Workforce Development Benchmark Project

Kathy Yeager Business Solutions Director Johnson County Community College Center for Business and Technology 12345 College Boulevard Overland Park, KS 66210-1299 913-469-3845 kyeager@jccc.edu December, 2006

Table of Contents

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Executive Summary............................................................................................................................... ......1 Major Survey Findings........................................................................................... ........................1 College Visitations Major Findings............................................................................................... ..2 Introduction............................................................................................................................ .....................3 Purpose........................................................................................................................ ...................3 Methodology............................................................................................................................... ....3 Community College Survey Participants.................................................................... ....................4 Demographics...................................................................................................................................... ........5 Sales Calls............................................................................................................................ .......................9 Revenue........................................................................................................................................ .............14 Curriculum.............................................................................................................................................. ...18 Customer Profiles................................................................................................................. .....................21 Instructors/Trainers.......................................................................................................................... ..........24 Marketing.......................................................................................................................... ........................27 ROI............................................................................................................................................... .............28 Evaluations............................................................................................................................. ...................29 Credit Contract Training............................................................................................................ ................31 Customer Loyalty.................................................................................................................. ....................33 Future Projections.............................................................................................................................. ........34 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Credit Enrollment...................................................................................... ..................5 Figure 2. Non-Credit Enrollment.......................................................................... ......................5 Figure 3. Service Area Population............................................................................ ..................6 Figure 4. Single vs. Multi-County........................................................................ .......................6 Figure 5. School Service Area Demographic....................................................... .......................7 Figure 6. Service Area Economy.................................................................................... .............7 Figure 7. Service Area Business Type.......................................................................................... 8 Figure 8. Number of Sales Calls Per Week.................................................................................. 9 Figure 9. Proactive Sales Calls......................................................................................... ..........9 Figure 10. Reactive Sales Calls...................................................................... ............................10 Figure 11. Organization Level Targeted for Approach........................................................ ........10 Figure 12. Vertical Market Targets for Sales Calls.................................................................... ..11 Figure 13. Length of Time to Close a Sale...................................................... ............................11 Figure 14. Sales Staff Sell Both Public Seminars and Contract Training?............................. .....12 Figure 15. Sales Person Complete Process From Approach to Delivery?.................................. .12 Figure 16. Sales Staff Receive Commission or Bonus?.......................................... .....................13 Figure 17. Which Services Generate Most Revenue?.......................................................... ........14 Figure 18. Average Contract Sale Amount....................................................................... ...........14 Figure 19. Sales Dept. Annual Retained Revenue Goal...................................... ........................15 Figure 20. College Expectations for Annual Net Revenue for Your Center.................................15 Figure 21. Percent Total Revenue Generated by Contract Training.......................................... ..16 Figure 22. Percent Revenue Generated by Public Enrollment Classes.......................................16 Figure 23. Percent Overhead College Charges Center............................................... ................17 Figure 24. Percent Discount for Volume Sales................................................................ ............17 Figure 25. Top Revenue Producing Products............................................................. .................18 Figure 26. Who Owns the Curriculum?............................................................. .........................19 Figure 27. Most Demanded Soft Skills...................................................................... ..................19 Figure 28. Most Demanded Computer Classes............................................................ ...............20 Figure 29 Where Leads Are Found.................................................................. ..........................21 i

Table of Contents
Figure 30. Figure 31. Figure 32. Figure 33. Figure 34. Figure 35. Figure 36. Figure 37. Figure 38. Figure 39. Figure 40. Figure 41. Figure 42. Figure 43. Figure 44. Figure 45. Figure 46. Figure 47. Figure 48. Figure 49. Figure 50. Figure 51. Figure 52. Figure 53. APPENDICES Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Are Prospects Qualified Before the Approach?........................................................ ..21 Industry of Top Two Customers...................................................... ...........................22 Company Size of Target Market...................................................................... ...........22 Are Customers Rewarded for Doing Business With Your Organization?...................23 Hourly Rate for Soft Skills Trainers................................................................... ........24 Hourly Rate for Computer Instructors............................................................... ........24 Are Full-Time Trainers Used?.............................................................. .....................25 What Do Full-Time Trainers Teach?......................................................................... .25 Pay Rate for Full-Time Trainers.................................................................... ............26 Target Audience for Marketing Materials....................................................... ...........27 How Marketing Materials Are Tracked.......................................... ...........................27 Is Return on Investment (ROI) Measured?.................................... ............................28 Level of Evaluation Used at Conclusion of Training........................... ......................29 What is the Charge for the Evaluations?............................................... ....................29 Is Pre-Assessment Given Before the Training is Provided?.......................................30 Is Post-Assessment Given After the Training?........................................ ...................30 Is Credit Contract Training Held at a Company’s Site?........................................... ..31 Dollar Volume for Credit Contract Training.......................................................... ....31 Top Credit Classes for Contract Training...................................................... ............32 Why Companies Use Your Center Over the Competition................................ ...........33 Wishes For the Ideal Sales Team........................................................ .......................34 Projected Sales Success This Year.......................................................... ...................34 Projected Sales Success in Three Years............................................. ........................35 Projected Sales Success in Five Years.............................................. .........................35 Tabled Survey Results................................................................................. ...............36 Participating Colleges for Survey and Visitations............................... ......................61 College Visitation Interview Grid............................................................ ..................63 Corporate Training Survey.......................................................................... ..............85

ii

Executive Summary

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

During the 2006 spring semester at Johnson County Community College, a workforce development benchmarking survey was conducted with 20 community colleges across the United States. The survey of key people working in the continuing education/contract training area was designed to gain insight into processes, procedures and best practices in the area of workforce development. Of the 20 colleges surveyed by e-mail, 19 returned the survey for a 95% response rate. Two-day visitations were also conducted with six community colleges during this time. Major Survey Findings • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Respondents indicated that 3-5 proactive sales calls were conducted per week (36.8%). Healthcare and manufacturing are the top two vertical market targets (66.7% each). Respondents cited 5-8 weeks to close a sale (42.1%). Eighty four percent of institutions do not give sales staff commission or bonus. All institutions (100%) listed contract training as the service generating the most revenue for the organization. Over half (52.6%) stated the average contract sale amount totals $4,000 - $7,999. The top five revenue producing products include Leadership (68.4%), Microsoft Products (52.6%), Customer Service (42.1%), IT Courses (31.6%), and Lean (31.6%). Over half (52.6%) indicated public enrollment courses generated the smallest portion of revenue (0% - 24%). The majority of institutions own their own curriculum (72.7%). The most demanded soft skills classes include Change (57.9%), Conflict (57.9%), Presentation Skills (52.6%), Coaching (47.4%), and Performance Reviews (47.4%). Computer classes most demanded included Excel (89.5%), Word (63.2%), Access (52.6%), Project Management (47.4%), and PowerPoint (42.1%). The largest lead generator came from referrals (94.7%). Over half (57.9%) of institutions target companies with 150 employees or more for their sales calls. Marketing materials target the HR Director (73.7%) and the Training Director (73.9%). Over 60% of institutions don’t/can’t track their marketing materials. The level of evaluation used at the conclusion of the training is Level 1 (84.2%) and Level 2 (63.2%). Over 68% of institutions sell contract training for credit with a dollar volume on average of $30,000 or more. Companies use the community college because of cost (89.5%), quality of instructors (84.2%) and quality of programs (84.2%). Institutions wished their sales team had more staff (68.4%) and better leads (52.6%).

1

Executive Summary
College Visitation Major Findings: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey


• • •

Five out of six colleges visited had a business plan. Over half of the colleges had a sales manager. Four out of six colleges visited had a bonus or compensation plan in place for the sales team. The main sales focus is on contracts—open enrollment classes are sold second or not at all. Revenue goals range from $415,000 to $8.2M for the business development area. All colleges visited indicated they sell the contract and then pass the project to a fulfillment team for execution. Of those colleges using Banner for their registration system, they indicated it doesn’t work well for non-credit. Four of the six colleges have on-line registration for non-credit. All six colleges knew their top 25 customers and nurture these customers for the long-term relationship. All colleges have top officers of the college making sales calls and passing the leads to the sales department. Colleges all use an assessment tool in different areas. One college out of six measured ROI. All colleges visited attempt to ‘run it like a business in an academic atmosphere” by treating purchasing and registration as subcontractors, owning their own building, paying bonuses and by being entrepreneurial. Half of the colleges visited sell credit classes. Best practices include clearly defined goals and processes, very customer focused, clear vision and mission, selling solutions instead of classes, ability to move quickly, partnerships and collaborations, bonus plans and good hiring practices. Best practices for the sales area include working in vertical markets, selling both credit and noncredit, doing more consulting instead of selling classes, utilizing a fulfillment team after the sale, commission plans, and solution selling. Challenges include competition, limited resources, working with Banner, long sales cycle, aging workforce, economy and need for better branding. Colleges indicated what held them back from running it like a business included internal systems, inflexibility of college system, working in a academic atmosphere, top level support, processes and policies.

2

Introduction

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Purpose As part of Johnson County Community College’s ongoing commitment to improving its programs and services, Kathy Yeager of the Center for Business and Technology at the college, decided to conduct a benchmarking survey with other community colleges across the country. The purpose of the survey was to gain insight into other colleges and how they conduct their workforce development open enrollment and contract training programs. The survey was designed to gather information concerning all aspects of the sales department, types of products offered, financial goals and achievements of the department, expectations of the college, industries served, payment of instructors, marketing techniques, evaluations, and future success goals. The main goal was to uncover best practices in small, medium and large institutions. Methodology During the 2006 spring semester, surveys were e-mailed to 20 community colleges across the country. As an incentive for completing and returning the survey, the colleges were offered a copy of the completed benchmarking report. Of the 20 community colleges surveyed, 19 returned the results for a response rate of 95%. Visitation of six community colleges, funded by a National Council for Continuing Education (NCCET) Special Grant, was conducted in Fall, 2006. The two-day visits consisted of in-depth interviews with college personnel involved with workforce education, and tours to gather more in-depth information about best practices in contract training and workforce development. The six colleges visited include: Anne Arundel Community College in Glen Burnie, Maryland Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte, North Carolina Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio Valencia Community College in Orlando, Florida Employee Training Institute in San Diego, California Pima County Community College in Tucson, Arizona Major findings are summarized on the following pages. Tabled results from the survey are in Appendix A, a list of colleges participating in the survey in Appendix B, a grid of the college visitation results is in Appendix C, and a copy of the survey is in Appendix D. Please direct any questions or comments about this survey to: Kathy Yeager Business Solutions Director Center for Business and Technology Johnson County Community College 12345 College Blvd. Overland Park, KS 66210-1299 913-469-3845 kyeager@jccc.edu

