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Graduate Catalogue

2010-2011
University of Mount Union
Graduate Catalogue
2010-2011
Table of Contents
The University .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................1
Academic Policies and Procedures.......................................................................................................................................................................................6
Campus Services ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................12
Program of Study..................................................................................................................................................................................................................16
Physician Assistant Studies.............................................................................................................................................................................................16
University Personnel .............................................................................................................................................................................................................26

The University of Mount Union reserves the right to change policies, regulations, courses and fees at any time subsequent to the publication of this
Graduate Catalogue.
The Mount Union Graduate Catalogue in effect at the time of a student’s admission to the University shall govern such student’s degree
requirements; an extended period of non-enrollment at the University may, at the time of return, result in a change to requirements as specified in a
later issue of the Catalogue.
Each student has the responsibility to be aware of and to meet the Graduate Catalogue requirements for graduation, and to adhere to all rules,
regulations and deadlines published in this Graduate Catalogue.
It is the policy of the University of Mount Union not to discriminate on the basis of race, sex, sexual orientation, religion, age, color, creed, national
or ethnic origin, marital or parental status, or disability in student admissions, financial aid, educational or athletic programs, or employment as now
or may hereafter be required by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, regulations of the Internal Revenue Service, and all other applicable federal,
state and local statutes, ordinances and regulations. Inquiries regarding compliance may be directed to (330) 823-2886, Associate Dean of Students,
Hoover-Price Campus Center, or to (330) 829-6560, Director of Human Resources and Employee Development, Beeghly Hall.

The University
Institutional Mission
The University of Mount Union offers a liberal arts education grounded in the Judeo-Christian tradition. The University affirms the importance of
reason, open inquiry, living faith, and individual worth. Mount Union’s mission is to prepare students for meaningful work, fulfilling lives, and
responsible citizenship.

Heritage
The University of Mount Union is proud of its religious heritage and its background in the Methodist Church. For more than a century, the University
has been officially connected with the Methodist Church. It is now affiliated with the East Ohio, West Ohio and Western Pennsylvania Conferences of
the United Methodist Church.
The Christian commitment of the University goes beyond historical and institutional ties even though the United Methodist Church exercises no
direct control over the educational functions of the University. The Christian and liberal arts traditions reinforce each other in the striving for
excellence, concern for the inherent dignity and worth of each individual and the emphasis on the spiritual as well as the intellectual achievements of
humanity.
Admission to the University has always been predicated on academic excellence and promise. We are aware that we cannot do everything for
every student who seeks an education, but we do believe that we must do something vital for each student who enrolls in this University. Mount
Union believes in the fundamental equality of all human beings and in the right of equal opportunity for all it seeks to serve and for all whom it
employs.

History
The University of Mount Union is the outgrowth of a town meeting held by forward-looking citizens of the village of Mount Union on October 4, 1846.
At that time, the people gathered to hear Orville Nelson Hartshorn outline the need for a new institution in the area, where men and women could be
educated with equal opportunity, where science would parallel the humanities, where laboratory and experimental subjects would receive proper
emphasis, and where there would be no distinction due to race, color, sex or position. On October 20, 1846, this young man organized and taught on
the third floor of the “Old Carding Mill” a “select school” of six students.
The school grew rapidly under his inspired leadership and in 1849 became known as “Mount Union Seminary.”
In 1853 a “normal department” was added for the training of teachers. On January 9, 1858, the institution was chartered and incorporated under
the laws of the State of Ohio as “Mount Union College.”


Although Mount Union had not been established by church efforts, its founder and early faculty members were dedicated Methodist laymen. One
of the articles in the charter of the institution looked to the day when Mount Union would come under the patronage of some annual conference of the
Methodist Episcopal Church. The Pittsburgh Annual Conference “heartily endorsed” the new University in 1858, but it was not until 1864 that Mount
Union was granted full patronage by the conference.
In September 1911, Scio University, located at Scio, Ohio, was united with Mount Union. By the articles of consolidation, the liberal arts alumni of
the former institution were made alumni of the latter.
Scio was established in 1857 at Harlem Springs, Ohio, as “The Rural Seminary.” In 1867 the school was moved to New Market, where it was known
variously as New Market College, the One-Study University, and finally, Scio University in 1878.
For many years Mount Union has claimed the distinction of being one of the first institutions to have a summer school. Started in 1870, this first
summer school was actually a fourth term in the school year. Since that time, summer instruction has been offered each year at the institution.
On August 1, 2010, the institution officially became known as the University of Mount Union. The change to a “university” designation was made in
an effort to better describe what Mount Union is today and more effectively communicate all that the institution has to offer. This decision,
unanimously approved by the Board of Trustees, came after careful review of data gathered through numerous research efforts and thoughtful
consideration and discussion.
From 1846 to present, the administration of the University has been under the leadership of 11 presidents: Orville Nelson Hartshorn, 1846-1887;
Tamerlane Pliny Marsh, 1888-1898; Albert Birdsall Riker, 1898-1908; William Henry McMaster 1899, 1908-1938; Charles Burgess Ketcham, 1938-1953;
Carl Cluster Bracy, 1954-1967; Ronald Gilbert Weber ’38, 1967-1980; G. Benjamin Lantz Jr., 1980-85; Harold M. Kolenbrander, 1986-2000; John L. Ewing
Jr. 2000-2005; and Richard F. Giese, 2005-.

Facilities
(Dates of construction or dedication)
Adams Court (2007): This row of townhouses within the village on Hartshorn Street, named in honor of Gary ’75 and Connie Adams, houses 24
upperclass students.
Art Center (1985): The William H. Eells Art Center contains a lecture room, painting studio, rooms for print making, sculpture, drawing and design,
plus faculty offices. Dr. Eells, a patron of the arts, is a member of the Mount Union Board of Trustees and a former faculty member at the University.
Beeghly Hall (1973): The administration building is named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Leon A. Beeghly of Youngstown, Ohio, who were major
benefactors of Mount Union during their lifetimes. The building houses the principal administrative offices of the University.
Berea House (1999): Originally Berea Children’s Home, this building, located at 1315 S. Union Ave., serves as an international house for 16
students.
Bica-Ross Residence Hall (1996): This three-story building houses 155 students in suite-style living units, contains two classrooms and is located
directly behind the Campus Center. It was named by Violet (Bica ’44) Ross in honor of her sister Virginia and in memory of her late husband L. Clayton
and brother George Bica ’41.
Bracy Hall (2003): This four-story natural sciences facility houses the departments of Biology, Chemistry, Geology and Physics, as well as the
Physician Assistant graduate program. Made possible through a lead gift from Jim and Vanita (Bauknight ’63) Oelschlager, the facility is named for Dr.
Carl C. Bracy, sixth president of the University. The 87,000-square-foot structure includes 22 laboratories of various types and sizes, three lecture halls,
two classrooms and 21 faculty offices.
Brown Village (2007): Located on Union Avenue, Brown Village is comprised of three apartment-style buildings (Clutter Manor, Jae Manor and
Keller Manor) housing a combined total of 104 students. This living community, which provides housing for juniors and seniors, was made possible by
a significant gift from David M. Brown ’54 and was named in his honor.
Chapman Hall (1864): This five-story brick, steel and concrete structure is named in honor of Professor Ira O. Chapman, who was associated with
the University from the fall of 1851 to the time of his death in 1880. It is the principal humanities classroom building on campus and was completely
rebuilt in 1966-67. There are 30 faculty offices, 30 classrooms, an accounting laboratory, an audio-visual room and student and faculty lounges.
Cicchinelli Fitness Center (2009): The fitness center, housed in the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex, was made possible by
Christopher Chicchinelli ’98 and his mother, Patricia Brisben. A two-story atrium takes you into a fitness center that has two floors housing
cardiovascular and weight equipment.
Clarke Astronomical Observatory (1968): Moved in May of 2003 to the south end of Bracy Hall, it was previously located at the south end of East
Hall. It is the second such building to honor the memory of Dr. George Washington Clarke, professor of natural philosophy at the University. The first
observatory, erected in 1924, served until it was razed to make room for the Timken Physical Education Building. The instruments, used in both
observatories, are the gifts of Elmer E. Harrold of Leetonia, Ohio.
Clutter Manor (2007): Named in honor of Ronald ’80 and Tracy Clutter, this apartment-style buildling is located within Brown Village on Union
Avenue and provides housing for 32 upperclass students.
Cope Music Hall (1964): This facility is named in memory of the late Kenneth B. Cope ’20, alumnus, trustee and churchman. Principal donors to
the building are his widow, Lela (Stoffer ’21) Cope, and family.
Cope Music Hall connects with the Rodman Playhouse and Crandall Gallery to complete the Fine Arts complex on the northeast edge of the
campus. Stauffer Courtyard Theatre, the outdoor Greek theater in the courtyard of the Fine Arts quadrangle, was named for the late Robert E.
Stauffer, librarian emeritus, and Mrs. Robert E. Stauffer.
The building contains the offices and teaching studios of faculty members in the Department of Music. Also located in this area is the Sturgeon
Music Library, given in memory of Bertha Fogg Sturgeon and her parents, by Samuel Sturgeon. The collection of books, scores and recordings was
begun by a generous donation by Mrs. Ella Wilcox Peasley and the Carnegie Corporation. Presently, there are more than 7,000 recordings in LP and
CD formats, more than 10,000 music scores, a music reference collection and approximately 60 music periodical titles in the library. The facilities
include four listening stations, an A-V room with stereo equipment, a TV and VCR and a computer workstation with access to the campus network, the
library system and the Internet.
A complete keyboard laboratory of 13 Roland electronic pianos is located in the music theory area, adjacent to a computer laboratory. The
Department of Music facility includes a state-of-the-art MIDI synthesizer/computer laboratory. There are currently four computer work stations in
place with access to a laser printer. The computers are connected via Studio 3 MIDI interfaces to either the Kurzweil K250, the Korg M-1 or to the


Yamaha DX-7 synthesizers. The laboratory is utilized by students to do remedial work in the area of basic musicianship skills, to process music theory
assignments, to orchestrate, to study audio theory and to investigate synthesizing, sequencing and voice sampling.
A large rehearsal room, a small recital hall, 30 practice rooms of various sizes and three classrooms are on the east side of the building. Presser
Recital Hall is dedicated to Theodore Presser, a former Mount Union student and professor. The three-manual organ in the recital hall is the gift of the
Kulas Foundation.
Crandall Gallery (1954): Attached to the Rodman Playhouse and Cope Music Hall, Crandall Gallery is an art gallery, made possible by the late
Charles N. Crandall of Youngstown, Ohio. Exhibitions of work by students and professionals are displayed in Crandall Gallery throughout the
academic year.
Cunningham Residence Hall (1968): A residence hall for 112 first-year students, this hall is named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Cunningham of
Alliance, Ohio. Mr. Cunningham was a trustee for 30 years. The three-story brick structure, facing Clark Avenue, is a duplicate of McCready Hall, and
the two halls are separated by a courtyard.
Dewald Chapel (1999): The first free-standing Chapel in University history, the Dewald Chapel was made possible by a lead gift from Dr. Donald
and Mrs. Eleanore (Iman ’38) Dewald. The Chapel includes a sanctuary, 24-hour meditation room, conference and meeting rooms for religious life
programs and offices.
Dussel House (1941): This house, located at 1330 S. Union Ave., was presented to the University by the late Mrs. Frank E. Dussel of Alliance, Ohio
and is used as a residential facility for up to 18 students.
Elliott Residence Hall (1914): Elliott is a three-story women’s residence hall named in honor of A.V.T. Elliott of Canton, Ohio. The building was
remodeled in 2006. Forty-two women are housed in the building.
Engineering and Business Administration Building (2010): This facility, originally built in 1958, was renovated in 2010 to house the new
Department of Engineering as well as the Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration. The facility includes a two-story lobby,
five labs, a computer lab, two lecture halls, a conference room, student lounge, study areas and 21 offices.
Gartner Welcome Center (2009): Named for Carl ’60 and Martha Gartner, the Gartner Welcome Center was designed to further enhance the first
impression for prospective students as they visit the Mount Union campus. Housing the Office of Admission and Office of Student Financial Services,
the Welcome Center displays the University’s commitment to green initiatives through its LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)
certification. It is one of only a few college and university buildings in Ohio to be LEED certified and the first in Stark County.
Grove Court (2007): Named for Charles and Carol Grove, this row of townhouses within the village on Hartshorn Street is home to 40 juniors and
seniors.
Gulling Training Center (2001): The Gulling Training Center is located west of Mount Union Stadium. The 12,750 square-foot building contains
offices, classrooms and areas for plyometrics and sprinting as well as a weight area for strength training. The building was funded by four major gifts
including the lead gift from Paul Gulling ’80 of North Canton, Ohio; Basil Strong ’26 of Atwater, Ohio; Tony Lee ’50 of Alliance, Ohio, in honor of his late
wife, Beverly Jean (Bowden ’51) Lee; and Robert Bordner of New Washington, Ohio.
Hammond Natatorium (2009): Located in the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex, the natatorium includes a pool and diving area for
recreation and varsity athletic competition. This home of the varsity swimming and diving team includes office space, storage, a scoreboard and
seating for 1,000 spectators. Hammond Construction generously provided the lead gift for this facility.
Haupt House (2002): The Fred J. Haupt President’s Home is located at 1304 S. Union Ave. Flexible for family living and formal entertaining,
highlights of the home include a domed ceiling in the foyer featuring the Mount Union seal and a wall of “University family” photographs dating from
the early 1890s.
The home was formally named the Fred J. Haupt President’s Home in 2007 in honor of long-time University supporter and Board of Trustees
member Dr. Fred J. Haupt ’63.
Hoiles-Peterson Residence Hall (1989): Hoiles-Peterson Residence Hall is a two-story, L-shaped building that houses 103 students in suite-style
living units. The residence hall, located on the east side of Miller Avenue, is named in recognition of the support and dedication of Josephine (Hoiles
’40) and Donald ’39 Peterson.
Hoover-Price Campus Center (1962): The University’s Campus Center is named in honor of the Hoover Company of North Canton, Ohio and the
late Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Price of North Canton, Ohio, principal donors for the building. It is a one-story structure of 55,800 square feet located on the
northwest edge of the campus.
The Campus Center is the extracurricular heart of the campus. Expanded in 1996, the Campus Center includes offices for many student services
including the Academic Support Center and the offices of Accessibility Services, Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling and Auxiliary Services. In
addition, the Campus Center is home to most of the Office of Student Affairs staff including the vice president for student affairs and dean of the
University and associate dean of students, as well as the offices of Residence Life, Multicultural Student Affairs, Student Involvement and Leadership,
Counseling Services, Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education and Career Development.
Both the Kresge Commons and the B & B Café were renovated in 2006-2007 and are popular gathering spots for students. The Campus Center is
also home to the University Store, a computer lab, student mailboxes and the University radio station. The Alumni Room, East Room and West Room,
as well as the Osborne and Deuble Conference rooms, provide accommodations for meeting space. The mezzanine level, added in 1988, houses the
CCTV and audio-visual operations. A student-staffed Information Desk and the main University switchboard are also located in the Campus Center.
Jae Manor (2007): This apartment-style building located within Brown Village on Union Avenue provides housing for 36 upperclass students and
was named to honor the legacy of the late Hugh ’54 and Nancy Jae.
Keener House (1979): This two-story brick building located at 145 Hartshorn is used to house the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies.
Keller Manor (2007): Named in honor of Daniel ’72 and Laura Keller, this apartment-style building located within Brown Village on Union Avenue is
home to 36 upperclass students.
Ketcham Residence Hall (1962): Located on Simpson Street, this residence hall is named for the late Dr. Charles B. Ketcham, president of Mount
Union from 1938-1953, and his wife, Mrs. Lucile Brown Ketcham. The three-story brick structure houses 115 students.
Perry F. King Guest House (1981): The home is the gift of Dr. and Mrs. Robert G. King ’33 of Marion, Massachusetts, in memory of his late father, Dr.
Perry F. King 1899, who was a prominent surgeon, member of the Board of Trustees (1914-1918), team physician (four decades), one of the founders of
the Alumni Association and responsible for the organization of the Student Health Service. The beautiful old home is located at 1414 S. Union Ave. and
is used to house male students at the University.
King Residence Hall (1960): Located next to the Health Center, King Hall houses 114 students. The three-story brick structure is named for the


late Dr. George L. King Jr. ’22 and his wife, Margaret (Wagner) King. Dr. King served as president of the Mount Union Board of Trustees for 18 years.
Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center (2000): The Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center provides 45,912 square feet of technology and
learning space, which is directly linked to the traditional library space (see library entry for resources). It houses the Writing Center, PC labs, a
Macintosh lab, a computer science lab, a language lab, several multimedia classrooms, 24-hour access to study space, computer labs and vending. It
also contains classrooms and office space for the departments of Computer Science and Information Systems, Foreign Languages and Communication.
The facility was made possible through a lead gift from Steve ’84 and Suzanne (Spisak ’84) Harter.
Lakes (1916): The campus lakes are located across from Cope Music Hall. An idea provided by former member of the Mount Union Board of
Trustees, Walter Ellet, the lakes were constructed in 1916. Shaped by shovels, wheelbarrows and horses using slip scrapers, the lakes were originally
formed in the shape of an “M.”
The lakes suffered much erosion during the ensuing years, so in 1983, the lakes were cleaned and renovated. Through the installation of a retaining
wall, much of the damage caused by the erosion was corrected. The lakes were also restored to their original depth of eight to 10 feet. Other repairs
included the addition of new drainage pipes and renovation of the pedestrian bridge.
The campus lakes are not to be used for recreational purposes.
Lamborn Plaza (1984): The Plaza, adjacent to the north entrance of Wilson Hall, is located on the former site of Lamborn Hall, which serviced
science classes from 1914 to 1983. The plaza includes in its construction the cornerstone and name plate from Lamborn Hall.
Library (1950): Originally built in 1950 and expanded in 1975, the University Library is located within the Kolenbrander-Harter Information
Center. The library offers more than 230,000 books in open stacks, more than 900 current journal titles, back years of journals in both bound and
microform format and more than 350,000 federal government publications. Access to a wide range of computer databases and electronic full-text
products is available via campus networked access to the Internet.
Library collections are accessed through the OPAL catalog. Mount Union is part of a 19 library catalog consortium which uses the Innovative
Interfaces software system. As part of the OhioLINK system, our users may borrow materials directly from all OPAL libraries as well as any of the 74
OhioLINK libraries throughout the state of Ohio.
In addition to the OPAL catalog, the Mount Union library home page on the Internet offers access to more than 200 periodical indexes in a wide
array of subject areas, more than 5,000 full-text periodical titles, a range of encyclopedias and dictionaries and several gateways to federal
government document resources.
Special collections are located in the Rare Books Room and the Historical Room, which houses the University’s archives and a local history
collection.
The estate of Louis H. Brush makes annual grants to purchase books and periodicals in memory of James Alpheus Brush, the first Librarian of the
University, and his wife. The Thomas S. Brush Foundation, Inc. made a gift of approximately $500,000 in 1971 to the Endowment Fund of the University
with the income to be used for purchase of books and periodicals in memory of Mr. Brush’s grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Brush.
The Sturgeon Music Library, located in Cope Music Hall, houses 7,000 recordings, 10,000 scores, current music periodicals and a music reference
collection. Listening stations equipped with compact disc players, turntables and cassette recorders are provided for student use as well as a
soundproof listening room.
The Science Library provides the most recent three years of science journals and a science reference collection in close proximity to science
classrooms and laboratories.
McCready Residence Hall (1965): A residence hall for 119 first-year students, McCready Hall is located between Hartshorn Avenue and State
Street. It is named in honor of the late B. Y. McCready ’16 of Alliance, Ohio, a long-time member of the Board of Trustees, and his widow, Mrs. B. Y.
McCready.
McMaster Residence Hall (1956): Located on Simpson Street, McMaster houses 163 women. It is named for the late president of Mount Union, Dr.
William H. McMaster 1899, and Mrs. McMaster. The three-story brick construction is built in an L-shape and is the largest residence hall on campus.
McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex (2009): The McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex is Mount Union’s primary health and
wellness complex. The facility is named in honor of Richard ’50 and Dorothy (Werstler ’49) McPherson, whose generosity provided for the McPherson
Center for Human Health and Well-Being in 1996 as well as for this latest addition and renovation. The MAAC includes the Timken Physical Education
Building, Peterson Field House, McPherson Center for Human Performance, Cicchinelli Fitness Center, Hammond Natatorium and Sweeney Auxiliary
Gymnasium as well as a wrestling room, exercise science center and laboratory, athletic training facility, classrooms, laboratories, office spaces and
an area dedicated to student recruitment.
McPherson Center for Human Performance (1996): The McPherson Center, located adjacent to the Timken Physical Education Building, is the
home for the Department of Human Performance and Sport Business with faculty offices, a student lounge and state-of-the-art classroom and
laboratory facilities. The building was made possible through a lead gift from Richard ’50 and Dorothy (Werstler ’49) McPherson. The center is part of
the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex.
Miller Residence Hall (1866): Miller is a three-story brick residence hall named in honor of the Honorable Lewis Miller of Akron, long-time
chairman (1868-99) of the Mount Union Board of Trustees. It is the oldest residence hall on campus and was renovated in 2007.
Mount Union Stadium (1915): The Stadium was planned and equipped by the University’s Alumni Athletic Association. It contains a football
field, an all-weather track, a steel and concrete grandstand, concrete bleachers and dressing and storage rooms. The stadium playing field is made of
an artificial surface called AstroPlay. Lights allow for night contests. Stadium capacity is 5,600.
Mount Union Theatre (1976): The Mount Union Theatre serves as an auditorium for the University. Located at 1745 S. Union Ave., the theatre was
originally constructed in 1920 as an automobile garage and was converted into a motion picture theatre in 1939. Mount Union purchased the theatre
in 1976 and renovated it in 1979. The theatre seats 784 people and includes a stage area.
Nature Center (1986): The John T. Huston-Dr. John D. Brumbaugh Nature Center is located six miles south of the campus. The 126-acres of
woodland, including 27-acres of old growth beech maple forest, provide a nature preserve for plant and animal populations native to northeastern
Ohio. The land, donated to the University by Dr. John D. Brumbaugh in honor of his grandfather, Mr. John T. Huston, will be used in perpetuity as a
center for environmental education. The preserve, used as an outdoor teaching laboratory for the natural sciences, also supports many
faculty/student research projects. In addition, nature trails are open to the public and to organized groups in the area. The Dr. John D. Brumbaugh
Visitors Center, completed in 1991, provides classroom and laboratory space and an information resource for students and other visitors.
Orwick Court (2007): This newest row of townhouses located on State Street was made possible by a gift from Carl ’42 and Martha “Nickie”
(Nicholson ’45) Orwick in honor of the four generations of family who have passed through Mount Union. Forty upperclass students reside within


