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Batteries

Section 92.61
I & O MANUALS

Installation and Operating

Instructions

For

ABSOLYTE IIP Batteries

50A

90A

100A

UL Recognized Component
INDEX
Page
SECTION 1
1.0 General Information ..................................................................................................................... 1

SECTION 2
2.0 Safety Precautions ....................................................................................................................... 1
2.1 Sulfuric Acid Burns....................................................................................................................... 1
2.2 Explosive Gases .......................................................................................................................... 1
2.3 Electrical Shock and Burns .......................................................................................................... 1
2.3.1 Static Discharge Precautions for Batteries................................................................................... 1
2.4 Safety Alert................................................................................................................................... 2
2.5 Important Message ...................................................................................................................... 2

SECTION 3
3.0 Receipt of Shipment..................................................................................................................... 2
3.1 Concealed Damage ..................................................................................................................... 2

SECTION 4
4.0 Storage Prior to Installation.......................................................................................................... 2
4.1 Storage Location .......................................................................................................................... 2
4.2 Storage Interval............................................................................................................................ 2

SECTION 5
5.0 Installation Considerations ........................................................................................................... 2
5.1 Space Considerations .................................................................................................................. 2
5.2 Battery Location ........................................................................................................................... 2
5.3 Temperature Variations................................................................................................................ 4
5.4 Ventilation .................................................................................................................................... 4
5.5 Floor Loading ............................................................................................................................... 4
5.6 Floor Anchoring............................................................................................................................ 4
5.7 Connecting Cables: Battery System to Operating Equipment ..................................................... 4
5.7.1 Paralleling .................................................................................................................................... 4
5.8 Stacking Limitations ..................................................................................................................... 4
5.9 Terminal Plates ............................................................................................................................ 4

SECTION 6
6.0 Unpacking and Handling .............................................................................................................. 5
6.1 General ........................................................................................................................................ 5
6.2 Accessories.................................................................................................................................. 5
6.3 Recommended Installation Equipment and Supplies................................................................... 5
6.4 Unpacking .................................................................................................................................... 5
6.5 Handling ....................................................................................................................................... 5

SECTION 7
7.0 Module Assemblies ...................................................................................................................... 6
7.1 Module Assembly Identification.................................................................................................... 6
7.2 Standard and Reverse Assemblies.............................................................................................. 6

SECTION 8
8.0 System Arrangements.................................................................................................................. 7
8.1 Module Arrangements.................................................................................................................. 7
8.2 Dummy Cells within a Module...................................................................................................... 8

SECTION 9
9.0 System Assembly......................................................................................................................... 8
9.1 Horizontal - Single Stack.............................................................................................................. 8
9.1.1 Bottom Supports .......................................................................................................................... 8
9.1.2 Handling ....................................................................................................................................... 9
9.1.3 Horizontal Stacking ...................................................................................................................... 9
9.2 Horizontal-Multiple Stacking......................................................................................................... 11
9.2.1 Stack Tie Plates ........................................................................................................................... 12
SECTION 10
10.0 Connections ................................................................................................................................. 13
10.1 Post Preparation .......................................................................................................................... 13
10.2 INTRA-Stack Connections ........................................................................................................... 13
10.3 INTER-Stack Connections ........................................................................................................... 13
10.4 Connections - Torquing................................................................................................................ 13
10.5 Connections - System Terminals ................................................................................................. 13
10.6 Connections - Check.................................................................................................................... 13
10.7 Cell Numerals............................................................................................................................... 13
10.8 Warning Label .............................................................................................................................. 13
10.9 Battery Nameplate ....................................................................................................................... 13

SECTION 11
11.0 Protective Module Covers ............................................................................................................ 18
11.1 Transparent Cover Installation ..................................................................................................... 18

SECTION 12
12.0 Initial Charge ................................................................................................................................ 18
12.1 Constant Voltage Method............................................................................................................. 18

SECTION 13
13.0 Operation ..................................................................................................................................... 18
13.0.1 Cycle Method of Operation .......................................................................................................... 18
13.1 Floating Charge Method............................................................................................................... 18
13.2 Float Charge - Float Voltages ...................................................................................................... 18
13.3 Voltmeter Calibration.................................................................................................................... 19
13.4 Recharge...................................................................................................................................... 19
13.5 Determining State-of-Charge ....................................................................................................... 19
13.6 Effects of Float Voltage ................................................................................................................ 19

SECTION 14
14.0 Equalizing Charge........................................................................................................................ 19
14.1 Equalizing Frequency................................................................................................................... 19
14.2 Equalizing Charge Method........................................................................................................... 19

SECTION 15
15.0 Pilot Cell ....................................................................................................................................... 20

SECTION 16
16.0 Records........................................................................................................................................ 20

SECTION 17
17.0 Tap Connections .......................................................................................................................... 20

SECTION 18
18.0 Temporary Non-Use..................................................................................................................... 20

SECTION 19
19.0 Unit Cleaning................................................................................................................................ 20

SECTION 20
20.0 Connections ................................................................................................................................. 21
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

Page

3 Fig. 1A-B Typical Systems


5 Fig. 2 Packaged Modules
5 Fig. 3 Unpacking Modules
6 Fig. 4 Handling - Lifting Strap Placement
6 Fig. 5 Various Module Assemblies
7 Fig. 5 Various Module Assemblies
7 Fig. 6A-B Typical Horizontal Stack Arrangements - Front Views
8 Fig. 7 Typical Horizontal Stack Arrangments - Back to Back and Side by Side
8 Fig. 8 Module Polarity Label Location
8 Fig. 9 Horizontal Base Support - Hardware Installation
9 Fig. 10 Horizontal Base Support Installation
9 Fig. 11 Handling Base Support Installation
9 Fig. 12A Tip-Over Procedure - Shackle-Strap Usage
10 Fig. 12B Tip-Over Procedure
10 Fig. 13 Module with Base Assembly After Tip-Over
10 Fig. 14 Horizontal Stacking - Shackle-Strap Usage
11 Fig. 15 Handling and Stacking Horizontal Modules
11 Fig. 16 Hardware Installation Sequence
11 Fig. 17 Installing Hardware
11 Fig. 17A Completed Horizontal Stack
11 Fig. 18 Positioning Horizontal Base Modlules
12 Fig. 18A Horizontal Stacks - Back to Back Positioning
12 Fig. 19 Completed Horizontal Stacks - Side by Side
12 Fig. 20A-B Tie Plate Assemblies - Horizontal Stacks
14 Fig. 21 Various Inter Stack and Intra Stack Connections - Horizontal Arrangements
15 Fig. 22 Terminal Plate Kit - 6 Cell Modules
16 Fig. 23 Terminal Plate Kit - 3 Cell Modules
17 Fig. 24 Protective Cover Assembly
21 Fig. 25 Sample Record Form
SECTION 1 these explosive gases will be released.