3

Introduction

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Community College Workforce Development Benchmarking Project
Nineteen community colleges participated in a Workforce Development Benchmarking Survey. The college data has been divided by size of non-credit enrollment per semester. The colleges were ranked by the following sizes: Large – 10,000 or more enrollment per semester Medium – 5,000 – 9,999 enrollments per semester Small – 4,999 or less enrollments per semester Those colleges responding to the survey include: College Name Anne Arundel Community College Bellevue Community College Bill J. Priest Campus of El Centro College (Dallas County CC) Black Hawk Community College Bucks County Community College Central Piedmont Community College College of DuPage Collin County Community College Cuyahoga Community College Delta College Ivy Tech Community College Kirkwood Community College Lane Community College Linn-Benton Community College Moraine Valley Community College Rio Salado College Tallahassee Community College Tarrant County Community College Valencia Community College State MD WA TX IL PA NC IL TX OH MI IN IA OR OR IL AZ FL TX FL Division Name Center for Workforce Solutions Business Training Institute Corporate Solutions Department Business Training Center Center for Workforce Development Corporate and Continuing Education Center for Corporate Training Business Solutions Group Corporate College Corporate Services Department of Workforce & Economic Development Training and Outreach Services The BIZ Center Training and Business Development Center Workforce Development Rio Salado College Economic and Workforce Services Corporate Services Valencia Enterprises Size by Non-Credit Enrollment Large Medium Large Small Large Large Medium Medium Large Large Small Large Small Small Medium Large Medium Large Medium

4

Demographics

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Even though credit enrollment was not a measurement for this survey, it was important to identify the enrollments per semester to give a baseline of college sizes participating in the survey. Eleven respondents had 15,000 enrollments or more, while two had 1,000-4,999, four had 5,000-9,999 and two had 10,000-14,999. See Table 1, Appendix A, and Figure 1, below.
Figure 1

Credit Enrollment

57.90%

10.50%

21.10%

10.50%

1,000-4,999

5,000-9,999

10,000-14,999

15,000+

Note: The remainder of the report will refer to college sizes by non-credit enrollment per semester: Large – 10,000 or more enrollments per semester Medium – 5,000 – 9,999 enrollments per semester Small – 4,999 or less enrollments per semester Of the 19 institutions who responded to the survey, 47.4% had non-credit enrollments per semester of 10,000 or more, 26.3% had enrollments of 5,000 – 9,999 and 26.3% had enrollments of 4,999 or less. See Table 2, Appendix A, and Figure 2, below.
Figure 2

Non-Credit Enrollment

42.1% 26.3% 26.3% 5.3%

1,000-4,999

5,000-9,999

10,000-14,999

15,000+

5

Demographics

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Smaller colleges generally had a population in the 100,000-249,000 range. Medium colleges focused on the 250,000-499,999 range while large colleges concentrated in the 750,000 + population. See Table 3 in Appendix A, and Figure 3, below.
Figure 3

Service Area Population

60%

60% 40% 20% 22.2% 11.1% 0% 0% 20%

55.6%

11.1% 0%

100,000-249,999

250,000-499,999

500,000-749,999 Large < 10,000

750,000+

Small >5000

Medium 5 - 10 K

Of the respondents, 80% of small institutions operated in multi-counties, while medium and large institutions operated in single counties with 60% and 66.7% respectively. See Table 4, Appendix A, and Figure 4, below.
Figure 4

Single vs Multi-county 80% 40% 20%

60%

66.6%

33.3%

Single County Small Medium

Multi-County Large

6

Demographics

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Smaller institutions were located in urban and rural settings, medium institutions predominately were suburban and large institutions were split between urban and suburban. See Table 5, Appendix A, and Figure 5, below.
Figure 5

School Service Area Demographic 80% 55.6% 40% 20% 20% 0% Urban Small Suburban Medium Large Rural 0%

44.4%

40%

Because multiple responses were requested, small institutions indicated robust and flat, medium institutions listed developing and large institutions were surrounded by robust economy. See Table 6, Appendix A, and Figure 6, below.
Figure 6*

Service Area Economy

80% 60% 40% 66.7% 44.4% 20% 11.1% 0% 0% 11.1% 60% 40%

Robust

Developing Small Medium

Flat Large

Depressed

* Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

7

Demographics

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Small institutions were predominately surrounded by manufacturing, medium institutions mainly had service and large institutions had healthcare, banking and manufacturing. See Table 7, Appendix A, and Figure 7, below.
Figure 7

Service Area Business Type

60% 40% 40% 20% 0% 20% 0% 0.0% 0% 0% 44.4%

33.3% 20%

11.1%

11.1%

Manufacturing

Service

Government Medium

Hi-tech Large

Other

Small

8

Sales Calls

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Of institutions responding, 36.8% conducted 3-5 sales calls per week followed by 26.3% making 6-8 calls. Medium institutions conducted more sales calls per week than small or large institutions. See Table 8, Appendix A, and Figure 8, below.
Figure 8

Number of Sales Calls Per Week
60% 40% 20% 11.1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 22.2% 20% 40% 22.2% 22.2% 20% 22.2%

1-2

3-5 Small

6-8 Medium Large

9-10

< 15

Of institutions surveyed, 32% indicated 50-74% of their sales calls are proactive. Small institutions indicated a higher response in proactive sales calls than medium or large institutions. See Table 9, Appendix A, and Figure 9, below.
Figure 9

Proactive Sales Calls
40% 33.3% 20% 20% 22.2% 20% 22.2% 20% 22.2% 40% 40%

0%

0%

0.0%

0%

Less than 10%

10%-24% Small

25%-49% Medium

50%-74% Large

75%-100%

9

Sales Calls

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Of institutions surveyed, over 31% indicated they were reactive to the sales call approach. Large institutions led the response with 44% indicating 75% or more of their calls are reactive. See Table 10, Appendix A, and Figure 10, below.
Figure 10

Reactive sales Calls
40% 44.4%

20%

20%

22.2%

20% 20% 11.1%

20% 20%

22.2%

20% 20%

0%

0.0%

Less than 10%

10%-24% Small

25%-49% Medium

50%-74% Large

75%-100%

Institutions indicated 89% of sales call approaches were targeted to the Training Director, Human Resources followed at 68% and the CEO at 63%. See Table 11, Appendix A, and Figure 11, below.
Figure 11*

Organization Level Targeted for Approach 89.5% 68.4%

63.2% 42.1%

Training Director

Human Resources

CEO

Other

* Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

10

Sales Calls

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Of the institutions surveyed, Healthcare and Manufacturing were tied as the top vertical markets targeted at 66% each, followed by Government at 50%. See Table 12, Appendix A, and Figure 12, below.
Figure 12*

Vertical Market Targets for Sales Calls 66.7% 66.7% 50.0% 44.4% 38.9% 38.9% 27.8% 11.1% 33.3%

In su ra nc e IT Te ch ni ca l Co ns tru ct io n

ov er nm en t

an uf ac tu r

an ce

ca re

He al th

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

Of the respondents to the survey, 42% indicated it took 5-8 weeks to close a sale followed by 37% taking 3-4 weeks. Large institutions closed sales in less time than small or medium institutions. See Table 13, Appendix A, and Figure 13, below.
Figure 13

M

G

Fi n

Length of Time to Close a Sale
60% 60% 40% 22.2% 20% 0% 0% 44.4% 22.2% 20% 11.1% 0% 0.0% 0% 0%

1-2 Weeks

3-4 Weeks

5-8 Weeks

9-12 Weeks

O

Small

Medium

Large

11

th er

in g

More than 12 Weeks

NA

Sales Calls

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Over 52% of respondents indicated they sell only contract training. However, 60% of small institutions have their sales staff sell both public seminars and contract training. See Table 14, Appendix A, and Figure 14, below.

Figure 14

Sales Staff Sell Both Public Seminars and Contract Training? 60% 40% 44.4% 40% 60% 55.6%

Yes Small Medium Large

No

College respondents indicated 52% of sales people do not complete the whole process from approach to delivery, thus using a fulfillment team. However, 66.7% of large institutions do have sales staff complete the process from approach to delivery. See Table 15, Appendix A, and Figure 15, below.
Figure 15

Sales Person Complete Process From Approach to Delivery? 80% 66.7% 40% 20% 60% 33.3%

Yes Small Medium Large

No

12

Sales Calls

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Overall, 84% of respondents do not give sales staff commission or bonus. Of those colleges giving commission, only small and large institutions participated. See Table 16, Appendix A, and Figure 16, below.
Figure 16

Sales Staff Receive Commission or Bonus? 100% 80% 77.8%

20% 0% Yes

22.2%

No Small Medium Large

13

Revenue

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

When asked to pick three responses, small, medium and large institutions chose contract training 100% as the service generating most revenue. Other top revenue services included Public enrollment 52% and online courses 21%. See Table 17, Appendix A, and Figure 17, below.
Figure 17*

Which Services Generate Most Revenue?

Contract Training 60% 40% 55.6% 0% 0% 44.4% 20% Assessments 0% 22.2% 0% Executive Coaching 20% 11.1% 20% 0% 0% 40% 40% 33.3% Small Medium Large

100% 100% 100%

Public Enrollment Classes

On-line Classes

One-on-One Consulting

Other

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

Fifty-two percent of institutions reported their average contract sale to be $4,000 - $7,999. Small institutions led the average contract amount at 80%. See Table 18, Appendix A, and Figure 18, below.
Figure 18

Average Contract Sale Amount 80% 60% 33.3% 0% $1,000-$3,999 $4,000-$7,999 Small 40% 44.4% 11.1% 20% 0% 11.1%

0%

0%

$8,000-$14,999 Medium Large

$15,000-$24,999

14

Revenue

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

The majority of sales departments within colleges surveyed had annual retained revenue goals of $100,000 or more (61.1%). All medium institutions surveyed had this goal. See Table 19, Appendix A, and Figure 19, below.
Figure 19

Sales Dept. Annual Retained Revenue Goal 100%

55.6% 25% 0% $0-$4,999 22.2% 25% 11.1% 0% $50,000-$74,999 Small 0% $75,000-$99,999 Large $100,000 or More 25% 11.1% 25%

Medium

Over 68% of the institutions surveyed had college expectations of $100,000 or more annual net revenue. All medium institutions surveyed had this goal. See Table 20, Appendix A, and Figure 20, below.
Figure 20

College Expectations for Annual Net Revenue for Your Center

100%

66.7% 40% 20% 0% $0-$4,999 11.1% 20% 0% $50,000-$74,999 Small 11.1% 20% 0% $75,000-$99,999 Large $100,000 or More 11.1%

Medium

15

Revenue

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Over 42% of respondents indicated 50% – 74% of total revenue is generated by contract training. Small and large institutions sold the most contract training in the 50% - 74% range. See Table 21, Appendix A, and Figure 21, below.
Figure 21

Percent Total Revenue Generated by Contract Training
60% 40% 20% 22.2% 0% 20% 0% 20% 0% 44.4% 40% 33.3%

0%-24%

25%-49% Small Medium

50%-74% Large

75%-100%

Over half (52.6%) of institutions indicated the smallest portion (0%-24%) came from Public Enrollment Classes. Medium and large institutions generated the least amount of revenue from public enrollment classes. See Table 22, Appendix A, and Figure 22, below.
Figure 22

Percent Revenue Generated by Public Enrollment Classes 66.7%

60%

60%

20%

20% 0% 0%-24% 25%-49% Small Medium 0%

20% 22.2% 0% 50%-74% Large

20% 11.1%

75%-100%

16

Revenue

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Large institutions (42.9%) indicated the college charged their Center 0%-4% overhead, while small institutions (40.0%) were charged 10%-19% overhead. Medium institutions were split between 5%-9% and 30% or more. See Table 23, Appendix A, and Figure 23, below.
Figure 23

