The Hind and the Lion.
Cerva fugens
venatores ingressa-est in
A Hind fleeing-from
huntsmen entered
into a
speluncam : autem cm
incidisset
cave :
but when she might havefallen (hadfallen)
in
Leonem bi,
comprehensa-est ab o :
upon a Lion
there, she was seized
by him :
autem morens
dicebat, Hei
mbi ! quod
but
dying she did say,
Whetome!
because
fugens
homnes
incdi
in
immitssum
fleeing-from men
I havefallen on the most-cruel
ferarum.
of wild-beasts.
Application.
Fabula signifcat multos
homnes
incurrre
The Fable
signifies,
many
men
to run-in
in magna pericula dum
fugut
parva.
into great dangers, whilst they avoid
small (onesJ.
FABULA LXI.
Cerva et
Vitis.
The Hind and the Vine.
Cerva fugens venatores delitit
sub
A Hind avoiding huntsmen lay^hid
under

vite.
avine.

62

M S 0 P U S.

Autem qum illi


prterissent parumper,
But when they might have passed-by a little,
the
Cerva
arbitrata jam
latere
prorsus,
Hind having thought
now to lie-hid
altogether,
incepit depasci
folia
vitis. Vero illis
began tofeed-on the leaves of the vine. But they being
agitatis,
venatores,
conversi, et
arbitrad
shaken, the huntsmen, being turned, and having thought
quod erat verum, alquod animal
occultari sub
what was true, some
animal to be concealed under the
folis,
confecerunt
Cervam
sagittis. Autem
leaves, theyfinished
the Hind with arrows. But
he morens dicebat tala :
passa-sum justa,
she dying did say
such (words) : I have suffered just
nim
oportebat non offendre am, quse
(things) ,for it did behove (me) not to offend
that, "which
servrat me.
had saved me.
Application.
Fabla signifcat,
The Fable signifies,
benefactores
(their) benefactors with

os
qui afficunt
those who affect (persecute)
injuria,
puniri Deo.
injury, to be punished by God.

FABLE LXH.
Asnus et
Lo.
The Ass
and the Lion.
Gallus pascebatur aliquando cum
Asno : autem
A Cock wasfed
some-time with an Ass :
but the
Leone
aggresso
Asnum,
Gallus exclamavit
Lion having attacked the Ass,
the Cock cried-out
et
Lo fugit, (nim
aunt hune timere
(crew), and the Lionfled, (for they say him to fear

S U S.

63

vocem
Galli.) At
Asnus
rtus
the voice of the Cock.) But the Ass having thought
um
fugisse propter
se,
sttim
him to havefled on-account-of himself, immediately
aggressus-est Leonem. Vero ut persecutus-est hunc
attacked the Lion.
But when he-followed him
prcul, qu
vox
Galli
perveniebat non
far-off, where the voice of a Cock did come
not
amplus, Lo
conversus devoravit um. Vero hic
more, the Lion being turned
devoured him. But he
morens clamabat, Misrum et dementemmeinim
dying did cry-out, Wretched and insane
me !for
natus non ex pugnacbus parentbus,
grat
being born not fromfighting parents, by favour
cujus
irri in acem.
(on account) of what have I rushed into line (battle).
Application.
Fabula signifcat,
plerosque
aggrdi
The Fable signifies,
most (persons) to attack
inimicos hommes, qui
humilirunt se
hostile
men,
who have humbled
themselves
de industria,
atque ta .
occidi ab illis.
from industry (design), and thus to be killed by them.

FABLE LXIJI.
Oltor
et
Cnis,
The Herb-seller and the Dog.
Cnis
Olitoris
decdit in
putum :
The Dog of an Herb-seller fell
into a well :
autem Oltor
vlens
extrahre ipsum illinc,
but the Herb-seller willing to draw-out him thence,
ipse et descendit in
putum Autem Cnis
he also ivent-down into the well.
But the Dog

64

S 0 P s.

rtus
gum
accessisse, ut
having thought him to have approached, that he might
obruret
se
mgis infers,
overwhelm (sink) himself rather more-low, being
conversus momordit Olitorem.
Autem hie
turned
bit
the Herb-seller. But
he having
reversus cum dolore, inquit, patfor justa;
nam
returned with pain, says, I sufferjust ( things) ; for
cur
stiidi unquam servare
interfectorem
why have I studied ever to preseme a murderer of
si?
himself?
Application.
Fabula in
injustos et ingratos.
A Fable against unjust and ungrateful (persons).

FABLE LXIV.
. .

Sus et
Cnis.
The Swine and the Dog.

Sus et
Cnis
convitiabantur mutu.
Et
A Swine and a Dog did rail
mutually. And
Sus
jurabat per Venrem, se
proculdubo
the Swine did swear by Venus, herself doubtless
discissuram Cnem
dentbus. Ver
about-to-tear the Dog with (her) teeth.
But the
Cnis dixit ad heec
per
ironam,
Dog said to these (words) through irony, Thou
Juras
bn nobis per Venerem,nim
significas
swearest well to us . by Femes, for thou signifiest
te
amari vehementer ab ips, quse admittit
thee to be loved exceedingly by her, who admits by
nullo pacto
in
sacellum
no
bargain (account) into (her) chapel (the person)

JE S 0 P U S.

65

degustantem tas impuras carnes. Et


Sus
tasting
thy impure fleshes. And the Swi?ie
Propter
hoc igitur
Da
fert
(says) On-account-of this therefore the Goddess bears
prse se
amare me mgis ; nam
before herself (professes) to love
me more ; for she'
aversatur
omnino occidentem aut laedentem
abominates (him) altogether killing
or injuring
quovis alio mdo :
tmen
tu
les
() in any other manner : however thou stinkest
ml et viva
morta.
badly both living and dead.
Application.
Fabiila signifjcai, prudentes oratores convertere
The Fable signifies, skilful
orators to convert
artificise in
laudm,
convica,
quse
artfully into praise, the reproaches, which are
objiciuntur ab inimicis.
.
objected
by enemies.

FABLE LXV.
Sus
et
Cnis.
The Swine and the Dog.

Sus
et
Cnis
certabant de
fcunditate.
A Swine and a Dog did contend about fruitfulness.
Autem Cnis dixit se
esse maxm fcecundam
But the Dog said herself to be most fruitful of
omnium animalum pedestrum :
et
Sus
all
animals
walking-on-foot : and the Swine
occurrens
ad hc, Sed qum
dicis
meeting (answering) to these, But when thou sayest,
hoc, scito, et te
parre
tos catlos ccos
this, know, also thee to bring-forth thy ivhelps blind.

66

S S.

Application.
Fabla signifcat res
judicari
The Fable signifies things to bejudged (should be
non
celeritate, sed
perfectione.
judged) not by speed,
but by perfection.

FABLE LXVI.
Serpens et
Cancer.
The Serpent and the Crab.
Serpens
vivebat un
cum Cancro,
A Serpent did live
together with a Crab, a
societate
int
cum o.
Itque
partnership being entered with him. Therefore the
Cancer, simplex
morbus,
admonebat,
Crab, simple in (his) manners, did admonish (him),
ut ille et
mutaret
astutam : autem hie
that he also would change (his) cunning: but he
prsebit se
minime
obedientem. Igtur
afforded himself by-no-means obedient.
Therefore
qum
Cancer
observsset,
when the Crab might have observed (had observed)
ipsum dormentem, et
compressisset
him
sleeping,
and might have squeezed
(had
pro
virbus,
occidit.
squeezed) according-to (his) forces (strength), he killed
At
Serpente
extenso
post mortem,
(him.) But the Serpentbemgstretched-out after death,
ille it, Sic
oportebat
esse rectum et
he says, Thus it did behove (thee) tobe
straight arid
simplcem antehac ;
nim eque
simple
before-this; for neither mighfst thou have
dedisses
hanc pnam.
given (suffered) this punishment.

M S 0 P s.
Application.
Fabula signif cat,
qui
The Fable signifies, (those) who
cum dlo, ipsos
potus
with deceit, themselves rather to be

actunt
amicos
approach friends
offendi.
injured.

FABLE LXVII.
Pastor
et
Lipus.
The Shepherd and the Wolf.
Pastor
reprit ac sustulit
catulum
A Shepherd found and bore-away the whelp of a
Lpi nuper natum, que nutrivit
una
cum
Wolf lately born, and nourished (it) together with
canbus. At,
qum
adolevisset,
(his) dogs.
But, when it might have grotcn-up
si quando
Lupus
(had grown up), if any-time the Wolf might have
rapuisset
5vem, ipse
et
persequebatur
seized (hadseized) a sheep, himselfalso didpursue
cum
canbus. Ver qum
cnes aliquando
with the dogs.
But when the dogs sometimes
possent
non
assqui Lpum,
might be able (ere able) not to catch the Wolf,
atque ido
reverterentur,
ille
and therefore might return (did return), he did
sequebatur, donee qum
assecutus-esset,
follow,
until when he might have caught (had
utpote
Lpus
f3ret
caught him), as (being) a Wolf he might be (was)
partceps
venationis,
deinde '
redibat.
a sharer
of the hunt (prey), then he did return.
A utem sin
Lpus
rapuisset
But if the Wolf might have carried-aivay (had

.68

JE S 0 P U S.

vem non extra,


ipse
occidens
earned away) the sheep not without, himself killing
clam,
comedebat cum
canbus, donee
fit) secretly, did eat (it)
with the dogs, until the
Pastor,
qum
conjectsset
Shepherd, when he might have guessed (had guessed)
et
intellexisset
rem,
and might have understood (had understood) the thing,
suspendit ipsum de
arbore et occidit.
hung
him from a tree and killed (him).
Application.
Fabula signifcat pravam naturam non nutrire
The Fable signifies, a corrupt nature not to nourish
bonos mores.
good morals.

FABLE LXVIII.
Lo et
Lupus.
The Lion and the Wolf.
Qum Lo
consenuisset,
When a Lion might have grown-old (had grown old),
segrotabat jcens in antro.
Autem esstera
he was sick
lying in a cavern. But the rest
animala prter
Vulpem, accesserunt
other) animals except the Fox,
approached about
visitatura
regem.
Igtur
Lpus
to-visit their) king.
Therefore the Wolf, Che
occasione
capt,
accusabat Vulpem pud
opportunity being taken, did accuse the Fox
at (to)
Leonem, qusi facientem
nihil
sum
the Lion, as-if making (regarding) nothing their
dominum omnium
et
proptera eque
lord
of all
and therefore neither having.

S S.
profectam ad visitationem. Intrim
Vulpee et
set-out
to a visit.
Meanwhile the Fox also
adfit
et audivit ultima verba
was present (came up) and heard the last
words of
Lpi. Igtur.
Lo infremit contra m;
the Wolf. Therefore the Lion growled against her;
sed tempore defensionis petito, Et, quis, inquit,
but time of defence being sought, And, who, says (she),
eorum, qui
convenerunt, profit tantum
of those, who have assembled, has profited so-much
quantum
ego, quse
circuivi
in omnem
as-much- as I, who have gone-about into all (every)
partem, et
qusivi
medicamentum pro te
part,
and have sought a medicine
. for thee

medco,
et
didci ?
from a physician,
and have learned
(a remedy)?
Autem qum
Lo
impersset
But when the Lion might have commanded (had
sttim,
ut
dicret
commanded)
immediately, that she should say the
medicamentum, illa inq uit Si vivente Lpo
medicine,
she say ,
If a living Wolf being
excoriato,
induris caldam pellem ipsius.
flayed thou shall have put-on the warm hide of him.
Et,
Lpo sttim,
jacente morto,
Vulpes
And, the Wolf immediately lying dead, the Fox
ridens
ait,
Sic
oportet non movere dommum
laughing says, Thus it behoves not to excite a lord
ad malevolentam, sed ad benevolentam.
to malevolence
but to good-will.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, um
The Fable signifies him
alum,
vertre laquum
another, to turn a noose

qui machinatur
who plots
in
seipsum.
against himself.

contra
against

70

S S.
FABLE LXIX.