Keep sparks, flames, and smoking materials away from the


1.0 General Information battery area and the explosive gases.

In normal use, the Absolyte battery will not generate or All installation tools should be adequately covered with vinyl
release hydrogen gas, will not release acid mist, and will not electrical tape to minimize possibility of shorting across con-
leak acid. This is because Absolyte batteries are designed dif- nections.
ferently than conventional lead acid batteries, in order to Never lay tools or other metallic objects on modules as short-
operate with low maintanence. Thus they are inherently safer ing, explosions and personal injury may result.
than conventional lead acid batteries. However, there is the
possibility that under abnormal operating conditions, or as a
result of damage, misuse and/or abuse, these potentially haz- DANGER
ardous conditions (hydrogen gassing, acid mist, and leaking
ELECTRICAL SHOCK
electrolyte) could occur. Thus, GNB recommends that Section
2.0 of these instructions entitled SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AND BURNS
be reviewed thoroughly, and strictly followed when working
with Absolyte batteries.
2.3 Electrical Shock and Burns

! CAUTION!
Multi-cell systems attain high voltages, therefore, extreme
caution must be exercised during installation of a battery sys-
tem to prevent serious electrical burns or shock.
Before proceeding with the unpack-
ing, handling, installation and opera- Interrupt the AC and DC circuits before working on batteries
tion of this sealed lead-acid storage or charging equipment.
battery, the following general infor- Assure that personnel understand the risk of working with bat-
mation should be reviewed together teries, and are prepared and equipped to take the necessary
with the recommended safety pre- safety precautions. These installation and operating instruc-
cautions. tions should be understood and followed. Assure that you
have the necessary equipment for the work, including insulat-
ed tools, rubber gloves, rubber aprons, safety goggles and
face protection.
SECTION 2

2.0 Safety Precautions

2.1 Sulfuric Acid Burns ! CAUTION!


If the foregoing precautions are not fully
DANGER understood, clarification should be obtained
from your nearest GNB representative.
SULFURIC ACID BURNS Local conditions may introduce situations
not covered by GNB Safety Precautions. If
so, contact the nearest GNB representative
for guidance with your particular safety prob-
Batteries contain sulfuric acid which can cause burns and lem; also refer to applicable federal, state
other serious injury. In the event of contact with sulfuric acid, and local regulations as well as industry
flush immediately and thoroughly with water. Secure medical standards.
attention immediately.

When working with batteries, wear rubber apron and rubber


gloves. Wear safety goggles or other eye protection. These
will help prevent injury if contact is made with the acid. 2.3.1 Static Discharge Precautions for Batteries

When maintaining a connected battery string, care must be


DANGER taken to prevent build-up of static charge. This danger is par-
ticularly significant when the worker is electrically isolated, i.e.
working on a rubber mat or an epoxy painted floor or wearing
EXPLOSIVE GASES rubber shoes.

Prior to making contact with the cell, discharge static electrici-


2.2 Explosive Gases ty by touching a grounded surface.

Batteries could generate explosive gases, which when Wearing a ground strap while working on a connected battery
released, can explode and cause blindness and other serious string is not recommended.
injury. If the safety vent opens while the explosive gases are
being generated (eg. in the event of a charger malfunction),
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2.4 Safety Alert SECTION 5
The safety alert symbol on the left appears 5.0 Installation Considerations
throughout this manual. Where the symbol
! appears, obey the safety message to avoid
personal injury. !
Prior to starting installation of the Absolyte Battery System, a
2.5 Important Message review of this section is strongly recommended.

Any modifications, alterations or additions to an


The symbol on the left indicates an
Absolyte system, without the expressed written
important message. If not followed, dam-
consent of GNB Engineering, may void any
age to and/or impaired performance of
warranties and/or seismic qualifications.
the battery may result.
Contact your GNB representative for additional
information.

SECTION 3
5.1 Space Considerations
3.0 Receipt of Shipment It is important to know certain restrictions for the area where
the battery is to be located. First, a designated aisle space
Immediately upon delivery, examine for possible damage should be provided to permit initial installation as well as for
caused in transit. Damaged packing material or staining from service or surveillance. After installation, any additional equip-
leaking electrolyte could indicate rough handling. Make a ment installed after the battery should not compromise access
descriptive notation on the delivery receipt before signing. If to the battery system.
cell or unit damage is found, request an inspection by the car- A minimum of 36" aisle space should be available adjacent to
rier and file a damage claim. the battery system. See Figure 1 for typical space allocations
required.
3.1 Concealed Damage NOTE: When planning system space requirements, allow at
least 6 inches past system total length wherever a terminal
Within 15 days of receipt, examine all cells for concealed
plate assembly is to be located.
damage. If damage is noted, immediately request an inspec-
tion by the carrier and file a concealed damage claim. Pay Figure 1 A-B are typical. For total length, width and height
particular attention to packing material exhibiting damage or dimensions of connected systems, consult layout/wiring dia-
electrolyte staining. Delay in notifying carrier may result in gram for the particular system.
loss of right to reimbursement for damages. 5.2 Battery Location & Ambient
Temperature Requirements
SECTION 4 It is recommended that the battery unit be installed in a clean,
cool, dry location. Floors should be level. Absolyte batteries
4.0 Storage Prior to Installation can be installed in proximity to electronic equipment.
A location having an ambient temperature of 75F (24C) to
4.1 Storage Location 77F (25C) will result in optimum battery life and perfor-
mance. Temperatures below 77F (25C) reduce battery
If the battery is not to be installed at the time of receipt, it is charge efficienty and discharge performance. Temperatures
recommended that it be stored indoors in a cool [77F above 77F (25C) will result in a reduction in battery life (see
(25C)], clean, dry location. Do not stack pallets to avoid cell table below.)
damage.
Maximum Annual Maximum Percent
Average Battery Battery Reduction
4.2 Storage Interval Temperature Temperature In Battery Life
77F (25C) 122F (50C) 0%
The storage interval from date of shipment to date of installa- 86F (30C) 122F (50C) 30%
tion and initial charge should not exceed six (6) months. If 95F (35C) 122F (50C) 50%
stored at temperatures 77F (25C) or below, the battery 104F (40C) 122F (50C) 66%
should be given its initial charge (refer to Section 12) at or 113F (45C) 122F (50C) 75%
before 6 months and recharged at 6 month intervals. Storage 122F (50C) 122F (50C) 83%
at elevated temperatures will result in accelerated rates of self
For example: If a battery has a design life of 20 years at 77F
discharge. For every 18F (10C) temperature increase above
(25C), but the actual annual average battery temperature is
77F (25C) the time interval for the initial charge and
95F (35C), the projected life of the battery is calculated to
recharge should be halved. Thus if a battery was stored at
be only 10 years.
95F (35C) the maximum storage interval would be 3
months. Storage beyond these periods without proper charge Temperature records shall be maintained by the user in
can result in excessive sulphation of plates and positive grid accordance with the maintanence schedule published in this
corrosion which is detrimental to battery performance and life. manual. The battery temperature shall not be allowed to
exceed the maximum temperature shown above. It is impor-
Failure to charge accordingly may void the batterys warranty. tant to maintain the battery temperature as close to 77F
(25C) as possible to achieve the optimum service life from