Percent Overhead College Charges Center
42.9%

40%

40%

40% 28.6%

20%

20% 14.3% 14.3%

20% 20%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%-4%

5%-9%

10%-19% Small

20%-29% Large

30% or More

NA

Medium

Volume discounts on sales were Not Applicable in 55.6% of institutions. Of those institutions giving volume discounts, 27.8% gave a 10% discount. When a discount was given, only large institutions gave 5%, 10% or 20%. See Table 24, Appendix A, and Figure 24, below.
Figure 24

Percent Discount for Volume Sales 80% 60% 40% 20% 12.5% 0% 0% 5% 10% Small Medium 0% 0% 20% Large NA 25% 25%

37.5%

17

Curriculum

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

The top revenue producing products/areas at institutions surveyed were Leadership (68.4%), Microsoft Products (52.6%), Customer Service (42.1%), IT courses (31.6%), Lean Manufacturing (31.6%) and Teambuilding (31.6%). Medium institutions relied more heavily on Leadership and Lean Manufacturing for revenue than small or larger institutions. See Table 25, Appendix A, and Figure 25, below.
Figure 25*

Top Revenue Producing Products

60% Leadership 55.6% 60% 60% 100%

Microsoft

Customer Server 20% IT 0% Lean Manufacturing 20% Teambuilding 0% 20% DDI

44.4% 40% 40% 44.4% 40% 33.3%

33.3%

60%

55.6% 40% 22.2% 40%

AchieveGlobal

0%

Six Sigma

Certificate Programs Project Management Vital Learning 0% 0% 0%

22.2% 20% 20% 22.2% 20% 20% 11.1% 20% 20% 11.1%

60% Other Small 55.6% Medium 80% Large

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

18

Curriculum

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

The majority of institutions (72.2%) indicated they owned the curriculum. See Table 26, Appendix A, and Figure 26, below.
Figure 26

Who Owns the Curriculum? 72.2%

27.8%

The Center

The Consultants

From the survey, Change and Conflict were the most demanded soft skills at 57.9% each. Presentation Skills ranked third at 52.6%. Coaching and Performance Reviews followed with 47.4% each. See Table 27, Appendix A, and Figure 27, below.
Figure 27*

Most Demanded Soft Skills 57.9% 57.9% 52.6% 52.6% 42.1% 26.3% 10.5% 10.5% 10.5% 5.3% Trust Other

47.4% 47.4%

Business Writing

Conflict

Presentation Skills

Performance Reviews

Time Management

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

19

Stress Management

Personality Profiles

Coaching

Change

Feedback

Curriculum

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

The most demanded computer class was Excel (89.5%). Word ranked second at (63.2%), Access ranked third at (52.6%) and Project Management ranked fourth at (47.4%). See Table 28, Appendix A, and Figure 28, below.
Figure 28*

Most Demanded Computer Classes 89.5% 63.2% 52.6% 47.4%

42.1% 21.1% 15.8% 0.0%

31.6%

Access

Outlook

Windows

PowerPoint

* Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

Project Management

20

Oracle

Other

Excel

Word

Customer Profiles

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Institutions indicated the largest lead generator came from referrals (94.7%). Large institutions utilized the most resources with referrals, marketing pieces, college representatives and grant leads. See Table 29, Appendix A, and Figure 29, below.
Figure 29*

Where Leads are Found 100% Referrals 60% 60% 66.7% 80% Chamber Lists 44.4% 40% College Rep 20% 66.7% 40% Grant 20% 55.6% Newspaper 22.2% Small Medium Large 40% 40% 60% 80% 100% Marketing Piece

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100% Most institutions (68.4%) do not have someone qualifying prospects before the approach. Small institutions qualify prospects more than medium or large institutions. See Table 30, Appendix A, and Figure 30, below.
Figure 30

Are Prospects Qualified Before the Approach? 88.9% 60% 40% 31.6% 40% 60%

Yes Small Medium Large

No

21

Customer Profiles

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Manufacturing was the leading industry for institution’s top customers at 63.2%. Healthcare was the second leading industry at 36.8%. See Table 31, Appendix A, and Figure 31, below
Figure 31*

Industry of Top Two Customers 63.2% 36.8% 26.3% 26.3% 10.5% 15.8% 5.3% Insurance 5.3% Retail Other 73.7% 57.9% 42.1% 21.1%

Manufacturing

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

Nearly 74% of institutions have a target market of 150 employees or more. See Table 32, Appendix A, and Figure 32, below.
Figure 32*

Government

Company Size of Target Market

0-49 Employees

50-99 Employees

Technology

Healthcare

100-149 Employees

Banking & Finance

150 Employees or More

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

22

Customer Profiles

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Over half (52.6%) of institutions do not reward customers for doing business with them. See Table 33, Appendix A, and Figure 33, below.
Figure 33

Are Customers Rewarded for Doing Business With Your Organization? 52.6%

47.4%

Yes

No

23

Instructors/Trainers

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Most soft skills trainers received $50-$75 per hour (42.1%) or $75-$99 per hour (36.8%). Forty percent of small institutions paid soft skills trainers $100 or more per hour. See Table 34, Appendix A, and Figure 34, below.
Figure 34*

Hourly Rate for Soft Skills Trainers

60%

40%

40% 33.3%

40%

40% 33.3%

40% 33.3% 20%

20% 11.1%

$25-$49 per Hour

$50-$74 per Hour

$75-$99 per Hour

$100 or More per Hour

Small

Medium

Large

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

Most computer instructors received $50-$75 per hour (52.6%). Medium and large institutions primarily paid these rates. See Table 35, Appendix A, and Figure 35, below.
Figure 35

Hourly Rate for Computer Instructors 60%

55.6%

40% 33.3% 20%

40%

20% 11.1% 0%

20%

0%

0%

$25-$49 per Hour

$50-$74 per Hour

$75-$99 per Hour

$100 or More per Hour

Small

Medium

Large

24

Instructors/Trainers

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

The majority of all respondents indicated they did not use full-time trainers (84.2%). See Table 36, Appendix A, and Figure 36, below.
Figure 36

Are Full-Time Trainers Used? 84.2%

15.8%

Yes

No

Of the three institutions that responded using full-time trainers, these trainers taught soft skills (66.7%) and computer classes (66.7%). See Table 37, Appendix A, and Figure 37, below.
Figure 37*

What Do Full-Time Trainers Teach? 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

0% Soft Skills Training

0% Computer Classes Small Medium Large

0%

0% Other

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

25

Instructors/Trainers

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Of the three institutions that responded using full-time trainers, these trainers were paid $25-$50 per hour (66.7%). The large institution listed as “Other” paid $40,000/year for a full-time trainer. See Table 38, Appendix A, and Figure 38, below.
Figure 38*

Pay Rate for Full-Time Trainers

100%

100%

100%

0% $25-$50 per Hour Small Medium

0%

0% Other

Large

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

26

Marketing

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Medium and large Institutions target their marketing materials primarily to HR Directors (73.7%) and Training Directors (73.7%). See Table 39, Appendix A, and Figure 39, below.
Figure 39*

Target Audience for Marketing Materials
80%77.8% 60% 60% 40% 40% 20%22.2% 0% 0% 0% 22.2% 11.1% 40% 40% 80%77.8% 66.7%

HR Directors

Training Directors

IT Directors

Sales Directors Large

Other

NA

Small

Medium

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

Over 63% of institutions responding do not track their marketing materials. See Table 40, Appendix A, and Figure 40, below.
Figure 40*

How Marketing Materials Are Tracked 63.2%

21.1% 10.5% 5.3% Color Coded

15.8%

Specific Name for Registration

Tracking ID Number

Other

NA

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

27

ROI

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Over 68% of institutions responding measure return on investment*. See Table 41, Appendix A, and Figure 41, below.
Figure 41

Is Return on Investment (ROI) Measured? 68.4%

31.6%

Yes

No

*Of small, medium, and large institutions responding yes to measuring ROI, their specific responses included the following methods: 1. Primarily done with Lean Enterprises and Six Sigma. 2. We calculate improvement based on assigned learning projects. 2. Track a six-month change survey. 3. Pre and post testing with executive debriefing 4. Kirkpatrick up to Level 3 5. Technical validation vs. training 6. Contract projects related to a business objective with metrics along with pre and post testing. 7. Customer savings vs. training costs. 8. Customer’s Profit & Loss Statement

28

Evaluations

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Level 1 evaluations are used most by institutions (84.2%). Level 2 evaluations are utilized next at (63.2%). See Table 42, Appendix A, and Figure 42, below.
Figure 42*

Level of Evaluation Used At Conclusion of Training 84.2% 63.2%

31.6% 21.1%

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

The majority of institutions (94.7%) do not charge for evaluations. See Table 43, Appendix A, and Figure 43, below.
Figure 43

What is the Charge for the Evaluations? 94.7%

5.3% $50 or More NA-No Charge

29

Evaluations

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Over 89% of responding institutions give a pre-assessment before the training is provided. See Table 44, Appendix A, and Figure 44, below.
Figure 44

Is a Pre-Assessment Given Before the Training is Provided? 89.5%

10.5%

Yes

No

Over 84% of responding institutions give a post-assessment after the training is provided. See Table 45, Appendix A, and Figure 45, below.
Figure 45

Is Post-Assessmnet Given After the Training? 84.2%

15.8%

Yes

No

30

Credit Contract Training

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

The majority of all respondents indicated they do provide contract training for credit at a company’s site (68.4%). Medium size institutions provide the most credit contract training. See Table 46, Appendix A, and Figure 46, below.
Figure 46

Is Credit Contract Training Held at a Company's Site? 80% 66.7% 60%

40% 33.3% 20%

Yes Small Medium Large

No

About half of the institutions surveyed indicated a dollar volume of $30,000 or more for contract training for credit per year (46.2%). Medium and large institutions generated the most revenue in this category. See Table 47, Appendix A, and Figure 47, below.
Figure 47*

Dollar Volume for Credit Contract Training

50%

50%

50%

33.3% 25%

33.3% 25%

33.3%

0% $1,000-$4,999

0% $5,000-$9,999 Small

0%

0% $30,000 or More

$10,000-$29,999 Medium Large

*Responses only include those indicating they provide contract training for credit 31

Credit Contract Training

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Business classes (69.2%) and Computer Information Systems (46.2%) are the top two credit classes offered for contract training to businesses. Small institutions equally sold Business and Computer Information Systems Classes while large institutions mainly sold Business Classes. See Table 48, Appendix A, and Figure 48, below.
Figure 48*

Top Credit Classes for Contract Training 83.3% 66.7% 50% 33.3% 16.7% 0% Business Computer Information Systems 0% 16.7% 0% 0% English Other 16.7% 66.7% 50% 50% 75%

Mathematics

Small

Medium

Large

*Responses only include those indicating they provide contract training for credit at a company site. Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

32

Customer Loyalty

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Companies used the specific institution as opposed to another vendor because of cost (89.5%), quality of instructors (84.2%) and quality of programs (84.2%). See Table 49, Appendix A, and Figure 49, below.
Figure 49*

Why Companies Use Your Center Over the Competition 89.5% 84.2% 84.2% 68.4% 63.2%

Cost

Quality of Instructors

Quality of Programs

Convenience

Other

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

33

Future Projections

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Institutions wish their sales team had more staff (68.4%) and better leads (52.6%). See Table 50, Appendix A, and Figure 50, below.
Figure 50*