Muler.
A Woman.
Qusedam Muler
babebatebrum vrum;
A certain Woman did have a drunken man [husband):
autem vlens
liberare ipsum
morbo
but willing to free
him
from the disease she
comminisctur quid tale.
Enimqum
devises
some such(thing). For when she might
observsset
ipsum gravatum ab
have observed (had observed) him
oppressed by
ebrietate,
et insensatum instar
morti,
drunkennss, and senseless like
of a dead (man),
deposit
eleyatum in
humeros
in
she deposited (him) lifted-up on (herJ shoulders into
sepulcretum, et abit.
Vero qum
a tomb,
and went-away. But when she might
conjectata-esset
ipsum jam
esse
have guessed
(had supposed)
him now to be
sobrum, pulsavit
janam
sepulcreti : autem
sober, she knocked-at the door of the tomb :
but
qum ille
dicret,
Quis est,
qui
when he might say (did say),
Who is (it), who
pulsat
janam ?
Uxor respondit, Frens
knocks-at the door ? The Wife answered, Bringing
cibara
mortis, ego adsum.
Et
meats (food) to the dead,
I am-present
And
ille
affer non mihi
comsse,
sed potus
he (says) bring not to me
to eat,
but rather
bibre, optme :
nim
es molestus
to drink, best (friend) : for thou art troublesome
mihi qum
meministi
cbi
non
to me, when thou hast remembered offood not
pots. Autem haec,
pectore
percusso, inquit,
of drink. But she, her breast being struck, says,

M S OP U S.

71

Hei
mihi misrse : nam eque
profi
Alas to me wretched: for neither have Iprofited
astu : nim tu, vir
non solum,
craft: for thou, man (husband) not only, hast
emendatus-es non, sed quoque evasisti
been amended
not, but also hast escaped (come off)
pejor
teipso,
cm
morbus
worse (than) thyself, when (since) the disease may
deductus-sit
tibi in
have been brought (has been brought) for thee into
habtum.
a habit.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, non oportere
immorari
The Fable signifies, not to behove (us) to continue-in
malis actbus : nam consuetudo
aliquando invadit
evil deeds : for a habit
sometimes seizes
homnem etam nolentem,
a man
even unwilling.

FABLE LXX.
Cygnus.
Tlie Swan.
Dives vir
nutriebat
Ansrem et
Cygnum
A rich man did nourish a Goose
and a Swan
smul,
tarnen non ad
edem,
sed
together, however not to the same (purposes), but
altrum
grat
cants,
the other (the one) by favour (for the sake) of song,
altrum
mensae. Autem qum
oporteret
the other of the table. But when it might behove
Ansrem
pti a
(did behove) the Goose to suffer those (things) for

72

JE S S.

causa quorum
nutriebatur, erat nox

the sake of which it was nourished, it was night, and


tempus permisit non
discernre utrumque.
the time
permitted not to distinguish each.
Autem Cygnus
abductus pro
Ansre cantat
But the Swan being led-away for the Goose, sings
quendam cantum, exordum
mortis : ac qudem
a certain song, the beginning of death : and indeed
exprmit
naturam cantu, vero effgit mortem
expresses fhis) nature by song,
but escapes death
suavitate
canendi.
by sweetness of singing.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, muscen saep differre mortem.
The Fable signifies, music often to put-off death.

FABLE LXXI.
iEthiops.
The ^Ethiopian.
Quidam
emit
.Ethiopem,
A certain (person)
bought an ^Ethiopian, having
rtus
talem
colorem inesse i,
supposed such
a colour to be-in to him,
by the
negligent ejus, qui habit
prus.
Ac
negligence of him, who had (him) before.
And (he
assumpto in
dmum
adhibit omnes
being taken
into (his) house, he applied all
abstersiones, que tentavit mundare
omnibus
cleansings, and tried to clean (to whiten) by all
lavacris : et quidem
potit non transmutare
washes : and indeed he. was able not to change the
colorem, sed
vexatto
" paravit
morbum.
colour, but the harassing (rubbing)procureda disease.

JE U S.

73

Application.
Fabla signifcat, Daturas manere, ut provenerunt
The Fable signifies, natures to remain, as they come-forth

principio.
from the beginning.

FABLE LXXII.
Hirundo et
Comix.
The Swallow and the Crow.
Hirundo et Cornix contendebant de pulchritudne.
A Swallow anda Crow didcontend
about beauty.
Autem Cornix respondens dixit, Sed ta pulchritudo
But the Crow answering said, But thy beauty
floret
verno tempore, ver mum corpus durt
flourishes in spring time,
but my
body
lasts
etam hyme.
even in winter.
Application.
Fabla
The Fable
meliorem
better (than)

signifcat
durationem
corporis esse
signifies the lastingness of the body to be
decore.
ornament (beauty).

FABLE LXXIII.
Butalis.
The Buzzard.
Butalis
pendebat
qudam fenestr: autem
A Buzzard did hang
from a certain window : but
Vespertilio, cum
accessisset
a Bat,
when he migh t have approached(hadapproached)
g

74

JE S 0 P U S.

rogavit, quare slet


qudem de, vero canit
nocte ?
asked, why he is-silent indeed by day, but sings by night ?
Ver dicente, facere hoc non temer;
But she saying, to do
this not rashly (without cause);
nam cnens olim
de,
furat capta, et
for singing formerly by day, she had been taken, aiid
proptera evasit
prudens ex
illo :
therefore came-off (became) prudent from that (time) :
Vespertilo it, Sed
oportet te
non
cavere
The Bat
says, But it behoves thee not to beware
nunc, qum
est nulla utiltas, sed antequam
now, when (there) is no
use,
but before-that thou
capereris.
might'st be taken (wast taken).
Application.
Fabla signifcat, pnitentam
esse inutlem in
The Fable signifies, repentance to be
useless in
infortunis.
misfortunes.
FABLE LXXIV.
Cochlae.
The Snails.
Filus rustci
assabat Cochlas: autem qum
The Son ofa rustic did roast Snails : but
when he
audiret
as stridentes, it,
pessm
might hear (did hear) them hissing, he says, worst
animantes,
cantis-vos, vestris dombus
incensis ?
animals, do ye sing,
your houses being burned ?
Application.
Fabla signifcat omne
factum intempestive
The Fable signifies all (every thing) done unseasonably
esse vituperable.
to be .

JE S P U S.

75

FABLE LXXV.
Muier et
Ancill.
The Woman and the Servant-girls.
Operosa vidiia Muier hbens ancillas,
A laborious widow Woman having servant-girls, was
solebat
excitare has
noctu ad
opra, ad
accustomed to rouse
these by night to (their} works, at
cantus
Gallorum. Vero his
the songs (crowing) of the Cocks.
But these being
defatigatis assid
labore,
visum-est
oportere
fatigued
constantly by labour, it seemed
to behove
occidre domestcum
Galium, tanquam ilium,
(them) to kill the domestic (house) Cock, as-if
him,
qui
excitaret
hram
noctu.
which might rouse (did rouse) (their) mistress by night.
Autem evenit
ipsis, hoc
facto, ut
But it happened to them, this being done, that they might
incidrent
in
grandiora mla. Nam
hra
fall (didfall) into greater
evils. For the mistress
ignorans
horam
Gallorum, excitabat as
not-knowing the hour of the Cocks, did rouse
them
mgis de
nocte.
more of (by) night.
Application.
Fabla signifcat,
consila
esse causas
The Fable signifies, (their) counsels (plans) to be the causes
malorum plerisque hominbus.
ofevils to most
men.
FABLE LXXVI.
Venfica
Muier.
The Enchantress Woman.
Venefica
Muier et prominens propulsiones
An Enchantress Woman and promising the expulsions of

76

iE S O P U 8.

divinarum irarum,
perseverabat facere multa
divine
angers, did persevere to do
many (things)
et
facere lucrum inde. Vero quidam accusaverunt eam
and to make gain thence. But some
accused
her
impietatis, et convicerunt, et
ducebant damnatam
of impiety, and convicted, and did lead (her) condemned
ad mortem. Autem quidam
conspicatus eam
to death. But a certain (person) having beheld
her
duci, it, Tu, qu
promittebas avertere iras
tobe led, says, Thou, zcho didst promise to avert the angers
Deorum, quomodo
potuisti neque
mutare
of the Gods,
how hast thou -able neither to change
consilium homnum ?
the counsel of men ?
Application.
Fabula signifcat multos promittre magna,
The Fable signifies many to promise great (things'),
valentes
facere ne qudem
parva.
beingable todo
not indeed (even) small (things).
FABLE LXXVII.
Mustek.
The Weasel.
,
Mustela
ingressa in
officinam
ferrari,
A Weasel having entered into the workshop of a smith,
circumlambebat limam jacentem bi.
Autem
did lick-round
file
lying
there. But
the
lingu
rae,
multus sanguis ferebatur.
tongue being scraped, much blood was brought (away).
Autemhc ltabatur,
rta
auferre
alquid
But she did rejoice, hav ing thought to bear-away something
ex
ferro, donee
absumpsisset
from the iron, until she might have consumed (had consumed)
pentus
totam bnguam.
entirely the whole tongue.

S U S.

77

Application.
Fabula in
os, qui offend unt seipsos
A Fable against those, who injure
themselves by
contentionbus.
disputes.

FABLE LXXVIII.
Agrcola.
The Husbandman.
Quidam Agrcla
fodens,
reperiebat aurum :
A certain Husbandman digging, didfind
gold :
igtur
coronabat terram quotide, ut
affectus
therefore he did crown the earth daily,
as being affected
ab a
benefico. Autem Fortuna adstans
huic,
by it with kindness. But
Fortune standing-by to him,
inquit, Hus ! tu, cur
attribis ma munra ;
says, o !
thou, why dost thou attribute my gifts
terr, qu govlens
ditare te
ddi
to the earth, which I willing to enrich thee have given to
tbi ? nam si
tempus immutatur, et tum aurum
thee ? for if the time be changed,
and thy gold may
venat in alias mnus, sco te tunc accusaturum
come into other hands, I know thee then about-to-accuse
me, Fortunam.
me, Fortune.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, oportere
cognoscrebenefactorem
The Fable signifies, tobehove(us)toknow
a benefactor
atque referre
gratam
huic.
and to repay thefavour (thanks) to him.

g5

78

iE S O P U S.

FABLE LXXIX.
Viatores.
The Travellers.
Do quidam
faciebant iter
un.
Et
Two certain (persons) did make
ajourney together. And
(j u m
alter
reperisset
when the other (the one) might havefound (hadfound) an
securim, alter, qui
invenrat non, admonebat ipsum
axe, the other, who hadfound (it) not, did remind
him
ne-dicret,
Inveni, sed
invenmus.
he should not-say, I have found, but we have found.
Sed paullo post, qum Uli, qui
perdidrant
But a little after, when those, who had lost
the
securim,
venissent
obvam ipsis,
qui
axe, might have come (had come) towards them, (he) who
habebat illam,
pressus
cursu,
dicebat
did have
it, being pressed in the race, did say to the
comti,
qui
invenrat non,
Perimus.
companion, who hadfound (it) not, We have perished.
.Autem bic it,
Die,
peri,
non
But
he
says, Say, I have perished, not we have
perimus : etnim et
dixisti tunc, qum
. perished : for
also thou hast said then, when thou
invenisti securim, Inveni, non
invenmus.
hastfound the axe, I havefound, not we havefound.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, os,
qui
fuerunt non
The Fable
signifies, those, who Jiave been
not
participes felicitatum,
nque
esse firmos
sharers offelicities (goodfortune), neither tobe firm
amicos in calamitatbus.
friends in misfortunes.

M S 0 P U S.

79

FABLE LXXX.
Ranae.
The Frogs.
Dse Ran rant vicin
sbi.
Autem
Two Frogs were neighbouring to themselves. But they
pascebantur, altera
in profundo stagno, et
were fed,
the other (one) in a deep
pond, and
procul
via ;
altera in
via, hbens
far from the way (road) ; the other in the way, having
prum qu. Verm qum
qu rat in
little of water. But
when (the one) which was in the
stagno,
admoneret
altram, ut
pond, might admonish (did admonish) the other, that she
migr ret ad se,
ut
frueretur tutiore
would emigrate to herself, that she might enjoy
safer
cbo, illa parit non, dicens,
teneri
firmissm
food, she obeyed not, saying, to be held by a very-firm
consuetudne hujusce loci, usque-dum
obtigret,
habit (use) ofthis
place, until-at-last it might happen
cnrrum prsetereuntem contundre ipsam.
(did happen), a carriage passing-by to crush
her,
Application.
Fabla signifcat, hommes quque aggredientes prava
The Fable signifies, men
also
attempting corrupt
mSri cits, quam
mutari in melius.
(deeds) to die sooner, than to be changed into better.