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your battery.
WALL

1A

1B

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5.3 Temperature Variations DO NOT SELECT CABLE SIZE BASED ON CURRENT
CARRYING CAPACITY ONLY. Cable size selection should
Sources of heat or cooling directed on portions of the battery provide no greater voltage drop between the battery system
can cause temperature variations within the strings resulting and operating equipment than desired. Excess voltage drop
in cell voltage differences and eventual compromise of battery will reduce the desired support time of the battery system.
performance.
5.7.1 Paralleling
Heat sources such as heaters, sunlight or associated equip-
ment can cause such temperature variations. Similarly, air
Where it is necessary to connect battery systems in parallel to
conditioning or outside air vents may cause cell string temper-
obtain sufficient capacity, cable connections to each of the
ature variations. Every effort should be made to keep temper-
parallel strings are important.
ature variations within 5F (3C).
Cables should be sized to minimize voltage drop, not only for
5.4 Ventilation current carrying capacity. The ampacity of the cables should
! not be exceeded, and they should be as short as possible.
However, the lengths of cables for all of the systems being
The Absolyte battery is a sealed low maintanence battery
which under recommended charging conditions in stationary paralleled to the load should be equal in length to provide
applications will not vent any gases. proper load sharing on discharge, satisfactory recharge as
well as the same float voltage per string.
However, should the battery be subjected to conditions such
as excessive overcharge, hydrogen and oxygen can be vent- 5.8 Stacking Limitations
ed to the atmosphere. Therefore, the battery should never be
installed in an air-tight enclosure. Sufficient precautions must
There are recommended limits on stacked battery configura-
be taken to prevent excessive overcharge.
tions, see Table A.
Tests have confirmed that 99% of the gases generated are
recombined within the cell. No special ventilation and/or bat-
tery room is required.
Module Maximum Modules
5.5 Floor Loading
! Arrangement Non-Seismic Seismic
The floor of the area where the battery system is to be
installed should have the capability of supporting the weight of Horizontal 10 High 8 High
the battery as well as any auxiliary equipment. The total bat-
tery weight will depend on the cell size, number of cells, as
well as module configuration involved. Prior to installation, a TABLE A
determination should be made that the floor integrity is ade-
quate to accommodate the battery system. 5.9 Terminal Plates

Each system is supplied with a terminal plate assembly for the


5.6 Floor Anchoring positive and negative terminations. These should always be
used to provide proper connection to the operating equipment
Where seismic conditions are anticipated, floor anchoring and module terminals. Any attempt to connect load cables
should be provided. Such anchoring is the responsibility of the directly to module terminal may comprise battery system per-
user. formance as well as the integrity of cell post seals.

Where non-seismic conditions are anticipated, anchoring of


horizontally stacked systems is recommended for maximum
stability.

Four 9/16" (14.3 mm) holes are provided in the horizontal


support for anchoring.

5.7 Connecting Cables: Battery


System to Operating Equipment

The Absolyte cell is UL component recognized.

Battery performance is based on the output at the battery ter-


minals. Therefore, the shortest electrical connections between
the battery system and the operating equipment results in
maximum total system performance.

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SECTION 6 6.3 Recommended Installation
Equipment and Supplies
6.0 Unpacking and Handling
Fork lift or portable boom crane
Chalk line
Line Cord
Torpedo level (Plastic)
Plywood straight edge 1/2" x 4" x 48"
Torque wrenches
Ratchet wrench with 10, 13, 17, 19 mm sockets
Box wrenches 10, 13, 17, 19 mm sizes
Vinyl electrical tape
Paper wipers
3M Scotch Brite scour-pads
Hammer drill (floor anchoring)

Trademark of 3M

6.4 Unpacking

Carefully remove bolts and protective shipping hood. See


PACKED MODULES
Figure 3. Remove the bolts holding modules to shipping pal-
Figure 2
let. Also remove hardware bolting upper channels of modules
together. Do not remove modules at this time. Base supports
6.1 General for horizontally stacked modules are more easily attached
before removing modules from pallet (see Section 9.0 System
Do not remove shipping materials if a storage period is Assembly). Similarly, base supports for vertically oriented
planned. modules may be installed prior to removal from pallet (see
Section 9.0, System Assembly).
The battery modules are generally packed in groups. Lag
bolts retain the modules to the shipping pallet together with a Note: Placement of modules on shipping pallet has no rela-
protective hood bolted in place. Modules are also bolted tionship to final installation and should be disregarded.
together at the top adjacent channels. See Figure 2.

6.2 Accessories

Accessories are packed separately and will include the


following:

Layout/wiring diagram
Installation and operating instructions
Lifting straps and lifting shackles
Protective covers and hardware
Terminal plate assembly kits and covers
Module tie plates (where required)
Vertical or horizontal supports
Lead-Tin Plated copper intercell connectors
Assembly hardware
NO-OX-ID A* grease
Battery warning label UNPACKING MODULES
Battery nameplate Figure 3
Cell numerals with polarity indicators
Shims (leveling)
Drift pins
6.5 Handling !
Seismic Shims (where required)
The design of the modular tray permits handling by a fork lift,
*Registered Trademark of Sanchem Inc. portable crane or by a hoist sling (see Figure 4). Whichever
method is used, make sure equipment can safely handle the
NOTE: Check accessory package against packing list to module weight.
assure completeness. Do not proceed with installation until all
accessory parts are available. Always use the two lifting straps and four lifting shackles for
lifting and placement of modules.