Orwick Court.
Peterson Field House (1981): Located at the west end of the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex, the Field House is named in recognition
of the late Donald ’39 and Josephine (Hoiles ’40) Peterson. Dr. Peterson’s many contributions included serving as a member of the Board of Trustees
from 1954 until 2006 and as Board president from 1971 to 1987.
The Field House features the Wuske Track, a 200-meter NCAA regulation indoor track for hosting college and high school meets, named in honor of
the University’s successful track coach, the late Jim Wuske. The facility also includes batting cages and indoor practice space for baseball, softball
and golf and provides recreational and varsity practice space for basketball, volleyball and tennis.
Ramsayer Health Center (1958): The University’s Health Center has treatment rooms, dispensary and consultation offices. It also has two wards
for daytime infirmary services. The Center was given by an anonymous donor.
Rodman Playhouse (1954): Rodman Playhouse includes a 290-seat proscenium theatre and is attached to Crandall Gallery. The Playhouse is the
gift of the C. J. Rodman family of Alliance, Ohio. The Playhouse includes offices, storage and stagecraft areas and a greenroom, which serves as a
lounge and classroom.
Scott Plaza: Adjacent to the library, Scott Plaza is named in memory of Dr. Joseph Scott who was head of the Department of Biology from 1918 to
1946.
Shields Residence Hall (1999): This three-story building houses 155 students in suite-style living units and is located directly behind the Campus
Center. It was named in honor of Dr. Clifford D. ’43 and Mrs. Betty (Hatton ’44) Shields.
Sweeney Auxiliary Gymnasium (2010): The auxiliary gymnasium, located in the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex, provides additional
practice space for Mount Union’s intramural program and recreational activities. The facility was made possible through the generosity of Sean ’79
and Caroline Sweeney.
Timken Physical Education Building (1970): The Timken Physical Education Building, part of the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex,
includes a performance arena with three full-size basketball and volleyball courts with a seating capacity of 3,000. Also housed in the facility is a
state-of-the-art sports medicine center that includes an athletic training room, offices, rehabilitation center and hydrotherapy facilities. The Office of
Athletics is located here along with classrooms, the M Club meeting room and an interactive kiosk that includes the M Club Athletic Hall of Fame.
Tolerton and Hood Hall (1982): Tolerton and Hood houses the departments of Mathematics, Psychology and Sociology. The building includes
faculty offices, a large lecture room, individual classrooms and student laboratories. The building was endowed in 1983 through a generous gift from
Mary (Tolerton ’24) Hood. Tolerton and Hood Hall was named for Mrs. Hood’s father, Howard Tolerton, and her husband, Clifford Hood.
Union Avenue Gateway and Park: The Gateway and Park are located between Union Avenue and the University buildings. The park, made
possible by the Mount Union Woman’s Club, contains two lakes, walks, a bridge, trees and shrubbery. A brick entrance, erected by the class of 1893,
marks the approach from Union Avenue.
van den Eynden Hall (1928): Located at 136 Hartshorn St. and formerly known as the Administration Annex, the building was named in 1990 in
recognition of the late Howard and Kathryn van den Eynden of Shaker Heights, Ohio. The building was the gift of an anonymous donor in 1940. Prior to
that time it housed the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity, and from 1942-1962 it served as the college Student Union and a residence hall. The building now
houses the Center for Global Education and the Center for Public Service.
Wable-Harter Building (1996): The Wable-Harter Building, located behind the Mount Union Stadium, is the gift of Steve ’84 and Suzanne (Spisak
’84) Harter of Houston, Texas. The building houses the football locker room and facilities, offices, a meeting room and a training room.
Whitehill Tennis Courts (1946): The University’s Tennis Courts, located behind Bica-Ross Hall, are the gift of the late Mr. C. E. Whitehill of
Indianapolis, Indiana. A new construction in 1999, the site includes six tennis courts.

Accreditations and Affiliations


The University of Mount Union is accredited by the following organizations: the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of
Colleges and Schools as a Degree-Granting Institution; Department of Education of the State of Ohio; University Senate of the United Methodist Church;
Ohio Board of Regents (Certificate of Authorization); National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA); Ohio Athletic Association; Association of
Independent Colleges and Universities of Ohio; National Association of Schools of Music (NASM); American Association for Health Education (AAHE); and
National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE). The athletic training program is approved by the Commission on Accreditation of
Athletic Training Education (CAATE), and Mount Union’s teacher education program is approved by the Ohio Department of Education and
accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The Physician Assistant Program has received a provisional
accreditation from the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA).

The Five College Commission


The Five College Commission, which operates as a division of The Commission on Higher Education of the United Methodist Church in Ohio, includes
in its membership the five United Methodist Colleges in the state: Mount Union, Baldwin-Wallace, Ohio Northern, Ohio Wesleyan and Otterbein. The
purpose of the Five College Commission is to promote communication and understanding and to serve as liaison between the five United Methodist
Colleges and the United Methodists of the State of Ohio for their mutual benefit.

Alumni and Related Organizations


The University of Mount Union Alumni Association was officially organized in 1948, having functioned for many years as an informal organization. Its
purpose is to promote interest in Mount Union through a variety of programs. All former students are automatically members of the association.
Activities are coordinated through the Office of Alumni Relations, part of the University’s administrative staff and the Alumni Council from the
association.
The Association holds local meetings each year in many areas throughout the nation. Special programs for alumni from all areas are provided at
the University on Alumni Weekend and also on Homecoming Day. Mount Union Magazine, a quarterly publication, keeps alumni and friends informed
of the programs and activities of the association and of the University.
The Mount Union Women, founded in 1933, is an organization of local chapters with the National Cabinet as its governing body. Its purposes are to
foster the interests of Mount Union, to promote the education of women, to provide an effective medium of contact between alumnae and the


University and to organize local chapters of Mount Union Women.
Any woman who has attended Mount Union is a member of Mount Union Women. Associate memberships may be held by the wife of an alumnus
and the mother, daughter or sister of an alumnus or alumna. Honorary memberships are given to the wife of the president of the University, the wives
of all members of Administrative Council, the director of alumni activities and women members of the University’s Board of Trustees. Honorary
memberships may be given to women professors and wives of professors.

Academic Policies and Procedures


Student Responsibility
Each student has the responsibility to be aware of and to adhere to all rules, regulations and deadlines published in this Graduate Catalogue, and in
any Handbooks provided by graduate programs.

The University of Mount Union Educational Records Policy Annual Notification to


Students
In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (commonly referred to as FERPA, or the “Buckley Amendment”), Mount Union has
adopted the following policies and procedures to protect the privacy of educational records. Students will be notified of their FERPA rights annually
by publication in the Graduate Catalogue and on the University’s website.

Definitions
The University of Mount Union uses the following definitions in this policy:

Student: any person who attends or has attended the University.

Education records: any record in whatever form (handwritten, taped, print, film or other medium) which is maintained by the University and
is directly related to a student, with the following exceptions:
• personal records kept by a University staff member if the record is not revealed to others and is kept in the sole possession of the staff
member;
• student employment records that relate exclusively to the student in the capacity of an employee;
• records maintained separately from educational records solely for law enforcement agencies of the same jurisdiction;
• counseling records maintained by the University chaplain or the University counselor;
• medical records maintained by the University solely for treatment and made available only to those persons providing treatment;
and
• Office of Alumni Activities records.

Rights Under FERPA


A student shall have the right and parents of a dependent student may have the right to do the following:
• inspect and review the student’s education records;
• request that the student’s education records be amended to ensure the records are not inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of
a student’s privacy or other rights;
• consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s educational records, except to the extent that FERPA
authorizes disclosure without consent;
• file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning the failure of the University to comply with the requirements of
FERPA; and

Procedure to Inspect Education Records


Students may inspect and review their education records upon request to the appropriate record custodian(s). Students must submit a written
request that identifies as precisely as possible the record(s) the student wishes to inspect.
Access will be provided within 45 days of the written request. Information contained in educational records will be fully explained and
interpreted to students by University personnel assigned to, and designated by, the appropriate office.
Student records are maintained in the following offices:
• admissions and academic records in the Office of the Registrar;
• financial aid records in the Office of Student Financial Services;
• financial records in the Office of Business Affairs;
• progress and advising records in the departmental offices and faculty offices;
• disability-related records in Disability Support Services;
• counseling records in the Office of the Chaplain and Counseling Services;
• academic dishonesty records in the Office of Academic Affairs;
• disciplinary and student conduct records in the Office of Student Affairs.

Right of the University to Refuse Access


The University reserves the right to refuse to permit a student to inspect the following information:
• the financial statement of the student’s parents;

• letters of recommendation for which the student has waived his or her right of access;
• records of applicants who were neither admitted to nor attended the University of Mount Union;
• records containing information about more than one student, in which case the University will permit access only to that part of the
record which pertains to the inquiring student; and
• records which are excluded from the FERPA definition of educational records.

Right to Challenge Information in Records


Students have the right to challenge the content of their education records if they consider the information contained therein to be inaccurate,
misleading or inappropriate. This includes an opportunity to amend the records or insert written explanations by the student into such records. The
student may not initiate a FERPA challenge of a grade awarded unless it was inaccurately recorded; in such cases the correct grade will be recorded.

Procedures for Hearings to Challenge Records


Students wishing to challenge the content of their education records must submit, in writing to the appropriate office, a request for a hearing
which includes the specific information in question and the reasons for the challenge.
Hearings will be conducted by a University official who does not have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing. Students will be afforded a
full and fair opportunity to present evidence relevant to the reasons for the challenge. The hearing officer will render a decision in writing, within a
reasonable period of time, noting the reason and summarizing all evidence presented.
If the hearing results are in favor of the student, the record shall be amended. Should the request be denied, an appeal may be made, in writing,
and submitted to the registrar within 10 days of the student’s notification by the hearing officer. The appeal shall be heard by an Appeals Board of
three disinterested senior University officials. The board will render a decision, in writing, within a reasonable period of time.
Should the appeal decision be in favor of the student, the record shall be amended accordingly. Should the appeal be denied, the student may
choose to place a statement with the record commenting on the accuracy of the information in the record and/or setting forth any basis for
inaccuracy. As long as the student’s record is maintained by the University, when disclosed to an authorized party, the record will always include the
student’s statement and the board’s decision.

Disclosure of Education Records


The University will disclose “non-directory” information contained in a student’s educational record only with the written consent of the student,
with the following exceptions:
• to school officials, including teachers, who have a legitimate educational interest in the record;
• to officials of another school in which the student seeks or intends to enroll;
• to federal, state and local agencies and authorities as provided under law;
• to the parents of an eligible student if the student is claimed as a dependant for income tax purposes;
• accrediting organizations;
• to comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;
• emergencies affecting the health or safety of the student or other persons; and
• as otherwise permitted by FERPA.
• Any student who wishes to authorize release of his or her grades to one or both parents should complete a disclosure form in the Office
of the Registrar.

Directory Information
Disclosure of directory information normally may be made without the student’s consent. Directory information includes the student’s name;
school and permanent addresses; school, permanent and cellular telephone numbers; school mailbox address; school e-mail address; date and place
of birth; majors and minors; dates of attendance; enrollment status; class level; degree(s) received and dates of conferral; honors and awards earned;
previous institutions attended; weight and height of athletes; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; and photograph.
A student who wishes to have all directory information withheld must submit an “Authorization to Withhold Directory Information” form to the
registrar. The hold will become effective the first day of class in the next regular semester (fall or spring). Once filed this request becomes a
permanent part of the student’s record until the student instructs the registrar in writing to have the request removed. Because the University’s
computer system is unable to put a “hold” on selective directory information, all directory information will be placed on hold or all directory
information except name and e-mail address will be placed on hold. Moreover, this request does not restrict the release of this information to
individuals and agencies list in “Disclosure of Educational Records” above.

Petitions and Appeals Regarding Non-Disciplinary Academic Matters


Any student with a concern about a non-disciplinary academic matter (for example, the assignment of a grade or the substitution of a course)
should attempt to resolve the matter with the instructor, if one is involved, or the department chair. If the matter then remains unresolved, the
student may submit a petition to the Academic Policies Committee for review. Petition forms and information are available from the Office of the
Registrar.
The student may appeal decisions of the Academic Policies Committee to the Vice President for Academic Affairs of the University. The student
must submit a written request for an appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs no later than five business days following the notification of the
committee’s decision.

Information Technology
The University offers state-of-the art teaching and learning resources. Each semester new facilities and technologies are made available on campus
to support teaching and learning.


Campus-Wide High-Speed Data Network
This infrastructure is the foundation upon which all of our computer information systems are built. The data network consists of a high-speed fiber-
optic network between buildings and Ethernet networks within each building – including small houses. Data, Campus Cable Television (CCTV) and
telephone jacks are provided in every residence hall room, office, classroom and lab. The apartment housing and townhouses are equipped with
data and CCTV in each bedroom and data, CCTV and telephone in each living room space. Each line has a voicemail mailbox which can be accessed
by dialing ext. 8595 on campus or (330) 823-8595 from off-campus. The entire network is directly connected to the Internet. Faculty, staff and
students have remote access to campus servers through our VPN.

Public Computer Facilities


General purpose computing labs are located in the Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center (KHIC) and Hoover-Price Campus Center (HPCC). The
Labs in KHIC are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Additionally, the library portion of KHIC and some residence halls have public
workstations. Numerous classroom computer labs are available as well as several specialized departmental computer labs. For detailed information
on public computer labs, please visit the Office of Information Technology website.

CCTV-Closed Circuit Television System


Residence hall rooms, as well as most offices, classrooms and labs are connected to the Campus Cable Television (CCTV) system. The University
satellite dish farm brings to campus a wide variety of television programming including commercial channels, educational channels, movie channels
and special teleconferences. Additionally, the University operates several closed circuit channels for calendars and information and educational
purposes.

Library
The University operates an automated library system providing online public access to the catalogue, circulation services, interlibrary loan,
research journals and databases.

Language Laboratory
A large, state-of-the-art language laboratory is located in the Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center.

Multimedia Facilities
The University has over 30 multimedia-equipped classrooms including large-screen computer and video projection and sound systems, as well as
document cameras. Additionally, faculty make use of portable carts with computers and projectors in other classrooms.

Administrative Systems
The student information system provides online access to services via the web ranging from applying for admission to registering for classes and
viewing transcript information. The University uses an ID card system for electronic access to residence halls, food service, laundry facilities, vending,
copy machines and other transactions. Textbooks and other bookstore items are available on the web.

Helpdesk
The Office of Information Technology provides helpdesk services to faculty, staff and students. To reach the Helpdesk, please dial ext. 4357 on
campus or (330) 829-8726 off-campus or e-mail helpdesk@mountunion.edu with details on your needs.

Technology Resources Acceptable Use Policy


Technology User Code of Conduct
The following Code of Conduct is intended to instruct technology users in acceptable behavior regarding their use of the University of Mount Union
technological resources. This document is not intended to be exhaustive of all possible behaviors that may be deemed inappropriate. Users are
expected to adhere to all policies set forth by the University regarding the use of technology resources. Failure to follow the expectations set forth in
this Code of Conduct or any other policy of the University regarding use of technology may result in sanctions against the user including, but not
limited to, loss of access to technology resources and/or disciplinary action.
1. Users are responsible for how their accounts are used; therefore, every effort must be made to protect against unauthorized access to
accounts. Users must have a password which will protect their accounts from unauthorized use and which will not be guessed easily. If
a user discovers that someone has made unauthorized use of her/his account, s/he should change the password and report the intrusion
to the Office of Information Technology. Users should change their password on a regular basis to assure continued security of their
accounts.
2. Users may not intentionally seek information about, browse or obtain copies of or modify files or passwords belonging to other people,
whether at Mount Union or elsewhere, unless specifically authorized to do so by those individuals. Also, users may not attempt to
intercept, capture, alter or interfere in any way with information on campus or global network paths.
3. Users must not attempt to decrypt or translate encrypted material or obtain system privileges to which they are not entitled.
Attempts to do any of the above will be considered serious violations.
4. If users encounter or observe a gap in system or network security, they must report the gap to the Office of Information Technology.
Users must refrain from exploiting any such gaps in security.
5. Users must refrain from any action that interferes with the supervisory or accounting functions of the system or that is likely to have
such effects.
6. Users must be sensitive to the public nature of shared facilities and take care not to display sounds or messages that could create an
atmosphere of discomfort or harassment for others.


7. Users must avoid tying up computing resources for game playing or other trivial applications, sending frivolous or excessive mail or
messages locally or over an affiliated network or printing excessive copies of documents, files, images or data. Users should be
sensitive to special needs for software and services available in only one location and cede place to those whose work requires the
special items.
8. Users may not prevent others from using shared resources by running unattended processes or placing signs on devices to “reserve”
them without authorization.
9. Users may not copy, cross-assemble or reverse-compile any software or data that the University has obtained under a contract or
license that prohibits such actions. If it is unclear if it is permissible to take such actions, users should assume that they may not do so.
10. Software may not be copied or used illegally. Web site materials must be cited appropriately and permission obtained for the
publishing, performing or distribution of copyrighted material.
11. Messages, sentiments and declarations sent as electronic mail or sent as electronic postings must meet the same standards for
distribution or display as if they were tangible documents or instruments. Users are free to publish their opinions, but they must be
clearly and accurately identified as coming from the particular user or, if a user is acting as the authorized agent of a group recognized
by the University, as coming from the group s/he is authorized to represent. Attempts to alter the “From” line or other attribution of
origin in electronic mail, messages or postings will be considered violations of University policies.
12. Users may not take any action that damages Mount Union technology resources in any way including technology found in classrooms,
public computing labs, departmental labs, residence halls and University houses or any other campus location.
13. Users may not establish any computer to function as a server without the knowledge and approval of the Office of Information
Technology.
14. Users are required to utilize anti-virus software on their computers. Anti-virus software must be updated regularly.
15. Users may not deploy any network electronic equipment or install wireless access points without express permission from the Office of
Information Technology.
16. Users who utilize the Mount Union e-mail system are required to comply with state and federal law, University policies and normal
standards of professional and personal courtesy and conduct.

