Sattvavajaya Chikitsa – Learning from the Soul!

2008

Sattvavajaya Chikitsa – Learning from the Soul!
Sattvavajaya chikitsa focuses on raising individual awareness about subjective levels of experience that underlie our objective experience in regard to the immediate world outside. It assists in creating transparency amongst subjective and objective realities, and so supports the synchronization between the Self or Jivatman and the world. Our karma indriyas or senses (eyes, ears, and etcetera) have a range of sensitivity that limits us in perceiving only a limited spectrum of stimulation from our environment. We see (rupa) and hear (sabd) things in the environment and this stimulation through our retina or eardrums then reaches the dosha (dynamic), bhuta (elemental), dhatu (biochemical), pranic (bioenergetics), kama-manas (emotional), buddhi-manas (psychological) and atmic (spiritual) levels of experience. What we see and hear is then interpreted from a known frame of reference which we then respond to physically, rationally and emotionally. When we close our eyes and close off the pathway to our indriyas or senses by disregarding what we see and hear from the environment we can still see and hear things coming from inside our mind-body system and we can feel psychophysical responses that we may not be able to interpret or have control over. Systematic consciousness research calls these responses ‘consciousnessrelated anomalous physical phenomena’; while in Psychology the same are called ‘bio-behavioral responses’ that are connected to ‘coping strategies’. In Ayurvedic Science (Caraka Sa. I 102 – 108) this is called Pragyaparadha or intellectual error and all connected physic-psycho-emotional actions or responses. At mentioned subjective levels of experience, from behind a veil of avidya (ignorance) lies the sub-conscious wherein the Jivatma or Self (Jung) is mostly disconnected from the immediate world outside due to the very coping strategies that try to protect us from experiencing pain. Pragyaparadha or ‘pain-body’, as it’s also called, is a filter between the reality of the Jivatma (Self) and objective reality of the World. It contains both the traumatic pain and the patterns of coping strategies which produce Rajas and Tamas. Hence we think that our pain is caused by the ‘triggerer’ (the world outside) while in reality our pain is kept hidden by mentioned filtering, through coping stratagems like fear, aversion and self-rejection; ready to be triggered by the outside world. This is how Pragyaparadha aggravates pitta through sadness, aggravates vata through fear and aggravates kapha through dissociation. Pragyaparadha creates a veil or division that we cannot go beyond without atmavidya or deeper awareness.

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Carlo Monsanto

Sattvavajaya Chikitsa – Learning from the Soul! 2008
Thus we feel lost and experience discomfort, agitation and dynamically changing symptoms in the first three dynamic stages of shatkriyakala (six stage process of development of disease) and static symptoms and clinical images in the latter three stages. This is how Pragyaparadha vitiates all the doshas and initiates and feeds the shatkriyakala. As we interact with the objective world outside the effects of Pragyaparadha, which acts from subjective levels, is externalized in our behavior, communication and actions. The following are just a few examples of the possible effects of mentioned Pragyaparadha. For instance some people are diagnosed with different clinical images because they've fixated or blocked the dynamics of the doshas for prolonged periods of time through the coping strategies (fear, etcetera) resulting from Pragyaparadha, thus causing the sthanasamsraya (localization), vyakti (manifestation) and bheda (clinical image) stages of the pathogenesis; for the same reason some people are diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or other psychiatric labels because they experience pain, fear or other inexplicable consciousness related physical phenomena that disrupt their normal behavior and daily living; some children are diagnosed with ADHD because they cannot ‘master’ the disruptive actions that come from within; some persons are experienced as being peaceful, wise or enlightened because they experience peace, wisdom and/or bliss from within the same subjective realm. The main difference between the former and the latter states would be a person's inborn constitution and inclinations, and that person’s atmavidya, awareness of the subjective or self-knowledge. It has been our general observation that by raising the integrated awareness of individuals about what goes on at mentioned subjective levels of experience a transformational process (Catharsis - Rechana) is elicited that creates new states of awareness which in turn assist our mind-body system in a continuous process of self-organization (dhatusaamya), self-healing and self-creation that feeds the very process of spiritual growth and healing. The twelve stages of the transformational process are: Ashvasana (assurance – gives comfort), Nidanam (diagnosis - observation of the process on subjective levels), Samsuchana (suggestion – direct feedback about the process and evolving patterns), Pratyayana (persuasion – on how to proceed through the process), Nirdesana (guidance – direction on what to do or not in regard to responses and evolving patterns there from), Prashikshana (education understanding about the meaning of responses and evolving patterns), Parimarjana (modification – the course of action on subjective levels is changed), Sammohana (hypnosis – the power of illusion is weakened), Visavedana (desensitization – the responses lose their influence), Rechana (catharsis – transformational cleansing), Samtripti (satisfying – peaceful flow of life force) and Brahman (growth - expansion of awareness). This transformational process that leads to self-organization, catharsis and expansion reverses the shatkriyakala, no matter what stage. Its healing actions

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Carlo Monsanto

Sattvavajaya Chikitsa – Learning from the Soul! 2008
actually constitute in restoring the dynamism and dynamic capacity (prana, tejas and ojas) connected with the doshas. Sattvavajaya Chikitsa offers theoretical models based on Ayurvedic principles to interpret what goes on in mentioned subjective realm; it defines the bhasha (experience based language) of the Jivatman (Self) versus the so-called ‘Inner Response Dialogue’ which defines the pathogenic mechanisms and patterns within Pragyaparadha; it offers a process oriented approach to Nidanam and Samsuchana or diagnostic and feedback practice to investigate and reveal the same; and it offers to integrate contemplative practices (dhyana) to make the raising of vidya (awareness) about the subjective essentially continuous. Sattvavajaya Chikitsa strengthens traditional Ayurvedic views and even traditional science with its holistic perspective from the "subjective". Based on this holistic paradigm it facilitates the learning from the Soul or Atman. Through its complementary approach to diagnosis of the Pulse or Nadi pariksha and Samsuchana or feedback, learners are assisted in going beyond the limited range of sensitivity of the indriyas (physiological sensors) to become increasingly aware of the complete spectrum of stimulation at subjective levels that include the dosha (quantum), dhatu (biochemical), pranic (bioenergetics), kama-manas (emotional), buddhi-manas (psychological) and atmic (spiritual) levels. Mentioned feedback offers a continuous stream of insight into the very nature of subjective experience including Pragyaparadha (filtering) and a broad range of anomalous phenomena (bio-behavioral responses), including anomalous cognition (clairvoyance, telepathy, etcetera). Through its deep learning approach Sattvavajaya Chikitsa stimulates the creation of new states of integrated awareness about the integration of the subjective and objective to (re)synchronize the Jivatman (Self) with the immediate world. This reactivates a person's inborn capacity to continuously seek a dynamic balance (dhatusaamya), connectedness, unity, clarity, transparency and inner purpose; spontaneously, effortlessly and exactly. It assists in changing our perception of ourselves, the world, problems, experience, life, communication, organizing, being and spirituality. It offers us a new way of cognizing reality, which leads to expansion of our awareness. While this article describes Sattvavajaya Chikitsa as a complete system of practice that relates to the synchronization between the subjective and the objective which results in self-organization and the expansion of awareness, we would like to give the reader a glimpse of the reality that this approach relates to by offering the following awareness raising exercise.

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Carlo Monsanto

Sattvavajaya Chikitsa – Learning from the Soul! 2008
Exercise: I would now like to give you a glimpse of the reality that the above article relates to by offering the following exercise. Please sit up straight in your chair with your legs at a ninety degree angle; your feet touching the floor; your arms resting on your upper legs with the backs of your hands resting on your knees. Now relax the extremities of your body; relax your arms, hands, fingers, back, stomach, legs and feet by briefly making slight movements while relaxing those parts; listen to your breathing in and out without using any control. (short reflection) What you may discover and feel inside yourself next, through this exercise, is the reality that you may never have been aware of or have always taken for granted. The reality is that the ‘subjective’ is where you can experience your Self as the basis of experience. Now, feel the two sides of your body; … these sides can feel quite distinct from one another; … feel in what way they differ. (short reflection) The left side of the body corresponds to the emotional (right brain) and the right side to the rational (left brain). In order to further enhance your awareness of your own subjective reality we’re going to review some questions; we’ll also define the sensations that you may feel inside your body. Remember that your thoughts, emotions and reflections make use of the whole space within your body; remember that while going through this experience we’re not going to try to achieve anything; just relax; open up yourself; don’t judge what you feel; allow yourself to feel anything that surfaces, be it comfortable or uncomfortable; sad or joyous; and as you open up yourself more and more you’ll be able to observe, feel and discriminate in more and more detail what you feel; please close your eyes while going through the following exercises. • • Please open up yourself to feel which side of your body on the frontal side feels bigger (short reflection); On what side (left or right), in what area on the frontal side of your body do you feel as if someone’s pushing against your body? This feeling represents a strategy and pattern of self-rejection (short reflection); Feel on what side and in what area you feel tension pulling towards the lateral side of your body. Any kind of tension (cramp, contraction) stands for the emotion of fear. Through fear we try to have control over our emotional pain (short reflection); Feel on what side and where you feel a burning sensation or feverish heat if any. This represents sadness (short reflection);

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Carlo Monsanto

Sattvavajaya Chikitsa – Learning from the Soul! 2008
• • Any painful tension/contraction represents a feeling of helplessness (short reflection); Open up to feel which side on the lateral side of the body feels bigger, the left emotional side or the right rational side? Where do you feel tensions; left or right of the spinal column; scan your body starting from the crown of your head down to the coccyx region. Again these tensions represent fear; burning means sadness and a painful contraction stands for helplessness (short reflection); Now take your time to observe and to feel your body and mind as a whole; without focusing on one or other part in particular; without judgment; don’t react; observe; recognize; acknowledge and allow yourself to feel whatever surfaces in the moment (short reflection).

Don’t interfere by looking for solutions for what you feel, don’t look for reasons, don’t react, just open up and let go of what you feel, go through the experience, don’t be afraid of what you feel. The story of what you feel is contained within what you feel. Now let go and allow the story to be told from within you … (longer reflection) This exercise is intended as a glimpse of the subjective reality within you and there is much, much more to become aware off about what you may have felt or seen. Through Sattvavajaya you can learn to develop a degree of sensitivity that will help you gain this deeper awareness and understanding of the subjective and through this knowing you can set yourself free.

Carlo Monsanto is director of the Caribbean Integral Institute and has since eighteen years done research and specialized in the theory and practice of Sattvavajaya as an Ayurvedic approach that serves to annihilate Pragyaparadha by (re)synchronizing the Self (Jivatman) and the World or objective reality; develop a capacity for self-organization and expand our awareness.

Carlo Monsanto
Caribbean Integral Institute (CII) Didoweg 8, Santa Rosa Curacao, Netherlands Antilles E-mail: carlo.monsanto@ciiedu.org Website: www.ciiedu.org

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Carlo Monsanto

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