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7.2 Standard and Reversed Assemblies
CAUTION!
Figures 5A, 5C, 5E and 5G depict standard assemblies. This
If a fork lift or portable crane is used to means that when facing the front of the module, the positive
(+) terminal to be connected to another module is located in
handle modules in a horizontal posi-
the lower right-hand corner and the negative (-) terminal in the
tion, a piece of insulating material such upper left-hand corner.
as heavy cardboard, rubber insulating
mats or plywood should be used
between handling equipment and 6 CELL 5 TO 15 PLATE
module tops to prevent shorting of STANDARD ASSEMBLY
module top connections with metal 5A
parts of lift equipment
STANDARD ASSEMBLY
WITH DUMMY CELL
5C

3 CELL 17 TO 33 PLATE
STANDARD ASSEMBLY
5E

STANDARD ASSEMBLY
WITH DUMMY CELL
5G

NOTE:
1) Straps must be criss-crossed.
2) Lifting shackle orientation and proper channel hole used
must be observed.
3) See Figure 14 for handling modules in horizontal orientation.
4) Never lift more than two joined modules with straps and hooks.

HANDLING - LIFTING STRAP PLACEMENT


Figure 4

! SECTION 7

7.0 Module Assemblies

Module assembly design is arranged to provide the shortest


connections between modules using rigid lead-tin plated cop-
per connectors to maximize system performance.

7.1 Module Assembly Identification

Modules are identified with a circular label located on one of


the module ends. Identification code is as follows:
S = Standard Assembly
R = Reversed Assembly
SD = Standard Assembly with Dummy
RD = Reversed Assembly with Dummy

Consult layout/wiring diagram for proper location in assembly


of battery system. Assemblies can be rotated 180 for proper
polarity location.

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Figures 5B, 5D, 5F and 5H depict reversed assemblies. Here SECTION 8
the positive terminal is located in the lower left-hand corner
and the negative terminal in the upper right-hand
corner when facing the front of the module. 8.0 System Arrangements

8.1 Module Arrangements


6 CELL 5 TO 15 PLATE
Absolyte batteries may be either arranged vertically (50A and
90A for float applications, 50A only for cycling applications) or
horizontally (50A, 90A and 100A). Horizontal configurations
are preferred. Figures 6 and 7 are typical arrangements and
are not intended to represent total configuration possibilities.

Most batteries will consist of a combination of modules facto-


ry-connectorized in standard and reverse arrangements (refer
REVERSED ASSEMBLY to figure 5). This practice facilitates installation and permits
5B solid short connections between adjacent modules. Systems
employing pre-connectorized modules work best with an even
number of stacks each with an odd number of modules or the
reverse: odd number of stacks consisting of even numbers of
modules.

Certain applications requiring specific termination locations


may require that modules be shipped without connectors
installed. The wiring diagram enclosed with shipment will
REVERSED ASSEMBLY show proper battery hook-up.
WITH DUMMY CELL
5D For seismic applications, maximum stack height is eight mod-
ules, while for non-seismic applications, ten modules is the
permissible maximum.

3 CELL 17 TO 33 PLATE

REVERSED ASSEMBLY
5F

Figure 6A

REVERSED ASSEMBLY
WITH DUMMY CELL
5H

VARIOUS MODULE ASSEMBLIES


Figure 5

Figure 6B

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9.1.1 Bottom Supports
Figure 7
Locate bottom I-beam supports and M10 serrated flange bolts
and nuts. I-beam supports and seismic shims should be
attached to the appropriate module assembly shown on the
layout/wiring diagram prior to removal from shipping pallet.
For modules with factory installed connectors, (+) positive and
(-) negative polarity labels are located by open terminals (see
Figure 8).

Secure I-beam support to a module channel as shown in


Figure 9, with access slots outward. Seismic shims are placed
between the channel and the nut and oriented so as to not
extend beyond the end of the channel. Torque hardware to 47
Newton-meters (35 Ft-Lbs) using insulated tools as shown
in Figures 9 and 10. When correctly attached, the I-beam
HORIZONTAL SINGLE STACK BACK TO BACK
will be flush with the front module channel and approxi-
mately 13mm (.50") away from the back of the module.
The side of the I-beam will be approximately 10mm (.38")
away from the end of the channels.

NOTE: The use of leveling shims is required when assem-


bling any Absolyte system in order to meet seismic require-
ments. Failure to use the shims to level each module and to
fill spaces between tray channels during module assembly will
result in the assembly not meeting seismic certification
criteria.

Similarly install the remaining I-beam on the other side of the


module.

HORIZONTAL MULTIPLE STACKS


BACK TO BACK AND END TO END
TYPICAL HORIZONTAL STACK ARRANGEMENTS
Figure 7
NOTE:
8.2 Dummy Cells within a Module 1) Polarity labels shown are typical and are shown for
location only.
See Figure 5 for variations.
Where application voltage requires, a dummy cell will replace
MODULE POLARITY LABEL LOCATION
a live cell in a module. For example, a 46 volt three-cell per
Figure 8
module system will consist of seven full modules and one
two-cell module. Most dummy modules will come with factory
installed connectors in either the standard-dummy or reverse-
dummy arrangement (refer to figure 5).

SECTION 9

9.0 System Assembly

9.1 Horizontal Single Stack

Consult layout/wiring diagram for total number and type of


module assemblies in system. There will be a combination of
standard and reverse module assemblies and could also
include standard or reverse assemblies with dummies (see M10 SERRATED FLANGE BOLT
Section 7.1, Module Assembly Identification) depending on
total system voltage.
SEISMIC SHIM

Compare required module assemblies called for on M10 SERRATED FLANGE NUT
layout/wiring diagram with modules in shipment for complete-
HORIZONTAL BASE SUPPORT HARDWARE INSTALLATION
ness before continuing further. Figure 9
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HORIZONTAL BASE SUPPORT INSTALLATION
Figure 10
9.1.2 Handling

The module/base support assembly may now be removed


from the pallet using methods outlined in section 6.5,
Handling. Also see Figure 11. Remaining modules may be
removed in a similar manner.
HANDLING MODULE - BASE SUPPORT ASSEMBLY
9.1.3 Horizontal Stacking Figure 11

In order to stack modules in the horizontal position, refer to


Figures 11 thru 13 to perform the tip-over procedure. The
module/base support assembly tip-over should be performed
first. This procedure can be performed using a portable boom
crane or fork lift in conjunction with the lifting straps and lifting
shackles supplied.
CAUTION!
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PERFORM TIP-OVER OF
MODULE MANUALLY AS SERIOUS PERSONAL
INJURY AND MODULE DAMAGE MAY RESULT.