FABLE LXXXI.
Apiaruis.
The Bee-master.
Quidam
ingressus in
mellarum,
A certain (person) having entered into an apiary, the

80

S O P U S.

domino
absente, abstulit
fvum.
Autem
master (being) absent, bore-away a honey-comb. But
hie
reversus, ut
vidit
alvelos inanes,
he having relumed, when he saw the hives
empty, did
stabat, perscrutans quod erat in his.
Autem apes
stand, searching
what was in them. But the bees
redeuntes
pastu,
ut
deprehenderunt
returning from feeding, as (when) they caught (found)
ipsum,
percutiebant
aculis, que
tractabant
him, did strike (him) with the stings, and did treat
pessm. Autem hie dixit eis, pessm animantes,
worst. But
he said to them, worst
animals,
dimisistis illsum
furatum vestros
ye have dismissed uninjured (him) having stolen your
fvos,
ver percuttis me satagentem
honey-combs, but ye strike
me being-busy (attentive)
vestri.
ofyou.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, sic quosdam
homnum non
The Fable
signfies, so certain-ones of men
not
caventes
inimicos per
imprudentam,
being-aware (watching) enemies through imprudence,
repellre
amicos, ut insidiatores.
to drive-away (their) friends, as plotters.

FABLE LXXXII.
Alcedo.
The King-fisher.
Alcedo
est solitaria vis, semper
The King-fisher is a solitary bird, always
in
mri.
Aunt hanc
in (at) the sea. They say
this (bird)

,
degens vitam
leading life
caventem
avoiding the

M S P s.

81

venationes homnum, edificare nidum. in. maritmis


searchings ofmen,
to build (its) nest
in the sea-side
scopulis; et jam pari tura
aliquando, fecit
cliffs ;
and now about-lo-bringforth some-time, it madt
nidum. Auteme
egress ad pablum, evenit
a nest. But she havinggone-out to food,
it happened
mre
concitatum vehementi vento
fuisse
the sea being roused-up by aforcible wind, to have been
elevatum supra
nidum, atque hoc
submerso,
lifted-up above the nest,
and this being sunk, to have
perdidisse
pullos. Vero hc
revers,
re
lost
(her} young. But she having returned, the thing
cognt, it, Me miseram ! qu cvens
being known,
says, Me wretched ! who avoiding the
terram ut insidiatricem, confugi ad hoc, quod est long
earth as a plotter, have fled
to this, which is far
insidus
mihi.
more -plotting for me.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, etam quosdam hommes cavendo
The Fable signifies, also certain men by being-aware
ab
inimicis, ignaros
incidre in amicos multo
from enemies, ignorant to fall
on friends by-much
graviores
inimicis.
more-grievous (than) enemies.
FABLE LXXXIII.
Piscator.
The Fisherman.
Piscator
piscabatur in quodam fluvo. Autem
A Fisherman didfish
in a certain river. But the
retbus
extensis, et
fluxu
comprehenso
nets being stretched, and the stream being caught
utrinque,
lapide
alligato
funi,
on-either-side, a stone beingfastened to a ropet he did

82

JE S U S.

verberabat
quam, ut
pisces fugientes
strike
(clash) the water,
that the fishes fleeing
jncaut
incidrent in
reta. Ver cm
incautiously mightfall-in
into the nets. But when
quidam ex
lis,
qui
habitabant circa
locum,
a certain out-of those, who diddwell
about theplace,
videret eum facere id,
increpabat, utpote
might see
him todo
that, he did chide (him), as
turbantem
fluvum, et non sinentem
bibre claram
disturbing theriver,
and not permitting to drink clear
quam.
Et is respondit, Sed nisi
fluvus
water.
And he answered, But unless the river
perturbetur sic,
oportebitme
esurientem
be disturbed soJitwillbehove me (Imust) being hungry
mori.
to die.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, etam
rectores civitatum facere
The Fable signifies, also the rulers ofstates to make
qustum tunc maxm, qum
induxrint
gain
then mostly, when they shall have induced
patrias in seditiones.
(their) countries into seditions.
FABLE LXXXIV.
Simus et
Delphis.
The Ape
and the Dolphin.
Qum
esset
mos
navigantbus
Whei it might be (was) a custom to (those) sailing
adducre
Melitenses catulos et
Simios in
to lead (with them) Militensian puppies and Apes in
solamen
navigationis, quidam
navgans
consolation of the voyage,
a certain (person) sailing
habebat et
Simum. .Autem qum
did have
also an Ape.
But
when he might have

JE S 0 P U S.

83

pervenisset
ad Sunum, promontorum
Attc,
come (had come) to Sunium, a promontory
of Attica,
contgit
vehementem tempestatem
fieri.
Autem
it happened a violent
tempest
to be made. But
navi
evers, et
omnibus enatantbus,
the ship being upset, and all
swimming-out, an
Simus et
enatabat : autem alquis Delphis
Ape
also did swim-out : but
some Dolphin having
conspicatus ipsum, et
rtus
esse homnem,
seen
him, and having thought{him) tobe aman,
suppostus
sustinebat perfrens
ad terram.
being placed-under didhold-up
bearing(him) to land.
Ver ut
fit in
Piro,
navale
Atheniensum,
But when hewas in the Piraus, a dock ofthe Athenians,
rogavit
Simum, an
esset
he asked the Ape,
whether he might be (was) an
Atheniensis
genere ? Autem qum hic
dicret .
Athenian bj/ birth ?
But
when he might say
se
esse,
et
esse
ciaris
(did say) himself to be (so), and to be from illustrious
parentbus bi ;
rogavit,
an
parents
there ; he asked (him), whether he might have
nsset
et
Pirum? Autem
Simus
known (had known) also the Piraus? But
the Ape
rtus
eum dicre de homne, it, Et
esse
having thought him to speak of aman,
says, And tobe
vald
amicum et
familiarem
i : et
exceedingly friendly and intimate
to him : and the
Delphis,
indignatus
tanto
mendaco,
Dolphin, having been enraged
by so-great a lie,
submergens occidit ipsum.
sinking
killed him.
Application.
Fabla in
vros, qui ignorantes
veritatem,
Fable
against men, who not-knowing the truth,
sperant
decipre.
hope
to deceive.

84

iESPUS.

FABLE LXXXV.
Muscae.
The Flies.
Melle
effuso
in qudam cell,
Honey beingpoured-out (spilt) in a certain cell (pantry),
Muse advolantes comedebant. Autem pedbus earum
Flies flying-to did eat-up.
But thefeet ofthem being
implitis,
potrant non
evolare.
Ver qum
entangled, they were-able not to fly-away. But when
suffocarentur
dicebant,
they might be choaked (were choakcd) they did say,
Miser nos, quia
perimus ob
modcum
Wretched we, because we perish on-account-of a little
cbum !
food I
Application.
Fabula significar,
gulam
The Fable
signifies, the throat (gluttony)
causam multorum malorum.
the cause of many
evils.

esse
to be

FABLE LXXXVI.
Mercunus et
Statuarus.
Mercury and the Statuary.
Mercurius vlens
scire, in quanto
honore
Mercury willing to know, in how-great honour -he might
esset pud homines, ivit in
domum
Statuarfi,
be
among men,
went into the house of a Statuary,
cm
assimisset
se
homni,
when he might have likened (had likened) himself to a man,
et
statua
Jovis
vis,
rogabat,
and a statue of Jupiter being seen, he did ask,
Of

M S P U S.

85

Quanti quis
posset
emre ipsam?
Of(for)how-much any-one might be-able to buy it?
Autem qum hic
dixisset,
Drachm,
But
when he might have said(hadsaid), with a Drachma,
risit :
et it,
Quanti eam Junonis ?
he laughed: and says, Of (for) how-much that ofJuno ?
qum
dixisset
Pluris: et
when he might have said (had said) Of (for) more: and
su
stat
ipsius
vis,
opinatus,
his-own statue of self being seen, and having imagined,
qum
sit
nuntus
Deorum, et
when (since) he may be (is) messenger of the Gods,
and
prsit
lucro,
maximum rationem
may preside (presides) to gain, the greatest
regard
haberi de se
pud hommes, rogavit, de
.
to be had
of himself among men, he asked, about it.
Ver
Statuarus it, Si
emris hasce,
But the Statuary
says, If thou shalt have bought these,
do
tibi et hanc
additamentum.
I give to thee also this (as) an addition.
Application.
Fabula in
gloriosum vrum, qui est in nullo
A Fable
against a boastful man,
who is in no
honore pud alios.
honour among others.

FABLE LXXXVII.
Mercurus et
Tiresas.
Mercury
and Tiresias.
Mercurus vlens
cognoscre vaticimum , Tires,
Mercury willing to know
the prophecy
of Tiresias,
an
esset verum,
furatus boves ipsius
whether it might be
true, having stolen the oxen ofhim

86

M S P U S.

ex
rure,
venit ad ipsum in
urbem,
from the country, came to himself into the city, being
factus simlis
homni, et
devertit
ad ipsummade like to a man,
and turned-away to him.
Autem amissione boiim
renuntiat
Tires, ille,
But the loss of the oxen being announced to Tiresias, he,
Mercurio
assumpto,
exivit,
consideraturus
Mercury being taken, (with him) weM-out, aboiit-to-cnsider
alquod augurum de
fre, et
jbet
huic
some
divination about the thief, and he orders to him
dicre sbi,
quamuam vem
vidrit. Autem
tosay to himself, what
bird he shallhave seen.
But
Mercurus primum
conspicatus Aqulam volantem
Mercury first having beheld
an Eagle flying from
sinistris ad dextrara, dixit i.
Qum hic
left
to right,
told to him. When he might have
dixisset
eam non attinere ad se,
vidit
said (had said) it
not to relate to himself, he saw
secundo Cornicem sedentem
sper qudam arbore,
secondly a Crow
sitting (perched) upon a certain tree,
et mdo aspicientem supers, mdo declinatam ad
and now looking
more-aloft, now bent
to the
terram, et rfert
vati.
Et
. re
earth, and relates (it) to the prophet. And the thing
cognt, is inquit ; Sed hc Cornix jurat et
being known, he says ;
But this Crow adjures both
Clum et terram, me recepturum
meas boves, si
Heaven and earth, me aboat-to-recover my oxen, if
tu
vlis.
thou may'st will (thou wilt).
Application.
Quispam
potrit uti hoc sermone advesus furacem
Any-one shallbe-able touse this speech
against athieving
vrum.

JE S 0 P U S.

87

FABLE LXXXVIII.
Canes.
The Dogs.
Quidam
hbens dos Cnes, docit
A certain (person) having two
Hogs, taught the
alterum
venari,
altrum servare dmum
other (one) to hunt, the other to keep the house.
Caetrum si quando
venatcus
capret
But
if any-time the hunting (dog) might take
alquid,
custos
dms et rat partceps
something, the keeper of the house also was sharer
dapis una
cum eo.
Autem ventco
ofthe feast together with him. But the hunting (dog)
ferente
aegr,
et objiciente ilH, quod
bearing (it) hardly (ill), and objecting to him, that
ipse
laboraret
quotid, vero ille
himself might labour (did labour) daily,
but he
laborans nihil,
nutriretur
labouring nothing, might be nourished (was nourished)
sis laborbus : ipse respondens, it,
Reprehende
bp his labours : he answering, says, Blame
non me, sed hram, qui
docit non me laborare
not me, but master, who has taught not me to labour,
sed comedesse alenos labores.
but to devour
others' labours.
Application.
Fabulasignificat, adolescentes, qui scunt nihil,
The Fable signifies, youths
who know nothing,
haud esse reprehendendos, qum
parentes
not to be to-be-blamed,
when (their) parents
educavrint os sic.
may have educated them so.

JE S P U S.
FABLE LXXXIX.
Maritus et Uxor.
The Husband and Wife.
Quidam
hbens
uxorem, quse erat
A certain (person)
having a wife,
who was
inimica
omnibus
domestcis, volit
scire
unfriendly to all
the domestics, willed to know
an
afficeretur
etam ta erga
whether she might be affected
also thus towards
paternos
domesticos ; quapropter
(her) paternal (father's) domestics ; wherefore he
mittitipsam ad sumpatremcum rationabli prsetextu.
sends her to her father with a reasonable pretence.
Ver a
reversa
paucis diebus post,
But she having returned in a few
days after, he
rogavit,
Quomdo
habuisset se
asked (her), How she might have had
herself
erga
illos. Ver qum hsec
dixisset,
towards them. But when she might have said (had
Quod
bubulci
et
pastores
said),
That
the herdsmen
and shepherds did
suspectabant me,
ait,
Sed uxor, si
es
suspect
me, he says, But wife, if thou art
odiosa
is
qui gunt
grges man,
hateful to those who act (drive) theflocks early,
autem revertuntur ser, quid oportet
sperare de
but return
late, what behoves (us) to hope
of
is
quibuscum
conversaris
those with whom thou conversest (dwellest) in the
toto de ?
whole day ?
Application.
Fabula signifcat, sic magna
cognosci
The Fable signifies, thusgreat (things) tobe knoivn
ex p arvis, et incerta
ex manifestis.
from small, and uncertain from evident (things).

M S P s.

FABLE XC.
Hoedus et
Lpus.
The Kid
and the Wolf.
Hdus
derelictus
grege,
agitabatur
A Kid being deserted by theock, was hunted

Lpo.
Ver
conversus ad um dixit,
by a Wolf.
But being turned
to him he said,
Lpe, quonam
persuasus-sum, me futurum
Wolf, since I have been persuaded,
me about-to-be
tum cbum, ne
morarinjucund,
cane
thy food, lestlmaydie unpleasantly, sing (play)
primm
tib, ut
saltem.
Autein
firstly with a pipe, that I may dance.
But the
Lpo canente
tib, atque
Hdo saltante,
Wolf singing with the pipe, and the Kid dancing,
qum
canes
audivissent
when the dogs might have heard
(had heard) they
persecuti-sunt Liipum. Vero hic
conversus, inquit
pursued
the Wolf. But he being turned,
says
HcedO,Hc
accdnnt merito
mihi;
to the Kid, These (things) happen deservedly tome ;
nim
oportebat me non imitari
tibicnem,
far it did behove
me not to imitate aflute-player,
qum
sim
coquus.
when (since) I may be (I am) a cook.
Application.
Fabulasignifcat,os qui negligunta,
TheFable signifies, thosewhoneglect thoset(hings),
qubus
sunt apti natura, ver conantur
for which they are fit by nature, but endeavour to
exercere quae sunt
aliorum,
incidre
exercise what are (the parts) of others, to fall
in infortuna.
into misfortunes.
A5

90

M S P U S.

FABLE XCI.
Cancer et
Vulpes.
The Crab and the Fox.
Qum
Cancer
ascendisset
When a Crab might have ascended (had ascended)
h
mSri,
pascebatur
in quodam loco.
from the sea, he was fed (did feed) in a certain place.
Vero Vulpes
esuriens,
ut
But a Fox being hungry,
when she might have
conspexisset,
accessit

rapit um
beheld, (had beheld) approached and seized him.
Vero ille devorandus
it,
Sed go pator justa,
But he to-be-devoured says, But I sufer just
qui
voli
esse terrestris,
qum
(things), who have willed to be terrestrial,
when
sim
marinus.
I may be (I am) belonging-to-sea.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, os etam ex
hominibus,
The Fable signifies,
those also out-of men,
qui propris exercitis
derelictis, aggrediuntur
who their-own exercises being abandoned, attempt
ea,
quae conveniunt
nihil,
esse merto
those, which suit (them) nothing, to be deservedly
infortunatos.
.unfortunate.

FABLE XCII.
Cithardus.
The Harper.
Rudis
Cithardus cnens
in
domo
An unskilful Harper
singing (playing) in a house

iE S OP U S.

91

incrustat
calce, ut
solebat,
et
plastered with lime, as he was accustomed, and the
voce
contra
resonante in se,
voice (sound)on-the-other-handre-echoingunto himself,
putabat esse vald
canorus : itque
did think to be exceedingly musical : therefore being
elatus
ob
id,
cogitavit
oportere
puffed-up on-account-of that, he thought to behove
etam
committre sese
(him) (he ought) even to commit
himself to the
theatro. Ver
profectus ad se
ostendendum,
theatre. But having set-out to himselfto-be-displayed,
qum
canret
admdum mle,
when he might sing (did sing) very
badly, they
abegerunt
lapidbus ipsum explosum.
drove-away with stones him hissed-off".
Application.
Fabula signifcat, sic quosdam
ex
The Fable
signifies, so certain
out-of the
rhetoribus, qui videntur esse alqui
in
rhetoricians, who seem to be some (thingJ in the
schlis, qum
venrint ad publcas res,
schools, when they may have come
to public affairs,
esse nullius preti.
to be of no
value.

FABLE XCIIL
Fures.
The Thieves.
Fures
ingressi in
quandam dmum,
Thieves having entered into a certain house,
invenerunt nihil
nisi
gallum ; atque hoc
found
nothing unless a cock ; and this being

92

iE S 0 P U S.

capto,
abirunt.
Ver bicoccidendus ab is
taken, they went-away. But he to-be-killed by them
rogabat, ut
dimittrent se,
dicens
did ask,
that they would dismiss
himself, saying
se
esse utlem hominbus,excitantem os
himself to be useful to men,
rousing
them by
noctu ad
opra.
Ver hi
dixerunt, Sed
7iight to (their) works.
But they said,
But we
occidmus te
tanto
mgis propter
hoc :
kill
thee by so-much more on-account-of this :
nim exctans illos,
snis
non nos furari.
for rousing them, tlwu-permiltest not us to steal.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, a
esse maxm
The Fable signifies, those (things) to be chiefly
adversa
, pravis, quae sunt beneficia
bonis.
opposed to the corrupt, which are benefits to the good.
FABLE XCIV.
Comix et
Corvus.
The Crow and the Raven.
Comix invdens
Corvo,
qud
is
A Crow envying to a Raven,
because he might
vaticinaretur
hommbus per augura,
prophecy (did prophecy) to men
by divinations,
que
crederetur
ob
and might be believed (was believed) on-account-of
id, ti prsedicens futura,
conspicata
that, as foretelling future (things), having beheld
quosdam viatores praetereuntes, ivit sper quandam
certain travellers passing-by, went upon a certain
arborem, que stans
crocitabat vald.
Vero
tree,
and standing did caw
exceedingly. But
illis
conversis ad vocem, et
stupefactis ;
they being turned to the voice, and being amazed; the

JE S 0 P U S.

93

re
cognt, quidam
inquit, Hus !
thing being known, a certain-one (of-them) says, Ho !
vos,
abeamus, nim est
Comix, quae
*
you, let us depart,
for it is a Crow, which has
crocitavit, et
hbet non augurum.
cawed,
and he has not divination.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, et homines certantes
TJie Fable signifies, also men
contending in the
eodem modo cum praestantiorbus,
esse
same manner with more-excellent {persons), to be
quoque dignos
risu,
prasterquam qod
also
worthy-of laughter, besides
that they
pervenunt non ad asqua.
arrive
not to equal (rewards) .
FABLE XCV.
Cornix et
Cnis
The Crow
and the Dog.
Cornix sacrifcans
Minervas, invitavit Cnemad
A Crow sacrificing to Minerva, invited a Dog to
eplas. Vero ille dixit,
Quid absumis
the feasts. But he said,
Why consumest thou t/ie
sacrifica frustra ?
Enim Da
ad
odit
sacrifices in-vain ? For the Goddess so has hated
te,
ut
sustulrit
fdeni
hates) thee,
that she may have taken-away faith
avbus conviventbus tecum.
fconfidence) from the birds living-together with-thee.
Cui
Cornix,
Ob
id
To whom the Crow (says),
On-account-of that I
sacrifico
mgis i, ut
reconcilietur
sacrifice the inore to her, that she may be reconciled
mihi.
to me.

94

S 0 P U S.

Application.
Fabula signifcat plerosque
vereri
non
The fable signifies most (persons) tofear (regard) not
prosqui inimicos
beneficas
ob
lucrum.
tofollow-up enemies withbenefits on-account-ofgain.
FABLE XCVI.
Corvus et
Serpens.
The Raven and the Serpent.
Ut
Corvus indgena
cbi
vidisset
When a Raven needing offood might have seen
Serpentem dormientem in quodam aprico
(had seen) a Serpent sleeping
in a certain sunny
lco,
devolando
rapit hune.
Ver quUm
place, by flying-down he seized him.
But when
hic
vertisset
se,
atque
he might have turned (had turned) himself, and might
. momordisset ipsum, Corvus moriturus dixit,
have bit (had bit) him, the Raven about-to-die said,
Misrum me ! qui
repri tal lucrum, ex quo
Wretched me ! who havefoundsuch gain, from which
etam pereo.
also Iperish.
Application.
Fablain
vrum, qui
periclitatus-sit
A Fable against a man, who may have endangered
ob
inventionem thesaurorum.
(himself) on-account-of thefinding of treasures.
FABLE XCVII.
Mnedula et
Columbae.
The Jackdaw and the Doves.
Monedula
conspicata Columbas bn nutritas
A Jackdaw having beheld
Doves
well fed

S S.

95

in quodam columbaro, dealbavit sese,


que ivit,
in a certain dove-house, whitened herself, and went,
ut ipsa et
impertiretur eodem cbo. Vero
that herself also might share in the same food. But
hse, dum
tacebat,
ratee
eam esse
these, whilst she was-silent, having thought her to be
Columbam, admiserunt.
Sed qum aliquando
rt Dove,
admitted (her).
But when some-time
oblita
emisisset
having forgotten she might have sent-forth (had sent
vocem,
tunc
natur
ejus
forth) a voice (sound), then the nature of her being
cognt, percutientes expulerunt ;
que a
known, striking they expelled (her) ; and she being
privata
o
cbo, redit
ad
Monedlas
deprived-of that food, returned to the Jackdaw^
rursum. Et qum illse
nssent non ipgam
again. And when they might have known not her
ob
colorem,
abegefunt
oii-account of the colour, they drove away (her) from
sito cbo, ta ut, apptens
duorum,
their food, so that, seeking (desirous) of the two, she
potiretur neutro.
might possess neither.
Application.
Fabla signifieat, et
oporterenos esse contentos
The Fable signies, alsotobehove usto'be content
nostris,
considerantes cupiditatem habendi,
with our (affairs), considering the desire of having,
prseterquam quod juvat nihil,
ssep
auferre
besides
that it helps nothing, often to take-away
et
bona, qu
adsunt.
, .
also the goods, which are present (we have).

96

S S.

FABLE XCVIII.
Monedla.
The Jackdaw.
Qum quis
cepisset
When
some-one might have taken {had taken) a
Monedulam et
alligsset
Jackdaw
and might have bound (had bound) the
pdem
filo,
traddit
so filio. Vero
foot with thread, he delivered (it) to his son. But
haec
passa
non victum inter hommes, ubi
she having endured not food among men,
when
nacta-est libertatem parumper,
fugitj que
she obtained liberty
a little-while, shefled, and
'contulit se
in sum nidum. Vero
vinculo
bore
herself into her nest.
But the tie being
circumvoluto
ramis, baud vlens
evolare,
entwined in the boughs, not being-able toflyaway,
qum
esset
moritura,
loquebatur
when she might be (was) about-to-die, shedidspeak
secum,
Misram me ! quse
passa
non
with-her self, Wretched me ! who having endured not
servitutem pud hommes, privavi me incaut
slavery
among men, have deprived me uncautiously
vit.
from (of) life.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, quosdam
nonnunquam,
The Fable signifies, certain (persons) sometimes,
dum
stdent
liberare se
whilst they study (endeavour) tofree
themselves

mediocrbus periclis,
incidre in
majora.
from moderate
dangers, to fall
into greater.

S 3.

97

FABLE XCIX.
Jupiter et Mercurus.
Jupiter and Mercury.
Jupiter jussit
Mercurio, ut
infundret
Jupiter commanded to Mercury, that he migh t infuse
medicamentum mendaci omnibus artificbus. Vero
a medicine
offalsehoodto all
artists.
But
hic, o'
trito,
et
facto admensuram,
he, it being ground, and being made to measure,
infudit
sequabilter singulis. Ver qum,
infused (it) equally to each.
But when,
the
sutore
solo
relicto, multum
medicamenti
shoemaker alonebei ig left, much of the medicine
superesset,
infudit
i
totum
might remain (did remain), he infused to him the whole
mortarum acceptum. Atquehinc
contgit, omnes
mortar
taken-up.And hence it has happened, all
artifices mentiri, ver sutores
maxm omnium.
artists to lie,
hut shoemakers most of all.
Application.
Fabla in
mendaces artifices.
A Fable against lying
artists.