Network Use Policies


The University of Mount Union network is provided for the academic use of students and faculty of Mount Union as well as to the University
administration for conducting official University business. Academic use is determined to be any legitimate use of the network for the purpose of
assisting in the conduct of the University’s academic mission. The official conduct of University business is limited to efforts on behalf of the
management and administration of the University. The network provides access to the Internet from all offices, residence hall rooms and computer
labs, in addition to public access stations in the library. Students living in on-campus housing are accorded the privilege of using the network for
personal use, as long as such use is in keeping with all applicable policies of the University, all applicable state and federal laws and is not excessive
(resulting in diminished service to fellow students).
User access to the network is governed by the acceptable use policy of the University as well as by the following:
1. Servers. All servers operating on campus must do so with the knowledge and consent of the Office of Information Technology. A server
is defined as any computer providing services of any type to other computers on the network or on external networks. Such services
could include DNS, DHCP, SNMP, e-mail and application, file and/or printer sharing. In order to request the deployment of a server on
the network, written petition must be made, stating:
a. The legitimate academic use of the server;
b. Intended server operating system;
c. All intended server functions and applications, including protocols and services; and
d. The identity and function of target subordinate computers/users.
2. Any computer acting as a server without prior authorization as stated above will be removed from the network. All licensing,
operation and support of the hardware and software utilized will be the responsibility of the petitioner if such petition is granted.
3. Accounts. All authorized users will be provided an account by which to access the necessary network resources of Mount Union. The
information regarding this account, including the account name and password, is privileged and must not be disseminated to anyone
other than the account owner for any purpose. Account holders should protect their passwords and keep them confidential. Passwords
should be changed frequently. Any problem resulting from irresponsible use of a password (e.g., a password that can be easily guessed
or oral or written dissemination of a password) may be treated as grounds for action against the account holder. Any attempt to
determine the passwords of other users is strictly prohibited. The following are categories of authorized users:
a. Full-time staff of the University.
b. Current faculty members
c. Current students
4. The following categories of users may be authorized to utilize the University network based on the legitimate need for access to such
resources:
a. Part-time staff of the University
b. Volunteer staff of the University
c. Student employees
d. Current students on transfer
e. Retired members of the faculty and staff
f. Guests
5. Other categories of users may be granted special permission to obtain access to the system at the discretion of the University. Student
employees who need to access administrative software and resources due to their employment must be given approval for this access
by a department administrator.
6. Special Access. From time to time, circumstances dictate the provision of short-term, special access to University systems. Such
access must be in accordance with the strictest adherence to the user policies stated above and may only be granted by the Office of

Information Technology after review of a written petition. The petition must state the purpose of the access, the source user name and
the department. Such access will typically be provided only for a limited time and will be allowed only from designated computers.
All such petitions that are approved will be maintained on file in the Office of Information Technology. All connections made through
such petitions will be monitored.
7. Network Electronic Equipment. Network electronic equipment, including switches, hubs and routers, may only be installed on campus
with the knowledge and consent of the Office of Information Technology. In order to request the deployment of this equipment on the
network, written petition must be made stating:
a. The legitimate academic use of the equipment;
b. The type of equipment wishing to be deployed and for what purpose;
c. All intended functions, including protocols and services; and
d. The identity and function of target subordinate computers/users.
8. Any network electronic equipment deployed without prior authorization as stated above will be removed from the network. If a
petition is granted, all licensing, operation and support of the hardware and software utilized will be the responsibility of the
petitioner.
9. VPN. (Virtual Private Network) is a resource made available to faculty, staff and non-residential Mount Union students. VPN will allow a
user to connect to the campus network from an off campus ISP (Internet Service Provider) and make it appear to the user that they
were physically connected to the Mount Union network. VPN will allow users to gain access to their home space (H:\ drive),
departmental common space (S:\ drive), and hand-in and handout folders (M:\ drive). VPN will be supported for only specified
operating systems. If misuse of this resource occurs or if the user does not comply with the VPN Policy of Mount Union, the Office of
Information Technology reserves the right to terminate any VPN connection without notice. Any party found to have violated the VPN
policy may be subject to disciplinary action, including termination of VPN access. A copy of the VPN policy can be found on the Office
of Information Technology web site.
10. Wireless. Wireless technology is available in specified areas of Mount Union. Use of the wireless information network implies consent to
abide by all University policies pertaining to the use of computer resources at Mount Union. Users may not install wireless access
points. Any unauthorized wireless access points deployed will be removed from the network.
11. Campus ID Card System. The Campus ID Card System is a network resource and as such is protected by the rules of this policy. Any
party found to violate this policy or damage devices specific to this system, such as door card, vending machine or laundry readers,
may be subject to disciplinary action.
12. Web Pages. The Mount Union website and individual web pages are network resources and as such are protected by the rules of this
policy. Any party found to violate this policy may be subject to disciplinary action.

Appropriate Use of E-mail and Internet


Mount Union e-mail is intended to serve the communication needs of the University community. Access to the e-mail system is a privilege. Any e-
mail addresses or accounts assigned by the University to individuals, sub-units or functions of the University are the property of the University. The
Mount Union network is not intended for private correspondence, as such, all communications on Mount Union computer systems, whether personal
or business-related, are the property of Mount Union. E-mail users are required to comply with state and federal law, University policies and normal
standards of professional and personal courtesy and conduct. Unacceptable uses of e-mail and Internet access include, but are not limited to, the
following:
a. Use for any purposes that violate a federal, state or local law.
b. Use for any commercial activities, including commercial advertising unless specific to the charter, mission or duties of the University of
Mount Union.
c. Use to publish, post, distribute, disseminate, or link to any:
i. Inappropriate, profane, defamatory, infringing, obscene, indecent, harassing or unlawful topic, name, material or information
ii. Software or other material protected by intellectual property laws, rights of privacy or publicity or other proprietary rights,
unless the individual owns/controls such rights or has received all necessary consents for the use of such software and other
materials
iii. Software or other material that contains viruses, corrupted files or that may or are intended to damage the operation of
another’s computer
d. Use to gather or otherwise collect information about others for commercial or private use, including e-mail addresses, without the
express consent of the individuals.
e. Use for fund raising, political campaign activities or public relations activities not specifically related to Mount Union activities.
f. Use to conduct or forward illegal contests, pyramid schemes or chain letters or to spam.
g. Use to sell access to the Internet.
h. Use to conduct any activity that adversely affects the availability, confidentiality or integrity of Mount Union’s technology.
i. Use to benefit personal or financial interests of any employee or student.
j. Use for mass e-mail purposes. Ennouncements should be used for this purpose.
E-mail users shall not give the impression that they are representing, giving opinions or otherwise making statements on behalf of the University or
any unit of the University unless expressly authorized to do so. Where appropriate, the following explicit disclaimer shall be included: “The opinions or
statements expressed herein are my own and should not be taken as a position, opinion or endorsement by the University of Mount Union.”

Security
E-mail, as a public record, is subject to the Freedom of Information Act and to subpoena by a court of law. Users should be aware that any
information submitted via e-mail is not confidential and could be observed by a third party while it is in transit. Encryption encourages the false
belief that privacy can be guaranteed. Users should never put anything in an e-mail message that must be kept confidential. E-mail users should
assume that anyone could accidentally or intentionally view the content of their message. E-mail security is a joint responsibility of the Mount Union
Office of Information Technology and e-mail users. The University will provide the security offered by the currently used software, as well as a
10 
“firewall” to prevent unauthorized access to the mail server. Users must take all reasonable precautions, including safeguarding and changing
passwords, to prevent the use of the account by unauthorized individuals. Users may not divulge passwords for Mount Union accounts to any other
person or allow other persons use of their Mount Union account for any reasons.

Archiving and Retention


The Office of Information Technology does not archive documents. Mount Union records communicated using e-mail or the Internet need to be
identified, managed, protected and retained as long as they are needed to meet operational, legal, audit, research or other requirements. Each
director is required to comply with approved records retention schedules or to set standards to retain, manage and make accessible in an existing
filing system, outside the email system, records needed to support program functions in accordance with Mount Union’s standard practices.

Eligibility for E-Mail Privileges


Students are eligible for e-mail privileges as long as they are officially registered at Mount Union. Faculty and staff e-mail privileges start on the
date employment begins and end at the close of the business day of the date of employment termination. The Mount Union Office of Information
Technology may, under its sole discretion, attempt to redirect email for a reasonable period of time as determined by the University for purposes
consistent with this policy and the University’s mission. The University may elect to terminate the individual’s e-mail account or continue the account,
subject to approval by appropriate University supervisory and systems operational authority. The Office of Human Resources at Mount Union is
responsible for notifying the Office of Information Technology of the date of employment termination.

Special Lectureships
Convocations: The goal of Convocations is to provide additional opportunities for enrichment and growth through contact with a variety of
speakers, performers, artists and forums. They are both externally and internally generated programs whose purpose is to encourage dialogue,
debate, and discussion with students, faculty, staff and the larger global community. Additionally, students often have the experience of meeting
with speakers in class or personal conferences.
The Carr Lecture: The Joseph M. Carr Lectureship was established at Mount Union in 1916 by the Carr family in memory of the Reverend Joseph M.
Carr, D.D., a close associate of President Hartshorn in the early days of the University of Mount Union. The condition under which the lectureship was
given states that the lecture shall always be upon the subject, “The Mission of the Christian University to the World.”
The Dewald Honors Dinner: The Dewald Honors Dinner is made possible by Dr. Donald W. and Mrs. Eleanore (Iman ’38) Dewald of Mansfield,
Ohio. The Dewalds have believed that academic achievement should be publicly recognized. This event applauds the quality of student effort and
encourages the pursuit of academic excellence at the University of Mount Union. The purpose of the dinner is to recognize freshman honor scholars,
upperclassmen who earned Dean’s List recognition during the academic year and students participating in the Honors Program.
The Eckler Lecture: The Eric A. and Mary W. Eckler Lecture in Literature and Drama was established through an endowment given by Mr. John A.
and Mrs. Dorothy (Nelson ’29) Cummins in appreciation of the Ecklers’ years of service to the community and Mount Union. The income shall be used
annually to bring a person(s) to the campus for one or more programs in literature or drama. Residents of Alliance and surrounding areas shall be
invited to participate in the public programs.
The Faculty Lecture: Each year a member of the faculty is selected to give a special lecture relating interesting and important developments in
his or her own field or exploring matters of general concern to the faculty. These lectures are open to the public.
The Heffern Lecture. The Gordon Heffern Business Ethics Lecture was established by Mount Union Trustee Gordon E. Heffern to encourage dialogue
about the practical ways in which spirituality can transform the workplace. Heffern, a graduate of the University of Virginia, served as chairman of the
board of Society Corporation before retiring in 1987.
The Judd Lecture: Through a contribution by the Alliance First National City Bank to Mount Union, the George H. Judd Lecture on Business and
Finance was established in 1958. This lectureship was established in honor of Mr. Judd’s 54-year connection with the Alliance First National Bank and
his service as a member of the Board of Directors of that bank.
The Kershaw Lecture: The Myrtie Allen Kershaw Lectureship on Poetry and the Fine Arts was established in 1960 by a bequest from Myrtie Allen
Kershaw of Kent, OH, who indicated in her will that such a fund should go to a University chosen by her friend and executrix of her estate, Elizabeth
Clark Bell. Because of Mrs. Bell’s personal interest in Mount Union, where she was a student in 1932-33 and where her uncle, Robert E. Stauffer, was a
teacher and librarian for many years, she designated Mount Union to receive the fund. The income is used to bring periodically to the University a
person of distinction, for one or more lectures on ancient or modern poetry, the fine arts, or music or for an original performance in one of these fields.
The Schooler Lecture Series: The Schooler Lecture Series was established in 1988 through a grant made by the Schooler Family Foundation of
Coshocton, Ohio. Through their gift, the University is able to provide a dramatically enhanced opportunity for young men and women studying at
Mount Union and for residents in the greater Alliance area to experience the breadth and depth of American culture. Speakers have included former
U.S. President Gerald Ford; former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop; the late Astronomer Carl Sagan; former U.S. Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger; and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.
The Slater Lecture: The Thelma Tournay Slater Classics Lecture is made possible through a gift of Mrs. Thelma E. (Tournay ’42) Slater. Mrs. Slater’s
lifelong passion for the classics began at Mount Union. The gift supports student enrichment through an increased appreciation of the civilization and
cultural achievements of ancient Greek and Rome that stand at the core of a liberal arts education.
The Smith Lecture: The C. Richard Smith Lectureship in Business was established by C. Richard Smith, a 1953 graduate of Mount Union. The
purpose of this lectureship is to bring business professionals to campus to share their knowledge and experience with business students, faculty and
others from the campus and local community.
The Wolf Lecture: The Eleanor Mincks Wolf Lecture was established by John L. Wolf of Medina in memory of his wife Eleanor (Mincks ’39). She was a
former teacher of English and Latin in Richfield and Highland school districts. This lecture features a professional in the English field.

11 
Campus Services 
Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education
The Office of Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education strives to facilitate student growth and development and encourage exploration of and balance
within the social, intellectual, spiritual, occupational, physical and emotional components of wellness. This office works collaboratively with Mount
Union faculty, staff and students to develop proactive programming, education and counseling opportunities. The primary goal is to address issues
related to substance use and abuse in the context of holistic student education, so that the campus community may grow toward its mission of
preparing students for meaningful work, fulfilling lives and responsible citizenship.
The Office of Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education provides programming and outreach in the form of campus-wide “awareness” events (e.g.,
Breast Cancer Awareness Month, National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week, Great American Smoke Out and Safe Spring Break), hall and floor
programs and individual/group counseling sessions. The office provides education and counseling for students concerned about alcohol, drug and
other wellness related issues. Additionally, the Office of Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education is a campus-wide resource, providing wellness-related
information and referrals for students, whether for a class project or personal use.
Two student organizations work in conjunction with the Office of Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education: C.H.O.I.C.E.S. (Choosing Healthy Options in
Celebration of Educational Success) and GAMMA (Greeks Advocating Mature Management of Alcohol). C.H.O.I.C.E.S. provides information and
opportunities for students interested in health and wellness issues. C.H.O.I.C.E.S. offers programs on stress management, healthy decision making,
responsible alcohol use, sexual responsibility and many others. GAMMA is composed of and works with students participating in fraternity and
sorority life. GAMMA offers programs designed to improve risk-management and promote responsible attitudes toward alcohol use.
The Office of Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education is located in the Office of Student Affairs behind the Information Desk in the Hoover-Price
Campus Center and welcomes any and all visitors.

Business Affairs
Financial Responsibility: Prior to each academic semester the Office of Business Affairs sends a billing packet to each student. Payments for the
full-payment plan are due prior to each semester; the specific dates are provided in the billing packet. A monthly payment plan with minimal
application fee is also available. Payments for the monthly payment plan option are due on the 5th of the month. Transcripts will not be released until
all financial obligations to the institution have been met. All questions should be referred to the Office of Business Affairs.
Cashier : The cashier’s window is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. With proper picture identification, personal checks
may be cashed up to a limit of $50. Any checks over $50, but not exceeding $500, can be approved by the cashier to be cashed at our local bank.
Meal Plans: Graduate students have the option of an unlimited meal plan, a 14-meal plan with $50 flexible money or a 10-meal plan with $100
flexible money. A block meal plan is also available for graduate students. Declaration of the plan option must be made 30 days prior to the start of
the semester. If no declaration is made,no plan will be provided. . Plans may not be changed during the semester.
Refund Checks: When a student’s account reflects a credit balance, the student must contact the Office of Business Affairs to request the balance.
Refunds over $50 will be issued by check on a weekly basis.
Student Employment Forms: All students who will be working at the University must complete the following forms before actual work begins in
order to receive a payroll check: Form I-9, Form W-4 and Form IT-4, all obtained from Office of Human Resources (must have driver’s license, original
social security card or birth certificate to complete these) and a Work Authorization Form obtained from the Office of Student Financial Services.

Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling


Facilities Scheduling: All facilities on campus must be scheduled through the Office of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling, which maintains an
accurate schedule of all activities occurring on campus and other events of interest related to Mount Union wherever they may take place. This
provides one central location where an event can be scheduled and details arranged for use of any facility on campus. Faculty, staff or students can
reserve facilities by creating an EMS account located at http://atlantis/VirtualEMSProfessional/ and reserving a room online or by calling (330) 823-
2881. Once a room is requested, the Office of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling will review the request for approval and if approved, a
confirmation e-mail will be sent to the faculty member, staff member or student requesting the reservation. The calendar of events can be viewed
from the Mount Union home page at http://calendar.mountunion.edu/mastercalendar/.
Purple Plus Cards: All students, faculty and staff receive a Purple Plus Card. The card is used to access residence halls and meals, check out books
in the library or as a debit card at various locations on campus as well as certain authorized off-campus vendors. The card is the property of Mount
Union and is non-transferable. There is a $15 fee for the replacement of lost cards. Replacement of broken cards requires that the recognizable pieces
be presented to the Office of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling. If the broken pieces are not recognizable, a $15 fee will be charged for the
replacement.
To obtain a new card, please visit the Office of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling. The office is located in the Hoover-Price Campus Center,
adjacent to the Information Desk. For more information, call (330) 823-2881 or visit http://www.mountunion.edu/purple‐plu‐card.

Career Development
The Office of Career Development, located in The Hoover-Price Campus Center, offers a wide variety of services and activities for all levels of
students and alumni. The focus of the office is to assist all students during their years as a graduate student and as they embark on a career.
Among its many functions, the Office of Career Development can assist students with resume preparation and their search for full-time
employment upon graduation. Employers from many types of businesses and government agencies regularly notify the center of their employment
needs. All employment opportunities coming to the Office of Career Development are available through our website, collegecentral.com.
Additionally, area employers who are seeking candidates to fill entry-level jobs in many different fields participate in the on-campus recruitment
program. Students who plan to interview with company representatives must register with the Office of Career Development and complete the
College Central electronic registration and resume upload.

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Counseling Services
The aim of counseling at Mount Union is to assist students in living as well as possible. Counseling here is a partnership; people working together to
find solutions and possibilities in life. Staff members in the Office of Counseling Services work to help Mount Union students sort out life’s problems
and move toward life goals.
The primary service requested by students is individual counseling. During counseling, students typically discuss problems with relationships,
adjusting to life in graduate school, stress or burnout, the death or illness of a friend or relative, academic difficulties, career or work decisions,
substance abuse problems, family dilemmas, sports injuries or setbacks, the effects of violence or prejudice and/or balancing school, work and social
life. Counseling is short-term, as it addresses normal life problems faced by college students.
Students experiencing serious emotional, medical or behavioral problems (including but not limited to suicidal or homicidal thoughts or actions,
eating disorders, substance addictions and disorders which impair the ability to think logically or relate with others constructively) are referred for
outside treatment, often with the aid of parents or guardians. To promote safety and recovery, students who seem a danger to themselves and/or
others may be withdrawn from the University (see Interim Suspension). In addition, as there are no psychiatric services available on campus, students
must find such services off campus.
As time allows, other services include presentations and consultation. Presentation subjects might include creating good relationships, learning
relaxation methods, finding the right path in life, making and reaching goals and communicating effectively with friends and loved ones. In addition,
the staff consults with students on mental health, relationship or general life decisions or concerns.
The Office of Counseling Services is located in Family Medical of Alliance building at 149 E. Simpson St. Staff members include two full-time
University Counselors. Both provide free, short-term counseling by appointment to enrolled students. To make appointments or get more information,
call the secretary at (330) 823-7288.

Health Services
Services
The Health Center is designed to serve the needs of undergraduate students. Graduate students should contact the Health Center or the Director of
their graduate programfor information on alternatives.

Emergency Information
Students who have medical emergencies should go to the emergency room at the nearest hospital. The nearest hospital in Alliance is Alliance
Community Hospital.

Health Requirements Prior to Arrival on Campus


All requirements are program specific. Please consult the Handbook for your graduate program for full details on the rules that pertain to that
program. The Handbook will also describe the mandatory health standards and immunizations, if any.

Hoover-Price Campus Center


Rules and Regulations
Mount Union expects that, in consideration of the rights of others, all students will observe reasonable standards of good taste in the matter of
dress in all public areas. The following standards should be observed:
• All persons entering the Campus Center will wear clothing to appropriately cover the body, including shoes and shirt.
• Gambling is prohibited in any part of the Campus Center.
• The Campus Center is a tobacco-free environment.
• Rollerblades, skateboards and bicycles are not permitted inside.
• Furnishings and audio-visual equipment may not be removed from the Campus Center.
• A Mount Union I.D. must be left at the Information Desk before a student can use any game equipment or obtain office keys. Only
Mount Union students and employees are permitted to use the game equipment.
• Students are not permitted to use the phone at the Information Desk.
• Room reservation inquiries for the use of facilities should be made through the Office of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling or
online.
• The paging of individuals through the Campus Center sound system is restricted to emergencies only.
• Animals (exception of service animals) are not permitted in the building.