A. Install lifting strap using lifting shackles in channel base


holes at each end of module upper rear channel as Figure 12A
shown in Figure 12A.

B. Center the lifting hook onto strap and lift until strap is
under tension and raises bottom of module from floor
surface so that upper and lower diagonal corners are in a
vertical mode.

C. While exerting manual force on the upper rear of module,


lower hoist until module is in horizontal position.
See Figures 12B and 13.

D. When module is horizontal, install the four lifting shackles


and two lifting straps as shown in Figure 14.

E. Where floor anchoring is required, position module/base


NOTE:
assembly in desired location. Mark floor through I-beam
1) One strap with shackles used for tip-over
holes and remove module/base assembly. Install floor
procedure.
anchoring and reposition module/base assembly over
2) Observe channel hole used as well as direction of
anchoring. Prior to installing nuts and washers, check that
assembly is level in both axes. Level using shims provid-
! shackle insertion.
3) Tip over procedure for single modules only.
ed. When level, fasten assembly and torque nuts to 47
Newton-meters (35 Ft-Lbs). TIP OVER PROCEDURE
SHACKLE-STRAP USAGE
Figure 12A

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TIP-OVER PROCEDURE MODULE WITH BASE ASSEMBLY
Figure 12B AFTER TIP-OVER
Figure 13

NOTE:
1) Straps must be criss-crossed
2) Lifting shackle orientation and proper channel hole used
must be observed.
! 3) See Figure 4 for handling modules in vertical orientation.
4) Lift single modules only.

HORIZONTAL STACKING SHACKLE-STRAP USAGE


Figure 14

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F. Using Steps A-D and the layout/wiring diagram, position
next module on top of first so that channels of each mate
with one another using drift pins to align channel holes.
Make sure channel ends and sides of the upper and lower
modules are flush. Remove lifting straps and install
serrated flange bolts and nuts in open holes, finger tight.
Use leveling shims to fil gaps between trays. See Figures
15, 16, and 17.

G. At this time, check to see that the first two modules are
plumb front to back and side to side using wooden or
plastic level together with plywood straight edge. This is
to insure proper alignment for module interconnection
later on. Torque hardware to 47 Newton-meters
(35 Ft-Lbs).

H. Proceed with stacking of remaining modules, checking


that stack is plumb in both axes as stacking progresses
before torquing hardware. Be certain to check the
layout/wiring diagram for correct horizontal orientation to COMPLETED HORIZONTAL STACK
provide proper polarity interconnection as stacking Figure 17A
progresses. See Figure 17A.
9.2 Horizontal-Multiple Stacks

It is recommended that all of the first modules with bottom


supports attached (see Section 9.1.1) be placed in position
first. A chalk line floor mark should be used to assure all
stacks will be in a straight line. This applies for stacks end-to-
end or end-to-end and back-to-back. Also refer to Section
9.1.3, Items A through H (Item E for base module leveling).

Module ends should be butted together so that module side


channel ends meet (see Figure 18).

Refer to layout/wiring diagram for seismic shim requirements.

At this time stack tie plates should be installed (see


HANDLING AND STACKING HORIZONTAL MODULES Section 9.2.1). It will be necessary to temporarily
Figure 15 remove the hardware fastening the base modules to
the I-beams.

See Figure 20A. Install tie plates and hardware. Torque to 47


Newton-meters (35 Ft-Lbs).

For stacks back-to-back, the two base modules are posi-


tioned to provide a minimum 4.5" spacing between the bot-
toms of the modules (not I-beam edges). See Figure 18A.

When all base modules are set in place, continue with stack-
ing of subsequent modules. Procedures for assembly of multi-
ple horizontal stacks are the same as outlined in section 9.1.
Also consult layout/wiring diagram. Each stack should be built
up in sequence to the same level until the top modules in all
Figure 16 Hardware Installation Sequence stacks are the last to be installed. The use of a line chord
attached to upper module corners of opposite end modules
as stacking progresses aids in alignment. See Figure 19.

INSTALLING HARDWARE
Figure 17
- 11 -
Figures 20A

HORIZONTAL STACKS BACK TO BACK POSITIONING


Figure 18A

TIE PLATE BOTTOM MODULES


Figure 20A

COMPLETED HORIZONTAL STACKS SIDE BY SIDE


Figure 19

9.2.1 Stack Tie Plates

To achieve maximum stack stability, especially where seis-


mic conditions may exist, as well as proper interfacing of
interstack connections, metal tie plates are provided. The
plates used on stacks end to end are 3" x 1" x 1/8" with two
9/16" holes. Use one tie plate at each interface to connect
the front and back module channels on only the base and
top modules of adjacent stacks. See Figures 20A and 20B.

Position plates on the front and back channels and secure


with hardware shown. Where stacks have different levels,
install plates on shorter stack top module and adjacent mod-
ule. Torque hardware to 47 Newton-meters (35 Ft-Lbs).

This completes the mechanical assembly of the battery sys-


tem.

For installation of intermodular connections and terminal


plate assembly, see Section 10.

For installation of protective module cover, see Section 11.

TIE PLATE TOP MODULES


Figure 20B

- 12 -
SECTION 10 cables directly to module terminals may compromise battery
system performance as well as the integrity of cell post seals.
10.0 Connections For terminal plate assembly, see Figure 29 (6 cell modules at
low rate) or Figure 30. Consult layout/wiring diagram for prop-
10.1 Post Preparation er kit use. It is recommended that all components be assem-
bled in place with hardware torqued to 11 Newton-meters
(100 in-Lbs).
All module terminals to be interconnected to adjacent mod-
ules were greased at the factory and bolts and washers used
Refer to Sections 10.1 and 10.2 for electrical contact surface
for fastening were installed finger tight.
preparation of terminal plate components.
Remove all intercell connectors and clean off all grease with
As shown, terminal plate assembly can be varied to satisfy
clean-dry wipers. Using either a brass bristle suede shoe
module terminal location as well as orientation of terminal
brush or 3M Scotch Brite scouring pad, brighten the flat cop-
plate in a horizontal or vertical plane. Do not make connec-
per terminal surfaces to ensure lowest resistance connec-
tions to operating system at this time.
tions.