Wishes For the Ideal Sales Team 68.4% 52.6% 36.8% 31.6% 21.1% 36.8%

More Staff

Better Leads

Larger Budget

No Boundaries

Someone to Do Fulfillment

Other

*Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%

Over half of institutions surveyed (52.6%) indicated they would experience $1 - $2 Million of sales success for the team this fiscal year. Medium and large institutions were prominent in this area. See Table 51, Appendix A, and Figure 51, below.
Figure 51

Projected Sales Success This Year
60%

55.6%

40% 40%

40%

22.2%

20% 11.1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 11.1%

Less than $1 Million

$1-$2 Million

$3-$4 Million

$5-$6 Million

$7 Million or More

Small

Medium

Large

34

Future Projections

Workforce Development Benchmark Survey

Large institutions responding to the three-year sales success still envisioned $1 - $2 Million (44.4%) and up to $7 Million or more (24%). See Table 52, Appendix A, and Figure 52, below.
Figure 52

Projected Sales Success in Three Years
60% 62.5%

40% 25%

20%

20%

20% 12.5%

20% 20%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Less than $1 Million

$1-$2 Million

$3-$4 Million

$5-$6 Million

$7 Million or More

Small

Medium

Large

Institutions responding to the five-year sales success envisioned $3 - $4 Million (42.1%) and up to $7 Million or more for small, medium and large institutions. See Table 53, Appendix A, and Figure 53, below.
Figure 53

Projected Sales Success in Five Years
60% 33.3% 20% 20% 0% 20% 0% 0% 0% 40% 33.3% 11.1% 20% 20% 22.1%

Less than $1 Million

$1-$2 Million

$3-$4 Million

$5-$6 Million

$7 Million or More

Small

Medium

Large

35

Appendix A Tabled Results

36

Table 1 Credit Enrollment per Semester Frequency Under 1,000 1,000-4,999 5,000-9,999 10,000-14,999 15,000+ Total Responses 0 2 4 2 11 19 Percent 0.0% 10.5 21.1 10.5 57.9 100%

Table 2 Non-credit Enrollment per Semester Frequency Under 1,000 1,000-4,999 5,000-9,999 10,000-14,999 15,000+ Total Responses 0 5 5 1 8 19 Percent 0.0% 26.3 26.3 5.3 42.1 100%

37

Table 3 What Is the Population of Your Service Area? Small Institutions Under 5,000 5,000-49,999 50,000-99,999 100,000-249,999 250,000-499,999 500,000-749,999 750,000+ Total Responses 0.0% 0.0 0.0 60.0 20.0 0.0 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 0.0 0.0 0.0 60.0 0.0 40.0 5 Large Institutions 0.0% 0.0 0.0 11.1 22.2 11.1 55.6 9 Total 0.0% 0.0 0.0 21.1 31.6 5.3 42.1 19

Note: Institutional size categories are based on institutions’ non-credit enrollment per semester and will appear on all subsequent tables (small=non-credit enrollment of 4,999 or less; medium=5,000 to 9,999; large=10,000 or more). Refer to Table 2.

Table 4 Does Your Institution Operate within a Single County or Multi-County? Small Institutions Single County Multi-County Total Responses 20.0% 80.0 5 Medium Institutions 60.0% 40.0 5 Large Institutions 66.7% 33.3 9 Total 52.6% 47.4 19

38

Table 5 Is Your Institution Located in an Urban, Suburban, or Rural Setting? Small Institutions Urban Suburban Rural Total Responses 40.0% 20.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 20.0% 80.0 0.0 5 Large Institutions 55.6% 44.4 0.0 9 Total 42.1% 47.4 10.5 19

Table 6 How Would You Describe the Local Economy Surrounding Your Institution? Small Institutions Robust Developing Flat Depressed Total Responses 60.0% 40.0 60.0 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 40.0% 80.0 20.0 0.0 5 Large Institutions 66.7% 44.4 11.1 11.1 9 Total 57.9% 52.6 26.3 5.3 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

39

Table 7 What Is the Predominant Industry Surrounding Your Institution? Small Institutions Manufacturing Service Government Hi-tech Other Total Responses 60.0% 40.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 20.0% 40.0 20.0 20.0 0.0 5 Large Institutions 33.3% 11.1 11.1 0.0 44.4 9 Total 36.8% 26.3 10.5 5.3 21.1 19

Table 8 How Many Sales Calls Are Conducted per Week by a Sales Representative? Small Institutions Zero 1-2 3-5 6-8 9-10 11-15 More than 15 Total Responses 0.0% 20.0 40.0 20.0 0.0 0.0 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 0.0 60.0 40.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5 Large Institutions 0.0% 11.1 22.2 22.2 22.2 0.0 22.2 9 Total 0.0% 10.5 36.8 26.3 10.5 0.0 15.8 19

40

Table 9 What Percent of Sales Calls Are Proactive? Small Institutions Less than 10% 10%-24% 25%-49% 50%-74% 75%-100% Total Responses 20.0% 20.0 0.0 40.0 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 40.0 20.0 40.0 0.0 5 Large Institutions 33.3% 22.2 0.0 22.2 22.2 9 Total 21.1% 26.3 5.3 31.6 15.8 19

Table 10 What Percent of Sales Calls Are Reactive? Small Institutions Less than 10% 10%-24% 25%-49% 50%-74% 75%-100% Total Responses 20.0% 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 40.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 5 Large Institutions 0.0% 22.2 11.1 22.2 44.4 9 Total 5.3% 26.3 15.8 21.1 31.6 19

41

Table 11 What Is the Level of the Organization Targeted for the Sales Call Approach? Small Institutions Training Director Human Resources CEO Other Total Responses 80.0% 60.0 60.0 60.0 5 Medium Institutions 100% 60.0 60.0 20.0 5 Large Institutions 88.9% 77.8 66.7 44.4 9 Total 89.5% 68.4 63.2 42.1 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

Table 12 To Which of the Following Vertical Markets Are Sales Calls Targeted? Small Institutions Healthcare Manufacturing Government Finance Insurance IT Technical Construction Other NA Total Responses 60.0% 60.0 40.0 20.0 20.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 60.0% 60.0 60.0 60.0 40.0 60.0 40.0 0.0 40.0 5 Large Institutions 75.0% 75.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 50.0 37.5 25.0 25.0 8 Total 66.7% 66.7 50.0 44.4 38.9 38.9 27.8 11.1 33.3 18

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

42

Table 13 How Long Does It Take to Close a Sale? Small Institutions Less than a Week 1-2 Weeks 3-4 Weeks 5-8 Weeks 9-12 Weeks More than 12 Weeks Total Responses 0.0% 0.0 20.0 60.0 20.0 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 0.0 40.0 60.0 0.0 0.0 5 Large Institutions 0.0% 22.2 44.4 22.2 0.0 11.1 9 Total 0.0% 10.5 36.8 42.1 5.3 5.3 19

Table 14 Does Your Sales Staff Sell Both Public Seminars and Contract Training? Small Institutions Yes No Total Responses 60.0% 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 40.0% 60.0 5 Large Institutions 44.4% 55.6 9 Total 47.4% 52.6 19

Table 15 Does Each Sales Person Complete the Whole Process from Approach to Delivery? Small Institutions Yes No Total Responses 20.0% 80.0 5 Medium Institutions 40.0% 60.0 5 Large Institutions 66.7% 33.3 9 Total 47.4% 52.6 19

43

Table 16 Does Your Sales Staff Receive Commission or Bonus? Small Institutions Yes No Total Responses 20.0% 80.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 100 5 Large Institutions 22.2% 77.8 9 Total 15.8% 84.2 19

Table 17 Which Three Services Generate the Most Revenue for Your Center? Small Institutions Contract Training Public Enrollment Classes On-line Classes Assessments Executive Coaching One-on-One Consulting Other Total Responses 100% 60.0 0.0 20.0 0.0 20.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 100% 40.0 0.0 0.0 20.0 0.0 40.0 5 Large Institutions 100% 55.6 44.4 22.2 11.1 0.0 33.3 9 Total 100% 52.6 21.1 15.8 10.5 5.3 36.8 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

44

Table 18 What Is the Average Contract Sale Amount? Small Institutions Less than $1,000 $1,000-$3,999 $4,000-$7,999 $8,000-$14,999 $15,000-$24,999 $25,000-$49,999 $50,000 or more Total Responses 0.0% 0.0 80.0 0.0 20.0 0.0 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 60.0 40.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5 Large Institutions 0.0% 33.3 44.4 11.1 11.1 0.0 0.0 9 Total 0.0% 31.6 52.6 5.3 10.5 0.0 0.0 19

Table 19 What Is the Sales Department’s Annual Retained Revenue Goal? Small Institutions $0-$4,999 $5,000-$9,999 $10,000-$29,999 $30,000-$49,999 $50,000-$74,999 $75,000-$99,999 $100,000 or More Total Responses 25.0% 0.0 0.0 0.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 4 Medium Institutions 0.0% 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100 5 Large Institutions 22.2% 0.0 0.0 0.0 11.1 11.1 55.6 9 Total 16.7% 0.0 0.0 0.0 11.1 11.1 61.1 18

45

Table 20 What Are the College’s Expectations for Annual Net Revenue for Your Center? Small Institutions $0-$4,999 $5,000-$9,999 $10,000-$29,999 $30,000-$49,999 $50,000-$74,999 $75,000-$99,999 $100,000 or More Total Responses 20.0% 0.0 0.0 0.0 20.0 20.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 100 5 Large Institutions 11.1% 0.0 0.0 0.0 11.1 11.1 66.7 9 Total 10.5% 0.0 0.0 0.0 10.5 10.5 68.4 19

Table 21 What Percent of Total Revenue for Your Center Is Generated by Contract Training? Small Institutions 0%-24% 25%-49% 50%-74% 75%-100% Total Responses 0.0% 40.0 60.0 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 20.0% 20.0 20.0 40.0 5 Large Institutions 22.2% 0.0 44.4 33.3 9 Total 15.8% 15.8 42.1 26.3 19

46

Table 22 What Percent of Total Revenue for Your Center Is Generated by Public Enrollment Classes? Small Institutions 0%-24% 25%-49% 50%-74% 75%-100% Total Responses 20.0% 20.0 60.0 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 60.0% 0.0 20.0 20.0 5 Large Institutions 66.7% 0.0 22.2 11.1 9 Total 52.6% 5.3 31.6 10.5 19

Table 23 What Percentage Overhead Does the College Charge Your Center? Small Institutions 0%-4% 5%-9% 10%-19% 20%-29% 30% or More NA Total Responses 20.0% 0 40.0 20.0 0 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 0 40.0 0 0 40.0 20.0 5 Large Institutions 42.9% 0 0 14.3 14.3 28.6 7 Total 23.5% 11.8 11.8 11.8 17.6 23.5 17

47

Table 24 What Is the Percent of Discount for Volume Sales? Small Institutions 5% 10% 15% 20% More than 20% NA Total Responses 0.0% 40.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 60.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 20.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 80.0 5 Large Institutions 12.5% 25.0 0.0 25.0 0.0 37.5 8 Total 5.6% 27.8 0.0 11.1 0.0 55.6 18