Posting Policy – Hoover-Price Campus Center


Any department, club or organization affiliated with Mount Union may post materials in the Campus Center. In order to ensure that materials are
posted appropriately, the following policies must be observed.
• Signs may only be posted on general posting bulletin boards.
• General posting space is on a first-come, first-served basis.
• Materials posted on reserved office or student organization boards that are not affiliated with that office or organization will be
removed.
• Signs with no event date will be marked by Campus Center staff and removed after one week.
• The removal or covering of previously posted materials is prohibited unless the event’s date has passed.
• Materials may be posted on bulletin boards with either pushpins or staples only. Signs posted with anything else, including
thumbtacks, will be removed.
• Materials may not be posted on any of the Campus Center walls, doors, floors or windows. Wall clocks, fire alarms, fire extinguishers
and electrical outlets are not to be covered. Materials may be posted in the restrooms provided they are limited to one per stall or
one above each urinal only.

13 
• Signs placed on bulletin boards or in bathrooms must be smaller than 17” x 22”.
• Banners, limited to eight feet in length, may only be hung in designated areas. Banners must be removed by the organization
responsible for hanging the banner within two hours after the event. Banner space in the Campus Center must be reserved in advance
with the Office of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling. Space is reserved on a first-come, first-served basis.
• Materials must not promote the use of alcohol or tobacco products in any way or display any alcohol/tobacco manufacturer or bar
location or name.
• Materials must be consistent with the University policy regarding sexist, racist and other discriminatory behavior.
• The Campus Center staff will remove all outdated signs and signs in violation of this policy.

Intramural Sports
The intramural sports program promotes the idea that, while every individual should be allowed to determine the amount of physical activity he
or she receives, physical preparation is as important as intellectual preparation in meeting the demands and stresses of everyday living. With this
philosophy in mind, intramural sports provide an opportunity to all students, faculty and staff to participate in the many sports activities that are
offered by this program.

Library
Libraries include the Main Library located in the Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center and the Sturgeon Music Library located in Cope Music
Hall.
• The circulation period for most library materials is 30 days. Items may be renewed before their due date for an additional 30 days, up
to three times, if there are no holds on the materials. Library materials may be renewed online through the “My Account” section of the
catalog. Fines for overdue books are 25 cents per book per day and 50 cents per day for videos. After an item is 30 days overdue a $25
overdue fee will be assessed. Borrowers will be charged $100 for each lost or damaged Mount Union item, which includes the $25
overdue fee.
• Borrowers may request items not currently available in our library system from other OPAL and OhioLINK institutions through the
online catalog. These materials from other schools circulate for 21 days and may be renewed before their due date up to four times if
there are no holds on the item. Overdue fines for these items are 50 cents per book per day and $1 per video per day for the first 29
days, then a fine of $50 on overdue day 30. The replacement charge for lost or damaged OhioLINK books is $125.
• Reserve materials, items intended for use by a particular class, are available either for use in the library or for a circulation period
selected by the professor. There is a $5 per item per reserve period fine for all overdue reserve materials. These fines are assessed
around the clock for items removed from the library.
• Hard copy and microform periodicals are intended for library use only. Digital copies of microform materials can be produced on
demand. This is a free service but please allow up to 48 hours for processing.
• Over 180 research databases and 50,000 full-text journals are available via the library home page. Full-text journal articles can be
located easily using the journal finder listed under the “Research by Journal Titles” function on the library home page.
• Research materials (including books, articles, etc.) not currently available in the library or through OPAL and OhioLINK institutions may
be borrowed from another library through the interlibrary loan process. Request forms are available at the circulation desk and online.
There is no fee for this service. Loan periods vary as they are determined by the lending institution. Overdue fines on these items are
charged at the rate of $1 per day per item. Renewals are at the discretion of the lending library and a request must be submitted
before the due date.
• Students who do not participate in the campus e-mail system must provide the library with an active e-mail address in order to
receive timely reminders about the arrival of OhioLINK items and interlibrary loan requests.

The Mount Union Library has a long tradition of excellent support for its Education Department and Teacher Education program. The library’s general
collections include 195,000 books, over 70,000 electronic books, 500 paper journal subscriptions, access to over 50,000 full-text journal titles, over 180
databases, and 400,000 government documents. The library also offers 450 study seats, 6 group study rooms, 4 computer labs, 40 public computers, and
a Writing Center.
The library web pages offer an education subject page with links to both general and education specific databases and other electronic resources.
These resources include four major collections of full-text education journals, including Education Abstracts (Wilson), Education Research Complete
(EBSCO), Educator’s Reference Complete (Gale), and the Professional Development Collection (EBSCO). We also offer access to ERIC, a children’s literature
database, and the Educator’s Reference Desk for lesson plans and curriculum materials. Materials cited in any one database are linked to full-text in other
databases through OLinks. Over 220 full-text journal titles are available in the OhioLINK EJC collection and are complimented by older journal titles in
our JSTOR collection. A Serials Solutions journal finder provides easy access to both print and electronic journals by journal title.
Library book collections reflect 150 years of collecting for the support of teacher training. Access to electronic books include such collections as the
OhioLINK Electronic Book Center, including publishers like Sage and Springer, and the Ebrary academic collection, which provides titles from major
academic publishers. A 10,000 volume reference collection is supplemented by electronic reference materials from such publishers as Oxford, Sage and
Gale.
A newly established Curriculum Resource Center occupies 2,300 square feet in the Main Library and includes a 600 square foot multimedia classroom
with a teacher observation station and an electronic smart board. The CRC provides an outstanding collection of library resources which support both
undergraduate and graduate level teacher education programs. These resources emphasize educational methods, materials for student instruction and
curriculum objectives for preschool through grade twelve, including special education. During the course of the summer library staff will be developing
a separate CRC web page for easy external access to these materials.
In preparation for the new education graduate program we will expand our holdings to further support concentrations in curriculum and instructional
design, information management and evaluation, school law and ethics, personnel administration and supervision, administrative policy making, fiscal
management, and statistical tools. While there will be a planned increase in departmental book budgets, much of the new funding will be used to
purchase specialized collections of electronic books which can be easily accessed by remote students. Our already substantial collections of education
databases and electronic journals are already remotely accessible through a proxy server arrangement managed by OHIONET.
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Our students have direct access to materials at 90 OhioLINK libraries as well as free access to full interlibrary loan services with most materials
delivered digitally via e-mail. Electronic reserve materials are already widely in use and can be accessed through the library catalog. Library staff have
already begun to make use of LibGuides to develop resource lists with live electronic links which can be added to course pages through our Angel
courseware system.
An extensive library orientation program will be included as part of the initial orientation programming for all incoming graduate students. For
the PA program this orientation session consists of a two hour demonstration of subject resources delivered by the instruction librarian and the library
director. Graduate education orientation will be provided by the instruction librarian and the department liaison librarian.

Multicultural Student Affairs


The Office of Multicultural Student Affairs falls under the Office of Student Affairs, reporting to the vice president for student affairs and dean of
students. The Office of Multicultural Student Affairs primarily serves as a resource for students of color in matters of academic, social, cultural and
personal well-being. However, we also offer our services to all students who are interested in/concerned with issues of diversity within the campus
community. Mount Union believes that an appreciation of diversity among campus constituencies creates a welcoming campus environment that is
crucial to the success of all of our students. As such we sponsor a variety of programs to meet these needs including our Kaleidoscope Multicultural
Student Orientation Program, Not Another Statistic Conference, Diversity Month programs and various other events that seek to educate the
community on issues of ethnic diversity and promote racial understanding and inclusion.
While student needs are the primary focus, diversity-focused programming, resources and training is available to the entire Mount Union
community during the academic year. The Office of Multicultural Student Affairs also oversees the operation of the Black Cultural Center, located at
243 W. Simpson Ave. To contact the office, please call (330) 823-2138.

Residence Life
Currently, the University does not provide housing for graduate students. Questions about temporary housing (such as nearby hotels), and housing
for special programs held during the summer may be addressed to the Residence Life staff at (330) 823-2496.

Security
The University attempts to provide for the security of individuals and their belongings through a security system which includes locks for rooms
and buildings, controlled access to buildings, the employment of professional security people and an extensive night-time lighting system. Campus
security officers patrol the campus 24-hours a day. In addition, the duty officer carries a cellular phone to be accessible to students 24-hours a day in
the event of an emergency
Security measures are only as effective as the individuals on campus choose to make them. Students are encouraged to use sound judgment at all
times. All residence halls are under a 24-hour locked condition. Access is granted using an authorized student ID card. All other campus buildings
have controlled access at night and on weekends. All individuals entering these facilities may be asked to show a valid ID card and may be denied
permission to enter if they are unable to produce an ID card. At times it may be necessary to establish other security checks and procedures and it is
expected that students will cooperate fully in carrying out security procedures, all of which are designed to promote the safety and security of the
University community.
In case of trouble, students should call Campus Security at (330) 428-1344 (or by dialing “SAFE” from any campus phone) or the Alliance Police
Department at (330) 821-3131 (or 2255 from any campus phone.) When calling for assistance, the caller should clearly state the nature of the problem
and its location.
In addition, Blue Light Phones are located strategically across campus for emergencies. Students need only to push a button on these phones to
alert the Alliance Police of an emergency situation. It is important to speak clearly, state the nature of the problem and its location.

Service-Learning and Community Service


The Office of Service-Learning and Community Service, located in Room 204 of van den Eynden Hall, is a center of resources for students wishing to
participate in community service opportunities, faculty wanting to add curricular service to a course and community partners needing student
volunteers. The office coordinates extracurricular volunteer community service activities, such as Make a Difference Week, Trick or Treat for Canned
Goods, MLK Day of Service, National Girls and Women in Sports Day and annual Alternative Spring and Fall Break programs. Students can also seek
regular community service placements through the office in a variety of fields and student organizations or other groups can also seek help in planning
and scheduling community service projects. Service internships in fields such as grant writing, non-profit management and public relations are also
available with some of our partners.
Service-learning is a method of teaching and learning that involves using the information and ideas learned in class in community service
experiences outside the classroom. Assistance for faculty and students can be provided by the director.
More resources are also available at www.mountunion.edu/service-learning-6 and in the Service Learning Library, located outside the Faculty and
Staff Commons in the Kolanbrander-Harter Information Center. Information about jobs, internships and other opportunities are frequently posted on
Ennouncements and on the bulletin boards near the Academic Support Center and the Service-Learning Library.
Students who would like more information about community service, volunteer opportunities or service-learning can contact the Office of Service-
Learning and Community Service at (330) 823-2838 or by e-mailing espensal@mountunion.edu.

Spiritual Life
All spiritual life programming and scheduling is handled through the Office of the Chaplain located in Room 128 of Dewald Chapel. The
coordinating body of student spiritual life organizations is the Religious Life Council (RLC), which is advised by the chaplain. Each of the organizations is
student led with a faculty or staff advisor. In addition to weekly meetings, the annual calendar includes retreats, lock-ins, alternative break mission
trips and special holy day services and activities. Worship takes place in the sanctuary of Dewald Chapel throughout the week. Sunday services
include Catholic Mass at 6:30 p.m. and Praise and Prayer at 9 p.m. In addition to scheduled worship times, there is a 24-hour meditation room

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available. Students, faculty and staff are always welcome to be a part of spiritual life activities and worship. For more information about spiritual life
on campus, contact the Office of the Chaplain at (330) 823-2838 or go to the Mount Union website.

Office of Student Involvement and Leadership


The Office of Student Involvement and Leadership prepares Mount Union students for meaningful work, fulfilling lives, and responsible citizenship
through engaging and intentional co-curricular activities, programs, services, and partnerships. Through immersed participation, training, practice
and reflection, the Mount Union student will gain skills that will complement their academic endeavors and further enable their success after
graduation. Leadership programming, preview and orientation, campus programming, fraternity & sorority life, student organizations, Family Day,
Little Sibs Weekend and more can be found as part of the Office of Student Involvement & Leadership.
Much of what the office does is viewed through the lens of student leadership development. Any student can learn about becoming involved in
these student organizations by participating in the Student Involvement Fair held during the second week of the fall semester. All student
organizations are required to register with the office and maintain current contact information for presidents and advisors as well as accurate
constitutions. Students interested in starting a new student organization can obtain materials and learn the appropriate process by contacting the
office.
Our leadership programs provide students at a variety of abilities and engagement levels with appropriately designed leadership opportunities to
further enhance their learning and engagement on campus. Workshops and seminars are available throughout the year to meet the needs of student
leaders and organizations. In support of the leadership program and student organizations, the Center for Student Involvement and Leadership,
located in the lower level of the Health Center, is a resource center and meeting space for student leaders and organizations.

The Mount Union AfterHours program is designed to provide a late night weekend alternative for student social interaction. Held during peak social
times, events include acoustical acts, Survival Bingo, Win the Game, ice skating and other themed and student-focused activities. After Hours strives
to give students activities free of charge while creating a fun and exciting atmosphere both on and off the Mount Union campus. The office staff also
advises the Raider Programming Board (RPB). RPB is responsible for most of the student-initiated campus entertainment, including events that occur
during Week of Welcome, Homecoming, Welcome Back Week and Springfest.

Student Success Center


The Student Success Center (SSC), located in the Hoover-Price Campus Center, includes the Office of Academic Advising, the Office of Academic
Support, and the Office of Student Accessibility Services.
The Writing Center, located in the Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center, is also a part of the SSC. While each office provides distinctly different
assistance to students, they work together so that students can locate exactly what they need with ease.
Academic Advising (AA) primarily services undergraduates in need of identifying an appropriate academic path, but graduate students are
welcome to use the office for answering questions about their academic strengths and interests.
Academic Support (AS) offers assistance with time management, study strategies that consider both the demands of specific courses and
individual learning styles, and ways to prepare for tests and deal with test anxiety.
Student Accessibility Services (SAS) provides educational opportunities for qualified persons with disabilities through accessible programs,
services, and a campus environment in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and other disability rights legislation. SAS also serves as a
resource to the University community in regard to compliance issues.
The Writing Center provides writing tutors who work with students to improve writing and editing skills for many different types of papers,
including essays, research papers, and lab reports. Graduate students may also make an appointment to work with the Faculty Director of the
Writing Center.
For more information call the Student Success Center, at (330) 823-8685.

Vehicles
Mount Union maintains a fleet of vehicles that are available for University-sponsored activities and functions. The use of a University vehicle is a
privilege that entails specific responsibilities. Failure to follow University, state and federal rules and regulations, or irresponsible use of a vehicle, will
result in that privilege being withdrawn.
All drivers must be authorized to drive University-owned vehicles. Drivers must annually fill out the driver’s application form and submit a copy of
their driver’s license to the Physical Plant office. New drivers must have this done seven days in advance to using a University vehicle.

Program of Study
Physician Assistant Studies
The mission of the University of Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program is to educate knowledgeable, competent and compassionate
physician assistants who, under physician supervision, provide patient care with professionalism and integrity.
The Physician Assistant Program will accomplish its mission by offering a graduate level curriculum that focuses on the development of critical
thinking, professional problem solving, appreciation of human diversity, and ethical leadership. Through its mission the program will help meet the
surrounding community’s need for qualified health care providers.
The strengths in the curriculum lie in its focus on:
• Patient-centered care that acknowledges diversity and an interdisciplinary team approach
• The impact of the U.S. Healthcare Delivery System within the context of the complex societal problems that affect the individual,
community and world
• The collaborative physician/PA relationship
• An understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of healthcare access and needs
• The importance of life-long learning for the PA
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Accreditation Status
The Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program was granted provisional accreditation from the Accreditation Review Commission on
Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA) following its September 2008 meeting. The ARC-PA defines provisional accreditation as: “the status
of accreditation granted for a limited, defined period of time to a new program that, at the time of the site visit, has demonstrated its preparedness
to initiate a program in accordance with the Standards.”
Follow-up provisional visits are conducted to programs that have successfully achieved provisional accreditation. Follow-up visits must occur no
sooner than four months after students have entered the clinical phase of the program and no later than six months after graduation of the first class,
and the ARC-PA retains the right to require an earlier follow-up provisional visit.

Applying to the Program


Potential candidates for the program must apply through CASPA by the October 1 deadline and submit a supplemental application and
shadowing forms to the Office of Admission, University of Mount Union.

Interview Days
Interviews are required for final consideration for program entry. Following the receipt of all required documents, the application is first evaluated
for completeness by the Office of Admission and designated staff. The following are considered in the decision to offer an interview: overall and
science grade point averages (as calculated by CASPA), references, personal statement and completeness of prerequisite coursework.
A second review for compliance with program requirements and selection for a personal interview is performed by the Physician Assistant
Program Admission Committee and designated staff. Competitive applicants will be invited to participate in a one-day interview process.
Interviews will be held on the University of Mount Union campus.
All travel expenses are the responsibility of the applicant.

Acceptance into the Program


Notification of acceptance into the Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program will be provided within 30 days of the interview. Applicants
offered a seat for the current matriculating class must acknowledge acceptance within two weeks of notification and forward a signed Acceptance
Form and a non-refundable $500 acceptance deposit (which will be applied toward tuition) to hold a seat in the class.
Acceptance into the PA program is provisional pending the following.
• Candidates must complete all outstanding prerequisite coursework with a grade of “C” or better.
• Candidates must complete a physical examination and immunizations prior to matriculation. A form will be provided with the letter
of acceptance to the program.
• All students are required to maintain adequate health insurance throughout the program. Information regarding health insurance will
be required upon program acceptance.
• Documentation verifying that the applicant can meet the Technical Standards for the Physician Assistant Studies Program is required.
• The background check must not provide negative information that is inappropriate for a medical professional student.

Wait List Status


Students who are not offered a seat in the program following Interview Day may be placed on a wait list, at the recommendation of the Admission
Committee and/or the program director. The wait list is activated as necessary by the program director. A wait list is valid from the close of the
interview process through the first week of classes for which the student applied. Wait listed applicants who are not advanced to a seat are not
considered for admission to the following class without re-application to the program.

Background Checks
The Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program requires that all students undergo background checks as part of the admission process.
Forms for the required background check will be distributed with notice of program acceptance. Applicants who exhibit non-compliance with the
background checks will not be given acceptance into the program.

Employment
Due to the challenging nature of the Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program, no student should attempt to complete the program while
maintaining employment. Class and clinical rotation schedules will not be adjusted to accommodate a student’s work schedule, and work will not
be given priority over academic responsibilities.

Notice of Nondiscrimination
In conformance with state and federal guidelines, the Physician Assistant Studies Program at Mount Union is an equal opportunity educational
program; this program does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, creed, disability, marital status, national origin, race or sex. In order to
protect the privacy of its applicants, information on identified individuals to third parties may be released only after receiving written permission
from the candidate involved, in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) guidelines.

Admission Requirements
Admission to the Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program is based on the following requirements.

1. Degree: A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited University or university is required. Applicants with degrees from any
discipline are welcome to apply to the program as long as the prerequisite coursework is complete (see below).
2. GPA: The program requires an overall GPA of 3.0 or above on a 4.0 scale and a cumulative 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale in prerequisite
17 
coursework. Overall and science GPAs greater than 3.0 are preferred.
3. Prerequisite Coursework: The following coursework is required.

Prerequisite Course Mount Union Equivalents Semester Hours

English Composition EH 100 or EH 120 3

General Psychology PY 110 3

General Biology I and II BI 140 and BI 270 8


with labs or higher level
biology courses

Anatomy and Physiology I BI 210 and BI 211 8


and II with labs*

Genetics BI 240W 2-4

Inorganic Chemistry with lab CH 111W 3-4

Organic Chemistry I with lab CH 231 3-4


Elementary statistics or MA 123 or PY 201 3-4
Biostatistics**

Microbiology with lab BI 305 4

Medical Terminology***

All prerequisite coursework must be completed with a grade of “C” or better. No grade of “C-” will be accepted. All
prerequisite science and math coursework must have been completed within the past 10 years. Coursework older than 10 years
will be reviewed on a case by case basis for acceptance.

One semester of Human Anatomy PLUS one semester of Human Physiology plus labs can substitute for Anatomy and Physiology I and II.
** Elementary Statistics cannot be replaced by any other math (like calculus)
*** Medical Terminology requirement may be met via a proficiency exam given on the day of the interview. Failure of the proficiency exam
will require the student to complete and pass a self-directed medical terminology course prior to matriculation.