Apply a thin film of NO-OX-ID A grease (supplied with bat- 10.6 Connection - Check
tery) to all terminal surfaces, bolts, and washers. This will pre-
clude oxidation after connections are completed. Again, visually check to see that all module terminals are con-
nected positive (+) to negative (-) throughout the battery.
10.2 INTRA-Stack Connections
Also measure the total voltage from terminal plate to terminal
plate. This should be equal to 2.15 volts times the number of
Multiple stacks side by side are interconnected as shown in
cells in the system, e.g., a 24 cell system would read: 24 x
Figure 28A and 28B. Consult layout/wiring diagram for correct
2.15v = 51.6 volts.
quantity of lead-tin plated copper connectors required at each
connection. Follow procedure in Section 10.1 and brighten
lead-tin plated surfaces coming in contact with copper posts. 10.7 Cell Numerals
Apply a film of NO-OX-ID A grease to these areas. Where
multiple connectors are required, across any single connec- A set of pressure sensitive cell numerals and system polarity
tion, brighten both sides of connectors along the entire length. labels are supplied and should be applied at this time.
Grease these areas as well. It is recommended when
installing connectors on horizontal arrangements that the Cell numerals should be applied to the top of the module and
upper bolts be installed first to reduce risk of accidental as close to the cell being identified as possible. Suggest appli-
shorting. cation to cell restraint bars or to module channels. Designate
the positive terminal cell as #1 with succeeding cells in series
10.3 INTER-Stack Connections in ascending order.

The system polarity labels should be applied next to the posi-


Multiple stacks end to end are interconnected as shown in
tive and negative terminals.
Figure 21C and 21D. Follow procedures in Section 10.1 and
Section 10.2. Also see Section 10.4, Connections - Torquing.

10.4 Connections - Torquing


10.8 Warning Label
!
Apply pressure sensitive warning label provided on a promi-
nently visible module side or end.

! 10.9 Battery Nameplate

When all inter-module connections have been installed, tight- For future reference and warranty protection, apply pressure
en all connections to 11.3 Newton-meters (100 in-Lbs) Use sensitive nameplate on a prominently visible module. Fill in
insulated tools. date of installation and the specified capacity and rate.
While inter-cell connections were made at the factory, these Make sure surfaces are free of dirt and grease by wiping with
must also be checked and torqued to 11.3 Newton-meters clean, dry wipers to ensure proper label adhesion.
(100 in-Lbs) Use insulated tools.
For protective module cover installation, see Section 11.
10.5 Connections - System Terminals

Each system is supplied with a terminal plate assembly for


the positive and negative terminations. These should always
be used to provide proper connection to the operating equip-
ment and module terminals. Any attempt to connect load

- 13 -
Figure 21

- 14 -
Figure 22

- 15 -
Figure 23

- 16 -
Figure 31

Figure 24

- 17 -
SECTION 11 TEMPERATURE CORRECTION

V corrected = V25C - (( T actual-25C) x ( .0055V/C)) or


11.0 Protective Module covers
! V corrected = V77F - ((T actual-77F) x (.003V/F))

Each module is provided with a transparent protective cover Raise the voltage to the maximum value permitted by the sys-
to help prevent accidental contact with live module electrical tem equipment, without exceeding 2.35 VPC. When charging
connections, and to provide easy visual access to the system. current has tapered and stabilized (no further reduction
for three hours), charge for the hours shown in the above
When all system assembly has been completed, as well as table or until the lowest cell voltage ceases to rise. To
initial testing including initial charge and cell float voltage determine the lowest cell, monitoring should be performed
readings, all covers should be installed. Covers should remain during the final 10% of the charge time.
in place at all times during normal operation of the battery
system.
SECTION 13
11.1 Transparent Cover Installation
13.0 Operation
The transparent cover is assembled by lining up the holes in
the legs with the corresponding holes in the cover and then 13.0.1 Cycle Method of Operation
inserting the snap rivets into the holes and depressing the
head of the rivets so that the legs are locked in place (see In cycle operation, the degree of discharge will vary for differ-
Figure 24). ent applications. Therefore, the frequency of recharging and
the amount of charge necessary will vary. The amount of
The cover is then installed by grasping it so that the GNB logo charge necessary depends on the number of ampere hours
is upright. Place the top feet of the cover legs onto the top discharged. Generally, Absolyte IIP cells require approximate-
tray channel. Then compress the legs by pushing up on the ly 105-110% of the ampere-hours removed to be returned to a
bottom of the cover while positioning the bottom feet of the full state of charge.
cover legs onto the bottom tray channel. Slowly release the
cover to allow the cover to slide in place (see Figure 24). The upper voltage settings recommended, given that the
maxium charge current is 5% of the nominal C/100 Amp-hour
rating and ambient temperatures of 25C (77F), are as fol-
SECTION 12 lows:
2.28 0.02 VPC @ 0-2% DOD
12.0 Initial Charge 2.33 0.02 VPC @ 3-5% DOD
2.38 0.02 VPC @ >5% DOD
Batteries lose some charge during shipment as well as during
the period prior to installation. A battery should be installed Due to the variety of applications and charging equipment
and given its initial charge as soon after receipt as possible. (particularly in Photovoltaic systems) it is recommended that
Battery positive (+) terminal should be connected to charger you contact a GNB representative when determining proper
positive (+) terminal and battery negative (-) terminal to recharge profiles.
charger negative (-) terminal. Failure to perform the initial
charge within the limits stated in section 4 will affect the per-
13.1 Floating Charge Method
formance and life of the battery and may void the warranty.
In this type of operation, the battery is connected in parallel
12.1 Constant Voltage Method with a constant voltage charger and the critical load circuits.
The charger should be capable of maintaining the required
Constant voltage is the only charging method allowed. Most constant voltage at battery terminals and also supply a normal
modern chargers are of the constant voltage type. connected load where applicable. This sustains the battery in
Determine the maximum voltage that may be applied to the a fully charged condition and also makes it available to
system equipment. This voltage, divided by the number of assume the emergency power requirements in the event of an
cells connected in series, will establish the maximum volts per AC power interruption or charger failure.
cell (VPC) that is available.
13.2 Float Charge - Float Voltages
Table B lists recommended voltages and charge times for the
initial charge. Select the highest voltage the system allows to Following are the float voltage ranges recommended for the
perform the initial charge in the shortest time period. Absolyte Battery System. Select any volts per cell (VPC)
value within the range listed that will result in the series string
TABLE B
having an average volts per cell equal to that value.
INITIAL CHARGE (77F)
CELL VOLTS TIME-HRS(Minimum) RECOMMENDED FLOAT VOLTAGES (77F)
2.23 to 2.27 VPC
2.30 24
2.35 12 NOTE: Recommended float voltages are for 77F. For other
temperatures a compensation factor of .003 V/F (.0055 V/C)
NOTE: Time periods listed in Table B are for 77F. For other per cell is recommended. The minimum voltage is 2.20 VPC,
temperatures a compensation factor of .003 V/F (.0055 V/C) temperature correction does not apply below this voltage. The
per cell is recommended. The minimum voltage is 2.20 VPC,
temperature correction does not apply below this voltage.

- 18 -
maximum voltage is 2.35 VPC, temperature correction does not 13.6 Effects of Float Voltage
apply above this voltage.
Float voltage has a direct effect on the service life
TEMPERATURE CORRECTION of your battery and can be the cause of thermal
V corrected = V25C - (( T actual-25C) x ( .0055V/C)) or instability.
V corrected = V77C - ((T actual-77F) x (.003V/F))
A float voltage above the recommended values reduces ser-
Modern constant voltage output charging equipment is rec- vice life. The chart below shows the effects of float voltage
ommended for the floating charger method of operation of (temperature corrected) on battery life.
GNB Absolyte batteries. This type of charger, properly adjust-
Temperature corrected 77F (25C) Percent
ed to the recommended float voltages and following recom-
Float voltage per cell Reduction
mended surveillance procedures, will assist in obtaining con-
Minimum Maximum in Battery Life
sistent serviceability and optimum life.
2.23 2.27 0%
2.28 2.32 50%
After the battery has been given its initial charge (refer to
2.33 2.37 75%
Section 12), the charger should be adjusted to provide the
recommended float voltages at the battery terminals. Voltage records must be maintained by the user in accor-
dance with the maintanence schedule published in this manual.
Do not use float voltages higher or lower than those recom- To obtain the optimum service life from the battery, it is impor-
mended. Reduced capacity or battery life will result. tant to make sure the batterys float voltage is within the rec-
ommended range.
Check and record battery terminal voltage on a regular basis.
Monthly checks are recommended. See Section 16.0, SECTION 14
Records, Item B. If battery float voltage is above or below the
correct value, adjust charger to provide proper voltage as 14.0 Equalizing Charge
measured at the battery terminals.
Under normal operating conditions an equalizing charge is
not required. An equalizing charge is a special charge given a
13.3 Voltmeter Calibration battery when non-uniformity in voltage has developed
between cells. It is given to restore all cells to a fully charged
Panel and portable voltmeters used to indicate battery float condition. Use a charging voltage higher than the normal float
voltages should be accurate at the operating voltage value. voltage and for a specified number of hours, as determined
The same holds true for portable meters used to read individ- by the voltage used.
ual cell voltages. These meters should be checked against a
standard every six months and calibrated when necessary. Non-uniformity of cells may result from low float voltage due
to improper adjustment of the charger or a panel voltmeter
13.4 Recharge which reads an incorrect (higher) output voltage. Also, varia-
tions in cell temperatures greater than 5F (2.78C) in the
All batteries should be recharged as soon as possible follow- series string at a given time, due to environmental conditions
ing a discharge with constant voltage chargers. However, to or module arrangement, can cause low cells.
recharge in the shortest period of time, raise the charger out-
put voltage to the highest value which the connected system 14.1 Equalizing Frequency
will permit. Do not exceed the voltages and times listed in
Table C, Section 14.2. An equalizing charge should be given when the following con-
ditions exist:
13.5 Determining State-of-Charge A. The float voltage of any cell (as per Section 15.0) is less
than 2.18 VPC.
If the normal connected load is constant (no emergency load
connected), the following method can be used to determine B. A recharge of the battery is required in a minimum time
the approximate state-of-charge of the battery. The state-of- period following an emergency discharge.
charge can be identified of some degree by the amount of C. The float voltage range within a string is greater than 0.10
charging current going to the battery. When initially placed on volts.
charge or recharge following a discharge, the charging cur-
rent, read at the charger ammeter, will be a combination of D. Accurate periodic records (See Section 16) of individual
the load current plus the current necessary to charge the bat- cell voltages show an increase in spread since the previ-
tery. The current to the battery will start to decrease and will ous semi-annual readings.
finally stabilize when the battery becomes fully charged. If the
current level remains constant for three consecutive hours, 14.2 Equalizing Charge Method
then this reflects a state-of-charge of approximately 95 to
98%. For most requirements, the battery is ready for use. Constant voltage charging is the method for giving an equaliz-
ing charge. Determine the maximum voltage that may be
If the normal connected load is variable (i.e. telecommunica- applied to the system equipment. This voltage, divided by the
tions), the following method may be used to check the state- number of cells connected in series, will establish the maxi-
of-charge of the battery. Measure the voltage across a pilot mum volts per cell that may be used to perform the equalizing
cell (See Section 15.0 for definition of pilot cell). If the voltage charge in the shortest period of time (not to exceed 2.35 VPC
is stable for 24 consecutive hours, the battery reflects a state applicable at 77F, 25C). Refer to Table C for voltages and
of charge of approximately 95%. recommended time periods.

- 19 -
TABLE C additional set of readings should be taken and recorded
as specified in Paragraph A above.
EQUALIZE CHARGE The suggested frequency of record taking is the absolute min-
imum to protect warranty. For system protection and to suit
CELL VOLTS TIME (HOURS) local conditions or requirements, more frequent readings
2.30 24 (monthly) are desirable. See Figure 25 for sample record
2.35 12 form.