Table 25 What Are the Top Five Products/Areas that Produce the Most Revenue for Your Center? Small Institutions Leadership Microsoft Customer Server IT Lean Manufacturing Teambuilding DDI AchieveGlobal Six Sigma Certificate Programs Project Management Vital Learning Other Total Responses 60.0% 60.0 40.0 20.0 0.0 20.0 20.0 40.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 0.0 60.0 5 Medium Institutions 100% 60.0 40.0 40.0 60.0 0.0 40.0 0.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 0.0 80.0 5 Large Institutions 55.6% 44.4 44.4 33.3 33.3 55.6 22.2 22.2 22.2 11.1 11.1 0.0 55.6 9 Total 68.4% 52.6 42.1 31.6 31.6 31.6 26.3 21.1 21.1 15.8 15.8 0.0 63.2 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

48

Table 26 Who Owns the Curriculum? Small Institutions The Center The Consultants Total Responses 80.0% 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 50.0% 50.0 4 Large Institutions 77.8% 22.2 9 Total 72.2% 27.8 18

Table 27 Which Soft Skills Are Most in Demand by Your Customers? Small Institutions Change Conflict Presentation Skills Coaching Performance Reviews Business Writing Time Management Feedback Stress Management Personality Profiles Trust Other Total Responses 60.0% 60.0 40.0 40.0 60.0 0.0 20.0 20.0 0.0 0.0 20.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 40.0% 20.0 60.0 40.0 40.0 80.0 0.0 20.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 60.0 5 Large Institutions 66.7% 77.8 55.6 55.6 44.4 44.4 44.4 0.0 22.2 22.2 0.0 55.6 9 Total 57.9% 57.9 52.6 47.4 47.4 42.1 26.3 10.5 10.5 10.5 5.3 52.6 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

49

Table 28 Which Computer Classes Are Most in Demand by Your Customers? Small Institutions Excel Word Access Project Management PowerPoint Outlook Windows Oracle Other Total Responses 100% 60.0 40.0 60.0 40.0 20.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 60.0% 60.0 60.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 0.0 80.0 5 Large Institutions 100% 66.7 55.6 44.4 44.4 11.1 11.1 0.0 22.2 9 Total 89.5% 63.2 52.6 47.4 42.1 21.1 15.8 0.0 31.6 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

Table 29 Where Do You Find Your Leads? Small Institutions Referrals Response to Marketing Piece Chamber Lists College Representative Gives the Lead Grant Lead Newspaper Purchased Lists Other Total Responses 100% 60.0 80.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 80.0% 60.0 60.0 20.0 20.0 40.0 0.0 60.0 5 Large Institutions 100% 66.7 44.4 66.7 55.6 22.2 22.2 22.2 9 Total 94.7% 63.2 57.9 47.4 42.1 31.6 21.1 26.3 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

50

Table 30 Does Someone on Your Staff Qualify Prospects before the Approach? Small Institutions Yes No Total Responses 60.0% 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 40.0% 60.0 5 Large Institutions 11.1% 88.9 9 Total 31.6% 68.4 19

Table 31 In What Industry Are Your Top Two Customers? Small Institutions Manufacturing Healthcare Government Technology Banking & Finance Insurance Retail Construction Other Total Responses 80.0% 20.0 20.0 20.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 80.0% 40.0 20.0 40.0 20.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 20.0 5 Large Institutions 44.4% 44.4 33.3 22.2 11.1 11.1 11.1 0.0 0.0 9 Total 63.2% 36.8 26.3 26.3 10.5 5.3 5.3 0.0 15.8 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

51

Table 32 What Size Company Is Your Target Market? Small Institutions 0-49 Employees 50-99 Employees 100-149 Employees 150 Employees or More Total Responses 0.0% 20.0 80.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 40.0% 60.0 40.0 80.0 5 Large Institutions 22.2% 44.4 55.6 88.9 9 Total 21.1% 42.1 57.9 73.7 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

Table 33 Do You Reward Your Customers for Doing Business with Your Organization? Small Institutions Yes No Total Responses 60.0% 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 60.0% 40.0 5 Large Institutions 33.3% 66.7 9 Total 47.4% 52.6 19

Table 34 What Is the Hourly Rate for a Soft Skills Trainer? Small Institutions $15-$24 per Hour $25-$49 per Hour $50-$74 per Hour $75-$99 per Hour $100 or More per Hour Total Responses 0.0% 20.0 40.0 40.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 40.0 60.0 40.0 20.0 5 Large Institutions 0.0% 11.1 33.3 33.3 33.3 9 Total 0.0% 21.1 42.1 36.8 31.6 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

52

Table 35 What Is the Hourly Rate for a Computer Instructor? Small Institutions $15-$24 per Hour $25-$49 per Hour $50-$74 per Hour $75-$99 per Hour $100 or More per Hour Total Responses 0.0% 40.0 40.0 0.0 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 20.0 60.0 20.0 0.0 5 Large Institutions 0.0% 33.3 55.6 11.1 0.0 9 Total 0.0% 31.6 52.6 10.5 5.3 19

Table 36 Are Full-Time Trainers Used? Small Institutions Yes No Total Responses 20.0% 80.0 5 Medium Institutions 20.0% 80.0 5 Large Institutions 11.1% 88.9 9 Total 15.8% 84.2 19

Table 37 What Do Full-Time Trainers Teach? Small Institutions Soft Skills Training Computer Classes Other Total Responses* 100% 0.0 0.0 1 Medium Institutions 0.0% 100 0.0 1 Large Institutions 100% 100 100 1 Total 66.7% 66.7 33.3 3

*Responses only include those indicating full-time trainers are used (refer to Table 36). Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

53

Table 38 What Is the Pay Rate for Full-Time Trainers? Small Institutions $10-$14 per Hour $15-$24 per Hour $25-$50 per Hour Other Total Responses* 0.0% 0.0 100 0.0 1 Medium Institutions 0.0% 0.0 100 0.0 1 Large Institutions 0.0% 0.0 0.0 100 1 Total 0.0% 0.0 66.7 33.3 3

*Responses only include those indicating full-time trainers are used (refer to Table 36).

Table 39 What Audience Is Targeted by Marketing Materials? Small Institutions HR Directors Training Directors IT Directors Sales Directors Other NA Total Responses 60.0% 60.0 0.0 0.0 40.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 80.0% 80.0 20.0 0.0 40.0 40.0 5 Large Institutions 77.8% 77.8 22.2 22.2 66.7 11.1 9 Total 73.7% 73.7 15.8 10.5 52.6 26.3 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

54

Table 40 How Are Marketing Materials Tracked? Small Institutions Specific Name for Registration Tracking ID Number Color Coded Other NA Total Responses 20.0% 20.0 0.0 0.0 80.0 5 Medium Institutions 40.0% 0.0 0.0 40.0 20.0 5 Large Institutions 11.1% 11.1 11.1 11.1 77.8 9 Total 21.1% 10.5 5.3 15.8 63.2 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

Table 41 Is Return on Investment (ROI) Measured? Small Institutions Yes No Total Responses 80.0% 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 80.0% 20.0 5 Large Institutions 55.6% 44.4 9 Total 68.4% 31.6 19

Table 42 Which Level of Evaluation Is Used at the Conclusion of the Training? Small Institutions Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Total Responses 60.0% 80.0 40.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 80.0% 80.0 80.0 20.0 5 Large Institutions 100% 44.4 0.0 11.1 9 Total 84.2% 63.2 31.6 21.1 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

55

Table 43 How Much Do You Charge for These Evaluations? Small Institutions $5-$9 $10-$24 $25-$49 $50 or More NA-No Charge Total Responses 0.0% 0.0 0.0 0.0 100 5 Medium Institutions 0.0% 0.0 0.0 0.0 100 5 Large Institutions 0.0% 0.0 0.0 11.1 88.9 9 Total 0.0% 0.0 0.0 5.3 94.7 19

Table 44 Is a Pre-Assessment Given before the Training Is Provided? Small Institutions Yes No Total Responses 100% 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 80.0% 20.0 5 Large Institutions 88.9% 11.1 9 Total 89.5% 10.5 19

Table 45 Is a Post-Assessment Given after the Training Is Provided? Small Institutions Yes No Total Responses 80.0% 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 80.0% 20.0 5 Large Institutions 88.9% 11.1 9 Total 84.2% 15.8 19

56

Table 46 Does Your College Provide Contract Training for Credit at a Company’s Site? Small Institutions Yes No Total Responses 60.0% 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 80.0% 20.0 5 Large Institutions 66.7% 33.3 9 Total 68.4% 31.6 19

Table 47 What Is the Dollar Volume for Contract Training for Credit per Year? Small Institutions $1,000-$4,999 $5,000-$9,999 $10,000-$29,999 $30,000 or More Total Responses* 33.3% 33.3 0.0 33.3 3 Medium Institutions 25.0% 0.0 25.0 50.0 4 Large Institutions 0.0% 50.0 0.0 50.0 6 Total 15.4% 30.8 7.7 46.2 13

*Responses only include those indicating they provide contract training for credit at a company site (refer to Table 46).

57

Table 48 What Are the Top Two Credit Classes You Provide for Contract Training? Small Institutions Business Computer Information Systems Mathematics English Other Total Responses* 66.7% 66.7 0.0 0.0 33.3 3 Medium Institutions 50.0% 75.0 0.0 0.0 50.0 4 Large Institutions 83.3% 16.7 16.7 16.7 50.0 6 Total 69.2% 46.2 7.7 7.7 46.2 13

*Responses only include those indicating they provide contract training for credit at a company site (refer to Table 46). Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

Table 49 Why Do Companies Use Your Center Verses Another Vendor? Small Institutions Cost Quality of Instructors Quality of Programs Convenience Other Total Responses 60.0% 80.0 80.0 60.0 40.0 5 Medium Institutions 100% 100 100 60.0 60.0 5 Large Institutions 100% 77.8 77.8 77.8 77.8 9 Total 89.5% 84.2 84.2 68.4 63.2 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

58

Table 50 What Do You Wish Your Sales Team Had Now That It Does Not Have? Small Institutions More Staff Better Leads Larger Budget No Boundaries Someone to Do Fulfillment Other Total Responses 40.0% 40.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 80.0% 60.0 40.0 40.0 0.0 40.0 5 Large Institutions 77.8% 55.6 44.4 33.3 33.3 44.4 9 Total 68.4% 52.6 36.8 31.6 21.1 36.8 19

Multiple responses allowed; therefore, percents may total more than 100%.