4. Physician Assistant Shadowing Experience: All applicants to the program must complete 40 hours of shadowing a NCCPA-certified
physician assistant prior to application to the program. The applicant is responsible for the arrangement of the shadowing
experience. Documentation verifying the shadowing experience must be submitted with the supplemental application to the
program. Applicants with more than the minimum 40 hour requirement will be preferred.
5. The Supplemental Application must be submitted to the University of Mount Union Office of Admission by the application deadline.
6. Applicants must complete an application via the Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA) and submit it by the
October 1 deadline.
7. Graduate Record Exam (GRE): General Exam. Please designate code 5966 on the GRE registration. Test scores should not be older than
three years. While there is no minimum GRE score required for admission, the competitive candidate will have scores above the 50th
percentile. Combined scores greater than 1000 are preferred.
8. Candidates must have the ability to meet the Technical Standards of the program. See p. 16 for a listing of technical standards.
9. Three letters of recommendation must be submitted via the CASPA web site. One recommendation must be from a practicing
physician or physician assistant.
10. For International Students Only Foreign Transcripts: All transcripts from an institution in any country other than the United States
must have a course-by-course evaluation, plus determination of letter grade equivalence. Either of the following agencies may be used
for foreign transcript evaluation:

World Education Services Education Credentials Evaluators


P.O. Box 745, Old Chelsea Station PO Box 514070
New York, NY 10113-0745 Milwaukee, WI 53203-3470
Phone: (212) 966-6311 or (800) 937-3898 Phone: (414) 289-3400
Fax: (212) 739-6139 Fax: (414) 289-3411
Web: http://www.aes-edu.org/ Web: http://www.ece.org/

a. International students must submit official TOEFL scores. Scores of 550 or above on the paper-based test, 213 or above on
the computerized test or 100 or above on the internet test are required for citizens of non-English speaking countries.
b. International students also are required to have U.S. visa information if they are currently residing in the United States

11. Background Check: Students must request and pay online for a criminal background check prior to program matriculation.

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Information will be provided upon acceptance.
12. Patient Care Experience: This experience is not required, but is preferred.
13. Preference: Preference will be given to University of Mount Union graduates who meet all other admission pre-requisites. Up to 20
percent of the 25 available seats in each entering class may be granted to University of Mount Union graduates in a preferential
manner, if all other admission requirements are met.
14. Priority Admission: The University of Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program offers priority admission to some applicants.
Please see the Priority Admissions section on pages 17-18 for details.

Note: The University of Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program does not offer credit for experience.
Note: There is no advanced placement within the University of Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program.
Note: The PA Program does not accept transfer credit from a student previously enrolled in another PA program, nor does it accept experiential credit. All
students accepted in the PA program must satisfy all requirements of the didactic and clinical years of study.

Priority Admission
The Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program offers priority admission into the Physician Assistant Program for applicants who have
completed the listed courses below at University of Mount Union. The successful applicant must have a bachelor’s degree, complete the GRE exam
and successfully complete the Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program interview process. A minimum grade of “C” must be achieved in
each of the listed courses. To be considered for priority admission into the Physician Assistant Studies Program, the applicant must have an overall
GPA of 3.2 on a 4.0 scale and a GPA of 3.2 in the courses listed below:

Biology Courses Semester Hours


BI 140 The Unity of Life 4
BI 270 Cell Biology 4
BI 210 Anatomy and Physiology 4
BI 211 Anatomy and Physiology 4
BI 240W Genetics 4
BI 305 Microbiology 4
BI 340 Immunology 3

Chemistry Courses Semester Hours


CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry 4
CH 231 Organic Chemistry I 4
CH 370 Biochemistry I 3
CH 371 Biochemistry I Laboratory 1

Statistics Courses Semester Hours


MA 123 Elementary Statistics 3
or
PY 201 Research and Statistical Methods I 4
or
SO 300 Statistics for Social Scientists 3

Chemistry Courses Semester Hours


PY 110 Introduction to Psychological Science 3

Technical Standards
Students training for the physician assistant profession must demonstrate the following abilities and skills: visual (observation); oral-auditory
(communication); motor, cognitive intellectual-conceptual, integrative and quantitative, and behavioral/social attributes. Technical standards apply
to all enrolled students in the Physician Assistant Studies Program. Accommodation can be made on a reasonable basis for individuals with
documented disabilities, and they will be considered, but students should be able to perform in a reasonably independent manner, so as not to
compromise the integrity of the Physician Assistant Studies Program or profession. Technical Standards for admission, progression and graduation
have been adopted for all physician assistant studies students. All students must meet these minimum standards with or without reasonable
accommodation.
The Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program commits to providing for the needs of admitted and enrolled students who are qualified
individuals with a disability under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), by providing
reasonable accommodations to such students. Reasonable accommodations will be made to students on a case-by case basis. It is the responsibility
of the student, however, to review the technical standards for the program and to make their needs known.
The Mount Union Physician Assistant Studies Program has established Technical Standards for its program delineating the minimum physical,
cognitive, emotional and social requirements necessary to participate fully in all aspects of academic and clinical education. One’s ability to meet
the Technical Standards of the program is a prerequisite for admission and continuation in the program. As noted earlier, applicants and enrolled
students must be able to meet all technical standards with or without reasonable accommodations. Reasonable accommodations may not:
• Fundamentally alter the nature of the training program.
• Compromise the essential elements of the program.
• Cause and undue financial or administrative burden.
• Endanger the safety of patients, self or others.

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Any applicant who has a question about whether he or she can meet these standards due to the functional limitations from a disability, should
contact the Office of Disability Support Services at (330) 823-7372 (V/TTY) for a confidential discussion.
All candidates for admission to the Physician Assistant Program, who are accepted, will be required to provide documentation verifying that they
understand and meet these technical standards.

Visual (Observation)
Students must be able to demonstrate sufficient attention and accuracy in observation skills in the lecture hall, laboratory, at the patient’s
bedside or in an outpatient setting. Functional use of vision and somatic sensation is necessary. It is enhanced by the functional use of the sense of
smell. Consistent with the ability to assess asymmetry, range of motion and tissue texture changes, it is necessary for students to have adequate
visual capabilities for proper evaluation and treatment integration.
Examples of the required visual skills include, but are not limited to the following:
a. Accurate observation of a patient (near and at a distance), recognizing non-verbal cues.
b. Accurate visualization and discrimination of texts, numbers, patterns, to interpret x-rays and other graphic images, and digital or
analog representations of physiologic phenomena, such as EKGs, with or without the use of assistive devices.
c. Accurate identification of changes in color of fluids, skin, and culture media.

Oral-Auditory (Communication)
Students must be able to demonstrate that they can communicate effectively and objectively in both the academic setting and in routine and
emergency situations in the clinical health care setting. Throughout the program, the students must show evidence of effective written and verbal
English communication skills. Communication includes not only speech, but also reading and writing. Students must be able to communicate
effectively and sensitively with patients, of all ages and genders, with varying degrees and types of infirmities, of varying cultures, ethnicities and
personalities. Students must also be able to communicate effectively and efficiently with other members of the health care team. In emergency
situations, students must be able to understand and convey information essential for the safe and effective care of patients in a clear, unambiguous
and rapid fashion. In addition, students must have the ability to relate information to and receive information from patients in a caring, articulate
and confidential manner.
Examples of the required oral-auditory (Communication) skills include, but are not limited to:
a. Clear, efficient and intelligible articulation of verbal English language.
b. Legible, efficient and intelligible written English language.
c. Accurate and efficient English language reading skills.
d. Accurate and efficient expressive and receptive communication skills.
e. Ability to prepare and communicate concise oral and written summaries of patient encounters.
f. Ability to accurately follow oral and written directions.
g. Ability to accurately discern and evaluate various components of the spoken voice (pitch, intensity, timbre), percussive notes and
ausculatory findings.

Motor
The students should possess enough physical stamina to sufficiently complete the rigorous course of didactic and clinical study as is required.
Students need to possess coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and integrated use of the senses of touch and vision.
Examples of the required motor skills include, but are not limited to the following:
a. Functional and sufficient sensory capacity to adequately perform a physical examination and must possess the motor skills necessary
to perform palpation, percussion and auscultation.
b. Execution of motor movements that allows the provision of general and emergency medical care such as airway management,
placement of intravenous catheters, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, wound closure and application of pressure to control bleeding.
c. Physical stamina sufficient to complete long periods of sitting, standing, lifting or moving are required in the classroom, laboratory and
clinical settings.
d. Demonstration of strength and mobility as needed to assist in surgery, emergency situations and activities associated with daily
practice as a physician assistant studies student.
e. Execution of motor movements to assess patient conditions, provide patient care and participate in basic diagnostic and therapeutic
maneuvers and procedures.
f. Properly use clinical instruments and devices for the therapeutic intervention including, but not limited to tuning forks, stethoscopes,
sphygmomanometers, Doppler devices, catheters, tubes, etc.

Cognitive (Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities)


In order to effectively problem solve in the clinical setting, and based upon the critical thinking skills demanded of physician assistants, students
must be able to demonstrate cognitive skills including, but not limited to intellectual, conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities.
Examples of the required cognitive skills include, but are not limited to the following:
a. Demonstrate ability to measure, calculate, reason, analyze, integrate and synthesize in a timely fashion.
b. Demonstrate the ability to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and understand the spatial relationships of structures.
c. Demonstrate the ability to acquire, retain and apply new and learned information.

Behavioral and Social


Students must possess the emotional health and stability required for the full utilization of their intellectual abilities, for the exercise of good
judgment, for the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients and for the development of mature,
sensitive and effective relationships with patients.
Examples of the required behavioral and social skills include, but are not limited to the following:
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a. Demonstrate ability to tolerate physically taxing workloads and function effectively under stress.
b. Demonstrate the ability to adapt to changing environments, display flexibility, compassion, integrity, motivation and interpersonal
skills, and learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of patients.

Tuition and Fees


Tuition and fees for the entire 27-month Physician Assistant Studies Program are as follows.

Tuition and Fees - 2011 Cohort


Entire 27-month PA program $56,700

Other Costs – 2011 Cohort


Textbooks $3,700
Laptop Computer $3,500
Lab Coats, equiptment, etc. $2,500
PDA (Clinical Year) $250
Health Record Maintenance (FileMD) $80
Graduate Studies Program Fee $500
University Technology Fee $600
Total Other Costs Estimate $10,880

Note: Living and travel expenses may vary widely, so they are not included in this estimate.

**While most clinical rotations are within a one-hour driving distance from University of Mount Union, students may elect to attend a clinical
rotation in a more remote area. In these instances, the student will be responsible for costs associated with student housing, if necessary, unless
previous arrangements have been made between the University and the clinical rotation site.

Financial Aid for Graduate Students


The primary goal of the financial aid program at Mount Union is to assist students in meeting their University expenses by providing financial
resources. Financial assistance from the University should be considered as supplemental to the family effort. The investment of the family includes
parental support for dependent students and a contribution from the students themselves. Mount Union will strive to assist eligible students to the
greatest extent possible based on the University’s available resources.

Eligibility and Determination for Financial Aid for Graduate Students


To be eligible for financial assistance, the student must be classified as having at least half-time enrollment and show satisfactory progress toward
meeting the requirements for a degree (see page 31). Institutional funds and federal grants are not available to graduate students.
Consideration for Federal Stafford Loans requires the student to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each academic year and
meet the federal eligibility requirements. Students must show financial need (according to the FAFSA) to qualify for Subsidized Stafford Loan funds.
Maximum annual amounts equal $8,500 (subsidized) and $12,000 (unsubsidized). Amounts may not exceed the cost of attendance (direct and
indirect costs associated with the program) in the given loan period.
Additionally, graduate students have the option to explore Federal Graduate PLUS Loans and private loans to assist with their costs. Amounts may
not exceed the cost of attendance (direct and indirect costs associated with the program) in the given loan period.

Financial Aid Application Procedures for Graduate Students


The following steps are necessary in order to apply for financial aid at Mount Union:
A. The student applies for admission to the University.
B. The student files the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.ed.gov to determine financial aid eligibility
for need-based financial aid. The federal school code for Mount Union is 003083. The process begins on January 1 preceding the
student’s entry term.
C. The process of sending award letters begins in March.

Financial Aid Renewal Procedure for Graduate Students


All financial aid awards are reviewed annually to accurately analyze any changes in the financial position of the student and his or her family. The
annual review also permits the University to take into consideration any change in educational costs. The following information relates to renewal of
financial aid:
A. File the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) renewal form online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. All renewal applicants are
encouraged to file by March of each subsequent year.
B. The Office of Student Financial Services will provide reminders to students electronically.
C. Award letters are electronically available to students in March.

Applying for Graduation


All students who wish to graduate must apply for graduation at least one semester prior to their planned date of graduation. Application for
Graduation forms are available in the Office of the Registrar or online at the registrar’s website. The University recommends that students apply at
least one year before graduation to ensure that all graduation requirements can be identified and completed by the expected graduation date. The
application form will include: when the student plans to complete graduation requirements; a declaration of the student’s major(s), minor(s), and
concentration(s); and the degree the student expects to earn.
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Once an application is received, the Office of the Registrar and the Physician Assistant Program Director will identify any remaining requirements
for graduation on a Degree Clearance Form, a copy of which will be given to the student and her/his advisor.

Degree Conferral
At the end of each fall and spring semester as well as summer sessions, the registrar presents to the faculty the names of all students who have at
that point successfully completed all requirements for graduation. The faculty must then approve these potential graduates before they can be
awarded a degree. Once the faculty have approved the candidates for a specific degree, that degree will be conferred on those students by the
University.
Faculty approval Degree conferral
At the end of the spring semester May
At the end of the summer sessions August
At the end of the fall semester December

“Walking” at Commencement
Students who are completing the Physician Assistant program will be permitted to “walk” at Commencement if they are making satisfactory
progress toward the Master of Science degree, with no more than seven (7) hours of coursework remaining toward the completion of the program. The
Director of the PA Program will confirm the eligibility of each student who submits an application to the Registrar to participate in the event.
Although the students in question will not receive their diplomas at the time of the Commencement ceremonies, they will be allowed to
participate in the ceremonies in every other way. They will attend the ceremonies in academic regalia, and their names will appear in the program.
These students will receive a diploma case (without diploma) during the ceremonies. Diplomas will be distributed to students at a later date, upon
the completion of the program, once all degree requirements have been met.

Academic Honesty
The practice of medicine requires sound judgment, honor, and integrity. All students enrolled in the University of Mount Union Physician Assistant
Studies Program are expected to conform to the principles of academic honesty. Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated by the program faculty or the
University.
Anyone determined by the program to have cheated on unit tests, quarterly examinations, final examinations, quizzes, practical examinations,
homework or written assignments will receive a final grade of "F" in the course, regardless of the student's progress to that point, and will automatically
be dismissed from the program.
Cheating also includes plagiarism, which, is the act of using another person’s ideas or expressions in your writing without acknowledging the source.
It is giving the impression that you have written or thought of something that you have in fact borrowed from someone else.
Further forms of cheating include but are not limited to purchasing of papers, and presenting the same written work for more than one course
without the permission of the instructor of the course in which the student is enrolled. The use of cellular phones and transmitting or recording devices
during exams or exam review sessions is prohibited, and will be considered academic dishonesty. For students in the clinical year, honesty is expected in
the recording of historic information, physical findings, laboratory data or other information not obtained directly by the student.

Academic Honor Code


Students are expected to demonstrate the highest moral and ethical principles as a member of the PA Program. All students enrolled in the
program are expected to maintain academic and professional integrity with regard to class assignments, examinations, research, publications, use of
electronic technologies, and service.
All matriculating students will be provided a copy of the Program Honor Code. All students are obligated to support the Honor Code and report
any violation thereof to the program faculty. Each student will signify subscription to the Honor Code by signing the Honor Code Form provided at the
Orientation Session.

Student Conduct
The PA student is required to abide by academic, clinical and professional Behavior policies as described in the PA Student Handbook’s Technical
Standards and the Student Handbook. Should a student (pre-clinical or clinical year) be arrested or convicted of a crime prior to the time he/she is
prepared to enter the PA profession, that criminal record may have further implications for the student’s eligibility to practice. Students should be
aware of state and federal or professional restrictions barring the practice of individuals with criminal records.

Academic Standing and Academic Dismissal


Students are expected to complete the designated professional curriculum in the sequence specified. Each semester's course work is to be
considered pre-requisite to the next semester. Students are required to successfully complete, in sequence, all course work as full-time students.
There is no opportunity to progress into an advanced semester. There is no opportunity to interchange pre-clinical course work. Elective courses are
limited to the clinical year.
Review by the Program Core Faculty Committee to determine a student's ability to continue in graduate school is required upon receipt of: one
grade of F; or three grades of less than B in any 500 or 600 level courses. The Program Core Faculty Committee will document in writing to the student
the conditions in which continuation is possible, if it is determined that the student may continue. If a recommendation for dismissal is made, this
recommendation will be made to the Dean of the University for review and final determination. Mandatory dismissal by the Program occurs if the
graduate student receives: two grades of F or has a cumulative GPA below 3.00 for greater than two semesters.

Requirements for the Degree in Physician Assistant Studies


The degree offered is a master of science in physician assistant studies. All students accepted into the Physician Assistant Program will be enrolled
in an identical course schedule for the didactic year (first four semesters). During the clinical year students are required to complete eight required

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clinical rotations and two elective clinical rotations.
The grading scale will be that of the physician assistant program, which differs from that of the University of Mount Union grading scale. Students
must pass all requirements and maintain good academic standing to continue in the program.

Grading Scale
90-100% A
80 - 89% B
70- 79% C
< 70% F

First Year Curriculum


Summer Semester I – 12 weeks
Required Courses Semester Hours
PA 501 The Physician Assistant Profession 1
PA 502 Clinical Anatomy 4
PA 503 Human Physiology 4
PA 505 Genetics and Molecular Mechanisms
of Health and Disease 3
PA 510 History and Physical Exam I 3

Total 15

Fall Semester I – 16 weeks


Required Courses Semester Hours
PA 504 Human Pathophysiology 4
PA 507 Patient Diagnostics 2
PA 511 History and Physical Exam II 4
PA 512 Clinical Medicine I 6
PA 515 Pharmacology I 4

Total 20

Spring Semester I – 16 weeks


Required Courses Semester Hours
PA 506 EKG 1
PA 513 Clinical Medicine II 6
PA 516 Pharmacology II 4
PA 517 Medical Ethics 2
PA 518 Clinical Skills 2
PA 519 Research Methods and
Evidence-Based Medicine 3
PA 520 Behavioral Medicine and Preventive
Measures 2

Total 20

Summer Semester II – 12 weeks


Required Courses Semester Hours
PA 514 Clinical Medicine III 6
PA 521 Healthcare Policy and Delivery 2
PA 522 Leadership and Preparation for Practice 2
PA 523 Emergency Medicine 4
PA 524 Integrative Patient Care Management 2

Total 16

Second Year Curriculum


Fall Semester II – 16 weeks
Required Courses Semester Hours
PA 6xx Clinical Practicum I 2
PA 6xx Clinical Practicum II 2
PA 6xx Clinical Practicum III 2
PA 6xx Clinical Practicum IV 2
PA 615 Professional Development Seminar I 1

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Total 9

Spring Semester II – 16 weeks


Required Courses Semester Hours
PA 6xx Clinical Practicum V 2
PA 6xx Clinical Practicum VI 2
PA 6xx Clinical Practicum VII 2
PA 6xx Clinical Practicum VIII 2
PA 625 Professional Development Seminar II 1
PA 660 Introduction to Master’s Capstone Project 1

Total 10

Summer Semester III – 12 weeks


Required Courses Semester Hours
PA 6xx Clinical Practicum IX 2
PA 6xx Clinical Practicum X 2
PA 670 Master’s Capstone Project 3

Total 7

Total Program Credit Hours 97

Clinical Practicum
Practicum Courses Semester Hours
PA 610 Family Medicine 2
PA 611 Pediatrics 2
PA 620 Internal Medicine 2
PA 621 General Surgery 2
PA 630 Women’s Health 2
PA 631 Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine 2
PA 640 Primary Care 2
PA 641 Emergency Medicine 2
PA 650 Elective 2
PA 651 Elective 2

Course Descriptions
PA 501 The Physician Assistant Profession. An introduction to the physician assistant profession, including information about the history of
the profession, AAPA Code of Ethics, credentialing and recertification requirements of the physician assistant profession, the physician assistant
professional’s role in healthcare delivery and reimbursement systems, relationship with the supervising physician and other healthcare professionals.
This course will provide information about legislation and governing bodies that affect the profession, use of appropriate referral sources when patient
management is outside the scope of physician assistant practice; and an introduction to the principle of intellectual honesty. 1 Sem. Hr.
PA 502 Clinical Anatomy. An in-depth study of clinical anatomy of the human body. Emphasis will be placed on important anatomical
landmarks required in the physical evaluation of the patient, anatomical relationships of structures to each other, anatomical components of body
systems and blood and nerve supply to organs and body regions. The course includes common pathological processes and topical landmarks related
to common surgical procedures. Students analyze, synthesize and apply clinically relevant anatomical information for physical examination, proper
diagnosis, appropriate therapy, accurate prognosis in patient care and other clinical procedures. Students will have the opportunity to apply
anatomical knowledge through the use of case studies and cadaver laboratory experiences. 4 Sem. Hrs.
PA 510 History and Physical Exam I. An introduction to obtaining and recording the complete medical history. This course will provide an
overview of the medical record as well as development of writing and organizational skills for medical record keeping and oral presentation skills and
an introduction to lifelong learning skills and cultural diversity influences on all aspects of medical practice. Patient counseling and/or patient
education theory and techniques will be discussed. Skills will be developed through structured laboratory exercises. 3 Sem. Hrs.
PA 503 Human Physiology. A comprehensive study of the physiology of the human. Emphasis will be directed toward advanced instruction
in membrane physiology, control of cellular activity, neuromuscular physiology, renal physiology, endocrinology, cardiovascular, respiratory and
central nervous system. 4 Sem. Hrs.
PA 505 Molecular Mechanisms of Health and Disease. A presentation of the principles of clinical genetics and the use of traditional and
molecular methods for the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of genetic disorders. This course includes genetic counseling concepts for disease
prevention. 3 Sem. Hrs.
PA 506 EKG. A study of the technique of 12-lead EKG recording and interpretation. This course is designed to allow students to recognize and
interpret electrocardiography (EKG) tracings and their clinical significance. 1 Sem. Hr.
PA 504 Human Pathophysiology. This course covers basic pathologic and pathophysiologic concepts of diseases per organ system
commonly encountered in primary care practice. 4 Sem. Hrs.
PA 507 Patient Diagnostics. An introduction to diagnostic and therapeutic procedures utilized to evaluate body systems, including
laboratory, radiography and respiratory methods and techniques, their indications and general principles of interpretation. Simulated cases will be
included to further develop clinical decision-making skills. 2 Sem. Hrs.

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PA 511 History and Physical Exam II. The Instruction, study and practice of skills required for conduction of a complete physical examination
using appropriate equipment, techniques and accurate medical terminology to document findings. This course includes instruction to identify and
discuss normal and abnormal anatomical structures, body system physiology, pathological conditions, common symptoms of disorders and clinical
findings and provide appropriate patient education. 4 Sem. Hrs.
PA 512 Clinical Medicine I. An intensive study of human diseases and disorders in the broad scope of clinical medicine including the
perspectives of epidemiology, etiology, historical data, clinical manifestations, progression, therapeutic management, pertinent preventative
medicine, laboratory medicine perspectives and prognosis. In addition, an overview of physiological and pathologic processes that influence the
human organism at the cellular, organ and systemic levels will be provided. Emphasis will be on disease processes common to primary care
practices and the development of differential diagnoses and plan based upon the patient’s clinical presentation. 6 Sem. Hrs.
PA 515 Pharmacology I. Preparation for appropriate administration/prescription of medicines is accomplished through a study of drug
classifications, pharmacodynamic actions and rationale for therapeutic use of prescription and non-prescription medications. 4 Sem. Hrs.
PA 513 Clinical Medicine II. The second part of an intensive study of human diseases and disorders in the broad scope of clinical medicine
including the perspectives of epidemiology, etiology, historical data, clinical manifestations, progression, therapeutic management, pertinent
preventative medicine, laboratory medicine perspectives and prognosis. In addition, an overview of physiological and pathologic processes that
influence the human organism at the cellular, organ and systemic levels will be provided. Emphasis will be on disease processes common to primary
care practices and the development of differential diagnoses and plan based upon the patient’s clinical presentation. 6 Sem. Hrs.
PA 516 Pharmacology II. A continuation of a two-part course. Preparation for appropriate administration/prescription of medicines is
accomplished through a study of drug classifications, pharmacodynamic actions and rationale for therapeutic use of prescription and non-
prescription medications. 4 Sem. Hrs.
PA 517 Medical Ethics. The course will focus on moral problems which arise in the day-to-day practice of health-care professionals,
administrators and researchers within the framework of existing institutions, social policies and laws. It will include readings on controversial moral
issues in clinical practice and apply forms and strategies of moral reasoning to selected cases. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 518 Clinical Skills. A study of the bedside and surgical procedures including aseptic technique, air and blood-borne pathogen
transmission prevention, foley catheter insertion, injections, surgical techniques and casting. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 519 PA Research Methods and Evidence-Based Medicine. This course is intended to enable the students to evaluate the findings in
current literature in light of current clinical practice. Students will become proficient in database search techniques, the interpretation of published
research and in determining the quality of published research to guide clinical practice decisions. 3 Sem. Hrs.
PA 520 Behavioral Medicine and Preventive Measures. Instruction focused on the detection and application of preventive measures and
treatment of health risk behaviors including stress, abuse and violence, substance abuse and psychological symptoms and syndromes through basic
counseling, patient education and/or appropriate referrals that are sensitive to culture and ethnicity. This course offers an introduction to strategies
to identify and ease patient reaction to illness and end of life issues and application of those strategies to overcome resistance, encourage therapeutic
cooperation and assist in changing patient risky behaviors. Cultural diversity and its relationship to health, disease and death will be addressed.
Other topics include sexuality and health. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 521 Health Care Policy and Delivery. An exploration of trends in health care delivery, related public policy and funding issues, as well as
theoretical and ethical considerations in delivering care. Topics include healthcare disparities, the medically underserved, and managed care. 3
Sem. Hrs.
PA 522 Leadership and Preparation for Practice. A review of leadership roles in healthcare. This course provides a review of techniques and
sessions for the NCCPA exam. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 523 Emergency Medicine. This course provides an overview of potentially life-threatening illnesses and injuries encountered in emergency
situations or in the critically ill patient. It will discuss the essentials of assessment and management for the initial evaluation, stabilization, assessment,
management and treatment, patient education, disposition and follow-up of an acutely ill patient requiring expeditious medical, surgical or
psychiatric attention. 4 Sem. Hrs.
PA 514 Clinical Medicine III. A presentation of medical problems and diseases encountered in primary care practice, emphasizing
obstetrics, gynecology and pediatrics. Etiology, signs, symptoms, diagnostic data interpretation, clinical course, methods of management and
potential complications provide framework for lecture and discussion. Differential diagnosis of related and similar diseases included. 6 Sem. Hrs.
PA 524 Integrative Patient Care Management. Using problem-based scenarios, students work through patient cases to develop appropriate
differential diagnoses. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 610 Clinical Practicum: Family Medicine. This four-week rotation in clinical health care settings is designed to emphasize the role of the
physician assistant to the primary care physician. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 611 Clinical Practicum: Pediatrics. This four-week pediatric rotation is designed to provide the physician assistant student with an
intense exposure of primary care pediatric problems with the objectives of developing skills in well-child preventative care, the care of common
pediatric illnesses and the care of the newborn and children. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 615 Professional Development Seminar I. This course integrates concepts and knowledge gained from field experience rotations into the
total learning process. It focuses on patient and professional communication, various professional practice issues and topics and lifelong learning.
Other discussions on current issues will be included. 1 Sem. Hr.
PA 620 Clinical Practicum: Internal Medicine. This four week rotation is designed to provide the physician assistant student with the
opportunity to develop proficiency in the addressing common medical issues via patient encounters in a clinical setting. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 621 Clinical Practicum: General Surgery. This four-week rotation is designed to provide the physician assistant student with
opportunities to become proficient in pre-operative, intraoperative and post-operative patient care. Student expected to become able to first-
assist a surgeon in a surgical setting. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 625 Professional Development Seminar II. This course integrates concepts and knowledge gained from field experience rotations into
the total learning process. It focuses on patient and professional communication, various professional practice issues and topics and lifelong learning.
Discussions on current clinical issues and student presentations on patient casework will be included. 1 Sem. Hr.
PA 630 Clinical Practicum: Women’s Health. This four-week obstetrics/gynecology rotation is designed to provide the physician assistant
student with an opportunity to develop proficiency in the unique medical history, physical examination and treatment of the prenatal/gynecology
patient. The student will also become familiar with tests and procedures unique to this patient population. 2 Sem. Hrs.

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PA 631 Clinical Practicum: Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. This four-week psychiatric rotation is designed to provide the physician
assistant student with a behavioral medicine experience in caring for ambulatory and hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders. The student
will be able to perform basic psychiatric evaluations, monitor medications and support the clinical management plan for patients after psychiatric
evaluation and treatment. The student will also be able to refer to psychiatrists and psychiatric facilities as needed. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 640 Clinical Practicum: Primary Care. This four-week rotation is designed to enhance the physician assistant student’s experience in a
primary care setting. The rotation scope is broad and encompasses such specialties as inpatient hospital medicine, physical medicine and
rehabilitation, palliative medicine, pediatric inpatient medicine, and urgent care. The student may be assigned to any of these opportunities, or be
selected to repeat a rotation within a family practice office or internal medicine setting. Prerequisites: PA 501-524. 2 Sem. Hrs
PA 641 Clinical Practicum: Emergency Medicine. This four-week emergency medicine rotation is designed to provide the physician assistant
student with exposure to and development of skills in managing patients in the emergency room setting. Learned skills will include those necessary
for appropriate triage, stabilization, diagnosis and management of patients with traumatic injuries and illnesses as well as the management of less life-
threatening problems that present to the emergency room. Physician assistant student will develop skills in working with the pre-hospital emergency
medical team and secondary referral systems. 2 Sem. Hrs.
PA 650/651 Clinical Practicum Electives I and II. These four-week clinical rotations are designed to provide the physician assistant student
with an elective opportunity in any of the following disciplines: dermatology, gastroenterology, plastic surgery, cardiology, radiology, ENT,
subspecialties in surgery, urology, gerontology, pulmonology, ophthalmology and oncology or another area of interest to the student or to extend any
of the required rotations. The student will be able to recognize conditions treatable by these specialties so they can refer patients appropriately
and/or work in a supportive role for such specialists. 2 Sem. Hrs. each
PA 660 Introduction to the Master’s Capstone Project. This course is designed to allow physician assistant students to conceptualize a
master’s project to be completed in Summer Semester III. The course includes summative evaluation OSCE. 1 Sem. Hr.
PA 670 Capstone Master’s Project. This course is designed to allow physician assistant students to complete a master’s degree project while
under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Students will identify a health care topic/issue, conduct appropriate library research, develop a research
paper and make an oral presentation on their topic at the conclusion of the master of science in physician assistant studies curriculum. Students will
be responsible for developing appropriate audiovisual, handouts, etc. for the oral presentation. 3 Sem. Hrs.

University Personnel
Board of Trustees
Officers
Randall Hunt, Chair
Allen Green, First Vice Chair
Gary Johnston, Secretary

Ex-Officio
Richard F. Giese, B.A., M.Div., M.A., Ph.D.; President, University of Mount Union
Daniel Griffith, B.A., J.D.; Attorney, Black, McCuskey, Souers, Arbaugh, Canton (President, Alumni Council)
John L. Hopkins, B.A., M.Div.; Bishop, East Ohio Conference of the United Methodist Church
Bruce Ough, B.A., M.A., M.Div.; Bishop, West Ohio Conference of the United Methodist Church
Aaron Swartz, B.A., M.A.; Senior Manager Assurance, Ernst & Young LLP, Akron (Vice President, Alumni Council)

Active Trustees
Gary S. Adams, B.A., J.D.; President, Greater Cleveland Auto Dealers Association, Cleveland
Marty Adams, B.A.; Interim Chief Executive Officer, PVF Capital Corp., Salineville
Jacquelyne Bailey, B.A., M.A.; National Vice President, INROADS, Inc., Cleveland
Steven J. Barr, B.A.; Partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP, San Francisco, CA
Ginger Brown; Massillon
Kenneth W. Chalker, A.B., M.Div., D.Min.; Pastor, First United Methodist Church of Cleveland, Cleveland
Roger Clay, B.S.; President, Rentwear, Inc., Port Clinton
Robert DeHoff, B.S.; President, The Prudential DeHoff Realtors, Managing Partner, Willmoll Development Company, North Canton
Scott R. Gindlesberger, B.A.; Vice President, Stifel Nicolaus/Butler Wick Division, Alliance
Allen Green, B.S.; President, HP Products, Louisville
Sylvester Green, B.A.; President of Green Consulting, LLC, New Cannan, CT
James Griffith, B.A., M.B.A.; President and Chief Executive Officer, The Timken Company, Canton
Charles D. Grove; President/Owner, Grove Appliance TV and Audio, Alliance
Fred J. Haupt, B.A., J.D.; Law Partner, Krugliak, Wilkins, Griffiths & Dougherty, Canton
Nancy Hill, B.A.; President & CEO, American Association of Advertising Agencies, New York, NY
Randall C. Hunt, B.A., J.D.; Director, Krugliak, Wilkins, Griffiths & Dougherty, Alliance
Gary Johnston, B.A.; Vice President of Marketing, Arrow International Inc., Cleveland
Daniel Keller, B.S.B.A., M.B.A.; Vice President and General Manager, Cedar Point, Cedar Fair L.P., Sandusky, retired and President, Kellco
Investments, LTD
Edward M. Kolesar, B.S., J.D.; Senior Manager, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, Chicago, IL

26 
William G. Krochta, B.S., Ph.D.; Manager, General Analytical/Environmental, PPG Industries, Monroeville, PA, retired
Robert Mahoney, B.A.; Chairman Emeritus, Diebold, Inc., Canton
William Manning, B.A.; President, Manning Ventures, Inc., Fairport, NY
Gerard Mastroianni, B.A.; President, Alliance Ventures, Inc., Alliance
Michael G. Muffet, B.A., M.A.; President, Muffet Associates, Barnesville
Vanita Oelschlager, B.S.; Assistant to the President, Oak Associates, Akron
John F. Peters, B.S.; Senior Vice President, Stifel Nicolaus/Butler Wick Division, Alliance
Thomas V. Petzinger, B.A.; President, Pan Atlas Travel Service, Inc., Youngstown, retired
Nancy Pickton, B.A., M.B.A.; Corporate Secretary, FirstEnergy Corp., North Canton, retired
E. Karl Schneider, B.S., D.D.S.; Dental, Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon, Mentor
Larry Shinn, B.A., B.D., Ph.D.; President, Berea University, Berea, KY
Marcus L. Smith, B.S., M.B.A.; Senior Vice President, Massachusetts Financial Services, Boston, MA
Brian Stafford, B.A.; Director of the U.S. Secret Service, VA, retired, Vice Chairman, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and Vice
Chairman, Lexis Nexis Special Services, Inc.
Sean S. Sweeney, B.A.; Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Philadelphia Insurance Group, Philadelphia, PA
Joe Tait, B.A.; Vice President of Broadcasting, Cleveland Cavaliers, Cleveland
Sandra Thomas, B.A.; Senior Vice President, JPMorgan Chase, Columbus, retired
Lee Ann Thorn, B.A.; North Canton

Honorary Trustees
Harold M. Kolenbrander, B.A., Ph.D., D.HL.; President Emeritus, University of Mount Union, Cincinnati

Trustees Emeriti
Joel H. Beeghly, B.S., M.B.A., M.S.; Senior Technical Specialist, Carameuse Lime Company, Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA, retired
Paul Bishop, B.S., J.D.; Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, H-P Products, Inc., Louisville
Judith Douglass, B.A.; Pittsburgh, PA
Carl W. Gartner, B.A.; President and Chief Executive Officer, General Color and Chemical Company, Inc., Minerva, retired
Craig W. George, B.S., M.D.; Eye Surgeon, Alliance, retired
Robert S. Kunkel, Jr., B.S., M.D.; Physician, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland
Richard F. Myers, B.S.; President, Myers Equipment Corporation, Canfield, retired
Ralph S. Regula, B.A., LL.B., LL.D., L.H.D.; Former Congressman, U.S. Representative, 16th Congressional District of Ohio, Navarre
David R. Schooler, B.A.; President, Town & Country Travel, Inc., Columbus
Clifford D. Shields, B.A., L.H.D.; Standard Oil Company, Cleveland, retired
Dorothy A. Sisk, B.S., Ed.D.; Conn Endowed Chair, Lamar University
Jack E. Spencer, B.A., M.Div.; Minister, Lakewood United Methodist Church, Erie, PA, retired
George E. Stradley, B.A.; President, Beifuss & Stradley, Inc., Hartville, retired
Robert J. Tomsich, B.S., M.E.; President, Nesco, Inc., Cleveland
George K. Weimer, B.A.; Vice President and Trust Officer, United National Bank and Trust Co., Alliance, retired
Walter A. Wichern, Jr., B.S., M.D.; Director, Department of Surgery, St. Lukes-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY, retired

Office of the President


Richard F. Giese, B.A., M.Div., M.A., Ph.D.; President
Laura Good; Assistant to the President and Board of Directors

Chaplain
Martha CashBurless, B.A., M.Div.; Chaplain

Office of Academic Affairs


Patricia Draves, A.B., Ph.D.; Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the University
James Thoma, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.; Associate Academic Dean of the University; Professor of Human Performance and Sport Business
William Cunion, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.; Associate Dean for Curriculum and Student Academic Issues; Associate Professor of Political Science and
International Studies
Jonathan Scott, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.; Associate Dean for Special Projects; Professor of Biology
Fang Du, B.A., M.A., M.A., Ph.D.; Director of Assessment and Program Development

Bracy Hall
Barbara Saulitis, B.S., M.S.; Chemistry Laboratory Supervisor and Chemical Hygiene Officer
Tom Wise, B.S.; Biology Lab Manager

Center for Global Education


Dawn Adams, B.A., M.B.A.; Assistant Director for the Center of Global Education
Lindsey Laret, B.A., Assistant Director for the Center of Global Education
Scott Slabaugh, B.S.; Director of the Center for Global Education

27 
Center for Public Service and Community Engagement
Harry Paidas, B.A., M.S.; Interim Director
Amanda Espenschied-Reilly, B.A., M.S., M.A.; Director of Service-Learning and Community Service
Lorie Miller, B.A.; Director of Community Education Outreach

Intercollegiate Athletics
Zac Bruney, B.S., M.S.; Assistant Football Coach
Sandra Douglas, B.S., M.S.; Senior Women’s Administrator and Head Softball Coach
Mark Hawald, B.S.B.A., M.B.A.; Head Wrestling Coach
Paul Hesse, B.S., M.A.; Assistant to the Athletic Director and Head Baseball Coach
John H. Homon, B.S., M.Ed.; Head Men’s Cross Country and Men’s Track and Field Coach
Lee Hood, B.A., M.A.; Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Melissa Joseph, B.S., M.Ed.; Head Women’s Soccer Coach
Christopher Kappas, B.A.; Assistant Football Coach
Larry T. Kehres, B.A., M.Ed.; Associate Professor of Human Performance and Sport Business, Athletic Director and Head Football Coach
Vince Kehres, B.A., M.A.; Assistant Football Coach
Daniel MacDuffie, II, B.A., M.A.; Head Men’s Golf Coach and Director of Wellness and Recreation
Leigh Ann Matesich, B.A., M.A.; Head Women’s Volleyball Coach
Eric Mojock, B.S., M.Ed.; Head Men’s and Women’s Swimming and Diving Coach
Leonard Reich Jr., B.S.; Director of Sports Information
Suzy Venet, B.S., M.S.; Head Women’s Basketball Coach and Home Athletic Contest Administrator
John Witkowski, B.A., M.S.; Head Men’s Soccer and Assistant Men’s and Women’s Swim Coach
Jeffrey Wojtowicz, B.A., M.S.; Head Men’s and Women’s Tennis and Assistant Football Coach, and Football Recruiting Coordinator

Library
Robert Garland, B.A., M.L.S., M.B.A.; Director of Libraries
Bette George, B.A., M.A.; Circulation Manager
Joanne E. Houmard, B.A., M.L.S.; Serials Librarian
Steven Kenneally, B.A., M.L.S.; Reference Librarian
Cheryl M. Paine, B.A., M.L.S.; Documents Librarian
Linda Scott, B.A., M.L.S.; Technical Services Librarian

Nature Center
Christine Johnson, B.S., M.A.; Academic Coach in Biology and Chemistry
Charles McClaugherty, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.; Director of the Brumbaugh Center for Environmental Sciences
Patricia Rickard, B.S.; Naturalist
Karen E. Santee, A.A.S.; Facilities Manager

Radio Station, WRMU-FM


Mark A. Bergmann, B.A., M.A.; Manager

Registrar
Karen Moriarty, B.A.; Registrar

Student Success Center


Rosemary Bienz, B.A., M.A. Ph.D.; Director of Office of Academic Support
Danielle Cordaro, B.A., M.A.; Director of the Writing Center
Karen A. Saracusa, B.A., M.Ed.; Director of the Office of Student Accessibility Service
Tiffani Tribble, B.A., M.S.; Director of the Office of Academic Advising

Teacher Education Program


Linda Bigham, B.S.; Teacher Education Program Administrative System Support Analyst

Office of Advancement
Ryan Calcei, B.A.; Advancement and Parent Relations Officer
Jessica Clough, B.A.; Assistant Director of The Mount Union Fund
Susan Denning, M.S.S.A., C.F.R.E.; Director of Advancement for Stewardship and Grants
Greg King, B.A., M.Ed.; Vice President for University Advancement
Kim Rodstrom, B.A., M.B.A.; Director of The Mount Union Fund
Matthew Stinson, B.S.;Director of Advancement for Major Gifts
Sherrie Wallace, B.A.; Assistant to the Vice President for Research and Information
Dave Wolpert, B.A.; Director of Advancement for Gift Planning

28 
Alumni Relations and University Activities
Anne Graffice, B.A., M.B.A.; Director of Alumni Relations and University Activities
Tiffany Hogya, B.A.; Assistant Director of Alumni Relations and University Activities

Office of Business Affairs


Michelle Baker-Sams, A.A.S., B.A., C.P.A.; Controller
Ron Crowl, B.S., M.B.A.; Associate Vice President for Business Affairs and Chief Planning Officer
John Gregory, B.S., M.B.A.; Director of Purchasing and Service Center Operations
Patrick Heddleston, B.A.; Vice President for Business Affairs and Treasurer
Rodney Peterson, A.C.E.; Director of Auxiliary Services

Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling


Robin Clough, A.B.; Manager of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling

Human Resources
Andrew Boothe, B.A., M.B.A.; Manager of Human Resources and Payroll
Pamela Newbold, B.S., J.D.; Director of Human Resources and Staff Development

Information Technology
David Bernat, B.S.; Administrative Systems Support Analyst
Rick Bodnar, A.A.B., B.S., M.S.; Instructional Technology and Media Services Manager
Jerry Brugh, B.A.; Manager of Video Services
Christine Cook, B.S.; Instruction Technology Specialist
Dajaun Eutsey, B.S.; Microcomputer Support Analyst
Margherita Kavulla, B.S.; Administrative Systems Support Manager
Daniel Hoffman; Manager of Telephone Services
Mark Kolenz, B.A., M.B.A.; Administrative Systems Support Analyst
Diana Lozier, A.A.; Network Support Technician
Cara McEldowney; Manager of User and Support Services
Mike Mitchum, B.S., M.S.; Web Services Manager
Benjamin Parker, B.S.; Network Support Technician
Catherine Royer; Microcomputer Support Analyst
David R. Smith; Network Support Services Manager
Tina M. Stuchell, A.C.P., B.S., M.A.; Director of Information Technology
Sandy Vild; Administrative Systems Support Analyst

Physical Plant
Blaine D. Lewis, A.S., B.A.; Director of the Physical Plant
James Rhodes; Assistant Director of the Physical Plant

University Store
Mary Swartz, B.A.; Director of the Bookstore

Office of Enrollment Services


Amy A. Tomko, B.A., M.Ed.; Vice President for Enrollment Services

Admission
Heather Brumbaugh, B.A.; Admission Representative
Jessie Canavan, B.A., M.A.; Assistant Director of Admission
Grace Chalker, B.M.E.; Director of Admission
Vincent Heslop, B.A.; Director of Enrollment Technology
Ronald Holden, B.A., M.A.;Admission Representative and Multicultural Recruitment Coordinator
Janel Iden, B.A.; Database Specialist
Laurie Scarpitti, B.A.; Assistant Director of Admission and Graduate and Transfer Coordinator
Audra Youngen, B.A.; Admission Representative

Student Financial Services


Christina Comanitz, B.S.; Financial Aid Representative and Work Study Coordinator
Lori Faur, B.S., B.A.; Student Financial Services
Marcus Jackson, B.A.; Minority Intern
Emily Swain, B.A., M.A.; Director of Student Financial Services

29 
Office of Marketing
Gina Bannevich, B.A.; Director of Marketing
Melissa Gardner, B.A., M.A.; Executive Director of Marketing
Callie Livengood, B.A.; Assistant Director of Marketing for Media Relations
Joanna Shields, B.A.; Assistant Director of Marketing for Editorial Services
Chelsey Wallace, B.A.; Assistant Director of Marketing for Website Development

Office of Student Affairs


John Frazier, B.A., M.A.Ed.; Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students
Karen Petko, B.A., M.A.; Associate Dean of Students

Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education


Kelleen Weber, B.A., M.A.Ed., L.P.C.C.-S., L.C.D.C.III; Director of Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education

Campus Safety and Security


Keane Toney, A.S., B.S., M.S.; Director

Career Development
Rebecca Doak, B.S., M.A.Educ.; Executive Director of Career Development
Sara Fugett, B.A., M.S.; Assistant Director of Career Development

Counseling Services
Allison West, B.A., M.Ed., L.P.C.C.; Assistant Director of Counseling Services

Health Service
Michael McGrady, M.D.; Medical Director
Linda Pauli, R.N.C., B.A.; Director of the Health Center

Multicultural Student Affairs


Richard Jackson Sr., B.A., M.A.M.; Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Multicultural Student Affairs
Ashley Ross, B.A., M.S.; Assistant Director/Program Coordinator, Multicultural Student Affairs

Recreation and Wellness


Dan MacDuffie, B.A., M.S.; Director

Residence Life
Katie Arthurs, B.A.; Resident Director
Brian Collins, B.A.; Graduate Assistant for the First Year Experience and Resident Director
Michelle Gaffney, B.A., B.S., M.A.; Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Housing and Residence Life
Andrea Kelley, B.A.; Graduate Assistant for Fraternity and Sorority Life and Resident Director
Dave Kokandy, B.A.; Graduate Assistant for Career Development and Resident Director
Deborah Minton, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.S.; Assistant Director of Residence Life for Training and Development and Resident Manager
Shannon Richardson, B.B.A., M.Ed.; Assistant Director of Residence Life for Programming and Summer Conferences and Resident Director
Sara Sherer, B.A., M.Ed.; Associate Director of Residence Life and Co-Curricular Director of the First Year Experience
Tiffani Tribble, B.A., M.S.; Resident Director

Student Involvement and Leadership


Katherine Carnell, B.A., M.A.; Director of Student Involvement and Leadership
Jessica Douglas, B.A., M.A.; Assistant Director of Student Involvement and Leadership

The Faculty
The listing that follows includes full-time members of the faculty and certain administrators who hold faculty rank. The year of initial
appointment is indicated in parentheses.

Department of Art
Robert Buganski (2003) Associate Professor of Art and Chair of the Department of Art; A.A., Cumberland Community College ’75; B.A., Stockton
State College ’82; M.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design ’85.
Joel R. Collins (1978) Professor of Art and The Dr. Robert T. and Phyllis S. White Chair in Art; B.A., Alderson-Broaddus College ’69; M.F.A., West
Virginia University ’76.
Margo Miller (2004) Assistant Professor of Art; B.F.A., The University of Akron ’82; M.F.A., Kent State University ’85.

30 
Department of Biology
Leonard G. Epp (1970) Professor of Biology and the Milton J. Lichty Chair in Biology; B.S., Gettysburg College ’66; M.S., Pennsylvania State University
’68; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University ’70.
Charles A. McClaugherty (1988) Professor of Biology and The John D. Brumbaugh Chair of Environmental and Ecological Sciences; B.S., Cornell
University ’73; M.S., University of Virginia ’80; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin ’83.
Gary Miller (2010) Visiting Professor of Biology; B.S., Grand Valley State University ’91, Ph.D., Bowling Green State University ’97.
Kim M. Risley (2004) Associate Professor of Biology; B.S., North Dakota State University ’94; Ph.D., East Carolina University School of Medicine ’98.
Jonathan Scott (1990) Professor of Biology and Dean of the Division of Mathematics and Sciences; B.S., Carroll College ’78; M.S., University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee ’80; Ph.D., Northwestern University ’84.
Lin Wu (1994) Associate Professor of Biology and Chair of the Department of Biology; B.S. Huazhong Agricultural University, China ’83; M.S., The Ohio
State University ’90; Ph.D., The Ohio State University ’91.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry


Debra Boyd-Kimball (2004) Asociate Professor of Chemistry; B.S., Bethany College ’01; Ph.D., University of Kentucky ’04.
Benjamin Burlingham (2002) Associate Professor of Chemistry and Director of Pre-Health; B.S., Grove City University ’96; Ph.D., Indiana University
’02.
Jeffrey Draves (2006) Professor of Chemistry and Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; B.A., Monmouth University ’85; Ph.D.,
University of Illinois ’90.
Patricia Draves (2006) Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the University and Professor of Chemistry; B.A., Mount Holyoke College ’85;
Ph.D., University of Illinois ’90.
Albert J. Gotch (2001) Associate Professor of Chemistry; B.A., Thiel University ’83; M.S., Purdue University ’88; Ph.D., Purdue University ’91.
Scott S. Mason (2001) Professor of Chemistry; B.S., Mount Union College ’89; Ph.D., University of South Carolina ’93.

Department of Communication
Jamie C. Capuzza (1992) Professor of Communication; B.A., Mount Union College ’85; M.A., The Ohio State University ’88; Ph.D., The Ohio State
University ’91.
Fendrich R. Clark (2000) Assistant Professor of Communication; B.A., Mount Union College ’95, M.A., The University of Akron ’00.
William E. Coleman, Jr. (1979) Professor of Communication and Assistant to the President for Diversity; B.A., The Ohio State University ’67; M.A.,
The Ohio State University ’68; M.Div., Capital University ’71; Ph.D., The Ohio State University ’74.
Len Cooper (2007) Assistant Professor of Communication; B.A., The University of Akron ’94; M.A., The University of Akron ’99; Ph.D., The Ohio State
University ’05.
Harry Paidas (2009) Associate Professor of Communication and Chair of the Department of Communication; B.A., Mount Union College ’74; M.S.J.,
Northwestern University ’75.
Govind Shanadi (2007) Assistant Professor of Communication; B.A., University of Georgia ’98; M.A., University of Florida ’01; A.B.D., University of
Oregon ’07.

Department of Computer Science and Information Systems


Clark B. Archer (2001) Professor of Computer Science and Information Systems; B.S., Mount Union College ’62; M.A., Bowling Green State University
’64; M.S., Florida State University ’66; Ph.D., Kennedy-Western University ’95.
Blase B. Cindric (1999) Associate Professor of Computer Science and Information Systems and Chair of the Department of Computer Science and
Information Systems; B.S., Westminster College ’82.; M.S., Pennsylvania State University ’85
John F. Kirchmeyer (1978) Professor of Computer Science and Information Systems; B.A., Carthage College ’72; M.S., Northwestern University ’74;
Ph.D., Northwestern University ’78.
James R. Klayder (1991) Associate Professor of Computer Science and Information Systems; B.A., University of Kansas ’72; B.S., University of Kansas
’75; M.S., University of Kansas ’85; Ph.D., University of Kansas ’93.
Louise E. Moses (1987) Professor of Computer Science and Information Systems; B.S., Muskingum College ’62; M.S., University of Akron ’71; M.S.,
University of Nebraska-Lincoln ’81.
Kenneth Weber (1996) Professor of Computer Science and Information Systems; B.S., Kent State University ’78; M.A., University of Wisconsin-
Madison ’79; M.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison ’83; Ph.D., Kent State University ’94.

Department of Criminal Justice


Rebecca Stevens (1996) Professor of Criminal Justice and Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice; B.A., Mount Union College’80; M.A., University
of Akron ’86; Ph.D., University of Akron ’91.

Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration


Brian R. Aurand (2010) Instructor of Economics, Accounting, and Business Administration; B.S. University of Akron ’84; M.B.A. Case Western Reserve
University ’91.
Sandra R. Ekstrand (2002) Associate Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.A., Malone University ’97; M.S., Case
Western Reserve University ’99.
Xiaoshu Han (2007) Assistant Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.A., Beijing Foreign Studies University ’99; M.A.,
State University of New York ’02; M.S., University of Texas-Austin ’04; Ph.D., University of Texas-Austin ’07.
Martin Horning (1979) Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.A., Mount Union College’71; M.A., Bowling Green State
University ’72; Ph.D., Rutgers University ’79.
Michael Kachilla (2009) Assistant Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.A., The Ohio State University ’77; M.B.A., Ohio
University ’07.
31 
David N. Kuhlke (2001) Associate Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.S., Oakland University ’74; M.B.A., University of
Akron ’88.
Patricia C. Matthews (1975) Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration, The Nolen A. and Thelma I. Cunningham Chair in
Business and Dean of the Division of Professional Studies; B.S., Mount Union College ’73; M.A., Kent State University ’75; D.B.A., Kent State
University ’79.
Mark McConnell (2007) Instructor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.B.A., Youngstown State University ’78; M.B.A., Tulane
University ’81.
Michael R. Myler (1983) Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.A., Northern Michigan University ’69; M.A., Michigan
State University ’76; Ph.D., Michigan State University ’83.
Ruth Pogacnik (2007) Assistant Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.S., Youngstown State University ’86; M.B.A.,
Youngstown State University ’97.
Raymond L. Posey (2003) Associate Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration and Chair of the Department of Economics,
Accounting and Business Administration; A.B., Brown University ’74; M.B.A., Case Western Reserve University ’97, D.B.A., Cleveland State
University, 2010.
John Strefeler (1997) Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.S., Kent State University ’68; M.A., University of Arizona ’75;
Ph.D., University of Arizona ’77; M.S., Golden Gate University ’96.
David C. Zoky (1979) Professor of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.S., Pennsylvania State University ’73; C.P.A., State of Ohio
’78; M.B.A., Youngstown State University ’79.

Department of Education
Melissa Askren Edgehouse (2009) Assistant Professor of Education; B.A., Mount Union College ’99; M.E., Ashland University ’03; Ed.D., Bowling Green
State University ’08.
Linda C. Burkey (1995) Professor of Education and The Lester D. Crow Professor in Education; B.S., Kent State University ’79; M.A., Lenoir-Rhyne
University ’89; Ph.D., Kent State University ’93.
Mandy Capel (2007) Assistant Professor of Education; B.A., Mount Union College ’98; M.A., Mary Grove University ’01; Ph.D., Kent State University ’08.
Theresa L. Duncko (2010) Visiting Professor of Education; B.S. Youngstown State University ’78; M.L.S. Kent State University ’95; Ph.D. Kent State
University ‘06
Thomas W. Gannon (1996) Professor of Education and Co-Chair of the Department of Education; B.A., Montclair State University ’68; M.A., Montclair
State University ’71; Ed. M., Auburn University ’74; Ed.D., Seton Hall University ’91.
James Infante (2000) Associate Professor of Education; B.S., Youngstown State University ’72; M.S., Youngstown State University ’75; Ed.D., Akron
University ’90.
Theodore D. Isue (1999) Associate Professor of Education and Fieldwork Coordinator; B.S., Kent State University ’65; M.Ed., Kent State University
’69.
Ernest Pratt (2000) Associate Professor of Education; B.S., University of Sierra Leone, West Africa ’78; M.E., University of North Texas ’94; Ph.D.,
University of Tennessee ’00.
Peter L. Schneller (1998) Professor of Education and Co-Chair of the Department of Education; B.A., Wittenberg University ’72; B.S., Kent State
University ’76; M.S., University of Akron ’81; Ph.D., University of Idaho ’97.
Shawn DiNarda Watters (2002) Assistant Professor of Education; B.S., Kent State University ’91; M.Ed., Kent State University ’93; Ph.D., Ashland
University ’07.

Department of Engineering
Helen E. Muga (2010) Assistant Professor of Engineering; B.S. University of Papua New Guinea ’00; M.S. Curtin University of Technology, Australia ‘ 03;
M.S. Michigan Technological University ‘ 07; Ph.D. Michigan Technological University ’09.
Donna J. Michalek (2010) Associate Professor of Engineering; B.S., Clarkson University ’85; M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute ’88; Ph.D., University
of Texas at Arlington ’92.

Department of English
John F. Bienz (1985) Professor of English; B.A., University of Michigan ’67; M.A., Indiana University ’70; Ph.D., Indiana University ’76.
Michelle Collins-Sibley (1994) Professor of English; A.B., Stanford University ’77; M.A., Monterey Institute of International Studies ’80; Ph.D., State
University of New York at Binghamton ’90.
Danielle Cordaro (2010) Assistant Professor of English; B.A., Western Michigan University ’03; M.A., Western Michigan University ’05.
Rodney Dick (2003) Assistant Professor of English; B.A. Gonzaga University ’96; M.A., University of Louisville ’00; Ph.D., University of Louisville ’05.
Katherine G. McMahon (1985) Professor of English; B.A., Oberlin College ’71; M.A., Northern Illinois University ’76; Ph.D., Northern Illinois University
’85.
Michael Olin-Hitt (1993) Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English; B.A., Otterbein College ’86; M.A., The Ohio State University ’89;
Ph.D., The Ohio State University ’93.
Andrew Price (1990) Professor of English, The Mary W. and Eric A. Eckler Chair in American Literature and Drama and Dean of the Division of Arts
and Humanities; B.A., St. Anselm College ’82; M.A., University of Notre Dame ’85; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame ’88.
Gwen Gray Schwartz (2006) Assistant Professor of English; B.A., Occidental College ’90; M.A., Morehead State University ’94; Ph.D., University of
Arizona ’06.
Frank J. Tascone (1998) Assistant Professor of English; B.A., Edinboro University of Pennsylvania ’85; M.A., Bowling Green State University ’89; M.F.A.,
University of North Carolina at Wilmington ’98.
David Thiele (2007) Assistant Professor of English; B.A., Kenyon College ’91; M.A., Boston College ’95; Ph.D., Boston College ’03.

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Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures
Clara H. Becerra (2001) Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages; Licendiada, Universidad Pedagógica Nacional ’76; M.A., University of Michigan at
Ann Arbor ’81; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin ’89.
Gregg O. Courtad (1996) Professor of Foreign Languages; B.A., Kenyon College ’83; B.S., The Ohio State University ’87; M.A., University of Cincinnati
’85; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati ’96.
Hamako Furuhata-Turner (1996) Professor of Foreign Languages; B.A., Kyoto University of Foreign Studies ’77; M.A., Western Michigan University ’91;
Ph.D., University of Idaho ’96.
Jennifer E. Hall (1999) Associate Professor of Foreign Languages; B.A., Beloit College ’91; M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison ’94; Ph.D., The Ohio
State University ’99.
Mark W. Himmelein (1996) Professor of Foreign Languages and Chair of the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures; B.A., Baldwin-Wallace
College ’79; M.A., University of Pittsburgh ’81; Ph.D., University of Akron ’94.
Franklin I. Triplett (1993) Professor of Foreign Languages; B.A., Ricker College ’68; M.S., University of LaVerne ’78; M.A., University of Cincinnati ’83;
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati ’89.

Department of Geology
Lee M. Gray (1984) Professor of Geology; B.A., Colgate University ’74; M.S., University of Rochester ’76; Ph.D., University of Rochester ’85.
Mark A. McNaught (1998) Associate Professor of Geology and Chair of the Department of Geology; B.S., Lafayette University ’85; M.S., University of
Rochester ’89; Ph.D., University of Rochester ’91.

Department of History
Theresa Davis (2006) Instructor of History; B.A., Mount Union College ’95; M.A., University of Akron ’00.
John L. Recchiuti (1998) Professor of History, Chair of the Department of History and The John E. and Helen Saffell Endowed Chair in Humanities;
B.A., Wesleyan University ’79; M.A., Warwick University ’82; M. Phil., Columbia University ’85; Ph.D., Columbia University ’92.
H. Louis Rees (1992) Associate Professor of History; B.A., The Ohio State University ’72; M.A., The Ohio State University ’76; Ph.D., The Ohio State
University ’90.
Santosh C. Saha (1994) Professor of History; B.A., Calcutta University, India ’55; L.L.B., University Law University, Calcutta University ’59; B.A.,
University of London ’76; M.A., Calcutta University ’60; Ph.D., Kent State University ’93.
Liangwu Yin (1991) Associate Professor of History; B.A., Anhui University ’74; M.A., University of Missouri ’84; M.A., Washington University ’86; Ph.D.,
Washington University ’96.

Department of Human Performance and Sport Business


Beth Canfield-Simbro (2004) Associate Professor of Exercise Science; B.S., Wright State University ’96; M.P.H., The Ohio State University ’99; Ph.D.,
The Ohio State University ’03.
Morgan Cooper (2009) Instructor of Human Performance; B.S., Mount Union College ’03; M.A., Kent State University ’05.
Daniel M. Gorman (1985) Associate Professor of Human Performance; B.S., State University of New York at Cortland ’81; M.S., Eastern Illinois
University ’83.
Marcelina Higgins (2005) Instructor of Human Performance and Sport Business; B.S., Mount Union College ’03; M.S., Ohio University ’04.
John H. Homon (1979) Assistant Professor of Human Performance; B.S., University of Massachusetts-Amherst ’72; M. of P.E., University of Nebraska-
Lincoln ’79.
James C. Kadlecek (1997) Associate Professor of Human Performance and Sport Business and Chair of the Department of Human Performance and
Sport Business; B.S., University of Northern Colorado ’79; M.A., University of Northern Colorado ’91; Ed.D., University of Northern Colorado ’01.
Larry T. Kehres (1974) Associate Professor of Physical Education and Athletic Director; B.A., Mount Union College ’71; M.Ed., Bowling Green State
University ’72.
Ronald W. Mendel (2004) Associate Professor of Human Performance and Sport Business; B.S., Walsh University ’91; M.A., Walsh University ’93; Ph.D.,
Kent State University ’98.
Adam J. Milligan (2007) Head Athletic Trainer; B.S., The University of Akron ’04; M.S., The University of Akron ’06.
Cenell Munford Clark (2001) Assistant Professor of Human Performance and Sport Business; B.S., Mount Union College ’93; M.S., University of Akron
’95.
Katherine Pierce (2009) Assistant Professor of Human Performance and Sport Business; A.A., Bethany Lutheran College ’95; B.S., Minnesota State
University, Mankato ’00; M.A., Minnesota State University, Mankato ’04.
Bruce A. Pietz (2010) Instructor of Human Performance and Sport Business; B.A., Rutgers University ’90; M.Ed., University of Houston ’93; Ed.D.,
University of Houston ’96.
James Thoma (1989) Professor of Sport Business and Associate Dean of the University; B.S., Grove City College ’72; M.A., The Ohio State University
’79; Ph.D., The Ohio State University ’81.

Department of Mathematics
Sherri Brugh (1994) Professor of Mathematics; B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College ’90; M.S., Vanderbilt University ’92; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University ’94.
Thomas J. O’Malley (2001) Associate Professor of Mathematics; B.S., King’s College ’68; M.A., Cornell University ’71; Ph.D., Cornell University ’74.
Ann Ritchey (2000) Associate Professor of Mathematics; B.S., California State University ’88; M.S., California State University ’91; Ph.D., University of
Oregon ’97.
Gerald J. Wuchter (1995) Professor of Mathematics and Chair of the Department of Mathematics; B.S., Miami University ’89; M.S., University of
Michigan - Ann Arbor ’91; Ph.D., University of Michigan - Ann Arbor ’95.
Michael L. Zwilling (1981) Professor of Mathematics; B.S., Eastern Illinois University ’75; M.A., Eastern Illinois University ’76; M.S., University of Illinois
’80; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University ’87.

33 
Department of Music
Elaine M. Anderson (1997) Associate Professor of Music; B.M., Concordia College ’90; M.M., Manhattan School of Music ’92; D.M.A., University of
Alabama ’99.
Patricia A. Boehm (2001) Associate Professor of Music and Chair of the Department of Music; B.M., Jacksonville University ’75; M.M., Florida State
University ’80; Ph.D., Kent State University ’99.
Clarence M. Shearer (2010) Visiting Professor of Music and Interim Director of Choral Activities; B.M.E. North Texas State University ’62; M.M. North
Texas State University ’67; D.M.A. University of Colorado ’76.
Maira Liliestedt (2005) Assistant Professor of Music; B.M., Bowling Green State University ’00; M.M., University of Cincinnati University Conservatory
of Music ’02; D.M.A., University of Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music ’05.
Jerome P. Miskell (1999) Associate Professor of Music; B.M., University of Akron ’85; M.M., University of Akron ’88; D.M.A., University of South Carolina
’95.
James E. Perone (1994) Professor of Music and The Margaret Morgan Ramsey Professor in Music; B.M., Capital University ’80; M.F.A., State University
of New York at Buffalo ’82; M.A., SUNY at Buffalo ’84; Ph.D., SUNY at Buffalo ’88.
Jonathan E. Willis (2005) Director of Bands; B.M., Youngstown State University ’89; M.M., Youngstown State University ’97.

Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies


Thomas K. Carr (1996) Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies; B.A., Willamette University ’84; M.Div., Princeton Theological
Seminary ’90; M.Phil., Oxford University ’92; Ph.D., Oxford University ’98.
G. Scott Gravlee (1998) Associate Professor of Philosophy and Chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies; B.A., University of
Washington ’88; Ph.D., Stanford University ’96.
Susan Haddox (2005) Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies; B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College ’94; M.S., Stanford University ’97;
M.Div., Pacific School of Religion ’00; Ph.D., Emory University ’05.
Nicole L. Johnson (2007) Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies; B.A., Westminster College ’98; M.A., Wheeling Jesuit University ’01;
Ph.D., Boston University School of Theology ’07.
Ivory Lyons (2000) Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies; B.S., Boston University College of Engineering ’82; B.S., Morehouse College
’82; M.Div., Bethel Theological Seminary ’92; M.A., Claremont Graduate University ’97; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University ’98.
Paul Tidman (1997) Professor of Philosophy; B.A., Asbury University ’78; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame ’90.

Physician Assistant Studies Program


Betsy Ekey (2009) Assistant Professor of Physician Assistant Studies; B.M.S., Alderson-Broaddus College ’99; M.P.A.S., Alderson-Broaddus College ’07.
Katharine Harpley (2008) Assistant Professor of Physician Assistant Studies; B.A., Northern Michigan University ’98; M.M.S., Midwestern University
’04.
Cindy Lanterman (2010) Assistant Professor of Physician Assistant Studies; B.M.S., Gannon University ’89; M.P.A.S, University of Nebraska ’09.
Sharon Luke (2008) Assistant Professor of Physician Assistant Studies and Program Director; A.A.S., Cuyahoga Community College ’96; B.S.
University of Akron ’86; M.S., Cleveland State University ’06.

Department of Physics and Astronomy


Steven E. Cederbloom (1992) Associate Professor of Physics and Chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy; B.A., Carleton College ’86; M.A.,
Indiana University ’91; Ph.D., Indiana University ’95.
Robert C. Ekey (2009) Assistant Professor of Physics; B.S., Dickinson College ’99; M.S., Bryn Mawr College ’06.

Department of Political Science and International Studies


William Cunion (2003) Associate Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of Political Science; B.A., Xavier University ’92; M.A.,
Ohio University ’95; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana ’03.
Jack DeSario (1990) Professor of Political Science; B.A., Brooklyn College ’75; M.A., Miami University ’76; Ph.D., State University of New York ’81; J.D.,
Case Western University ’89.
Richard W. Dutson (1985) Professor of Political Science and Dean of the Division of Social Sciences; B.A., Brigham Young University ’72; M.A., Brigham
Young University ’82; D.A., Idaho State University ’84.
Michael Grossman (2003) Associate Professor of Political Science; B.A., The George Washington University ’92; M.A., Northeastern University ’97;
Ph.D., University of South Carolina ’03.
Francis Schortgen (2008) Assistant Professor of Political Science; B.A., Miami University ’97; M.A., University of San Fransisco ’99; M.B.A., National
University of Singapore ’02; Ph.D., Miami University ’08.

Department of Psychology
Tamara Ann Daily (1993) Professor of Psychology and Chair of the Department of Psychology; B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University ’88; M.A., University of
Nebraska-Lincoln ’91; Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln ’93.
Michael M. Knepp (2010) Assistant Professor of Psychology, B.A. University of Pittsburgh ’05; M.S. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
’07; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University ’10.
Kevin Meyer (2009) Assistant Professor of Psychology; B.A., The Ohio State University ’99; M.S., The Ohio State University ’01; Ph.D., The Ohio State
University ’07.
Melissa Muller (2006) Assistant Professor of Psychology; B.S., California Lutheran University ’98; M.A., Kent State University ’00; Ph.D., Kent State
University ’06.
Sarah Torok (2006) Assistant Professor of Psychology; B.A., Mercyhurst College ’00; M.A., State University of New York at Albany, ’01; Ph.D., State
University of New York at Albany ’05.
Kristine Schuster Turko (2006) Assistant Professor of Psychology; B.S. Drexel University ’95; M.S., Lehigh University ’01; Ph.D., Lehigh University ’06.
34 
ROTC Program - Department of Military Science
MSG Todd Harris, Instructor of Military Science
LTC Terry P. Michaels, Instructor of Military Science; B.S. University of Akron '86; M.S. Central Michigan University, '00.

Department of Sociology
Jeffery L. Hahn (1975) Professor of Sociology; B.A., Mount Union College ’73; M.A., Kent State University ’75; Ph.D., Kent State University ’80.
Paul Muller (2004) Associate Professor of Sociology; B.S., Brigham Young University ’97; M.A., University of New Hampshire ’99; Ph.D., University of
New Hampshire ’04.
Naoko Oyabu-Mathis (1988) Professor of Sociology; B.A., Mount Union College ’80; M.A., University of Akron ’85; Ph.D., University of Akron ’88.
Kathleen Piker-King (1978) Professor of Sociology and Chair of the Department of Sociology; B.A., Indiana State University ’72; M.A., Kent State
University ’73; Ph.D., Kent State University ’78.

Department of Theatre
Douglas B. Hendel (1982) Professor of Theatre; B.S., Bowling Green State University ’71; M.A., Bowling Green State University ’79; Ph.D., Bowling
Green State University ’86.
Deborah J. Lotsof (2001) Professor of Theatre; B.A., Grinnell College ’75; M.F.A., University of Illinois ’81.
Rudy Roggenkamp (1990) Professor of Theatre and Chair of the Department of Theatre; B.A., Heidelberg College ’78; M.F.A., Virginia
Commonwealth University ’83.

Emeriti Faculty and Emeriti Staff


Chester E. Bartram (1955-1983) Department of Education; B.A., Marshall College ’46; M.A., Marshall College ’47; Ph.D., The Ohio State University ’56.
Emeritus ’85.
Donald R. Buckey (1973-1998) Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies; B.A., Cornell University ’54; B.D., Drew University ’57; M.A., Yale
University ’60; Ph.D., Yale University ’66. Emeritus ’99.
Ralph J. Daily (1960-1990) Department of Education; B.S., University of Akron ’52; M.S., University of Akron ’57. Emeritus ’91.
W. James Dillon (1981-2004) Department of Mathematics; B.S., Idaho State University ’63; M.A., University of Nebraska ’66; Ph.D., St. Louis
University ’72. Emeritus ’05.
Paul E. Froman (1966-1993) Registrar and Department of Foreign Languages; B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College ’53; M.Div., Drew University ’59; M.A.,
Kent State University ’71. Emeritus ’95.
Donald G. Hobson (1986-1999) Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies; B.A., Willamette University ’56; M. Div., Union Theological Seminary
’60; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School ’68; Emeritus ’01.
W. Faye Hollaway (1958-2001) Department of Chemistry; B.S., Mount Union College ’57; M.S., Western Reserve University ’58; Ph.D., Kent State
University ’84. Emerita ’02.
James Hopper (1966-1999) Department of Art; B.S., Juniata College ’60; M.F.A., Columbia University ’62. Emeritus ’01.
Carl H. Kandel (1961-1989) Department of Music; Mus.B., Ohio Wesleyan College ’57; M.A., Kent State University ’69. Emeritus ’90.
Harold M. Kolenbrander (1986-2000) President of the University and Professor of Chemistry; B.A., Central College ’60; Ph.D., University of Iowa ’64.
Mary Ellen Lloyd (1988-2007) Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.S., University of Michigan ’57; M.S., Kent State
University ’89; CPA State of Ohio ’85. Emerita ’08.
Judith Makens (1989-2007) Department of English; B.A., University of Utah ’66; M.A., University of Utah ’68; Ph.D., University of Utah ’72. Emerita
’08.
Gloria S. Malone (1969-1990) Department of English; B.S., Central State College ’49; M.Ed., Kent State University ’56; M.A., Kent State University ’79.
Emerita ’91.
Steven Malycke (1956-1982) Department of Music; B.S.Ed., Ohio University ’44; M.M., Cincinnati Conservatory of Music ’47. Emeritus ’83.
William A. Markley, Jr. (1956-1995) Department of Mathematics; B.S., Bucknell University ’49; M. Litt., University of Pittsburgh ’59; Ph.D., University
of Pittsburgh ’68; Emeritus ’96.
Charles R. Morford (1966-1994) Department of Communication and Director of the Radio Station, WRMU; B.S., Kent State University ’56; M.A.,
Western Reserve University ’64; Emeritus ’96.
Arthur Murdoch (1968-1999) Department of Chemistry; B.A., Westmar College ’56; M.S., Yale University ’58; Ph.D., Yale University ’64; Emeritus ’01.
Mary Ellen Nurmi (1965-1984) Department of English; B.A., Western Reserve University ’43; M.A., Kent State University ’60; Ph.D., Kent State
University ’65. Emerita ’85.
Lewis A. Phelps (1970-2001) Department of Music; B.M., University of Arizona ’62; M.M., University of Arizona ’63; A.Mus.D., University of Arizona ’70;
Emeritus ’02.
Hubert R. Pinney (1967-1996) Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration; B.S., The Ohio State University ’52; M.A., The
Ohio State University ’62; C.P.A., State of Ohio ’64; Emeritus ’98.
James P. Rodman (1951-1992) Department of Physics and Astronomy and Director of Mount Union Observatory; B.S., Mount Union College ’49; M.A.,
Washington University ’51; Ph.D., Yale University ’63; Emeritus ’93.
John E. Saffell (1948-1982) Department of History; B.A., Mount Union College ’37; M.A., Western Reserve University ’38; Ph.D., Western Reserve
University ’65. Emeritus ’83.
Georgia M. Sprinkle (1965-1986) Department of Education; B.A., Marshall University ’51; M.R.E., Boston University ’63. Emerita ’87.
Terence S. Taylor (1965-1998) Vice President of Student Affairs and Dean of Students; B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University ’58; M.A., Michigan State
University ’62.
George H. Thomas (1963-1993) Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies; B.A., Birmingham Southern College ’52; B.D., Vanderbilt University
’55; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University ’61; Ed.S., Kent State University ’80. Emeritus ’95.
Truman D. Turnquist (1965-2004) Department of Chemistry; B.A., Bethel College ’61; Ph.D., University of Minnesota ’65. Emeritus ’05.
35 
Wesley J. Vesey (1963-1990) Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies; B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University ’51; S.T.B., Boston University ’54; Ph.D.,
Boston University ’61. Emeritus ’91.
James E. Vincent (1963-1992) Department of Theatre; B.S., Indiana State University ’51; M.F.A., Ohio University ’53; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
’62. Emeritus ’94.
Kenneth E. Wable (1962-1989) Department of Human Performance and Sport Business; B.A., Muskingum College ’52; M. Ed., Kent State University
’63. Emeritus ’90.
Robert G. Wiese, Jr. (1964-1998) Department of Geology; B.S., Yale University ’55; M.A., Harvard University ’57; Ph.D., Harvard University ’61.
Emeritus ’99.
Shea Zellweger (1969-1993) Department of Psychology; B.A., University of Chicago ’52; M.A., Temple University ’57; Ph.D., Temple University ’66.
Emeritus ’94.
Angela A. Zumbar (1963-2001) Department of Foreign Languages; B.A., Marietta College ’55; M.A., University of New Mexico ’57; Ph.D., University of
Akron ’85. Emerita ’02.

Support Staff
Dotty Baia; Shift Supervisor, Mail Center
Janet Barker; Assistant to the Registrar
Janice Behner, CPS/CAP; Secretary to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students and Residence Life
Michael Bondoni; Grounds Supervisor
Pamela Boone, B.A.; Part-time Coordinator of Direct Mail, Office of Admission
Connie Brodzinski, B.A.; Part-time Customer Service Representative, Bookstore
Jeanne Capel; Secretary and Receptionist to Student Financial Services
Cynthia Cirone, A.A.S.; Part-time Cataloging Assistant, Library
Christine Cochran, B.A.; Part-time Interlibrary Loan Assistant
Joan Cockrill; Secretary to the Vice President for Business Affairs and Treasurer
Ann Cowley, A.A.S., A.S.; Data Entry Operator, Enrollment Services
Jean Dalesandro; Faculty Secretary
Rhonda Drakulich; Part-time Customer Service Representative, Bookstore
Judith Edwards, R.N.; Health Center Nurse
Karen English, B.A.; Faculty Secretary
Debbie Fink; Secretary for Student Affairs
Patricia Fisher, B.A.; Part-time Athletics Receptionist
Nancy Fox, B.A.; Cataloguer, Library
Molly Fulton; Secretary to the Office of Marketing
Virginia Gaines; Part-time Athletics Receptionist
Michael Greiner, B.S.; Property Manager, Nature Center
Adina Haught, B.A.; Night Music Library Manager and Secretary for the Music Department
Mary Heather Hickman-Davis, B.A., M.A.; Secretary to the Vice President for Academic Affairs
Todd Howard; Fleet Supervisor
Crystal Johnson; Secretary of University Advancement
Carmel Katich, B.A.; Government Documents Assistant
Judy Kirchmeyer, B.S.; Part-time Periodicals Assistant, Library
Tracie Marty; Part-time Costume Shop Manager
Jean Kritz-Conway; Cashier
Colleen Krueger; Mail Center
Patricia Kuhn; Payroll Representative
Theresa Latham; Part-time Receptionist, Information Desk
Barbara Lyons, B.A.; Faculty Secretary
Michele McCallum; Faculty Secretary
Tracy McGary, B.S.; Faculty Secretary
Shelly Monter, B.A.; Customer Service Representative, Bookstore
Linda Montgomery; Secretary, Physical Plant
Beth Mozzochi; Faculty Secretary
Patty Nutial; Part-time Customer Service Representative, Bookstore
Theresa O’Brien; Faculty Secretary
Cathy Ossler; Secretary for The Mount Union Fund
Carol Ott; Part-time Evening Circulation, Library
Diana Penny; Housekeeping Supervisor
Lori Peters; Application Processing Coordinator, Enrollment Services
Christine Pontius; Secretary to the Center for Global Education
Dolores Pope; Part-time Receptionist for the Registrar
June Porter; Secretary of Alumni Relations and University Activities
Deanna Ream; Data Entry/Receptionist for Office of Student Financial Services
Debra Retterer, A.A.; Accounts Payable Clerk and Bookkeeper
James Rhodes; Maintenance Supervisor
Stephanie Roach; Library Office Assistant/ Acquisitions

36 
Joyce Robinson; B.A.; Assistant to the Registrar
Jessica Rogers; Office Assistant/Acquisitions
Aimee Schuller; B.A.; Textbook Assistant, Bookstore
Melissa Scott, A.A.B.; Secretary to the Office of Academic Affairs
Diana Snyder; Secretary, Physical Plant
Rhonda Stephenson; Accounting Clerk
Karen Teal; Faculty Secretary
Bonita Twaddle; Community Outreach Coordinator, Nature Center
Beth Wayt, L.P.N.; Health Center
Carol Wearstler; Faculty Secretary
Linda Wilcox; Accounting Clerk, Bookstore
Debra Wolpert, B.S.; Part-time Customer Service Representative, Bookstore
Julie Wright, R.N.; Part-time Registered Nurse
Linda Zepernick; Secretary, Career Development and Academic Support Center

37 
University of Mount Union
1972 Clark Ave.
Alliance, OH 44601
(330) 821-5320
www.mountunion.edu