NOTE: Charge volts listed in Table C are for 77F. For other
temperatures a compensation factor of .003 V/F (.0055 V/C) SECTION 17
per cell is recommended. The minimum voltage is 2.20 VPC.
The maximum voltage is 2.35 VPC. Temperature 17.0 Tap Connections
correction does not apply outside of this range.
Tap connections should not be used on a battery. This can
V corrected = V25C - ((T actual-25C) x (.0055 V/C))or cause overcharging of the unused cells and undercharging of
V corrected = V77F - ((T actual-77F) x (.003 V/F)) those cells supplying the load, thus reducing battery life.
Raise the voltage to the maximum value permitted as
described above. When charging current has tapered and SECTION 18
stabilized (no further reduction for three hours), charge
for the hours shown in Table C or until the lowest cell
voltage ceases to rise. Monitoring of cell voltages should be
18.0 Temporary Non-Use
started during the final 10% of the applicable time period to
determine lowest cell in the battery. An installed battery that is expected to stand idle longer than
the maximum storage interval (see Sec. 4.2), should be treat-
ed as stated below. The maximum storage interval is 6
SECTION 15 months if stored at 77F.

Give the battery an equalizing charge as per Section 14.


15.0 Pilot Cell Following the equalizing charge, open connections at the bat-
tery terminals to remove charger and load from the battery.
A pilot cell is selected in the series string to reflect the general
condition of cells in the battery. The cell selected should be Repeat the above after every 6 months (77F) or at the
the lowest cell voltage in the series string following the initial required storage interval. See Section 4.2 for adjustments to
charge. See Section 12.0 - Initial Charge. Reading and storage intervals when the storage temperature exceeds
recording pilot cell voltage monthly serves as an indicator of 77F.
battery condition between scheduled overall individual cell
readings. To return the battery to normal service, re-connect the battery
to the charger and the load, give an equalizing charge and
SECTION 16 return the battery to float operation.

16.0 Records SECTION 19


A complete recorded history of the battery operation is essen-
tial for obtaining satisfactory performance, and life. Good
19.0 Unit Cleaning
records will also show when corrective action may be required
to eliminate possible charging, maintenance or environmental Periodically clean cell covers with a dry 2" paintbrush to
problems. remove accumulated dust. If any cell parts appear to be damp
with electrolyte or show signs of corrosion, contact your local
The following surveillance data must be read and permanent- GNB representative.
ly recorded for review by supervisory personnel so that any
necessary remedial action is taken.

A. Upon completion of the initial charge and with the battery CAUTION!
on float charge at the proper voltage for one week, read
and record the following: Do not clean plastic parts with solvents,
1. Individual cell voltages detergents, oils, mineral spirit or spray
2. Battery terminal voltages type cleaners as these may cause crazing
3. Ambient temperature or cracking of the plastic materials.
4. Optional: Temperature of the negative terminal of
each cell/unit of battery.
B. Every 12 months, a complete set of readings as specified
in Paragraph A above must be done.
C. Whenever the battery is given an equalizing charge, an

- 20 -
GNB Industrial Power

Figure 25

SECTION 20 If corrosion is present, disconnect the connector from the ter-


minal.
20.0 Connections Gently clean the affected area using a suede brush or Scotch
Brite scouring pad. Apply a thin coating of NO-OX-ID A
Battery terminals and intercell connections should be corro- grease to the cleaned contact surfaces, reinstall connectors
sion free and tight for trouble-free operation. Periodically and retorque connections to 11.3 Newton-meters (100 inch
these connections should be inspected. pounds).

ALL TERMINAL AND INTERCELL CONNECTIONS


CAUTION!
! SHOULD BE RETORQUED AT LEAST ONCE EVERY YEAR
TO 11.3 NEWTON-METERS (100 INCH POUNDS).

DO NOT WORK ON CONNECTIONS NOTE: Design and/or specifications subject to change


WITH BATTERY CONNECTED TO without notice. If questions arise, contact your local
CHARGER OR LOAD. sales representative for clarification.

- 21 -
I & O MANUALS Batteries

GLOBAL OPERATIONS
Total
Battery
NORTH AMERICA
GNB Industrial Power
Lombard, Illinois U.S.A.
TEL: 1.630.629.5200
FAX: 1.630.629.2635
GNB Industrial Power
Mississauga, Ontario Canada
TEL: 1.905.624.1107
Management
FAX: 1.905.624.1801
EUROPE GNBs commitment to the environment constitutes
Exide Technologies
Im Thiergarten, Germany a complete approach to the business of recycling,
TEL: 49.6042.81.177
FAX: 49.6042.81.216
manufacturing and distribution that continues to set
the standard in the battery industry.
Exide Technologies
Aalst, Belgium
TEL: 32.53.73.53.53 For the past 75 years, GNB has led the industrys
FAX: 32.53.77.75.56
effort to recycle rather than discard used batteries.
MIDDLE EAST/AFRICA
Exide Technologies Last year alone, GNB safely processed more than
Abu Dhabi, U.A.E.
TEL: 971.2.226235 250,000 tons of lead.
FAX: 971.2.227644
JAPAN Let GNB take the risk out of the disposal of your
GNB Industrial Power Japan
Tokyo, Japan spent batteries. As part of a Total Battery
TEL: 81.3.5269.1061 Management program, GNB will pick up and
FAX: 81.3.5269.1069
transport any spent lead acid batteries to
AUSTRALIA/NEW ZEALAND
Exide Technologies GNB-owned, EPA approved recycling centers
Padstow, N.S.W. Australia
TEL: 61.2.9722.5700 globally.
FAX: 61.2.9774.2966
SOUTH EAST ASIA Only companies with the strongest possible
Exide Technologies S.E. Asia
Singapore financial resources are able to make that kind of long-
TEL: 65.546.2866 term commitment to recycling and
FAX: 65.546.2966
GNB has what it takes to help you.
CHINA/HONG KONG
Exide Technologies
Kowloon, Hong Kong
TEL: 852.2.956.6688
FAX: 852.2.956.2161
LATIN AMERICA
GNB Industrial Power
Atlanta, Georgia U.S.A.
TEL: 1.770.551.9136
FAX: 1.770.206.9650

INDIA
GNB Industrial Power
Bangalore, India
TEL: 91.80.529.7326
FAX: 91.80.529.7326

www.gnb.com
RE
AD

TU
LE

RN

Absolyte is a registered trademark of GNB Technologies, Inc.


(Part No. Z99-003599) RPT 4/01 Printed on recycled paper. RECYCLE