Table 51 What Is the Most Optimistic Level of Sales Success You Can Envision for Your Team this Fiscal Year? Small Institutions Less than $1 Million $1-$2 Million $3-$4 Million $5-$6 Million $7 Million or More Total Responses 40.0% 40.0 20.0 0.0 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 40.0% 60.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5 Large Institutions 22.2% 55.6 0.0 11.1 11.1 9 Total 31.6% 52.6 5.3 5.3 5.3 19

59

Table 52 What Is the Most Optimistic Level of Sales Success You Can Envision for Your Team in Three Years? Small Institutions Less than $1 Million $1-$2 Million $3-$4 Million $5-$6 Million $7 Million or More Total Responses 60.0% 20.0 0.0 20.0 0.0 5 Medium Institutions 20.0% 40.0 20.0 20.0 0.0 5 Large Institutions 0.0% 62.5 12.5 0.0 25.0 8 Total 22.2% 44.4 11.1 11.1 11.1 18

Table 53 What Is the Most Optimistic Level of Sales Success You Can Envision for Your Team in Five Years? Small Institutions Less than $1 Million $1-$2 Million $3-$4 Million $5-$6 Million $7 Million or More Total Responses 20.0% 20.0 40.0 0.0 20.0 5 Medium Institutions 20.0% 0.0 60.0 0.0 20.0 5 Large Institutions 0.0% 33.3 33.3 11.1 22.1 9 Total 10.5% 21.1 42.1 5.3 21.1 19

60

Appendix B Participating Colleges for Survey and Visitations

61

Workforce Development Benchmarking Project List of Participating Colleges Kathy Yeager December, 2006
Anne Arundel Community College – Glen Burnie, MD (visitation) Bellevue Community College – Bellevue, WA Bill Priest Institute for Economic Development – Dallas, TX Black Hawk College – Moline, IL Bucks County Community College – Newtown, PA Central Piedmont Community College – Charlotte, NC (visitation) College of DuPage – Glen Ellyn, IL Collin County Community College – Plano, TX Corporate College - Cuyahoga Community College– Westlake, OH (visitation) Delta College Corporate Services – University Center, MI Employee Training Institute – San Diego, CA (visitation) Ivy Tech Community College – Lafayette, IN Kirkwood Community College – Cedar Rapids, IA Lane Community College – Eugene, OR Linn-Benton Community College – Albany, OR Moraine Valley Community College – Palos Hills, IL Pima County Community College – Tucson, AZ (visitation) Rio Salado College – Tempe, AZ Tallahassee Community College – Tallahassee, FL Tarrant County Community College – Fort Worth, TX Valencia Enterprises – Orlando, FL

62

Appendix C College Visitation Interview Grid

63

Questions for Community College Visitation (Appendix C) Workforce Development Benchmarking Project Kathy Yeager
Note: As part of the Workforce Development Benchmarking Project, visitations were conducted to Central Piedmont Community College, Corporate College at Cuyahoga Community College, Anne Arundel Community College, Valencia Enterprises, Employee Training Institute in San Diego and Pima County Community College. The responses to the interview questions are listed below.
Benchmarking Questions Central Piedmont Cuyahoga Corporate College Anne Arundel Valencia Enterprises San Diego Employee Training Institute Pima County Community College

Does the Center have a printed business plan or strategic plan? If so, what is the timeframe? Why was the business plan or strategic plan created?

Yes. It is a three-year plan with additional five-year goals. To help restructure, for upper management buy-in and for funding. Exec. Summary, CCE Bus. Model, Industry Competitive Analysis, SWOT, 3-year goals, tactics tied to goals, 5year plan.

Yes. There is a 10year revenue projection, a 3-year strategic plan and a 1-year dashboard. Help the board understand, helps us stay focused, and a management tool for funding.

Yes. There is a 10-year strategic plan that is reviewed yearly. Living document with all the college goals tied to it. The President uses it to speak in the community. Priorities, Strategies, Action Plan, Facilitator, Start date and end date, and Individual Goals.

Yes. There is a 5year business plan that is reviewed quarterly. The plan helped obtain funding and headcount. The organization runs this area as a business, and the plan show progress back to the college. Goals & objectives, report on sales, plan for each individual area, financials, methods of measurement.

Yes. There is a three-year plan.

The Center does not have a plan, but each individual program has a plan.

The plan was designed to launch growth and funding.

What are the components of your strategic plan?

Business Description, SWOT, Market research, Competitor Analysis, marketing plan, operations plan, management team.

Exec. Summary, business over-view, marketing strategy, operations, and financial overview, income statements, 3-year budget, and 3-year contingency budget.

64

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

Who Monitors and updates the strategic plan? Who reads and expects results from this plan? Who approves the plan and sets the revenue goals?

The Associate Dean updates. Vice President and Dean of CCE reads and expects results. The Vice President and Dean. Revenue goal is grow 6% per year.

The president, her boss and the board reads and expects results. The President and Directors monitor and update the plan. The Corporate College President and the College President. Revenue goal is grow 5% per year.

The Board, the President and the VPs. All college staff updates and monitor. Everyone is held responsible. College-wide strategic planning committee approves the plan. Revenue and budget goals are set by the area and get direction from the VPs. This is the only plan for the college. It is for credit and noncredit. Yes. Manage the team. Director of Workforce Solutions.

The COO monitors and updates. The President, Sr. VP, Adm. Services and the Board expects the results. The Chief Operating Officer approves the plan and sets the revenue goals. The President reviews and approves.

The Dean/Executive Director monitors the plan.

The Board of San Diego CC Auxiliary Organization approves the plan. The Dean sets the revenue goals.

How is the plan similar/different from the credit plan? Is there a sales director? If so, what are the responsibilities? What is the job title?

This is the only plan of its kind at the college Yes. Manage the sales staff and sell. Director of Corporate Training

Credit does not have such a plan.

Credit does not have such a plan.

Focuses on meeting business needs. There is no credit business plan. No. No. There is, however, a position approved for hiring.

Yes. Manage the sales staff. Executive Director of Sales. Also has other responsibilities

Yes. Helps drive revenue through sales and marketing, daily management of staff, and handles marketing and sales strategy.

65

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

With respect to compensation, is the same model used in sales as in other areas of the college. Is performance based pay and/or viable pay a tool used to date? What does the comp model look like? Does the sales team sell both contract training and open enrollment classes. If so, how is that going? If not, why not?

No. Sales people are assigned goals. Once the group makes the goal, a bonus of 1% is paid to each person. Another flat fee is paid for reaching goals attached to strategic plan. The sales team sells contract training. If they do sell or recommend open enrollment, they track dollar volume of business transferred. This year’s goal is $663,000. The Director of Corporate Training decides the number.

No. Sales (Acct. Exec) get a base salary plus compensation plan. Based on gross margin and tiered layers. Layers start at $350,000 volume to over $750,000 volume and 5%13%. Sales team primarily sells contract training. They do sell open enrollment to the top 10 clients.

No. The Center for Workforce Solutions team receives a salary. No commission or bonus plan is used.

No. Sales staff receives a 4% commission on sales. This is monitored quarterly.

No. A bonus plan has been in place since 1999. The staff receives base salary and a percentage based on the size of the sale. The percentage ranges from 2.5% to 10%.

Yes. All are paid the same. No bonus plan is in place.

The team sells only contracts. They may direct employees to open enrollment when appropriate.

The sales team sells mainly contract training. They get credit if they sell open enrollment to their top 10 clients.

The sales team sells contract training. Fee classes are marketed and managed by one person.

The sales group has a main focus on contract training. Some of the larger contracts also hold public classes that are open to outside people. Yes. The revenue goal is $2M.

Does the sales team have a quota? If so, what?

Yes. The sales team goal is $3.6M. Individual goals are $1.2M. Retained revenue is 55%65%.

Because of reorganization and position openings, there is no quota this year.

Yes. The team goal is $1,350,000. Individual goals are $425,000, $500,000, and $425,000.

Yes. The team goal is $300,000, but may change based on projects that come in.

66

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

Is solution selling utilized? If so, explain the process. If not, please explain the process for a sales call.

This team sells the courses that are available. A needs assessment is used and selling is based on market segments All are regular employees. They would like to get an apprentice for additional help. Corporate and Continuing Education does $5.7M. Of this, $2.7M is self supporting and $3.0M is state funded. The sales goal in contact training is $685,389. Vice President and Dean.

Solution selling is utilized. An open enrollment schedule is also housed on a company website for seamless information and registration. Sales personnel are regular employees hired from the business world. The goal is $8.2M with a stretch goal of $10.2M. This is all self-supporting. The retained revenue is 55%65% and goes back to the Corporate College. Finance and Business Services.

Are all sales personnel regular employees, or are contract employees utilized? What is the total financial revenue goal for your Corporate Training Center? What is your retained revenue/income?

Yes. Leads come in and contracts are sold to companies. This could include both credit and non-credit options. Each can be customized. Both regular and contract employees.

Yes. Someone from the Business Solutions Group helps identify the need and the solution. An assessment and performance consulting may be utilized. All are regular employees. None have contracts.

Yes. Leads are developed and then listening becomes key to uncover the basic business need. From that, a solution is developed for the customer. All are regular employees.

Yes. Sales staff is proactive in asking questions, listening and formulating a solution. This usually ends up in a customized format. All are regular employees.

Targeting $415,000 in Workforce Solutions. The overattainment goal is usually 40-50%.

The goal is $4.7M. The group goal is to be totally self supporting (bldg. lease, utilities, salaries, etc.) in five years. They are currently 2 ½ years into the plan. The COO and the group determine the financial goal as outlined in the five-year business plan.

The goal is $2MD. The projected retained revenue is $80,000.

The goal is $6M. We count FTSE and utilize general funds.

Who determines your financial goal? Does it come from the president of the college-the Board or others?

The Dean determines the financial goal and the President approves the goal.

The Dean/Executive Director of the Employee Training Institute

The campus president and dean determine the financial goals. The board approves the general fund budget.

67

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

Are retained revenue dollars reinvested into your Corporate Training Center or do they go to the college as a whole?

What is the percent retained revenue to the total financial goal?

How are revenue and expenses tracked on a monthly basis?

The college sweeps 22% for overhead, and 3% goes to IT Services. The plan calls for $100,000 retained revenue in year three or 20% of CCE. Year 1 – cover direct costs, Year 2 – Cover direct costs & admin. Costs Year 3 $100,000 or 20% of CCE income. Public is 5% and CT 15%-20%. Spreadsheet. Each class and contract is tracked and reviewed monthly.

Retained revenue dollars are reinvested into the Corporate College

Utilize the Enterprise Budget which covers all costs and reinvests the revenue into the Workforce Solutions group as needed. 40% - 50%

Once breakeven is obtained, the retained revenue dollars will be reinvested into the organization and a portion given back to the college. 40% - 60%

The dollars may go the college. The funds go into the 501C3 as retained earnings.

Retained revenue goes back to the college as a whole. Our area is part of the college capital cascading plan. Revenue consists of cash and FullTime Student Equivalents (FTSE). Retained revenue is 14%

55%-65%

40%

By own enrollment financial people on a contract training sheet. An expense summary form is developed and done before & after the contract starts.

Reports from DataTel. Each contract is tracked and complete reports are reviewed monthly.

Through Continuity 2000 and Oracle. Reports track revenue and expenses for all programs. These reports are reviewed monthly and reported to the President.

QuickBooks.

Reports from Banner.

68

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

What are the sources of revenue?

Contract training and open enrollment

Contract sales, open enrollment, facility rental, corporate lease, subsidy.

Contract sales in training, consulting, assessment, and room rental.

Contract training, Scenarios On-Line, Center for Global Languages, Consulting Services, Open Enrollment, facility rental. Cover expenses and have 60% margin in contract training, 40%-60% margin in consulting and 40% margin in open enrollment.

How do you price your contracts? Is there a specific formula for pricing?

Each contract is priced individually to include expenses/costs, overhead, profit to program, etc.