FBLE C.
Jupiter.
Jupiter,.
JupTter
ce,brans
nuptias,
excipiebat omna
Jupiter celebrating nuptials, did receive
atl
animaba
convivio. Ver
testudne sol
animals in a banquet. But the tortoise alone having
i

98

iESOPUS.

profect ser,
admiratus
causam
set-out late, having admired the cause of ()
tarditatis,
rogavit eam, quamobrem ipsa
slowness, he asked her, why
she might have
accessisset non ad convivum. Ver qum hsec
approached not tothebanquet. But when she might
dixisset,
Chara dmus
optma domus ;
havesaid (hadsaid~),Dear house (home) best home;
iratus
ipsi,
damnavit,
ut
being angry to (with) her, he condemned, (Jier) that
bajulans
circumferret
domum.
carrying she should bear-about (her) house.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, plerosque homines eligre pots
The Fable signifies, most
men to choose rather
vivre pare
pudse,
qum laut
apud
to live sparingly at themselves, than liberally at
alios.
(with) others.
FABLE CI.
Lupus et
Ovis.
The Wolf and the Sheep.
Lupus
morsus canbus, et
affectus
A Wolf being bit
by dogs, and being treated
m&l,
jacebat abjectus.
Ver indgens
cbi,
badly, did lie
down-cast. But needing offood,
conspicatus 8vem,
rogabat, ut
having beheld a sheep, he did ask,
thatshewould
afferret sbi
potum ex
flumne praeterfluente :
bring to himselfdrink out-ofthe river flowing-by :
nim, inquit,
si tu
dedris potum mhi,
for, says he, if thoushalt have given drink to me,
ego
invenam cbum mihi-ipsi. Ver illa respondit
/ willfind
foodfor myself. But she answered

m S 0 P U S.

99

et it, Sed sigo


dedro potum
tbi,
and says, But if I shall have given drink to thee,
tu et
utrisme
cbo.
thou also wilt use me (<w) food.
Application.
Fabula in
malefcum vrum insidiantem
A Fable against a malicious man plotting
per
simulationem.
through pretence.

FABLE CIL
Lepres.
The Hares.
Leporesolim
belligerantes cum aqulis,invocrunt
Hares formerly warring with the eagles, besought
vulpes in auxilum:autemhae dixerunt,
the foxes into aid:
but these said, We should
Auxilaremur non vobis, nsi
sciremus,
assist
not to you, unless we might know,
qui vos estis, et cum qubus bellamni.
who ye are, and with whom ye wage-war.
Application.
Fabula
signifcat os, qui certant cum
The Fable
signifies
those, who contend with
praestantiorbus,
contemnre sam
more-excellent (persons), to despise
their-own
salutem
safety.

100

S P s.

FABLE CHI.
Formica.
The Ant.
Quse est nunc Formica, fit olim
homo,
(That) which is nowanAnt,
wasformerly aman,
et incumbens assidue
agricultures, erat non
and plying
constantly to agriculture, was not
contentus propris laborbus, sed et
surripiebat
content withhis-own labours, but also did steal the
fructus
vicinorum.
Autem Jupiter,
fruits of (his) neighbours. But
Jupiter being
indignatus
cupiditate
hujus habendi,
enraged
with the covetousness of him of having,
transmutavit um in hoc animal, quse
appellatur
transformed him into this animal, which is called
Formica. Veim qum
mutsset
the Ant.
But when he might have changed (had
formam, mutavit non et
affectum
changed) form, he changed not also (his) passion :
Nam
circumeundo
arva hucusque,
collgit
For by going-about the lands until-now, he collects
labores
aliorum, et recondit
sbi-ipsi.
the labours of others, and lays-up for himself.
Application.
Fabla signifcat,
pravos
natur, ut
The Fahle signifies, the corrupt by nature, though
transmutavrint
specem
maxm
they may have transformed (their) appearance mostly
mutare non mores.
(the most possible) to change not manners.
FABLE CIV.
Vespertilio et
Mustela,
The Bat
and the Weasel.
Cm
Vespertilio
cecidisset
in
When a Bat might have fallen (hadfallen) unto the

JE S 0 P U S.

Ol

terram,
capta-est
Mustel, et qum
earth, she was caught by a Weasel, and when she
foret
occidenda,
rogabat pro salute.
might be (was-) to-be-killed, she did ask
for safety.
Ver hc dicente, non
posse
dimittre ipsam9
But she saying, not to be able to dismiss her,
quod
fret
inimica omnibus volucrbus,
because she might be (was) hostile to all birds,
ilia it, Non esse vem, sed murem : et sic
she says, Not to be a bird, but a mouse : and thus
dimissa-est. Autem qum postremo
was dismissed.
But when lastly she might have
cecidisset
itrum, et
fuisset
fallen (had fallen) again, and might have been (had
capta ab al
Mustel,
orabat
been) taken by another Wmsel, she didpray she might
ne-voraretur.
Autem hc dicente esse
not-be-devoured. But she saying to be (that she
inimicam cunctis murbus ;
dicebat se
was) hostile to all
mice ; she did say
herself to
esse non
murem sed
Vespertilionem, et
be not a mouse but a Bat,
and was
dimissa-est rursus.
Atque ta
evenit
am
dismissed again.
And thus it happened her to
consecutum-fuisse salutem bis,
nomine
have obtained
safety
twice, (her) name
mutato.
being changed.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, nque
oporterenos permanere
The Fable signifies, neither to behove us to remain
semper in
eisdem,
considerantes os, qui
always in the same (states), considering those, who

102

SOP U S.

mutantur ad
tempus plerumque emigre
are changed to (for) a time
generally to escape
pericla.
dangers.

FABLE CV.
Viatores.
The Travellers.
Viatores facientes iter
juxta quoddam littus
Travellers making ajourney near a certain shore
venerunt in
quandam speculam :
et
came
into a certain watch-tower :
and having
conspicati illinc sarmenta natanta prcul,
beheld
thence faggots floating far-off,
they
existimrunt esse magnam navem : quamobrem
thought (if) to be a great
ship :
wherefore they
expectrunt, tanquam a
esset
appulsura.
waited,
as-if
it might be (was) about-to-laiul
' Ver qum
sarmenta lata
(to come to land).
But when the faggots borne by
vento frent
props,
videbantur
the wind might be (were) nearer, they did seem
viderenon navem amphus
sed scpham.
to see not a ship more (any longer) but a wherry.
Autem ill
advect,
qum
But that being brought-to, when they might have
vidissent
esse sarmenta,
dixerunt inter
seen (had seen) to be faggots, they said
among
se,
Ut igtur
nos expectabamus frustra
themselves, How therefore we did expect
in vain
quod est nihil !
.
.. !,:
(that) which is nothing I

s P s.

103

Application.
Fabula signifcat, nonnullos homnes, visos-esse
The Fable, signifies, some
men, to have seemed
terribles ex-improviso, qum
fecris
terrible suddenly,
when thou shlt have made
periculm, inveniri esse nullius preti.
trial, to be found to be of no
value.
FABLE CVI.
Sylvestris
Asnus.
The Woodland (wild) Ass.
Sylvestris Asnus
conspicatus domestcum
A wild
Ass having beheld
a domestic (tame)
Asnum in quodam aprico loco,
profectus
Ass
in a certain sunny place, having set-out
ad ipsum
dicebat
beatum et
bn
to him did say (call him) happy both in good
habitudne corporis et
perceptione cbi. Vero
condition of body
and the enjoyment offood. But
deinde,
qum
vidisset
um
afterwards, when he might have seen (had seen) hint
ferentem onra,
et
agasonem sequentem
carrying burthens, and a groom
following on the
-tergo, et
percutientem ipsum
baculis,
it,
rear,
and striking
him with sticks, he says,
Ast ego existimo non te beatum ampls; nim vido,
But I think
not thee happy more ; for I see,
quod
hbes felicitatem non sine
magnis mlis.
that thou hast happiness not without great evils.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, lucra non esse
mulanda
The Fable signifies, gains not to be to-be-rivaled
cum periclis et miseris.
(envied) with dangers and miseries.

104

m s p s.
FABLE CVII.
Asnus et
Vulpes.
The Ass
and the Fox.

Asnus indutus
pelle
Leonis
circuibat
An Ass
clad with the skin of a Lion did go-about
perterrens
relqua
bruta.
Cetrm
affrighting the rest [other) brutes.
But having
conspicatus Vulpem, tentavit perterrefacre et hanc.
beheld
a Fox, he tried to affright
also her.
Autem hic it
i,
(nim
audivrat ipsum
But she says to him, (for she had heard
him
casu
rudentem) Sed seito
bn, quod ego
by chance braying) But know thou well, that I
et
timuissem te, nsi
also might have feared
thee, unless I might have
audivissem
rudentem.
heard (had lieard thee) braying.
Application.
Fabula significatnonnullosindoctos,
qui
The Fable signifies some
unlearned [fellows), who
videntur extris
esse alqui,
seem to foreign (persons) tobe some (remarkable),
redargi ex s
loquacitate.
to be confuted from their-own babbling.

FABLE CVIIL
Asnus et
Ranee.
The Ass
and the Frogs.
Asnus frens
ligna
pertransibat
quandam
An Ass
carrying logs did pass-through a certain

S U S.

105

paludem. Autem
lapsus, ut
decdit,
non
marsh.
But having slipt, when he fell-down, not
vlens
surgre,
lamentabatur,
being able to rise,
he did lament,
and did
suspirabat. Autem Ranse, quae rant in
palude,
sigh.
Sut Frogs, which were in the marsh,
suspiris ejus
auditis, dixerunt, Heus ! tu,
the sighs of him being heard, said,
Ho ! thou,
et
quid
facres, si
and what would'st thou do,
if thou might'st have
mansisses
tanto
tempore hc,
remained (had?st remained) in so-great time
here,
quanto
nos, qum
lamentaris sic,
in how-great (as) we, when thou lamentest thus,
quia
lapsus-sis in
brve
because thou may'st have slipped
in (for) a short
tempus.
time.
Application.
Quisquam
potrit uti hoc sermone in
Any-one shali be able to use this speech against
segnem vrum, qui
tristatur oh
a lazy
man,
which is dejected on -account-of the
mnimos labores, qum ipse
resistat facile
least
labours, when himself may resist easily to
majorbus.
greater.

FABLE CIX.
A sinus et
Corvus.
The Ass
and the Raven.
Asnus,
dorso
ulcerato,
pascehatur in
An Ass, (his) back being ulcered, was fed
in

106

S S.

quodam prato.
Autem Corvo incidente
a certain meadow. But a Raven perching-to (on)
i, et percutiente ulcus,
Asnus rudebat, ac
it, and striking the ulcer, the Ass did bray,
and did
saltabat.
Sed
agasone stante
procul,
dance (leap). But a groom standing at- a- distance,
ao ridente,
Lupus praeterens vidit ipsum, et
/ and laughing, a Wolf passing-by saw him,
and
dixit, Misri
nos ! qui si
videamur tantm,
said, Wretched we I who if we be seen
only, are
agitamur, autem rident
hunc.
hunted, but they laugh-at him.
Application.
FabSla
signifcat,
maleficos
homines
The Fable
signifies,
malicious
men to be
dignosci,
si
apparant tantm.
distinguished, if they may appear only.

FABLE CX.
Asnus et
Vulpes.
The Ass
and the Fox.
Asnus et
Vulpes, societate
int
An Ass
and a Fox,
partnership being entered
inter
se,
exiverunt ad venationem. Vero
between themselves, went-out to hunting.
But
qum
Lo
occurrisset
ipsis,
when a Lion might have met ( had met) to them, the
Vulpes vdens
immnens periculuni,
profeca
Fox
seeing the impending danger, have gone
ad
Leonem, pollicta-est se
tradituram
to the Lion, promised
herselfabout-to-deliver the
Asnum i,
si
promisrit impunitatem
Ass to him, if he shall have promised forgiveness

E S P U S.

107

sbi.
Qui qum
'
dixisset
to herself. Who when he might have said (had said)
se
dimissurum am, illa,
Asno
himself about-to-dismiss
her, she, the Ass, being
adductoin quosdam casses, fecit
ut
led
into certain nets, made (caused) that he might
incidret.Sed Leo vdens ilium posse
minime
fall-in. But theLionseeinghimto-be-ableby-no-means
fugre, comprehendit Vulpem primam, deinde
to flee,
seized
the Fox first,
afterwards
sic
versus-est ad
Asnum.
thus was turned
to the Ass.
Application.
Fabula signifcat os, qui insidiante socis
The Fable signifies those, who plot
for associates
saep
perdre et ipsos.
often to destroy also themselves.

FABLE CXI.
Gallina et
Hirundo.
The Hen
and the Swallow.
Gallina,
ovis
Serpentis
inventis,
A Hen,
the eggs of a Serpent
being found,
excludit
diligenter calefacta. Autem
shut-out (hatched them) diligently warmed. But
Hirundo, qum
vidisset
am,
a Swallow, when she might have seen (had seen) her,
it,
demens
quid nutrs
haec,
says, mad (creature) why nourishest thou these,
qu, cm
excrevrint, auspicabuntur
which, when they shall havegrown, will commence
injuram
te prim ?
injury from theefirst ?

103

iSOPUS.

Application.
Fabula signifcat pravitatem
esse implacbflem,
Tlte Fable signifies corruption to be implacable,
licet >
afficiatur
maxmis beneficis.
although it may be affected with the greatest benefits.

FABLE CXII.
Camelus.
The Camel.
Qum Camelus visa-est primm, homines, perterrrti
When a Camel was seen first,
men,
affrighted
et
admirati
magnitudnem, fugiebant^ vero
and having admired the size (ofit) , didflee :
but
bi,
tempore procedente,
cognoverunt
when, time
advancing,
they knew
the
mansuetudnem ipsius
consi-sunt usque-, ut
tameness
of him, they confided
so-far, that
accederent ad earn. At
they would approach to it.
But (it) being:
intellecto
paulo post,
bellam habere non bilem
understood a little after, the beast to have not bile,
ire

contempts, ut
they went to-that (pitcK)of contempt, that they would
imponrent fraena
i, et
tradrent
put
bits (a bridle) toit, and would deliver
agendam
puris.
(it) to-be-driven to by) boys. ,
Application.
Fabla signifcat, ut consuetudo facat terribles
The Fable signifies, that custom may make terrible 1
res '- contemptibles.
things contemptible.

S 0 P U S.

109

FABLE CXIII.
Serpens.
The Serpent.
Serpens
conculcatus multis hominbus,
A Serpent being trampled by many men,
supplex adit
Jovem.
Autem Jupiter dixit
suppliant approached Jupiter. But
Jupiter said
i : Sed si
pupugisses
to him : But if thou might'st have pricked (stung him)
qui prior
conculcavit,
secundus
who former (first) has trampled,
the second
neququam
aggressus-fuisset facere id.
by-no-means would have attempted to do
thatApplication.
Fabla signifcat os, qui resistunt prs
Hie Fable signifies those, who resist
before to
invadentbus, firi
formidolosos
alis.
(those) invading,
to become formidable to others.

FABLE CXIV.
Columba.
The Dove.
Columba correpta
sti,
ut
vidit
.A Dove
seized
with thirst, when she saw a
depictum poclum quse in quodam loco, putavit
painted cup of water in a certain place, thought
esse verum, atque allata
multo mpetu
(it) to be real, and borne with much force
imprudens offiendit in
tab&lam,
ut, et
imprudent dashed against the picture, (so~) that, also

: s op s.

pennis
ipsius
perfractis,
decidret
the feathers of her being broken, she might fall
in
terram, atque
caperetur
(didfall) unto the earth, arid might be taken
a
quodam
occurrentum.
certain (person) of ( those) meeting (her).
Application.
Fabla signifcat rionnullos homines aggredientes
The Fable signifies ' some
men
attempting
res
inconsulto,
injicre sese
in
things inconsiderately, to cast
themselves into
pernicem,
destruction.
:
l.' . . '
.
h. ill \
FABLE .
Columba et
Comix.
The Dove
and the Crow.
Columba
nutrita in quodam columbario
A Dove being fed
in a certain dove-house did
superbiebat
fcunditate. Ver Comix,
pride (herself) in (her) fruitfulness. But a Crow,

audit, ' Sit ;


Sed Hus ! tu,
desne
she being heard, says ; But Ho ! thou, cease to
gloriari
hc re ;
nam
quo
boast in this thing ; for by what (how much) the
plures
paree,
o
more thou shalt beget, by-that (by so much) the
plures dolores
actumulas.
more griefs thou dost accumulate.
Application.
FabtLla signifcat cos
ex
famulis quque
The Fable signifies those out-of servants alto to

S S.

111

esse infelicissmos,
qui procrant multos libros
be most-unfortunate, who beget
many children
in Servitute.
in slavery.

FABLE CXVI.
,
Dives.
"The Rich {lady).
Dives
hbens das filias,
altr
A rich (lady) having two daughters, the other (oneJ
mort, conduxit prsefcas :
ver
altr
having died,
hired
mourners : but the other
fil
dicente, Ut
misrse
nos, quse
daughter saying, How wretched (are) we, who
ipsse,
quarum dlor est, nescimus
lamentari,
ourselves, whose grief it is, know-not to lament,
ver has non necessar
plangunt sic vehementer?
but these not acquaintances bewail so excessively ?
Mater it,
Mirare ne, filia,
si has
(Her) mother says, Wonder not, daughter, if these
lamentantur ta, nam
gunt id
grat
lament
so, for they act that by favour (for the
nummorum.
sake) of moneys.
Application.
Fabula
signifcat,
nonnullos hommes,
The
Fable
signifies,
some
men,
propter
amorem pecunise, dubitare non
on-account-of the love of money, to hesitate not to
facre qusestum ex
alienis calamitatbus.
make gain
out-of others misfortunes.

iE SO PUS

FABLE CXVII.
Pastor.
The Shepherd.
Pastor,
ovbus
actis in
quoddam
A Shepherd, (his) sheep being driven into a certain
quercetum,
veste
strat sub
oak-grove, (his) garment being spread under an
quercu, ascendit, et
decutiebat fructum. Vero
oak,
mounted, and did shake-off the fruit.
But
ves edentes glandes, et nescse
devorrunt
the sheep eating acorns, also unknowing devoured
vestes
una.
At
qum
pastor
(his) garments together. But when the shepherd
descendisset et
might have (had) descended and might have (had)
vidisset quod
factum-rat ; it,
pessma
seen
what had been done ;
he says, worst
animala, vos praebetis vellra
csetris
ad
animals, ye afford fleeces to the rest (others) to
vestes,
ver
surripuistis etam
garments, but you have stolen
even (my)
vestem
me, qui nutro vos.
garment from me, who nourish you.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, plerosque homines
ob
The Fable signifies, most
men
on-account-of
stultitam afficientes
benefico os,
qui
folly
affecting (using) with kindness those, who
attnent nihil
ad se,
tractare ml in
relate nothing to themselves, to treat ill unto
domestcos. ,
(their) domestics.

M S 0 P s.

113

FABLE CXVIII.
Piecator
t
Cerrus.
The Fisherman and the Pilchard.
Piscator,
reti
demisso
in
mre,
A Fisherman, a net being let-down into the sea,
retulit
Cerrum, qui
qum
brought-up a Pilchard, which when (since) it might
esset
parvus,
rogabat ipsum supplicter,
be (was) small, did ask
him
suppliantly, he
ne-capret se
tunc qudem, sed
would not-take himself then indeed, but would
dimittret,
qud
esset
parvus : At,
dismiss (him), because he might be (was) small: But,
inquit,
qum
crevro, et
says he,
when I shall have grown, and shall have
evasro magnus
potris
capre me,
come-off great (big) thou shalt be-able to take me,
quonam et
re- majori utilitati tibi. Et
since
also I shall be for greater use to thee. And
Piscator
it, Sed ego
furim demens,
the Fisherman says, But I should have been mad,
si , lucro, quod est in manbus,
misso,
lct
if the gain, which is in hands, being dismissed, although
sit parvum,
sperem
expectatum, licet
it may be small, I may hope (that) expected,
although
furit magnum.
it shall have been great.
Application.
Fabula signifcat
esse inconsideratum,
The Fable signifies (that man) to be thoughtless,
qui,
' spe
majoris ri,
amittat qu sunt
who, from hope of a greater thing, may lose
what are
in manbus, qud
sint parva.
in hands,
because they may be small.
5

114

s s.
FABLE XIX.

Equus et
Asnus.
The Horse and the Ass.
Quidam homo
habebat Equum et
Asnum.
A certain man did have a Horse andan Ass.
Autem qum
facrent
iter
in
But
vclien they might make (did make) a journey in the
v,
Asnus it
Equo, Tolle partem ex meo
way, the Ass
says to the Horse, Bear part out-of my
onre,
si
vis me
esse salvum. Ver ille
burthen, if thou wilt me to be safe.
But he was
persuasus-est non. Vero Asnus cecdit atque mortus-est
persuaded not. But the Ass fell
and died

labore. Autem omnibus impostis


i ab
from labour. But
all being put-to (on) him by the
hro, et
pelle ips
Asni, Equus conqurens
master, and the hide itself of the Ass, the Horse complaining
clamabat, Hei mihi miserrmo !
quid
evenit
did cry-out, Wo to me most-wretched ! what has happened
mihi affileto ? nim, quia
nohli
accipre
o me afflicted? for, because I have willed not to receive
parm
onris, ecce
gesto omna, et
pellem !
ittle of the burthen, behold I carry all,
and the hide!
Application.
Fabla signifcat, si
magni jungantur cum
The Fable signifies, if the great bejoined
with tlte
parvis, utrosque servari in vit.
small, each to be preserved in life.
F4BLE CXX.
Homo et
Satyrus.
The Man and the Satyr.
Quidam Homo, societate
int cum Satyro,
A certain Man, partnership being entered with a Satyr,

.ESOPUS.

115

comedebat una
cum o.
Ver qum hyeme et
did eat
together with him. But when winter and
frigus
accessisset,
Hmo
cold might have approached, (had approached) the Man
admovens sas mnus
ori
afflabat.
applying his hands to (his) mouth did blow (on them).
Autem Satyro
sciscitato
ob
quam causam
But the Satyr having enquired on-account-qf what cause
facret hoc ;
it,
Calefaco mas mnus
he might do
this; he says, I warm
my hands
propter
frigus. Sed paulo post, calido edulo
on-account-of the cold. But a little after, hot food being
allato,
Homo admovens
ori
brought, the Man applying (it) to (his) mouth did
insufflabat ipsum. Ver
Satyro rursus rogante, ' quare
blow
it.
But the Satyr again asking, why he
facret id ?
it,
frigefaco ferculum.
Ver
might do
that ? he says, I cool the dish-of-meat. But
sermone
suscepto,
Satyrus it, Sed go
the discourse being taken up, the Satyr says, But I
renuncio tam amicitam posthac ; quia
emittis
renounce thy friendship hereafter ; because thou emittest
et caldum et frigdum ex
eodem ore. .
both hot
and cold
from the same mouth.
Application.
Fabula signifcat oportere nos fugre amicitas,
The Fable signifies to behove us to flee friendships, the
affecto
quarum est anceps.
affection of which is doubtful.
FABLE CXXI.
Vulpes et
. Lignator.
The Fox
and the Wood-cutter.
Vulpes fugens venatores, et mult v
decurs
Fox avoiding huntsmen, and much way being run

: sop s.

in deserto, invenit vrum lignatorem in o, cui


in a desert, found a man a woodcutter in it, to whom she
supplicabat, ut
abscondret se.
A
did supplicate, that he would hide
herself. By
quo so tuguro ostenso ei,
ingressa delitit
whom his cot being shown to her, having entered she lay-hid
in
angtis. Ac
venatoribus
profectis et
in the corners. And the huntsmen having set-out and
rogantbus vrum, hic qudem
negabat
voce
asking the man, he indeed did deny with (his) voice to
scire quidquam, sed
demonstraba* locum
s mnu.
know any-thing, but did point-out the place with his hand.
Ver qum hi
advertissent
non,
But when these might have perceived (had perceived) not,
abire
confestim.
Igtur
ut
Vulpes
they went-away immediately.
Therefore when the Fox
vidit os
prterisse, exivit
allocuta
saw them to have gone-by, she went-out having spoken
nihil.
Autem illo accusante ipsam, qud
nothing.
But
he accusing her,
because being
servata

se,
agret
non
preserved by himself, she might-act (did return) not
gratas
sbi,
Vulpes
conversa inquit, Hus
thanks to himself, the Fox being turned says, Ho
tu ! ego ver
egissem gratas tbi, si
thou ! I truly would have acted thanks to thee, if thou
h abaisses gestus
manum et mores
might'st have had
gestures of hands
and manners
simles
verbis.
like to (thy) words.
Application.
Fabula in
os, qui qudem promittentes utila
A Fable against those, who indeed promising useful
verbis, sed facunt centra
rebus.
(things) by words, but do
oppositely by things (deeds).

M S P s.

117

FABLE CXXIL
Homo Perfractor
Statuai.
A Man the Destroyer of a Statue.
Quidam Homo hbens lignum dum, qum
A certain Man having a wooden god,
when (since) he
esset
pauper,
supplicabat, ut
might be (was) poor, did supplicate,
that he would
benefacret sbi.
Igtur
qum
facret
benefit to himself. Therefore when he might do (did do)
hsec
et nihilomnu3
degret in paupertate,
these (things) and nevertheless might dwell in poverty,
iratus
projecit ipsum elevatum
crurbus in
being angry he cast
it
lifted-up by the legs
upon
pavimentum. Igtur .
capte
illiso,
the pavement.
Therefore (its) head being dashed, and
sttim
diffracto, quamplurmum auri effluxit ;
immediately being broken, very-much ofgoldflowed-out ;
quod ille jam collgens
exclamabat,
Es
which he
now collecting did cry-out,
Thou art
perversus et
ingratus,
ut
pto :
nim
perverse and ungrateful, as I think : for thou hast
profuisti nequaquam
mhi colenti
te,
autem
profited by-no-means to me worshipping thee, but thou
remuneravisti
multis bonis, verberantem te.
bast remunerated (me) with many goods, beating
thee.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, te non profuturum
tbi,
The Fable signifies, thee not about-to-profit to thee,
honorntem pravum homnem, sed profuturum
mgis
honouring a corrupt man,
but about-to-profit more
verberantem ipsum.
beating
him.

118

M S P U S.
FABLE CXXIII.

Homo et
Canis.
The Man and the Dog.
Quidam Homo parabat cnam, accepturus
A ertain Man did prepare a supper, about-lo-receive a
quendam
suorum amicorum et
familiarum.
certain (person) of his
friends and acquaintances.
Ver Cnis ipsius invitavit alum cnem, dicens,
But the Dog of him invited another dog,
saying,
amice, vni, cna un
mecum.
Ver qum is
friend, come, sup together with ..
But when he
accessisset,
adstabat laHus, spectans
might have approached, he did stand-by glad, beholding a
magnam nam, clamans
in so corde, Pap !
great
supper, crying-out in his heart,
Strange !
quanta
ltita nuper
oblata -est derepent
now-great gladness lately has been presented suddenly to
mihi ! nam et
nutrar,
et
cnabo ad
me ! for both I shall be nourished, and will sup
to
satietatem, ad ut
esuriro
null
fulness,
so
that I shall have been-hungry by no
mdo
eras.
Cne dicente hc
maimer (means) to-morrow. The Dog saying these
secum, que
smul
movente
(things) with himself, and at the-same-time moving
caudam, ut qui jam
fidret
(wagging) (his) tail,
as who now might trust to (his)
amico,
oquus, ut
vidit ipsum circumagentem
friend, the cook, when he saw
him
shaking-about
caudam hue
illuc,
crurbus ipsius
(his) tail
hither (and) thither, the legs of him being
arreptis, ejecit
sttim
de
fenestris.
seized, cast (him) out immediately from the windows.
At qum is
decidisset,
abibat
But when he might have fallen-down, he did go-away

iE S OP US.

excltnans vehementer. Sed quidam


cnum
crying-out exceedingly. But a certain-one of the dogs
occurrentum illi in
via
pereontabatur, ut belle
meeting
to him in the way did question,
howfinely
coenatus-es, amice ? Ver ille respondens i,
hast thou supped,
friend ? But he answering to him,
dixit,
inebriatus
multo potu supra satietatem,
said, being inebriated with much drink above fullness,
novi' ne qudem
vam ipsam,
qu
I knew not indeed (even) the way itself, by which 1
egressus-sum.
came-out.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, non oportere
confidre is
The Fable signifies, not to behove (us) to trust to those
qui pollicentur benefacere ex alienis.
who promise to benefit
from strange (persons').

FABLE CXXIV.
Piscator.
The Fisherman.
Piscator,
rdis
piscandi, tibis ac retbus
A Fisherman unskilled offishing, pipes and nets being
acceptis, perrexit ad
mre, *t stans
'super
received, proceeded to the sea,
and standing upon
quandam ptram, primum qudem sonabat
tibis,
certain rock, first
indeed did sound with the pipes,
existmans, pisces assilire ad
suavitatem
vocis.
thinking, thefishes to leap-up at the sweetness of the voice.
Ver ut contendens multm,
profcret
But when striving
much, he mightprofit (didprofit)
nihil,
tibis
depostis,
assumit rete, ae
nothing, the pipes being laid-aside, he took a net, and (it)

120

S O P U S.

jacto in
quam, cpit multm piscum. Vero
being cast into the water, he took much offishes.
But
cm
ejecisset illos
ret, ut
when he might have cast-out them from the net, when he
vidit
salientes, it, pessm animantes, qum
saw (them) leaping, he says, worst animals, when
sonabam
tib,
saltabatis non ; vero
did sound (play) with a pipe, ye did dance
not ; but
qum
cessavi, agtis
id.
when I have ceased, ye act (perform) that.
Application.
Fabula in
os,
qui gunt alquid
prter
A Fable against those, who act
something beside
rationem, et inopportune.
(contrary-to) reason, and unseasonably.

FABLE CXXV.
Bubulcus.
The Herdsman.
Bubulcus pascens
armentum taurorum
amisit
A Herdsman feeding a herd
of bulls (oxen) lost a
vitulum. Ver cum
lustrsset
calf.
But when he might have viewed (had viewedJ
omnem solitudnem qurens,
traxit
all the desert
seeking {it), he drew (contracted) a
moram. Autem bi
potit
invenire nihil,
delay. ' But
when he was-able tofind
nothing, he
fecit votum Jvi,
si
ostcndret furem, qui
made a vow to Jupiter, if he would shew the thief, who
cepisset
vitulm, se ,
oblaturum
might have taken ' the calf,
himself aboul-to-offer a
hcedum in sacrificum. . Cetrum proficiscens in . . ;
kid
in sacrifice.
But
setting-ut into a

s s.

tort

quoddam quercetum,-'
inveni leonem devorantem
certain
oak-grove, he found a lion
devouring the
vitulum. Igtur
factus trepdus
et
calf.
Therefore being made fearful (trembling) and
vald terrtus,
sis manbus
elevatis in clum,
greatly affrighted, his hands being lifted-up unto heaven,
it Domme Jupiter,
promisram me esse
he says, Lord
Jupiter, I had promised
me to be
daturum
hdum tbi, si
invenirem furem ;
about-to-give a kid to thee, if I mightfind the thief;
autem nunc pollicor sacrificaturum
taurum tbi, si
but
now I promise about-to-sacrifice a bull to theei if I
eugero mnus hujus.
shall have escaped the hands of him.
Application.
Fabula in
infortunatos hommes,
A Fable against unfortunate men,
crent, precantur ut
inventant ;
want, pray
that they mayfind ;
invenrint, quaerunt effugre.
shall have found,
seek to escape.

qui dum
who whilst they
vero qum
but when they

FABLE CXXVI.
Corvus.
The Raven.
Corvus aegrotans it
matri, Mater, precare
A Raven being^ick says to (his) mother, Mother, pray-to
Dum, nec lamentare. Vero a respondens, it, Quis
God, nor lament.
But she answering, says, Who
Deorum
miserebtur ti, O f)li ? nim cujus
of the Gods will pity
of thee, son? for. ..whose
carnes
surrcptae-fuerunt non te?
fleshes (meats) have been stolen
not by thee ?

122

JE S P U S,
Application.

Fabla signifcat, os qui hbent multos inimicosin


The Fable signifies, those who have many enemies in
vita, inventaros neminem amicum in necessitate.
life, about-to-find no-one afriend in necessity.

FABLE CXXVII.
Aqula.
The Eagle.
Aqula
sedebat sper ptrara, quserens capre
An Eagle did sit
upon a rock,
seeking to catch a
Leporem. Autem quidam
percussit hanc
Mare.
But a certain (person) struck
her with an
sagitt, et qudem sagitta ingressa-est ipsam. Sed
arrow, and indeed the arrow entered
her.
But the
crena cum
pennis
stabat ante
oculos : vero
notch with thefeathers did stand before (her) eyes ; but
ilia
conspicata inquit, Et hsec
altera mstita
she having seen (it) says, And this (is) another sorrow
mhi, quod
interam
propris pennis.
to me, that I may perish (I perish) by my-ownfeathers.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, esse durum, qum quis
pattur
The Fable signifies, to be hard, when any-one suffers
periculum
sis.
danger
from his-own.
FABLE CXXVIJI.
Cicada
et
Formicae.
The Grasshopper and the Ants.
Tritco madente
tempore hymis,
Formicse
The Wheat being-wet in the time of winter, the Ants

s s.

ventilabnt.
Autem Cicada
esurens
idfan (dry it). But a Grasshopper being hungry did
rogabat as cbum. Vero Formic dixerunt i, Cur
ask
themfood. But the Ants
said to her, Why
colligebas non alimenturn
state ? Vero hc
didst thou collect
not nourishment in summer ? But she
it,
Eram non otiosa, sed
canebam musc.
says, I was not idle,
but I did sing
musically.
Tum h ridentes dixerunt, Si
modulabaris
Then these laughing said,
If thou didst tune in the
tempore statis, salta
hyme.
time of summer, dance in winter.
Application,
Fabula signifient, non
oportere quenquam esse
The Fable signifies/
not to behove any-one to be
negligentem in alqu
re,
ne
mrat
negligent
in some (any) thing, lest he may grieve and
periclitetur.
may be-in-danger.

FABLE CXXIX.
Vermis et
Vulpes.
The Worm and the Fox.
Vermis qui
celabatur sub
cceno,
A Worm which was concealed under mud, having
egressus sper
terram, dicebat omnibus animalbus
come-forth upon the earth, did say to all
animals,
Sum medcus, doctus
medicamnum, qualis
/ am a physician, taught (skilled) of medicines,
such-as
Pon est, medcus
Deorum. Et quomdo, it
Paon is, the physician of the Gods.
And how,
says

vesopu-s.

Vulpes, curans alos


curavisti non teipsum
the For,
curing others hast thou cured
not thyselfclaudum ?
Application.
Fabla signifcat, nisi
experienta
furit
The Fable signifies, unless experience may have been
prst, omne verbum
esse inane.
at-hand, all word (language) to be empty (useless).
FABLE CXXX.
Auripara
Gallina.
The Gold-producing Hen.
Quidam
habebat Gallinam, parientem
A certain (person) did hve
a Hen,
producing
anrea ova, et
rtus
massam auri
esse
golden eggs, and having thought a mass ofgold to be
intra ipsam, repprit
occisam simlem alis
within her,
found (her) being killed
like to other
gallinis. Ver hic sperans se
inventurum multm
hens.
But he hoping himself about-to-find much of
divitiarum, privatus-est
, illis etam exigis.
riches, was deprivedfrom (of) them even little.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, oportere
esse contentum
The Fable signifies, to behove (a man) to be content
prsentbus
et
fugre insatiabilitatem.
with present (things) and to avoid insatiableness.
FABLE CXXXI.
Lo et
Vulpes.
The Lion and the Fox.
. Lo
onfctus seno,
et non vlens
A Lion being spent with old-age, and not being-able to

S U S.

125

suppeditare cbum sbi,


decrevit facere alquid
supply
food to himself, resolved to do
something by
astu. Itque
profectus in
quoddam antrum,
crqf. Therefore having gone
into a certain cave,
et
inclusus,
simulabat se
grotare.
and being shut-up, he did pretend
himself to be-sick.
Igtur
comprehendens animala advenienta,
Therefore seizing
the animals coming-to (him), by
grat
visitatonis, devoravit.
favour (for the sake) of a visit,
he devoured (them).
Igtur
multis animalbus
absumptis, Vulpes,
Therefore many animals being consumed, a Fox
that
arte
cognt accessit
ad ipsum, et stans
art (trick) being known approached to him, and standing
extra
speluncam, rogabat, quomdo
haberet
without the cavern, did ask,
how he might have
se.
Autem qum is
dixisset,
himself. But
when he might have said, (had saidJ:
Ml que
rogaret
causam, quamobrem
Badly ; and might ask (did ask) the cause, wherefore he
ingrederetur non ;
Vulpes it, Quia
video
might enter
not ; the Fox
says, Because I see
vestiga
multorum introeuntum, vero
the footsteps of many
entering,
but (those) of
paucorum exeuntum.
few
coming-out.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, prudentes homines providentes
The Fable signifies,
prudent
men
foreseeing
pericula ex
conjecturis, evitare.
dangers from conjectures, to avoid (them).

16

126

jESOPUTS.
.

1
'. . '

'.
FABLE CXXXII.
Lupus et
Vetilla.
The Wolf and the Old-woinaiu

Lupus esurens
crcuroibat qurens cbum.
A Wolf hungering did go-about
seeking food.
A utem
profectus ad
quendam locum, audivit
But having set-out
to a certain
place, he heard a
puerulum lugentem, et
Arnim
dicentem ei,
little-boy crying,
and an Old-woman saying to him,
Desne plorare: sin-mmus,
tradam te
Lupo
Cease to weep :
if-not, I will deliver thee to a Wolf
hc hor. Igtur
Lpus
rtus,
quod
this hour. Therefore the Wolf having thought, that
.anicula
loquitur serd,
sttit expectans
the little-old-woman speaks
seriously, stood waiting
multam horam.
Sed qum vespra
much
hour (tim). But when evening might have
oppressisset
audit
Anum
rursus
pressed-on (had presscd-on), he hears the Old-woman again
blandientem puerlo, ac dicentem i, Si Lpus
coaxing to the little-boy, and saying to him, If a Wolf
vencrit hue,
interficiemus um, O fili.
shall have come hither, we will kill
him, son.
His
auditis
Lupus abivit,
dicens,
These (words) being heard the Wolf went-away saying,
In hoc tugurio, dicnt aliud,
ver
in this cot, they say
another (one thing,) but they
faciunt aliud.
do
another.
Application.
Fabla in
hommes, qui hbent non facta simila
A Fable against men,
who have not deeds like to
verbis.
(their) words.

S OP s.

127

FABLE CXXXIII.
Hdus et
Lpus.
The Kid
and the Wolf.
Hdus stans
sper quodam tecto, cum
A Kid
standing upon a certain roof, when he might
videret
Lpum prtereuntem, conviciabatut
see (did see) a Wolf
passing-by, did rail-at
et
mordebat ipsum. Sed
Lpus it, Hus,
and did bite (jeer) him.
But the Wolf says, Ho,
tu ! non tu conviciaris mihi, sed
locus.
thou ! not thou railest to me, but the place.
Application.
Fabla signifcat, qud plerumque et
locus et
The Fable signifies, that generally both place and
tempus prbet
audacam adversus prstantiores.
time
affords (afford) boldness against more-excellent
(persons.)
FABLE CXXXIV.
Mulus.
The Mule.
Mulus pinguefactus hordo,
lasciviebat damans
A Mule fattened with barley, did wanton
crying-out
ac dicens, Meus pter est cursor quus, et ego sum
and saying, My father is a racer horse, and I am
totus similis i.
Atque aliquando, qum
esset
entire like to him. And some-time, when it might be
necesse
i
currre, ut
cessavrat
( was) necessaryfor him to run,
when he had ceased

cursu, recordatus-est sttim


Asni
from the race, he remembered
immediately of tht Ass
ptris.

(his) father.
. ,
'. . .

128

. JE S 0 P U S.
Application.

Fabla signifcat, etsi


tempus
promoveat
The Fable signifies, although time may promote
alquem
ad gloram, tmen
obliviscatur
some-one (any one) to glory, however he mayforget
nop. . sx-ipsius fortun nim hsec vita instablis.
not of'hit-own
fortune: for this life is unstable.

FABLE CXXXV.
Serpens et
Agrcola.
The Serpent and the Husbandman.
Serpens habens
antrum in
vestibulis
A Serpent having a cave
in the thresholds of a
Agrcl,
sustulit
infantem puerulum ejus.
Husbandman, bore-away an infant
little-boy of him.
Autem magnus luctus fit
parentbus. At
pter,
But great grief was to the parents.
But thefather,
securi
accept
pr
mrore, rat
an axe being taken
before (from) grief,
teas
occisurus
serpentem
egressum. Ver Ut
about-to-kill the serpent having come-out. But when the
Agrcla
festinans inclinavit se
parumper, ut
Husbandman hurrying bent
himself a little,
that
percutret ipsum, erravit,
orificio
he might strike
him, he missed (him), the opening of
foramnis tantm
percusso. Autem Serpente
the hole
only being struck.
But the Serpent
digresso,
Agrcla
rtus
having departed, the Husbandman having thought the
Serpentem non ampls
meminisse
Serpent
not more (longer) to have remembered of the
injuria, accepit panem et slem, que apposit
in
injury, took bread and salt, and placed (them) in the

S U S.

129

foramne. Sed
Serpens
teni siblo, Sit,
hole.
But the Serpent with slight hiss,
says,
Fdes
vel amicita,
rit non
nobis
Confidence or friendship, shall be not to us
postbac, quamdu ego vido lapiden^ vero tu .
hereafter, s-long-as I see a stone,
but thou the
tumulum ti fili.
tomb of thy son.
Application.
Fabula signifcat, nullum oblivisci odi, aut
The Fable signifies, no-one to forget of hatred, or
vindictes, quamdu
vdet monimentum, quo
of revenge,' as-long-as he sees the monument, by which
trisfatus-est.
he was grieved.
FABLE CXXXVI.
Tubicen.
The Trumpeter.
Tubicen,
exerctu
congregato,
ac
A Trumpeter, the army being collected-together, and
superatus ab
hostbus,
clamabat,
being overcome by the enemies,
did cry,
Ne-occidte me,
vri, temer et frustra : nim
Slay-not
me, men, rashly and in-vain : for
occidi non quemquam vestrum ; nam, prseter
I have slain not any-one of you ;
for, beside
o ass,
possido nihil
aliud.
Vero hi
this brass, I possess nothing other (else). But they
dixre illi,
Ob
hoc
moriris
said to him, On-account-of this thou shalt die the
mgis, qui excitas omnes ad pugnam, qum ipse
more, who rousest all
to battle,
when thyself
nequas
pugnare.
may be-unable toght.

130

JE S P U S.
Application.

Fabla signifcat,
The Fable signifies,
conctant mlos
rouse
bad
and
ml.
badly.

os
peccare
those to sin
grves principes
severe princes

pls, qui
more, -who
ad agendum
to act

FABLE CXXXVII.
A rundo et
Oliva.
The Reed and the Olive.
Arundo et
Oliva
contendebant de
A Reed
and an Olive did contend
about
tolerant, et virbus,
et quiete.
Vero
endurance, and forces (strength) , and quietness. But
arundne
affect
convicis ab
the reed being affected (attacked) with reproaches by
Oliva, utpote imbecill, facle cedente
the Olive, as
weak,
and easily yieldi?ig to
omnibus ventis,
Arundo tcens
locuta-est
all
winds, the Reed
being-silent spake
nihil.
Ac
praestolata parumper, bi
nothing. And having waited a little-while, when a
acer ventus afflavit,
Arundo
succussa, et
sharp wind
blew, the Reed being shaken, and
declinata
ventis evasit facle.
Autem
bent-down by the winds escaped easily.
But the
Oliva
diffracta-est
vi,
qum
Olive was broken-asunder by force, when (since) it
restitisset
ventis.
might have resisted (had resisted) to the winds.

S U S.

131

Application.
Fabula signifcat, os,
qui resistunt o
The Fable signifies, those, who resist
not to
tempori, ac prsestantiorbus,
esse meliores
time,
and more-excellent (persons), to be better
is,
qui contendunt cum potentiorbus
(than) those, who contend
with more-powerful
(persons).

FABLE CXXXVIII.
Liipus et
Grus.
The Wolf and the Crane.
Os
infixum-rat
guttre
Lpi.
A bone had been fastened in the throat of a Wolf.
Ver ille dixit se
prssbiturum
mercedem
But he said himself about-to-afford a reward to a
Gri,
si,
capte
injecto,
Crane, if, (her) head being cast-in, she shall have
extraxrit
os
sbi
ex
guttre :
extracted the bone for himself out-of the throat:
autem haec, o
extracto, quippe quse
hut she, it being extracted, because which might
esset
procero
eolio,
efflagitabat
he (was*) with tall (long) neck, did demand the
mercedem : qui
subridendo que exacuendo
reward:
who in smiling
and whetting (his)
dentes it, hoc solum suffcit
tbi, qud
teeth says, this alone suffices for thee, that thou
exemris
cput salvum ex
may'st have taken-out (thy) head safe
out-of the
ore
et dentbus Lpi,
passum nihil
mouth and teeth of a Wolf, having suffered nothing
mli.
of evil.

132

JE S P U S.

Application.
Fabla in
vros, qui
servati

A Fable against men, who being preserved from


periculo, referunt eam
gratam
danger, return that fsuch) favour (to those) having
mertis bn de se.
deserved well of themselves.

FABLE CXXXIX.
Snex
et Mors.
The Old-man and Death.
Snex
olim,
lignis
sectis, et ferens
An Old-man formerly, logs being cut,
and bearing
a
ibat multam vam, ac
ob
multum
them did go much way, and on-account-of much
laborem,
onre
deposito
in
quodam
labour, (his) burthen being laid-down in a certain
loco,
invocabat Mortem. Sed Morte
place, did call-on
Death.
But Death (being)
prsesente, et
rogante
causam,
propter
present, and asking the reason, on-account-of
quam
vocaret se,
Snex
which he might call
himself, the Old-man being
perterrefactus, it, Ut
attollas mum
terrified,
says, That thou may'st raise
my
onus.
burthen.
;
Application.
Fabula signifcat, omnem
homnem esse
The Fable signifies, all (every) man
ta be
studiosum vitas, lct
sit infortunatus et
fnd of life, although he may be unfortunate and
mendicus.
a beggar.
. .

S S.

133

FABLE CXL.
Ranae.
The Frogs.
Do Ranse,
palude bi
habitabant
Two Frogs, the marsh where they did dwell being
siccat,
circumibant quserentes bi
dried, did go-about
seeking
where they might
manerent: ac
profectee ad
profundum
remain :
and having set-out
to a deep
putum et
acclinatse deorsum,
well
and being bent
downward, having
conspicatse quam,
altera
monebat, ut
seen
water, the other did advise, that they
saltarent deorsum continuo :
ver altera
might leap
downward immediately : but the other
it, Si hic et
arurit, quomdo
says, If this also shall have dried, how shall we
potermus ascendre ?
be-able to ascend?
Application.
Fabula signifcat, ut
ne-gas quid
The Fable signifies, that thou may'st not-act any
sme
consilo.
(thing) without counsel.

FABLE XLI.
Agnus et
Lipus.
The Lamb and the Wolf.
Agnus stans
A Lamb standing
maledictis
Lpum
reproaches a Wolf

in alto lco
insectabatur
in a high place did cut with
prsetereuntem vam infers,
j)assing*by the way more-low,
m

134

iESOPUS.

et
appellabat mlam et
crudivoram
and did call (Aim) a bad and raw-flesh-devouring
fram.
Sed
Lupus
conversus it
Uli,
beast. But the Wolf being turned
says to him,
Non tu
conviciaris
mihi, sed
turris in qua
Not thou reproachest to me, but the tower in which
stas.
thou standest.
Application.
Fabula ad os,
A Fable to those,
hominbus, mtu
men, from fear of

qui feront injurias ab


indignis
who bear injuries from unworthy
sublimiorum.
higher {persons).

FABLE CXLII.
Culex et
Lo.
The Gnat and the Lion.
Culex
profectus ad Leonem Sit, Neque
A Gnat having set-out to a Lion
says, Neither
timo te, nque es
fortor
me.
/ fear thee, nor art thou more-brave (than) I.
Sin
mnus,
quid robur
est tibi? quod
But-if less (not), what strength is to thee? because
lacras
ungubus et mordes
thou tearest with (thy) talons
and bitest with thy
dentbus ? foemna et pugnans cum vro fcit hoc.
teeth ? a woman alsoJighting with a man does this.
Vero go sum long fortor
te.
Vero
But I am by-far more-brave (than) thee. But
si
. vis,
veniamus ad pugnam.
if thou wilt, we may (let us) come
to battle.
Et qum
cecinisset
And when he might have sung (had sounded) with

M S P U S.

135

tub,
Clex inhsit,
mordens
a trumpet, the Gnat cleaved-to (him) biting the
nudas gnas
ipsius circa
nares.
Autem
naked cheeks of him about (Ate) nostrils. But the
Leo dilaniavit seipsum
propris ungubus, donee
Lion tore
himself with his-own talons,
until
indignatus-est. Autem Culex,
Leone
he was enraged.
But the Gnat, the Lion being
victo,
qum
sonuisset
conquered, when he might have sounded (had sounded)
tb,
et
cecinisset
with a trumpet, and might have sung (had sung)
triumphale carmen,
avolavit.
Ver
a triumphal poem (song), flew-away. But being
implictus
vincttlo
aranse, qum
entangled in the chain (thread) of a spider, when he
devoraretur
lamentabatur,
might be devoured (was devoured) he did lament,
qud pugnans cum
maxmis,
that fighting with the greatest, she should be
occideretur
vili animali, Aran.
killed
by a vile animal, a Spider.
Application.
Fabula in
os, qui prosternunt magnos
A Fable against those, who overthrow great (ones)
et
prosternuntur
parvis.
and are overthrown by the little.

FIN IS.

T. C. Hanurri, Printer, Ptr nosterfow.Loadon.