Cover expenses and have 55%-65% retained revenue. No specific formula.

Cover expenses and have a 40%50% overattainment. Pricing is divided by regular, Government, discount and minimum.

Contract training in Fiscal Project Management Services, Organizational Development & Customer Training, Workforce Dev. & fee based Professional Dev. Cover expenses of the contract and build in a 40% for indirect.

Contract training, grants, tuition, credit feeds, non-credit fees, and FTSE.

$600/half day plus books for soft skills. There is a template for automatic calculation with 40% indirect costs and program charges.

69

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

How are you structured? If you could start over— would you structure like this again?

CCE is divided under a VP and a Dean. Directors report to Assoc. Deans. Sales will sell a contract, pass to a Program Developer, but still stay in the loop for future sales. This structure is 2 years old. Yes.

Ex. Dirs. Report to President of Corporate College. Sales will sell a contract and pass lead to Program Manager, but still stay in the loop. The model is routinely reviewed and “tweeked.”

Workforce Solutions is divided into teams. Business Development Manager sells the contract. The Client Services Manager works on the contract details along with the Program Assistant. This is a new model.

What motivates staff members to do exemplary work?

We hire high achievers who want to do good work. The motivation comes from within. DataTel. This was sold to the “curriculum” side with no plan for CE. It has issues.

Buy-in to mission and reward system for lead generation. Always tell the real story.

Want to serve the customer and achieve success with the contract. Buy-in to the Learning College concept. DataTel. Works well.

Sales obtains the lead, conducts a sales call, then brings in a rep from the Business Solutions Group to assist with the solution, sales presents the proposal, closes, and passes back to the Solutions Group for fulfillment. Yes, they would organize like this again. Recognition and compensation plan. Everyone working together to attain the same goal.

The business developer obtains the lead and prescreens. The business developer and/or the executive director will call on the lead. When business is closed, it is passed to others for fulfillment. Yes, they would structure like this again. Bonuses, feeling part of the team, love of the organization, sense of ownership, and proud of the work they do. A customized Access database prepared just for this area. It is working great.

The Center for Business Solutions sells the contracts and we work with a coordinator and support staff to deliver. The whole division was done by acquisition and is slowly moving into a new structure.

What database registration system are you using? How is it working?

Banner. It doesn’t work well for noncredit. Trying to use Astra.

Continuity 2000. Worked better than Banner. We customized reports and hired an administrator.

Reputation of programs, passion for programs, step progression plan, success of students now and in the future, & benefits. Banner works for credit programs, but doesn’t work for Cntr. for Trng. & Dev.

70

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

Do you post grades or transcripts in CE? Is registration for the whole college or is it a separate entity for CE? Do you have online registration?

Grades are pass/fail and transcripts are posted. Separate entity just for CE registration.

Grades and transcripts are posted. Registration is a separate entity.

Yes, grades and transcripts are posted. Registration is for the whole college because there are no lines between credit and non-credit. Yes.

No

No

Separate entity just for this group.

Separate entity just for ETI.

No. We show clock hours, but no grades. We do transcript CEUs. Whole college.

What activities are defined as marketing in your organization?

Yes. We have phone and online, but it has issues. People don’t like to give SS#. Direct mail, email blasts, radio, trade show, chamber events,

No. Customers must still fax in paperwork or call.

Yes.

No.

Catalog, print collateral, media sponsorship, radio, advertising

Print materials, newspaper advertising, TV & Radio ads, Enewsletter, community work, foundation work.

Branding, lead generation, direct mail, advertising, networking, trade shows, etc.

Website, showcase, collaborations in the county, page in college schedule, co-sponsoring events, e-mail blasts, networking, presence on district website and marketing packet.

Yes. On-line is for credit and non-credit classes if they are current students. Flyers for individuals programs.

71

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

What is your marketing budget? How is it determined? How does your marketing tie in with other areas of the college?

The marketing budget for CCE is $300,000. The budget for sales is $23,000.

The marketing budget for Corporate and Workforce College is $1.2M. Ties to college brand, but is separate from credit.

Do you track your marketing pieces? If so, please explain how it is done.

Not yet. We do have two phone numbers, an alias URL, search feature, etc.

No

The marketing budget for the whole college is $450,000. This doesn’t include $480,000 for the schedule. Workforce Solutions has some marketing money. Non-credit is tracked—credit isn’t tracked. Tracking is done by website hits, increase in phone calls, and asking people on a survey. This is still being developed. Direct mail is the most effective marketing method. The distance learning brochure is the least effective.

The marketing budget is $600,000. The marketing ties to the college brand, but is very specific for Valencia Enterprises.

The marketing budget was $40,000, and now it is $10,000. Trying to be more aggressive with other areas of the college and using a new seal containing the district logo. Yes. Have tracked marketing pieces before the current CRM database.

The marketing budget is $5,000. It doesn’t tie in at this time.

What has been the most effective marketing method? What is your least effective marketing method?

Radio has been the most effective. NPR Talk Radio works. Tiny calendars were the least effective.

Don’t know. Just started tracking hits to web site and print material. May do away with catalog.

Yes. We use a marketing code to differentiate between the course flyer and the catalog. Also did specific mailings to homes and businesses and tracked return. Customers were sent to the web to fill out a survey. Direct mail of letters has been most effective. Mass mailing is least effective. We are discontinuing our course catalog.

No.

E-mail campaign, our website, showcase, partnerships and referrals are the most effective methods. The least effective method is mailers

Getting in front of the customer. Cold calling is the least effective method.

72

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

Do you know how effective your brand is in the marketplace? If so, please explain. Does your college have multiple brands, tag-lines and logos?

Do you know your top 25 customers? Do you have an active and regular contact program with them? If so, how do you track them? What is the dollar volume of your largest customer? Why are they your top customer?

We have one brand and one tagline. We are phasing out the little brands. There is sub brands (1) college to business, (2) college to student, (3) college to customer. We focus on audiences. Yes. Yes. Spreadsheet. Top customer is $79,000. They like the content, instructor, & the price. We are very responsive and have good quality.

There is one brand and one tagline. Many people still don’t know what we do.

There is one brand, one tagline and one logo. Doing a communication’s audit.

The brand is becoming more effective and generating more leads. There were multi logos, but that is shrinking into one.

The brand is getting more recognizable. There is not a consistent look and feel with other college marketing materials

The Pima brand has wide recognition. Our division brand has minimal recognition. The college doesn’t have multiple tag-line or logos. We are working on our external brand.

Yes. Regular contact. Track on spreadsheet with 10 of top 30 meeting quarterly on networking basis. Top customer is $1M. They like our programs, the people selling and delivering the product, and we guarantee our programs.

Yes. We know our top customers and track them in ACT! Top customer is $300,000. Customers use the college because of quality, proximity to college, and grant money.

Yes. We know and track our customers in Goldmine and Continuity 2000. The top customer is $75,000. Our customers work with us because we are flexible, independent, more market driven, and it doesn’t take a committee to decide if they can do it.

Yes. Yes. Customers are tracked in our CRM system which was customized just for ETI. The top customer is $100,000. Customers use us because we seek to understand their needs, we respond quickly and treat them well.

Yes. Yes. They are tracked in ACT! The largest customer is $4M since 1998. Customers work with us because of the long-term relationship.

73

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

Do officers of your college make sales lead calls to your top customers? (Executive Key Accounts)

Yes. The college president is very connected. He passes off leads to us.

Yes. President of college helped get us into hard to approach company. President opens doors and helps sell huge sponsorships for Jack Welch Conference. No

Do you reward customers for doing business with you? If so, how?

No

Please explain your customer service model.

Put customers first. Improve the overall customer expectations, dev. quality standards, & evaluate the results. Achieve customer repeat ratio of 30%.

Don’t have one.

Yes. Leads routinely come from the college President, Executive VPs and Deans. The President of the college is wellknown in the area and obtains specific leads. Yes. We have nominated customers for awards. Also took 80 customers to Anne Arundel night at the ballpark. We don’t say “no”, or we find a partner who can assist. We strive for 100% customer satisfaction.

Yes. The President of the college has many contacts and brings back leads.

Yes. Many contacts are made throughout the college and not necessarily coordinated through ETI.

Yes. The campus president makes many contacts and passes off leads.

No.

Yes. We provide a luncheon with free food and awards for our top customers.

No.

We are very customer focused, and don’t have the word “no” in our vocabulary.

We understand the need, work on a timeline, gather resources, clearly communicate, make the customer feel important, and treat our internal customers well.

We have open communication and promise to always get the answer for the customer. We are entrepreneurial and look for the best solutions for the customer.

74

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

Is an employee pre-assessment utilized? If so, please explain the pre-assessment. Is an employee post-assessment utilized? If so, please explain the post-assessment.

Yes. There is a questionnaire they can fill out on line.

Yes. Training needs analysis questionnaire. Each area has a different pre and post assessment. Yes. Could be online, fill in form or observation.

Yes. There is a questionnaire they can fill out on line.

Depends on the training. We use a pre-assessment in ESL and also IT from Element K or the instructor. A postassessment is sometimes used, but is often part of the course.

Yes. We use Survey Monkey.

Yes. We use Survey Monkey. We also use Causus for ESL.

Yes. We use Asset or Compass for the basic skills area.

A post assessment is sometimes used when we are measuring performance.

Do you charge for these assessments? If so, what is the fee? Do you use other assessments? If so, please explain.

No. Not unless customized.

Yes/No. Depends on the type of assessment.

We may charge, but it is often part of the course.

Yes. Depends on the type of assessment.

Yes. A 360 and on-line assessments based on competencies.

Pre-employment screening, placement & promotion, succession planning, employee dev., 360, and career development

Yes. We use assessments for the Motor Vehicle Association and others.

Yes. We use Survey Monkey, observation, oneon-one, focus groups, etc.

Yes. We may administer the same battery of tests as the pre-assessment. The instructor may give a portfolio and performance assessment. We charge for the language assessment. It is $1,250 for a group of 25 employees in ESL. Yes. We also conduct a skills assessment.

Yes. A credit assessment is built in automatically.

No

Clep testing is used.

75

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

Do you measure ROI? If so, please explain. If so, how is this articulated back to the customer? Do you charge the customer to measure ROI? If so, please discuss the fee. If you measure and report ROI, how beneficial is this to build repeat business? How does the college make decisions on the level of investment it will make in this area?

No. However, we are moving in that area.

No

No

Yes. The Senior Performance Consultant measures results at multiple levels and identified the impact of solutions on the organization.

No. However, we are looking a company with an ROI worksheet.

No

76

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

How do you run your Corporate Training Center like a business in an academic atmosphere?

Bonus plan for sales staff, easily hire & fire, retained revenue goes back to the Corporate Center, Upper Management totally supports us, Fulfillment team takes over the account after it is sold, Everyone says the same 30second commercial

Run everything we can outside the college system. Treat purchasing and registration as subcontractor, and build in time for them to do what they need to do.

Regularly talk with the staff about goals and achievements. Utilize the Enterprise Budget to bring the money back to the Center. Ticket booth at BWI airport. Credit and & Non-credit work together for the right solution for the customer.

Do you sell training for credit? If so, how successful is this. What is the fee?

Little credit training is sold. Leads are passed to credit. Most companies don’t want semester training.

No

Yes. Very successful. We can modify credit courses and offer to businesses. There is a 15% markup.

We are a separate unit from the college with our own building, staff to operate the building, and responsibility to cover all the costs of rent, utilities, payroll, expenses of the programs, etc. We follow a business plan and specific goals to be successful in this start-up business. We measure cost and yield on everything. We handle our own registration and billing, etc. No. Not yet.

We are a 501C3 organization and generally separate from the rest of the college. We have a grant that assists with some salaries, our own CRM database, accounting, HR, operations, marketing, and business developer. We have our own board. The group is entrepreneurial, and we have paid bonuses to staff members since 1999. Yes. We sell credit with any of the colleges in the district. The faculty is paid by the college and ETI reimburses the college.

We do 90% of all the contracts of the college and the majority is for credit. We can turn a credit contract for a company in 48 hours in a customized manner. There is no curriculum council approval. We have the full support from our campus president and can be entrepreneurial. We found ways around using Banner. Yes. This is highly successful as we conduct the majority of our business in credit contract training.

77

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

How is your support staff organized? (Do they work in a pool or report to just one director?) What are the titles for your support staff?

They work for individual directors and have specific duties Exec. Sec. Sr., Exec. Sec., Adm. Sec. Sr., Adm. Sec., Program Assistant, Adm. Assistant, Adm. Clerk. Yes, the Administrative Secretary Senior enters data into DataTel

They report to individual directors. There is four support staff.

Support staff report to different directors.

Support staff report to different directors.

Adm. Coord. II Coordinator II Office Mgr. III Adm. Assistant

Program Assistant, Administrative Assistant I, and Program Developer. Yes. They use DataTel to enter course sections, date, times, instructors, sponsorships, 3rd party billing, etc. They also enter data into ACT! The support staff helps with implementation, paperwork and room scheduling. The coordinator gets the instructors and feeds information to support staff. 78

Solution Specialists. They used to be Training Support Specialists.

Any support staff is also responsible for a program area. The staff is crosstrained and does administrative work as needed. Program Assistants

The support staff is organized in a pool to be utilized by the workforce. Support Tech, Fiscal Support Specialist and Program Assistant

Does your support staff enter data into the college database?

Please explain the role of your support staff in scheduling of classes.

The Program Developer and Program Assistant do the scheduling—not the support staff. They do order books and call the instructor, however.

Yes. This includes instructional contracts, scheduling new classes, budget change requests, PO’s. Banner is cumbersome, and trying to obtain a “work around”. Admin Coord. II and Coordinator II get the class schedule from the program manager containing dates. They create a section and then call the instructor with date and time.

Yes. They use Continuity 2000 to enter course sections, date, times, instructors, etc.

Yes. They enter data into their CRM system which is Access.

Yes

They would enter the date and rooms in the system for the class. They would also change dates. However, they don’t actually schedule the class with the instructor.

They work with the instructors to schedule the classes and then enter this information into the CRM.

The courses are scheduled by the managers and then the support staff enter the information into Banner.

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

How closely does your support staff work with registration?

The Program Assistants work closely with registration.

Not closely. Support staff can’t register people.

They don’t actually register. They do review the forms for accuracy. Business Development Manager sells, gives info to Program Assistant to enter in DataTel. They also work with clients with special needs, certificates, evaluations, deliver books, start a class, post grades, print certificates, etc.

Please explain the role of your support staff in the fulfillment of contract sales.

The Program Assistant helps the Program Developer fulfill the contracts.

No direct role. Everyone assists in selling. Support staff prepares materials and schedules rooms/food if on college site.

They don’t actually register people for classes. They keep track until after the class goes, and then operations does the registration. It is all related to implementation. The Order Entry Form comes from the Sales Team to the Business Solutions Group and those support staff. They work as a team. They will enter the class into Continuity 2000, order books, materials, prepare instructor packets, tent cards, evaluations, roster and put them in the plastic bins for the instructors to pick up. All upcoming contracts or classes for the next four weeks show up on the “Radar Screen”.

They are registration. They use the CRM to register students into classes. They order books, schedule dates, do contracts, and prepare everything for the class.

They work directly with the registration staff.

They track student issues, invoicing, produce class materials, order books, track data and do research.

79

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

What are the best practices for your Corporate Training Center?

(1) Strategic Plan with buy-in from all levels. (2) Clearly defined goals with Director performance goals & processes identified. (3) Business model of sales, marketing, programming & operations. (4) Collaboration with “curriculum” or credit area (5) Ability to create new programs.

Flexibility—can move on a dime (2) Employees are from business (3) Very customer focused (4) Very entrepreneurial (5) Everyone is held accountable (6) Expanding the vendor partnerships for on-line training (7) Quality area (8) Technology solutions (9) Internal curriculum created for leadership (10) facilities (11) Clear vision & mission— everyone says the same thing.

(1) Blurred lines between credit and non-credit. Can use curriculum from the different Institutes on campus (2) Utilize Enterprise Budget to hire additional people or launch new projects (3) BWI Satellite Center (4) Streamlined processes with checklists (5) Strategic Plan is a living document and guides the Workforce Solutions Group.

(1) Created a Corporate Culture (2) Team incentives when the whole org. reaches the goal (3) Sell solutions instead of classes (4) Consulting practices using Performance Management (5) Autonomy from the college (6) Directors report to COO (7) Ability to move quickly and make needed changes. (8) New instructor process and tool kit (9) Ability to hire positions as needed.

(1) Leverage multiple projects for overall benefit of the organization (2) Mix contracted services with government grants with fee class operations that funding can be leveraged to create a full service consulting/training operation. (3) Entrepreneurial (4) Partnerships & collaborations that build win-win. (5) Bonus plan (6) Grant to help cover salaries

(1) Insist on quality (2) Student outcomes focuses (3) Fair pricing (4) Creativity (5) Willingness to collaborate (6) Customer service (7) High level of information flow (8) Handle conflict immediately. We don’t do conflict avoidance (9) Hire good personnel

80

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

What are the best practices for your sales area?

(1) Implementation of sales team two years ago. (2) Work in vertical markets or segments. (3) Training Matrix tracks & gives leads (4) ENewsletter sent monthly to targeted segments (5) Pass lead to Program Developer. (6) Get leads from college President (7) Use of ACT.

(1) Come from business background (2) Work in vertical markets (3) Selling a wide variety of programs as solutions including Lean, Six Sigma, etc. (4) Team selling (5) Commission plan

Who decided these best practices? Who would change or update them?

Vice President and Dean

President and staff. Customers and leadership team.

(1) Divided into teams (2) Grant money for corporate training (3) Ability to sell the “whole” college rather it be credit or noncredit to provide a solution (4) All contract training goes though the Center for Workforce Solutions (5) ACT (6) Instructor review process (7) Orientation packet & process (8) Immediate written follow up of evaluation to company (9) Comprehensive curriculum and product line. President, VP, and Dean.

(1) Bring the content team to the customer’s area. (2) Solution Selling (3) Consistent in pricing (4) Getting away from just selling classes (5) Consulting practices (6) Have our own P&L and autonomy. (7) Commission plan

(1) Attitude of customer service “can do” and confidence (2) Business Development person locates the leads and prescreens (3) React quickly to organize resources, get team in place and take advantage of opportunities.

(1) Checklist for tasks (2) Open communication (3) Standardized budget model (4) Flexibility of credit and noncredit for our customers

President, COO and Directors. The COO and Directors would change or update them.

The Dean/Executive Director of ETI

The Dean

81

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

How do you measure success?

By revenue & enrollment, by repeat customers, and by attainment of performance goals by Directors. (1)Competition (2)Limit to resources (3)Finding the right partners to work with us

Repeat business, sales volume, customer testimonials, customer referrals.

What are the biggest challenges facing your Corporate Training Center?

Banner – can’t register on-line, college systems we have to follow, funding for the college, independent consultants who compete.

Key indicators such as enrollment, revenue, FTE, customer satisfaction ratings and number of clients. (1) Not fully staffed (2) Quantity of work (3) Becoming a cohesive team (4) Limited resources (5) Changing systems and processes

By asking if we are better today than yesterday. By checking revenue, and bottom line.

(1) Obtaining enough sales volume to breakeven (2) Long sales cycle (3) Not everyone in the college understands what we do (4) Getting the message out to our customers (5) Changing the culture (6) If we have all the right people and they are “on board”.

Contributions we make to the organization, diversity of projects, and expertise to meet the needs, and if we complete the year in the black. (1) Aging workforce (2) Not strategic as an overall organization (some classes are free) (3) Building even stronger collaborations and partnerships

Evaluations, return business, passing rate on exams, revenue generation, and SBDC is loans and venture capital. (1) Economy (2) Lack of large private sector to conduct business (3) Marketing (4) Balance between academic & revenue side of house (5) Companies do internal training. (6) Need better external branding

82

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

What holds you back from “Running it like a business?”

What is the greatest level of success that you can envision for your group in the future? What is the likelihood of achieving it?

Internal systems – ITS and HR, registering online, financial system that is always real time, inflexibility of community college system, and DataTel. From $5.7M, grow the revenue 6% per year. Very likely.

Working in an academic atmosphere and certain processes.

Keeping pace with demand, finding qualified instructors, and space.

We are “running it like a business”. We weigh each hiring decision heavily as it will affect the P&L. Everyone is working hard to reach the goals.

Top level support.

Community college structure approval processes & policies.

$10.2M. 80%

Four or five more Breakeven and Client Service begin making a Teams and 20% profit in 2 ½ years. of Continuing Ed. FTE.

$3M given the right funding streams. Not likely.

Grow programs to $6.5M. This is very likely.

83

Benchmarking Questions

Central Piedmont

Cuyahoga Corporate College

Anne Arundel

Valencia Enterprises

San Diego Employee Training Institute

Pima County Community College

What are the critical profiles of types of individuals that are necessary for your success as employees? To what degree is your group staffed by the “right type” of blends of skills, background and character? Is there any way you can envision that you can accelerate the growth of the types of human resources that you ideally need?

Personality type is critical. We look for motivated selfstarters who want CCE to be successful. Our staff is proportioned well. The mix is good and many have only been here 1-3 years. When we grow the programs, we can warrant more staff.

Business oriented, customer focused, very agile, understand solutions, want to work hard, have fun, like what they do. The staff is a good mix, and with future “tweeking” will be positioned for success.

Detail oriented, good with customers, sales knowledge, ability to write good proposals and contracts, good follow up, and team player. We are not totally staffed yet. We must go through all levels of the process to get the right people.

Business background, can accept change, a positive attitude, very creative and not caught up in all the smallest details. In the operations area, all are trained to do each other’s job. This ensures the business keeps going even if someone is absent.

Intelligent, excellent verbal and written communication skills, team player, embraces challenges, insightful with good analytical skills, entrepreneurial tendencies, wants to grow and learn personally, appreciates people, integrity, ethics, great facilitator, resourceful/organiz ed, comfortable existing within a bureaucracy and adapting in a business arena.

Flexibility, initiative, creativity, collegial, change agent, curriculum expertise, negotiation skills, sales, consulting, and understanding of both business and academia.

84

Appendix D Survey Instrument

85

86

87

88

89

90

91

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

100

101

102

103

104

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful