BY STACY TAFF

staff@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — There are
certain moments in life worth
documenting. Whether it’s a
new baby, a wedding, senior
year or even just getting the
family all in one place for
a keepsake photograph, pho-
tography studios can capture
one’s milestones.
At Visual Image Photo
in Delphos, Ty Coil works
behind the scenes as a pho-
tography assistant, graphic
designer and editor to help
create images that meet cus-
tomers’ desires.
“I don’t know whether
you’d say the magic happens
out there in the studio or in
here in the editing room. It’s
kind of like an Oreo cookie;
both sides are good,” she
said. “If you light, pose and
set a photo right, editing
is usually easy. You have
to light people correctly or
everything ends up looking
flat. You also have to know
how to pose people because
you wouldn’t pose a woman
who’s a size 2 the same way
you would pose a woman
who wears a size 14. You
wouldn’t pose a girl the same
way you would pose a guy.
Girls take a lot more work.
Guys usually end up posing
themselves.”
Since Coil works with
subjects of all ages and per-
sonalities, posing can occa-
sionally get complicated.
“I’m the one who gets to
make a fool of myself with the
2-year-olds,” she said. “We
bring out candy, Cheerios and
other things to tempt them
and I get to play peek-a-boo
and stomp my feet, make
funny noises. I’ve got some
sleigh bells in my pocket that
I bust out if I need to. That
stuff only works until they’re
3 or so because at that age
Sat ur day, Febr uar y 25, 2012
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
FFA Olympics, p12
Those Were The Days,
p3
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Memories 8
Classifieds 10
TV 11
World news 12
Index
Clear tonight
with low
in low 20s
and Sunny
Sunday with
high in low
40s. Low in mid 30s.
www.delphosherald.com
City Feed Store comes down
The former City Feed building in Delphos was torn down Friday. The building dated back to the early 1900s and had been in the Odenweller family
since the 1930s. It started as a creamery until the Odenweller family turned it into a grain elevator.
Stacy Taff photos
Staff Reports
DELPHOS — The for-
mer City Feed building was
demolished Friday. The
building sat empty after
Owner Terry Odenweller’s
retirement in October 2010.
He inherited the business
from his father, Vince, who
started it in about 1930.
The building had been
built in 1909 as a cream-
ery. The elder Odenweller
turned it into an agricul-
ture business grinding feed,
buying grain and clover
seed.
He came from a long
line of elevator families.
His father, Edward, was a
co-owner of the Odenweller
Milling Company in
Ottoville. It was locat-
ed along the Miami–Erie
Canal, where boats stopped
to pick up flour, which
was shipped to Toledo and
Cincinnati.
As a creamery, it was
owned by Felix Steinle,
S. F. Shenk, Joseph Roth,
Joe Jettinghoff, A. B.
King, Jettinghoff Bros.,
Theodore Helmkamp,
Edward Scherger, William
Wemmer, Henry Wemmer
and J. J. Duvall. The struc-
ture was 30 X 70, built of
brick, with a frame interior.
Vince Odenweller was
married to Dorothy Ditto,
daughter of Police Chief
Glenn Ditto. They had five
children: Mike, Terry, Barb
Miller, Jim and Sharon
Whitney. Vince passed away
in December 1997. Dorothy
resides in her home on Fort
Jennings Road in Delphos.
Putnam County commissioner
Jerwers Diemer
Jerwers, Diemer
vie for GOP nod
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
OTTAWA — Three
years into a four-year term,
Commissioner Travis Jerwers
is availing himself to voters
for a second term. His seat will
be up for grabs in November
and will be sought by the lone
Democrat vying for it, Mark
Schmiedebush.
If Jerwers is to take him
on, he will first have to be
selected by Republican vot-
ers on March 6. The com-
missioner is being challenged
by former county sheriff Ron
Diemer.
Jerwers touts his conser-
vative credentials of fiscal
responsibility during his time
in office.
“I’m running for re-elec-
tion to continue serving the
taxpayers of Putnam County
and get their tax dollars spent
the best way they can for their
benefit,” he said.
Jerwers said paying off
the jail was among the more
important accomplishments to
have taken place.
“We worked together as
a team to get the jail paid
off; it’s been long-standing
and we’re starting to get our
debt with our landfill to be
worked out. Also, I’ve been
fiscally responsible with how
my votes are and the spend-
ing for the best benefit to
taxpayers,” he said. “We paid
off the jail by working with
some bonds to get it reduced
from the projected years; we
had that cut in half and we
did all the interest and made
payments over a period on an
annual basis.”
However, there was a sales
tax increase that passed because
the other commissioners sup-
ported it. Jerwers explains why
he voted against it:
“I didn’t feel another tax
was feasible. I thought we
were going good the way it
was and wasn’t necessary.
That was my feeling and opin-
ion on the tax hike,” he said.
Having had a 27-year career
in law enforcement, Diemer
says he knows how to run a
jail. He says the county lock-
up is being under-utilized.
“I feel the jail needs to be
full instead of only running
at 1/3 capacity. It needs to
be filled to offset the budget.
If you house prisoners from
other counties, there is a per
diem cost that you get and it
offsets the extra expense of
housing those extra prisoners.
We have a jail that holds 96
people and last I knew, it had
about 30 prisoners in it. I ran
a jail for 16 years and I kept it
full. That money comes from
other counties’ general fund
and into ours and still leaves
money left over to offset bud-
get shortages despite the extra
costs involved,” he said.
At the beginning of the
recession, there was contro-
versy between commission-
ers and Sheriff Jim Beutler
because commissioners
implemented cuts across the
board without exempting law
enforcement. Diemer said
he doesn’t think the depart-
ment should have been spared
because it could house other
counties’ inmates to offset the
cut.
The Vietnam War veteran
was at the police department
in Leipsic for 14 years before
running for sheriff in 1984
and serving until 2000. He
thinks it’s time for change
in the commissioners’ office
and says his experience at
managing a budget, depart-
ment personnel, his knowl-
edge of criminal and civil law
and school board service at
Vantage Career Center quali-
fies him for the job.
“It’s time for change in
Putnam County. We have
flooding issues — not just
in Ottawa but throughout the
county. We have sewer issues
to address and the jail needs to
be full,” he said. “My goal is
to work for the people of the
county, that they get the most
out of their tax dollars.”
Jerwers echoed that senti-
ment:
“My sole purpose for being
here in the office is to work for
the benefit of the taxpayers,
their money and we’re literally
servants of the public. It’s not
just lip-service,” he said.
The commissioner went
on to address concerns there
may be a conflict of interest.
His father, Tom Jerwers, was
appointed to sit on the board
of elections by the county
Republican Party’s Central
Committee. The commission-
er said he doesn’t know how
voters will perceive the issue.
“I wouldn’t be treated any
different,” he said. “The same
old departments are treated on
an equal basis with budgets
and such.”
It’s My Job
Photo submitted
Photographer’s assistant Ty Coil
Coil’s job a snap
Library to host
Beauty 101
The Delphos Public
Library will host Beauty 101
at 6:30 p.m. on Monday at
the First Edition Building.
Stylists from Shear
Brilliance will present skin
care, hair style and make-up
tips and answer questions
you might have on your
daily beauty regimen.
This free program is
for ages 12 and older.
Registration is appreci-
ated but not required.
St. John’s sets
Catholicism class
St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church will hold
a 10-week class called
“Catholicism — Journey Of
A Lifetime” in the annex on
South Jefferson Street begin-
ning on March 3. Classes
will be held at 7 p.m.
Participants will watch a
DVD and have discussion
with the Rev. Jacob Gordon
on the weekly topic and learn
more about the Catholic faith.
The class is open to mem-
bers and non-members.
Call 419-695-4050 to
register. There will be free
babysitting and food.
See COIL, page 12
Local / Area Boys
Basketball
Celina 67, Bath 62;
Columbus Grove 57,
Delphos Jefferson 32;
Continental 48, Pandora-
Gilboa 29; Crestview 68,
Ada 56; Delphos St. John’s
55, Coldwater 49; Elida 65,
Defiance 61; Findlay 71,
Lima Sr. 51; Ft. Recovery
62, New Bremen 56; Patrick
Henry 66, Van Buren 55;
Wayne Trace 42, Ottoville
37; Kalida 56, Fairview 40;
Kenton 54, Wapakoneta
46; Leipsic 92, Ft. Jennings
66; Lima Cent. Cath. 62,
Bluffton 40; Perry 61,
McComb 52; Shawnee 57,
St. Marys Memorial 55; Lima
Temple Christian 55, Hardin
Northern 41; Lincolnview
67, Allen East 53; Marion
Local 59, Minster 50; Miller
City 69, Hicksville 57;
Ottawa-Glandorf 63, Van
Wert 55; Spencerville 70,
Paulding 33; St. Henry 58,
New Knoxville 48; Tol. Cent.
Cath. 59, Tol. St. John’s 57;
Tol. St. Francis 56, Oregon
Clay 52; Tol. Whitmer 59,
Fremont Ross 43
Division IV
Botkins 50, Ft. Loramie
49; Day. Jefferson 89,
Lewisburg Tri-County N.
36; Sidney Lehman 70,
Ansonia 27; Troy Christian
64, Cedarville 29
Girls
Division IV
Danville 58, Tree of Life
51; Fairfield Christian 46,
Cols. Wellington 28; Morral
Ridgedale 54, Granville
Christian 24; Shekinah
Christian 68, Groveport
Madison Christian 27
2
VOTE FOR
Republican
DENZIL R. WORTMAN
(Denny)
Paid for by: Committee to elect Denzil R. Wortman, County Commissioner.
Phyllis Wortman, Treasurer, 13005 Richey Road, Van Wert, OH 45891
• LifelongresidentofVanWert
County and Pleasant Township.
• Ownandoperateafarm.
• EmployeeofChryslerAmplex/GKN
for31yearsuntilclosing.
• DegreeinElectronicsEngineering.
• MajoredinBusinessAdministration.
• LicensedPrivatePilotw/InstrumentRatings
VAN WERT COUNTY COMMISSIONER JAN. 3, 2013 TERM
WHY PAY
MORE?
RED
BOX
AT
McDonald’s
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419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth St.
Delphos
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419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth St.
Delphos
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419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth St.
Delphos
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419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth St.
Delphos
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419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth St.
Delphos
419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth St.
Delphos
Choice�Travel
Buckeye�Charter’s
1235�E.�Hanthorn�Rd.
Lima,�OH��45804
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-17
Public Invited
SAT., FEB. 25
American Legion Post 715
100 Legion Drive, Ft. Jennings, Ohio
Carryout - $7.00
starting at 4:30 p.m.
CHICKEN FRY
6:30 p.m. until 11:00 p.m.
All You Can
Eat and Drink
$
13
per
person
The Legion Hall is available for Weddings, Receptions and
Parties. For information call 419-286-2100 or 419-286-2192
MARY’S
A&W ROOT BEER
924 E. Fifth St. Delphos
419-695-1632
Hours:
Open Daily at 10:30 a.m.
Sun.-Thurs. close at 9 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. close at 10 p.m.
$
3
99
2 – The Herald Saturday, Februaryt 25, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
FUNERAL
LOTTERY
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CorreCtions
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 194
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising
manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $1.48
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
I often peruse news web sites in the evening
just to see what everyone else is talking about
and, of course, see what strange and bizarre
events occurred.
I came across the tidbit about teen/tween
girls posting self-polls asking viewers if they are
attractive.
I found this very disturbing on many lev-
els. Why are these young girls seeking the
approval of their physical attributes from strang-
ers? Technology is wonderful and/or horrible
depending on who has it and how it is used.
There have been web sites around for years.
I remember “Hot or Not” where kids would put
pictures of themselves on the site and others
would rate them from 1-10.
Their mothers were shocked. Yeah. They
should be. Monitoring a child’s Internet access
and use is imperative in this world. You never
know who your child could let into your home.
We’ve all seen the news stories. It can be tragic.
I find this trend tragic, as well.
We all know outside beauty is skin deep but
we are bombarded daily by svelte models telling
us you have to be skinny to get attention and if
you don’t use this lipstick or wear that outfit,
you’ll never fit in.
As adults, most of us know this is not true.
We know the value of ourselves is what we have
to offer — our talents and our minds.
Kids are different. Don’t you remember what
it was like to be young and vulnerable? The
uncertainty. Never knowing if you’re doing
things right and fearing someone watching and
then making fun or even worse, telling every-
one? The nervous excitement and the dread; the
bullies and the teachers and the other students
and the social awkwardness?
Parents need to be engaged. Kids are looking
far outside the family unit for approval. They are
desperately seeking validation for who they are
why they are here.
What is even sadder is that we, as a society,
do value pretty over not so much. We do treat
people differently based on how they look. We
fawn over movie stars and ogle models and wish
we were more like them. We aren’t teenage girls,
either.
I watched a TV program once where a beauti-
ful woman was put in a fat suit and went out and
about. At one point, she dropped a glove and no
one passing by bent down to pick it up. They all
watched as she struggled to do it.
She took off the fat suit and did the same
thing and people fell over themselves, women
included, to make sure she got her glove back.
She said she found the experience very
enlightening and quite disturbing.
No, not everyone is beautiful. I am not really
referring to just looks. People can be pretty but
have a terrible personality that makes them a
lot less attractive. A lot of people are a whole
lot easier to be around until they open their
mouths.
Kids should not have to wonder if they are
cute or ugly or if some stranger finds them
attractive. All kids are beautiful because they
represent our hope and our future. We need to
nurture them.
Do you remember the commercial with Kelly
LeBrock: “Don’t hate me because I’m beauti-
ful?” I always replied back at the TV: “I don’t. I
hate you because you are conceited.”
I didn’t really hate her. I just found the whole
premise ridiculous.
See what I mean? We don’t send the right
message to our kids or each other for that mat-
ter.
NANCY SPENCER
On the
Other hand
Delphos City schools
Week of Feb. 26-30
Monday: Charbroiled ham-
burger sandwich, cheese slice,
oven potatoes, fruit, lowfat
milk.
Tuesday: Soft taco, lettuce
and cheese, mixed vegetables,
mandarin oranges, pretzel rod,
lowfat milk.
Wednesday: Italian dip-
pers, dipping sauce, baby car-
rots with ranch dip, apple-
sauce cup, lowfat milk.
Thursday: lowfat milk.
Friday: lowfat milk.
st. John’s
Week of Feb. 26-30
Monday: Hamburger sand-
wich/ pickle and onion or cold
meat sandwich, assorted fries,
salad, pears, milk.
Tuesday: Chicken wrap/
lettuce/ tomato/ cheese or
cold meat sandwich, cheddar
whales, salad, peaches, milk.
Wednesday: Rotini/ meat-
sauce/ garlic toast or shred-
ded chicken sandwich, jello,
salad, turnover, milk.
Thursday: Italian grilled
chicken sandwich or Sloppy
Jo sandwich, California
blend/cheese, salad, mixed
fruit, milk.
Friday: Italian dippers
or cream of broccoli soup/
crackers/ cheese stick, peas,
salad, applesauce, milk.
Landeck
Week of Feb. 26-30
Monday: Ham sandwich,
baked beans, fruit, milk.
Tuesday: Breaded chicken
nuggets, dinner roll, corn,
fruit, milk.
Wednesday: Tacos, but-
ter/peanut butter bread, green
beans, fruit, milk.
Thursday: Hamburger
sandwich, french fries, fruit,
milk.
Friday: Macaroni and
cheese, butter/peanut but-
ter bread, lettuce salad, fruit,
milk.
Fort Jennings
Week of Feb. 26-30
Chocolate, white or straw-
berry milk served with all
meals.
H.S. - Ala Carte - Pretzel
and cheese available every
Friday; Salad bar with fruit
available every Wednesday
except during Lent.
Monday: Chicken nuggets,
dinner roll, green beans, fruit.
Tuesday: Fiestata, cocoa
bar, corn, fruit.
Wednesday: Spaghetti and
meatsauce, breadstick, green
beans, fruit.
Thursday: Taco, refried
beans, mixed vegetables,
fruit.
Friday: Fish sandwich,
peas, cheese slice, sherbet,
fruit.
ottoville
Week of Feb. 26-30
Monday: Sloppy Joe, tator
tots, corn, pineapple, milk.
Tuesday: Popcorn chick-
en, augratin potatoes, butter
bread, peaches, milk.
Wednesday: Chicken faji-
ta w/cheese-lettuce/tomato,
corn, applesauce cup, cookie,
milk.
Thursday: Chicken strips,
baked potato, butter bread,
pears, milk.
Friday: Grilled cheese,
tomato soup (4-12), green
beans (K-3), cookie, peaches,
milk.
spencerville
Week of Feb. 26-30
Monday: Hamburger sand-
wich, fries, sour apple shape
up, milk.
Tuesday: Breaded chicken
patty sandwich, corn, peach
crumble, milk.
Wednesday: Salisbury
steak, mashed potatoes and
gravy, 8 grain dinner roll,
applesauce, milk.
Thursday: Southwest pizza,
toppings, corn, peaches, milk.
Friday: Fish sandwich or
fish nuggets, french fries, lime
sherbet, cupcake, milk.
HUGHes, Miriam, 73,
of Portage, Mich., memo-
rial Mass will be celebrat-
ed at 11 a.m. Feb. 27 at
St. Monica’s Church with
a visitation starting at 10
a.m. and a reception to
follow service. In lieu of
flowers, memorials are
to West Michigan Cancer
Center, KIA, Richmond
Center and St. Monica’s
Church. Friends may leave
messages for the family at
www.avinkcremation.com.
Arrangements by Avink
Funeral Home Cremation
Society, Schoolcraft,
Mich.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
The winning numbers in
Friday evening’s drawing of
the Ohio Lottery
Pick 3
6-5-8
Pick 4
1-9-4-1
Rolling Cash 5
03-04-05-28-36
Ten OH
05-12-14-23-25-29-34-38-
41-44-53-56-57-62-63-66-72-
75-78-79
EL PASO, Texas (AP) —
A retired British business-
man accused of plotting to
sell missile components to
Iran arrived in the U.S. late
Friday to face charges after
failing to overturn an extra-
dition order.
Christopher Tappin faces
charges in El Paso, Texas,
that he tried in 2006 to buy
specialized batteries for
Hawk missiles for $25,000
from undercover American
agents with the intention of
exporting them to Iran.
According to the U.S.
Attorney’s Office, Tappin
arrived at the city’s air-
port on a commercial flight
Friday evening accompanied
by U.S. Marshals, though he
was able to slip by reporters.
His first court appearance is
scheduled for Monday.
The 65-year-old Tappin
faces up to 35 years in jail if
convicted. He fought extra-
dition for two years until last
month when he was denied
a petition to take the case
to Britain’s Supreme Court.
A subsequent appeal to the
European Human Rights
Court was also rejected.
Tappin denies any wrong-
doing, saying he was the vic-
tim of a sting operation.
The order to deport Tappin
sparked a debate in the U.K.,
where critics claim the coun-
try’s extradition treaty with
the U.S. does not provide
equal protection for British
and American citizens.
Prime Minister David
Cameron has promised to
carefully review the treaty
and a recent independent
study on its balance. That
report, conducted by Lord
Justice Scott Baker, largely
endorsed the treaty and the
overhaul demanded by many
of the deal’s critics doesn’t
appear to be in the cards.
U.S. Marshalls took
Tappin into custody Friday
morning at London’s
Heathrow Airport. He com-
plained to reporters that he
was receiving harsher treat-
ment than Abu Qatada, a
radical, Jordanian-born cler-
ic accused of ties to al-Qaida
who recently received bail in
London.
“I have no rights,” Tappin
said as his wife looked on in
tears. “Abu Qatada is walk-
ing the streets of London
today and we cannot extra-
dite him. He has more rights
than I have. If I was a ter-
rorist, I would not be going
to America. I think it’s a
shame, a disgrace.”
Tappin’s attorney,
Houston based attorney Dan
Cogdell said he will aggres-
sively seek bond.
“He is not a flight risk,
not a terrorist, not a danger,”
Cogdell said. He declined to
comment further.
Tappin was accused in a
2007 three-count indictment
of scheming to export the
batteries to the U.K. without
a license. Court documents
show that a cooperating
defendant provided computer
files that demonstrate Tappin
intended to then send the
batteries to a Tehran-based
company and that he and the
cooperating defendant had
illegally sold U.S. technol-
ogy to Iran in the past.
UK suspect in
Iran missile plot
extradited to US
WASHINGTON (AP) —
President Barack Obama on
Friday declared the U.S. and
its allies would consider “every
tool available” to stop the
slaughter of innocent people in
Syria, using his most forceful
words to date in response to an
increasingly grim crisis that has
gripped the world.
The president did not give
specifics about what the U.S.
or other countries would do to
help. Lacking international con-
sensus on any armed confronta-
tion, and with Syrian President
Bashar Assad unyielding, the
United States has only limited
options and leverage.
“It is absolutely imperative
for the international commu-
nity to rally and send a clear
message to President Assad
that it is time for a transition,”
Obama said after a meeting
with the Danish prime minister.
“It is time for that regime to
move on. And it is time to stop
the killing of Syrian citizens by
their own government.”
The president added that
nations cannot afford to be
“bystanders” as the killing con-
tinues.
Obama spoke shortly after
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton used strong
language to denounce Russia
and China for protecting Syria,
and the president’s language
about the need for world
unity was viewed as a simi-
lar condemnation of those two
nations.
Obama said he was encour-
aged by developments out of
Tunisia on Friday, where more
than 60 nations, in a unified
bloc, asked the United Nations
to begin planning a civilian
peacekeeping mission that
would deploy after the Assad
regime halts its brutal crack-
down on the opposition.
The Tunisia meeting is the
latest international effort to end
the crisis, which began when
protesters inspired by upris-
ings sweeping across the Arab
world took the streets in some
of Syria’s impoverished prov-
inces nearly a year ago to call
for political change.
Assad’s security forces
have responded with a fierce
crackdown. There is no end
in sight.
The government blames
the violence on Islamic
extremists and armed gangs.
The situation has grown
increasingly militarized in
recent months, with oppo-
sition forces increasingly
taken up arms against the
regime. The U.N. estimated
in January that 5,400 people
were killed in the conflict in
2011. Hundreds more have
died since.
Obama’s language was
stronger than in the past, reflect-
ing the worsening humanitar-
ian crisis and the urgent efforts
to help civilians in the short
run.
Among the near-term
options to help civilians are Red
Cross evacuation missions like
one that brought at least seven
wounded people out of Homs
on Friday, and larger interna-
tional efforts to get humanitar-
ian supplies into the country.
The Obama administration
has not called for any specific
action but would almost cer-
tainly be part of any large-scale
humanitarian relief effort that
might be organized over the
coming days or weeks.
Obama: Every tool eyed to stop slaughter in Syria
Don’t hate me because i’m beautiful
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ELECT
BillEVANS
for Van Wert County Commissioner
(/.%34s(!2$7/2+).'s%80%2)%.#%$
Paid for by Citizens for Evans, Ruth Evans, Treasurer
16170 Wren Landeck, Van Wert, OH 45891
VOTE
REPUBLÌCAN PRÌMARY
March 6, 2012
MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT
BILL EVANS
VAN WERT COUNTY COMMÌSSÌONER
· HONEST
· HARD-WORKING
· EXPERIENCED
E
L
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C
T
Bill EVANS
Pa|d lor oy C|l|zers lor Evars Rulr Evars, Treasurer, 1ê1Z0 wrer Lardec|, var werl, 0l 15891
ELECT
BillEVANS
for Van Wert County Commissioner
(/.%34s(!2$7/2+).'s%80%2)%.#%$
Paid for by Citizens for Evans, Ruth Evans, Treasurer
16170 Wren Landeck, Van Wert, OH 45891
E L E C T
B i l l E V A N S
f o r V a n W e r t C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r
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P a i d f o r b y C i t i z e n s f o r E v a n s , R u t h E v a n s , T r e a s u r e r
1 6 1 7 0 W r e n L a n d e c k , V a n W e r t , O H 4 5 8 9 1
Paid for by Citizens for Evans, Ruth Evans, Treasurer, 16170 Wren Landeck,
Van Wert, OH 45891
Republican Primary March 6, 2012
MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT
Bill Evans 4 CommissionEr
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705 E. Main St., Elida
(St. Rt. 309)
(just west of Speedway)
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1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Saturday, February 25, 2012 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
It was a summer evening in
1965. We had moved again.
This time from Midland,
Md., to Mineral Wells, W.Va.
When school started, it would
be the sixth different school
that I had attended in seven
years. If we had stayed in
Maryland I would have been
the starting quarterback for
the Valley High School Black
Knights. I was disappointed,
frustrated, angry and pretty
much fed up with being a
preacher’s kid.
My dad didn’t approve
of me going to dances. But
when my neighbor and only
friend I had made since mov-
ing asked if I wanted to go
with him to check out a dance
at the Pettyville Community
Building; I didn’t hesitate.
We arrived, went into
the lobby area, and began
looking through the open
doors of the gymnasium to
see what was happening. I
was pleased to see that a live
band was playing and was
surprised at how good they
sounded. There were a few
adult chaperones, but most
of the attendees looked like
they were in their teens to
early twenties. Some were
just standing around, a few
others were sitting in chairs,
but most were dancing to the
sounds of rock and roll.
Then it happened. I
noticed a pretty blonde in a
red dress. She looked like
she might be about my age.
I think she saw me looking
at her. Someone said, “The
next dance is “lady’s choice.”
To my surprise, she started
walking toward me. I think
my heart jumped a beat as she
asked me to dance with her.
It was a slow song. I didn’t
have much experience as a
dancer but found myself very
much enjoying having her
hand in mine and holding her
kind of close. We were both
so nervous that we were shak-
ing like we feared something
terrible was going to happen.
Instead, something wonderful
was taking place.
She asked me if I attended
church anywhere. I told her
that my dad was the new
preacher at the Pettyville
United Methodist church.
She said, “That’s funny.
That’s where I go, but I don’t
remember seeing you.” I
explained to her that my dad
knew how disappointed I was
not to be able play football
and finish my senior year at
Valley so he was letting me
take a break from church.
However, I assured her that
I would be at church the next
Sunday. About two and a half
years later, we were married
in that same church.
After we were married,
my wife told me that when
she saw me that evening at
the dance, she turned to her
friend, Mary, and said, “See
that new guy standing in the
doorway. I don’t know how
I know this, but I’m going
to marry him someday.” It
was actually my wife’s mom
who insisted that she ask me
to dance. I’m so glad she did
and I’m so grateful that God
put us together. It’s a phrase
that is over-used, but it was
“love at first sight.”
When I saw our baby
daughter, Chrissy, for the first
time I also fell in love with
her. When she was a little girl
she used to stand on the top
of my feet while we danced.
She has become a beautiful
woman with a husband, two
sons, and a daughter.
It’s hard to believe how
quickly the years have passed.
It was more than 46 years ago
that I danced with a very
pretty girl in a red dress. Last
night I danced with another
very pretty girl in a red dress.
It was the third consecutive
year I’ve been privileged
to be our grand-daughter,
Jaynah’s, date at her school’s
“Sweetheart Dance.” Jaynah
is almost 11 years old and
looks a lot like her mommy,
Chrissy. I hope she had a
good time with her Papaw
Dan. I sure enjoyed it.
Was it love at first sight?
Have I loved Janie since the
first time I saw her? I could
not tell you if I loved her the
first moment I saw her, or
if it was the second or third.
But I do remember the first
moment I looked at her walk-
ing toward me on a summer
evening in 1965 and realized
that somehow the rest of the
world seemed to disappear.
Love at first sight
Those Were
The Days
Pastor Dan Eaton
PET CORNER
The Humane Society of
Allen County has many pets
waiting for adoption. Each
comes with a spay or neuter,
first shots and a heartworm
test. Call 419-991-1775.
The following pets
are available for adop-
tion through The Animal
Protective League:
Cats
Himalayan, M, F, 3-4 years,
fixed, Siamese color, blue eyes
M, 2 years, gray tabby, neu-
tered, name Earl
F, 7 yrs,m fixed, dew
clawed, black and white, name
Pepper
M, 1 year, black
Kittens
F, 8 months, black and
white, calico, tiger, white and
black, yellow and white
F, 6 months, gray and white,
name Penny
Dogs
Husky Shepherd, M, 3
years, neutered
Puppies
Springer Spaniel, M, 8
weeks, brown and white, black
and white
For more information on
these pets or if you are in need
of finding a home for your pet
contact The Animal Protective
League from 9-5 weekdays at
419-749-2976. Donations or
correspondence can be sent to
PO Box 321, Van Wert OH
45891.
Thomas A. Edison from
Milan, Ohio developed the
incandescent light bulb,
phonograph, and early motion
picture camera.
Sally is an 8-year-old bea-
gle that lost her home through
no fault of her own. She is
very laid back and loves to
go for walks. She is okay with
other dogs. She will be in fos-
ter care but she still needs to
find a forever home.
Wiggles is a torti kitten
who was bottle fed at 1 week
old. She was cared for by a
9 year old girl all summer.
She is well socialized, playful,
friendly and will cuddle. She
deserves a loving family to live
out her remaining “8” lives.
Museum offers
‘The Valley of
the Kings’
The Allen County
Historical Society will host
Joe Dunkle who will pres-
ent the locally made docu-
mentary, “The Valley of the
Kings,” at 2 p.m. on Sunday
in the Folsom Auditorium of
the Allen County Museum.
A stroll through Woodlawn
Cemetery offers a history of
Lima with countless recog-
nizable names marking the
way. The monuments, many
of which mirror the architec-
tural tastes of past decades,
tell the story. Of note is the
Egyptian style pyramid erect-
ed in 1918 by Job Taylor,
who was formerly a paper
mill operator, Masonic lec-
turer, and author. It was from
this marker that the title,
“Valley of the Kings,” was
given to the 1984, histori-
cal society’s, Allen County
Reporter publication, written
by Anne Beehler.
In 2011, Dunkle hit upon
the idea of creating a vid-
eo-taped tour of the cem-
etery. Working together with
the Woodlawn Cemetery
Association, historical soci-
ety, and the Adman, Inc., Joe
developed the script and tour
for what would become an
audio-visual, digital record
of this unique historical land-
scape in Allen County.
Dunkle graduated from
Bath High School in 1963
and majored in music and
broadcasting fine arts at the
University of Cincinnati
before joining the U.S. Army,
where he was an announcer
for the Armed Forces Radio
Station - Santo Domingo.
He retired in 2005 after 37
years with the Southern and
Union Pacific Railroads in
San Francisco, St. Louis and
Omaha. Currently, Dunkle is
a local history researcher and
docent with the Allen County
Museum.
This program is free and
open to the public.
DAYTON (AP) —
Misconduct complaints
against Ohio nurses have
skyrocketed in recent years,
leading to a backlog of inves-
tigations for the state nursing
board’s disciplinary system, a
newspaper investigation has
found.
The Dayton Daily News
reported Friday the Ohio
Board of Nursing is taking
more than a year to investigate
complaints. That’s allowed
some nurses to continue with
caretaking duties while com-
plaints are reviewed.
The board received 6,880
complaints in the 2011 budget
year that ended June 30, and
the allegations are on pace
for a double-digit increase
in the two-year accounting
period, the newspaper report-
ed. There were 11,645 com-
plaints during the previous
two-year period.
Complaints include allega-
tions of drug theft, substance
abuse, patient abuse, poor
practices and other criminal
conduct.
Judy Patak of Beavercreek
told the board in January
2011 that a nurse caring for
her severely disabled husband
had treated him improperly
during a feeding. The case
has yet to get a hearing.
“If they get fired, they can
just go somewhere else and
the other agencies, they don’t
know their ethics or what
they’re like,” Patak told the
newspaper.
One of the three nurses
criminally charged for not
reporting the poor health a
14-year-old girl also has yet
to have a hearing with the
board.
Makayla Norman, who
had cerebral palsy and was
dependent on others for her
care, died almost a year
ago. She weighed only 28
pounds and was covered with
bedsores and caked in dirt,
authorities said.
The newspaper reported
that the license for Mary
Kilby, a registered nurse
working for Cincinnati-based
CareStar Inc. as Norman’s
case manager, remains
active.
Kilby was indicted with
others on charges of failing to
provide care to a functionally
impaired person and failing
to report child abuse. She
faces an April 18 trial.
Nurses have a right for
allegations to be fully inves-
tigated, said Betsy Houchen,
director of the nursing board.
That requires the board to
interview witnesses, issue
subpoenas and gather all the
evidence. Cases are then pre-
sented at one of six board
meetings held annually.
Complaints
against nurses
are on the rise
“Hero-worship is strongest where there is least regard for human freedom.”
— Herbert Spencer, British philosopher (1820-1903)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Saturday, February 25, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
This
and
That
by HELEN
KAVERMAN
Karen Lucke Heitmeyer of
Fort Jennings, along with her
siblings, can claim ancestors
with names like Tebeck and
Wink; names that have disap-
peared as time has passed.
Their many descendents just
didn’t carry on those family
names.
Karen’s mother, Mary
(Ricker) Lucke’s mother was
Mary Tebeck and her mother
was Maria Wink, daughter of
John Wink.
Karen’s father, Ferd
Lucke’s mother was
Catherine Fanger. There once
was a Fanger’s Restaurant in
Delphos. The name can still
be found in Kalida. One of
the Fanger ancestors is cred-
ited with inventing a piece of
farm equipment for harvest-
ing sugar beets. Sugar Beets
were once a good crop in
the area until the Sugar Beet
Factory went bankrupt a few
years back.
Karen is blessed to have
in her possession several
old scrapbooks made by
her mother, Martha Lucke.
Martha saved many interest-
ing newspaper articles on
people and places she was
interested in and she was
interested in everything and
everyone, not just family and
friends.
One article featured Fred
Buettner and his wife, the
former Johanna Frombaugh.
Fred came to America from
Sacksabyron, Germany in
1835. At the age of 17 he
started a shoe cobbler’s busi-
ness in Delphos. Johanna
passed away in 1904 and Fred
died in 1912 at the age of 93.
Both are buried in the Walnut
Grover Cemetery.
The story in Martha’s
scrapbook was written when
BiRite was holding its grand
opening in the building which
is now the home of The
Delphos Canal Commission
Museum.
Buettner leased the land
to Busch Bros. to build the
building, which was leased to
the Grant Company in 1930.
The building remained in the
Buettner family until pur-
chased by the Delphos Canal
Commission.
The Buettner brick home
on N. Canal Street was one
of the first homes in Delphos.
Max Roberts owned the
house and his carry-out next
door at the time this article
was written. He purchased
it from F. J. Schaffer. It was
then remodeled and made into
apartments.
Another interesting clip-
ping in Martha’s scrapbook
featured a well-known Fort
Jennings woman, Mrs. Verena
“Franey” (Schuerman)
Minning, who was every-
body’s friend when she was
working at Meyers IGA in
Fort Jennings at the age of
84. Franey treated the little
kid buying his “penny candy”
just as nice as a customer,
purchasing a large order. As a
young woman, Mrs. Minning
ventured into her first job at
the former Raabe’s Grocery
in Fort Jennings.
Leona Backus, of Delphos
was featured in an article in
Martha’s collection. Many
young people (especially
those in their 50’s) have fond
memories of Leona, as the
head cook in the St. John’s
School cafeteria. She also
served as head cook of the big
St. John’s Fall School Festival
for many years. Leona was
recruited into cooking for
weddings by another famous
cook, Lulu Wahmhoff. Leona
began her next occupation,
cooking for weddings, when
most weddings were held at
the home of the bride, possi-
bly in a large tent. At the time
this story was written by Ruth
Wrasman, Leona commented
that she probably had more
than 500 weddings and anni-
versary parties to her credit.
Still another story in
Martha’s scrapbook was writ-
ten by Marguerite Calvin in
her Personally Speaking col-
umn in the Putnam County
Sentinel. This story told of the
Ricker Genealogy, written by
Frances Christen Ricker. Her
husband, Edward J. Ricker,
was born near Glandorf. His
grandfather, John Bernard,
more commonly known as
Barney Ricker was born in
Schaffen, Hanover, Germany.
He came to America with his
family at the age of 4. His
brother, Herman was 5. Their
father was Bernard Herman
Ricker. A family legend tells
that Bernard Herman Ricker
came home one day and told
his wife, Catherine Knieper,
that they were leaving in
three days for America. She
spent two of those days in the
Scrapbooking
III
One Year Ago
• Those whose political careers have taken them to the
nation’s capital typically visit their home district when Congress
is not in session. The Tri-county is represented in the United
States House of Representatives by Congressman Jim Jordan,
who stopped in Delphos Thursday before going to Akron.
25 Years Ago — 1987
• Americanism winners and their parents were honored
recently at a banquet hosted by American Legion Post 268.
Honored were Julie Mosier, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Mosier; Mindy Best, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gene Best; Mike
Goliver, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Goliver; Robert Ulrich Jr.,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ulrich Sr.’ and Gary Guthrie, son
of Mr. and Mrs. William Guthrie.
• In the second contest Tuesday evening in the Van Wert
Class A sectionals, the Jefferson Wildcats defeated the Ohio
City Warriors for the second time this year by a convincing
59-38 score. Three Wildcats found their way into double fig-
ures. Dawn Stocklin led the way with 17, Angie Gonyea added
13 and Margie Miller was just one behind with 12.
• After reading an article that the Goodwill needed shoes
John O. Rellinger of Fort Jennings collected 243 pairs of shoes
in one week. He delivered them Feb. 23 to Goodwill Industries
at Lima. Rellinger attributes the success of this project to the
“good people of the Fort Jennings community.”
50 Years Ago — 1987
• There is a local family in Delphos with a decided personal
interest in this week’s triumph of Astronaut John H. Glenn.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Feathers became acquainted with the Glenns
when the Feathers’ son-in-law, the late Lt. Thomas B. Collins,
served in the United States Air Force with Glenn. The two men
and their families were located on Guam. Later the two men
were instructors at Corpus Christi, Texas, and it was there that
the Feathers family visited at the Glenn home.
• Richard Shirack of Delphos, warehouse manager for Ohio
Equity, was elected first vice president of the Ohio Feed and
Grain Dealers Association at the annual convention held in
Toledo. Others from this area attending the convention were
Hubert Calvelage of Delphos and Robert Cremean of Gomer.
• Basketball for the 1961-62 hard-court squad at Delphos
Jefferson has passed into oblivion by virtue of the Wildcats’
41 to 57 defeat by Perry in the Allen County semifinals played
Friday night at Bluffton. It was a valiant effort on the part of
Jeff’s Jim Dorman, who fought to keep his squad in the running
by securing 13 points in the first half.
75 Years Ago — 1937
• “Sweet ladies in brocade and lace, powdered and patched
is every face.” This excerpt gives colorful description of those
ladies who will welcome guests to a colonial tea on Saturday
afternoon of this week. The ladies will be arrayed in colonial tea
gowns of long, long ago. The tea is being sponsored by Circle
One of the Methodist Aid and will be held at the parsonage.
• Mrs. Ray McGrew, West Fifth Street, entertained the
members of the 1908 Club and one guest, Mrs. W. R. France
of Sidney, at her home Wednesday evening. There were three
contests. The honors were awarded Mrs. E. W. Bell, Mrs. A. B.
Louthan and Mrs. Earl Scott. Mrs. McGrew served a luncheon
with attractive appointments in keeping with St. Patrick’s Day.
• Plans are being discussed to repair North Main Street from
just north of Eleventh Street to the paper mill. The street at that
section is in bad condition. North Main Street is paved with
brick to about midway between Eleventh and Twelfth streets.
At this point a strip of concrete payment has been placed
through the center of the street, leaving a portion of the road
unpaved on each side.
Lease of additional
Waterworks Park land to be
used for parking facilities at
the Fruehauf Trailer factory
here, for a period of 99 years,
is to be granted the Fruehauf
Trailer Co., Inc.
Legislation authorizing
the leasing of the public lands
was passed by City Council
at its regular session. Request
was made by Gus Plumpe, Ft.
Wayne, a Fruehauf represen-
tative.
The land to be leased
extends about 338 feet east
and west and about 50 feet
deep on the west and about
80 feet at the Route 66 edge,
lying south of the Hunt street
park drive and north of the
factory fence. The section
will be graded and stoned by
the Fruehauf Company and
will be available for local and
area picnickers on Sundays
and holidays for parking.
The new industry will also
straighten the drive running
east from Hunt street.
A request for a traffic light
on Route 66 at the factory
entrance was also approved
by council.
Production at the Fruehauf
factory here is expected to
start early in May with the
assembling of the auto-trans-
port (car hauler) being sched-
uled. Parts for the first 50 car
haulers are to be fabricated
at the Ft. Wayne factory and
brought here for assembling,
Mr. Plumpe said.
In addition to the car-haul-
er, the Delphos plant will
probably complete special
reefers, refrigerator trailers,
with the skeleton trailers
being constructed at the Avon
Lake plant, the largest of the
ten Fruehauf trailer factories
throughout the country.
The Fruehauf official
stated that some 70 welding
machines will be required for
the car-hauler line and a pro-
duction schedule for 5 trailers
a day will be the goal.
Delphos Herald,
Apr. 13, 1955
----------
Lutheran Church
to Sponsor Harp
Concert Here
A special treat is in store
for Delphos and area music
lovers on Sunday afternoon,
according to the Rev. David
Lynn, pastor of St.. Peter’s
Lutheran Church, when Otto
Baganz of Plymouth, Wisc.,
rated among the top concert
harpists in America today,
presented a concert here.
Mr. Baganz is the only
living exponent of Lutheran
Choral and Christian hymns
on the harp in the nation. He
studied under such greats as
Enrico Tramont, recognized
as the world’s greatest harpist;
Edmund Schueker, the great
chorale harpist, and Joseph
Vito, of Chicago. For many
years he was a member of sym-
phony orchestras in Chicago
and other Illinois cities.
His $10,000 harp was
especially made for exhibit
in the Hall of Religion at the
Chicago World’s Fair where
he played it daily.
Although he has played
the harp on national radio
programs, Baganz prefers to
limit his work to churches.
The concert here Sunday
will start at 3 p.m. at the
Lutheran Church. The gen-
eral public is cordially invit-
ed and a free will offering
will be received to defray
expenses.
Delphos Herald,
Apr. 22, 1955
----------
New Super Market
to Open About
November 1st
A new supermarket is
scheduled to open in Delphos
next November, according to
an announcement made by
Gilbert Brandehoff, who is
erecting a new building for
the grocery on the site of the
Century Club Cafe, which
was destroyed by fire several
months ago.
The new building will be
of concrete block construc-
tion with a brick front and
will be 140 by 50 feet in size.
The location is on Elida Ave.
at the east edge of Delphos.
The new super market
is to be opened by Arthur
Becker of Beaverdam and
L.W. Meyers, Fort Jennings.
Presently Meyers operates
an IGA supermarket in Ft.
Jennings. Construction was
started more than a week ago
by R.J. Osting, local contrac-
tor.
According to Mr.
Brandehoff, a black-topped
parking lot for some 150
autos will also be provided at
the new super market.
Delphos Herald,
July 22, 1955
----------
Old Model A
Ford Involved in Crash
A 26-year-old auto was
damaged extensively in an
auto-truck crash near Fort
Jennings on Thursday.
The auto, a 1929 Model
A Ford tudor, driven by Otto
Holdgreve, 77, of 228 1/2
North Main street, Delphos,
collided with a truck driven
by Kenneth Miller, 25, of
Route 1, Cloverdale, at the
intersection of State Route
190 and County Road 34,
about 1.4 miles southwest
of Ft. Jennings at 1:25 p.m.
Thursday.
According to Lima Post
state highway patrol, the
truck was stopped legally on
the county road for Route
190 when Mr. Holdgreve
made a right turn off the state
road and struck the left rear
tire and wheel of the truck.
The tire and wheel on the
truck was damaged while the
front end of the Model A
was demolished. No one was
injured.
Mr. Holdgreve was cited
to appear before Mayor
Walter Bigelow of Ottoville
in an improper right turn.
Hearing is scheduled for
Sunday, July 31.
Delphos Herald,
July 29, 1955
----------
Throttle Twisters
To Meet Saturday
A meeting of the
Delphos Throttle Twisters
(Motorcycle) Club is sched-
uled at the Sanders Cycle
Sales, Route 2, Delphos,
Saturday evening.
All members are urged to
attend this meeting set to start
at 7 o’clock.
Delphos Herald,
July 21, 1955
----------
Ad
Notice
We Wish To Contact
A Mechanically-Minded
Steady Worker to
Rent Modern
Sunoco Station in
Delphos
Contact Toomy’s Motel
732 West Fifth
Phone 25421
Delphos Herald,
Apr. 13, 1955
Leases additional Waterworks Park land
BOB HOLDGREVE
Window
to the
Past
A photo of Native Americans in the Wink photo album
in Karen’s collection. They were probably friends of the
Wink family before moving West.
This is one example of suggested page layouts. The cor-
ners are just cut from card stock and the long Strip on the
left side is from card stock. The triangles are cut from card
stock also. The mall squares are made with a paper punch,
another scrapbooking tool.
See SCRAPBOOKING, page 9
Saturday, February 25, 2012 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Delphos Safety Building
1
Phone: 419-495-2419
www.KimBrandtForCommissioner.com
Paid for by committee to elect Brandt, Comissioner, Cary Brandt, Treasurer, 1098 St. Rt. 81, Willshire, Ohio 45898
VOTEKim
BRANDT BRANDT
for COUNTY
Why Vote For Brandt?
★ Leadership & Experience
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-Proactive-
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COMMISSIONER
Leading you to better health.
Dr. Najeed- Heart Specialist of St. Rita’s
“To learn more
visit stritas.org.”
Although there are many things you can do to help prevent heart
disease, some factors are simply beyond your control. That’s why it’s
so important to learn your family history and talk to your family doctor
about a vascular screening. Together, these two simple things can
take the mystery out of heart disease.
Along with diet, exercise and avoiding tobacco, there are many things
you can do each day to reduce your risk for heart disease. But should
you need emergency cardiovascular care, you can rest assured
knowing that St. Rita’s Medical Center is always here to help with the
latest intervention techniques.
“Sometimes heart disease
is a family affair.”
EVERYONE WELCOME!.. We will be changing
over to Spring and Summer Items.
Thrift shop proceeds are used to help pay rent and utility bills
for needy families. Volunteers are always welcome and needed.
If interested, please call the Thrift Shop at 419) 692-2942.
Bargains
Galore
Church Women United Are Sponsoring a
Gigantic
Winter Stock
SALE
25
¢
INTERFAITH THRIFT SHOP
102 N. MAIN ST., DELPHOS
Hours: Thursday 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Friday 1:00 - 4:00 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. - Noon
Sale Starts March 1st, 2nd and 3rd
AUTO DEALERS
•Delpha
Chev/Buick Co.
•Raabe Ford/Lincoln
AUTO PARTS
•Pitsenbarger Auto
FINANCIAL
INSTITUTIONS
•First Federal Bank
FURNITURE
•Lehmann’s Furniture
•Westrich Home Furnishings
GARAGE
•Omer’s Alignment Shop
HARDWARE
•Delphos Ace Hardware
& Rental
This message pub-
lished as a public
service by these
civic minded firms.
Interested sponsors
call
The Delphos Herald
Public Service Dept.
419-695-0015
FEB. 26
Shannon Jackson
Cherie Miller
Wayne Ledyard
Brian Laudick
Craig Good
FEB. 27
Margaret Pulfer
Larry Miller
Beth Kemper
Quincy Brinkman
Gina Rekart
Gerald Bowling
Ashley Brown
From the Thrift Shop
People are out running
in tank tops and shorts, kids
are outside shooting hoops in
their T-shirts — it’s grand and
kind of crazy too, isn’t it?!
This time of the year, we
should still be crunching snow
when we carefully walk from
our cars into work, or school,
or to church, or across the mall
parking lot. We haven’t done
much of that this winter. Even
the emergency rooms have
been less crowded from peo-
ple falling or over-doing the
shoveling — so that’s wonder-
ful, too! But, alas, the calendar
says winter is not over, and in
reality, it’s probably not!
Here at the Thrift Shop,
however, winter is officially
over. Today is the last day
of the big winter sale and the
change-over to all the spring
and summer items will be
made after the doors close at
noon. All of the pretty pastels,
bright summer colors, shorts,
sandals, and bathing suits will
greet you on your next visit,
along with the huge selection
of Easter decorations. The
cute little (and large) bunnies
are soft and plush and ready
to be placed in Easter baskets
everywhere. Kids love story
books, and the Thrift Shop
has a great selection to choose
from — these make great
additions to Easter baskets as
well, so be sure to stop in.
We’re excited that the
new addition is speeding
right along. The weather has
certainly been a factor there.
Great plans and ideas have
been formed to utilize all the
new space, so be sure to keep
an eye on the corner of First
and Main streets.
One thing that won’t
change is the location of the
drop off window. It’s still at
the rear of the building on the
First Street side. If it’s full,
please don’t leave your items
on the sidewalk. If someone
is there, you can make your
delivery at the back door, or
call 419-692-2942 to make
arrangements for your drop
off. As always, all donations
are appreciated, welcomed
and tax deductible, just ask
for a receipt.
Did you know that since
the Thrift shop opened its
doors more than twenty-five
years ago, it has never raised
the prices of its merchandise?
I bet you can’t find a single
business establishment any-
where on earth that can make
that statement. We have,
however, just recently had to
raise the prices on some of
the items. Through the past
several years, we have seen
greater and greater need in
our community because of
the economy, so in order to
have the funds to help with
the needs, we have had to
raise some prices. That was
done after thoroughly check-
ing other shops’ prices in the
area, and even with the price
increase, we are still very
much lower than other thrift
and good will shops. Your
continued patronage of the
Delphos Thrift Shop is great-
ly appreciated. The Delphos
Thrift Shop’s mission is to
help the needy and we can’t
do it without you.
If you’d like to help in any
capacity, please call the Thrift
Shop at 419-692-2942. We’d
love to have you. Sorters,
cashiers, baggers — you’re
all needed and we’d appreci-
ate your help.
Until the next time, that’s
this month’s report.
COMING
EVENTS
TODAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store, North Main
Street.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
5 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club hosts a
chicken fry.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam County
Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St. Kalida.
1:30 p.m. — Amvets Post
698 Auxiliary meets at the
Amvets post in Middle Point.
4 p.m. — Amvets Post 698
regular meeting at the Amvets
post in Middle Point.
7:30 p.m. — Sons of
Amvets Post 698 meet at
Amvets Post in Middle Point.
MONDAY
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. — Ottoville
Branch Library is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Ottoville village
council meets at the municipal
building.
Marion Township Trustees
meet at the township house.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Eagles Aerie 471 meets at the
Eagles Lodge.
Thrift Shop worker Barb Haggard rearranges Easter
items.
12
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419-331-0031
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STAN OWENS
ELECT
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Paid political ad
6 – The Herald Saturday, February 25, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By MALLORY KEMPER
The Delphos Herald
mallorykemper@gmail.com
DELPHOS — The St. John’s
Blue Jays hosted their last and
final home game of the season
against the Coldwater Cavaliers
in a Midwest Athletic Conference
showdown Friday night.
Coldwater shot 7-of-10 from
long distance in the first half but
the Blue Jay defense and plays
down the stretch gave them the
55-49 win on Senior Night.
St. John’s improved to 12-8
overall and 7-2 in the MAC.
Coldwater fell to 7-13 on the sea-
son and 2-7 in the league.
The Blue Jays recognized five
senior players; Alex Clark, Tanner
Calvelage, Ben Warnecke, Josh
Rode and Aaron Ledyard; in their
final home game.
Delphos took a quick 11-3
lead with a Calvelage drive and
then jumped to a 16-6 lead when
Clark found junior Seth Bockey
under the basket for a 3-point
play. After a Curtis Geise triple
for the Blue Jays, Coldwater
went on a 5-0 run to close out the
first quarter down 19-11.
St. John’s shooting was
superb in the first quarter action,
shooting 6-of-7 from the field
and 2-of-4 from long distance to
take that 8-point lead.
The Cavaliers started to heat
up in the second quarter with
3-point plays from Brody Hoying
and Austin Bruns to cut the defi-
cit to four at the break, 31-27.
“I think in the first half we
didn’t contest very well and we
gave them a little more space and
time than we should have,” St.
John’s coach Aaron Elwer said.
“We needed to do a better job
communicating on the screens
and have a sense of urgency, get-
ting a hand in their face.”
The Cavaliers took their first
lead of the night with a bucket
from Alex Bruggeman to start
the third quarter. A triple from
Andrew Metzger and a steal and
layup from Geise gave St. John’s
a slim 40-34 lead going into the
final eight minutes.
Mitch Heyne nailed a 3-point-
er to start the fourth quarter for
the guests but the Blue Jays
responded with a Clark triple.
Back-to-back drives to the hoop
by Buescher and Geise gave the
hosts a 51-40 lead with less than
two minutes in the game. Free
throws down the stretch helped
them hold off the Cavaliers.
“Last weekend was a tough
weekend and you don’t want to
lose three in a row going into tour-
nament,” Elwer added. “Getting
this win will give us confidence
going into tournament and gets
us back to where we were a
couple weeks ago.”
Geise led all scorers with 21
points. Buescher had 14 points
and six rebounds. Metzger added
seven points for the Blue Jay
offense.
The Blue Jays outrebounded
the Cavaliers 18-11.
“We buried ourself and we
had to fight back and you don’t
do that in this kind of environ-
ment,” Coldwater coach Mike
Bruns said. “We just need to
work on our rebounding; it seems
that others teams beat us on the
boards a lot.”
Bruns had a team-high 11
points for Coldwater. Hoying
added eight points and Mark
Brunet had seven points.
St. John’s won the junior var-
sity contest 57-44. Eric Clark
exploded for 30 points, including
eight triples, for St. John’s.
St. John’s opens Division IV
tourney play Wednesday at Van
Wert versus Ottoville in game 1.
VARSITY
COLDWATER (49)
Jeremy Scott 0-0-0, Alex
Bruggeman 2-0-4, Mark Brunet 2-2-7,
Kyle Post 2-1-6, Austin Bruns 3-2-11,
Jordon Harlamert 0-0-0, Ted Fisher
0-0-0, Mitch Heyne 2-0-6, Adam
Klosterman 0-0-0, Mitch Schoenherr
1-0-2, Brandon Wolters 2-0-6, Brody
Hoying 2-2-8. Totals 6-10-7-49.
ST. JOHN’S (55)
Ryan Buescher 5-2-14, Alex Clark
2-0-6, Tanner Cavelage 1-0-2, Ben
Warnecke 0-0-0, Curtis Geise 8-4-21,
Cody Looser 0-0-0, Andrew Metzger
3-0-7, Josh Rode 0-0-0, Aaron Ledyard
0-0-0, Seth Bockey 1-1-3, Eric Clark
0-2-2. Totals 14-6-9-55.
Score by Quarters:
Coldwater 11 16 7 15 - 49
St. John’s 19 12 9 15 - 55
Three-point goals: Coldwater,
Bruns 3, Heyne 2, Hoying 2, Wolters 2,
Brunet; St. John’s Buescher 2, A. Clark
2, Geise, Metzger.
----
JUNIOR VARSITY
COLDWATER (44)
Brody Hoying 2-0-4, Derek Thobe
1-3-5, Adam Klosterman 2-0-6, Mitch
Schoenherr 3-1-7, Chase Bruggeman
4-1-9, Greg Gilliland 0-0-0, Ted Fisher
2-0-5, Jordan Harlamert 3-2-8. Totals
14-3-7-44.
ST. JOHN’S (57)
Aaron Hellman 0-0-0, Eric Clark
11-0-30, Ben Wrasman 1-0-2, Ryan
Koester 3-0-6, Nick Bockey 0-0-0, Cole
Fishbach 0-0-0, Evan Hays 4-1-9, Tyler
Conley 1-2-4, Eric Gerberick 0-0-0,
Jake Csukker 0-0-0, Andy Grothouse
2-1-6. Totals 13-9-4-57.
Score by Quarters:
Coldwater 11 10 10 13 - 44
St. John’s 14 15 15 13 - 57
Three-point goals: Coldwater,
Klosterman 2, Fisher; St. John’s, Clark
8, Grothouse.
Jays get win over Cavs on Senior Night
Senior Alex Clark knocked down two triples versus
Coldwater Friday night on his last night on the Robert A.
Arnzen Gymnasium hardwood. The host Blue Jays finished
the regular season at 12-8 with a 55-49 triumph.
Tom Morris photo
By DAVE BONINSEGNA
The Delphos Herald
zsportslive@yahoo.com
LEIPSIC — To say that the
Fort Jennings Musketeers boys
basketball team got off to a slow
start in their Putnam County
League matchup with the Leipsic
Vikings Friday night would be a
bit of an understatement.
The Musketeers made just
five baskets from the field in the
first half, while the hosts came
out like gangbusters, scoring 61
points in the first half on their
way to a 92-66 thumping of the
Musketeers and taking a share of
the PCL title with the win.
Zach Kuhlman connected on
eight 3-pointers, leading the hosts
with 33 points, Ty Maag was just
as torrid from inside the arc, tally-
ing 25 points.
Cody Warnecke led the
Musketeers with 27 points, while
Brandon Kohli hit double digits
with 12.
The combination of poor
shooting and lack of defense dug
the early hole for Fort Jennings
as the Vikings set the tone early,
scoring the first 10 points of the
game. Kuhlman hit three shots
from beyond the arc in the first
quarter on three consecutive trips
down court; the junior paced the
hosts to a 20-5 lead with a triple
with 4:32 to go in the first stanza.
When the dust had cleared from
the first eight minutes of play, the
home team had a 31-11 advan-
tage in a quarter that ended with
a long-range shot at the buzzer
by Maag.
The second stanza was more
of the same for Leipsic, Kuhlman
draining shots from beyond the
arc and Maag taking care of the
buckets at the low post. Despite
being in the bonus early on in the
second quarter, the Musketeers
still couldn’t muster up an offense.
Fort Jennings made just two bas-
kets from the field in the second
canto and shot 6-of-15 from the
line. The Vikings created 25 turn-
overs in the first half and ended
the first 16 minutes of play with
a Kuhlman 3-point buzzer-beater,
making it 61-21 contest.
In the third period, the
Musketeers came out a differ-
ent team. They traded baskets
early on with their hosts as Cody
Warnecke and Kurt Warnecke
answered the Vikings’ Devin
Mangas
(14 points) shot for shot on
trips down court. The Musketeers
posted 24 points in the third peri-
od, three more than they managed
the entire first half. However, the
hole dug was just too deep as
where Kuhlman and Maag were
on target in the first half, Mangas
was on the mark in the third
stanza.
Cody Warnecke accounted
for 14 of his team-high points
in the third stanza, while Kohli
delivered for eight of his 12 in the
final period.
The Musketeers managed 21
points in the final period.
With the win, the Vikings
share the PCL championship with
Columbus Grove as both ended
the season with just one PCL loss;
however, the Bulldogs beat the
Vikings early in the season.
Fort Jennings tangles with
Perry 8 p.m. Wednesday at Van
Wert.
In the JV contest, the Vikings
held off a late run by Jennings to
win 47-43.
Fort Jennings (66)
Conner Wollenhorst 1-2-4, Tyler
Wiedeman 3-2-9, Nolan Neidert 1-1-
3, Cody Warnecke 10-7-27, Kurt
Warnecke 4-0-9, Chad Recker 1-0-2,
Brandon Kohli 5-2-12. Totals 23-2-14-
66.
Leipsic (92)
Mangas 7-0-14, B. Schroeder
0-1-1, Brown 0-1-1, Barerra 2-2-6,
Steffan 4-0-8, Z. Kuhlman 12-1-33, L.
Gerdeman 2-0-4, Maag 10-2-25. Totals
26-11-5-92.
Scoring by Quarters
Ft. Jennings 11 10 24 21 - 66
Leipsic 31 30 18 13 - 92
Three-point goals: Fort Jennings,
Wiedeman, K. Warnecke; Leipsic,
Kuhlman 8, Maag 3.
LOCAL ROUNDUP
Bearcats romp past
Panthers
SPENCERVILLE —
Spencerville’s boys basket-
ball team put a hurting on
Paulding Friday night, bashing
the visiting Panthers 70-33 in
Northwest Conference action at
Spencerville High School.
The Bearcats (13-7, 6-3
NWC) take on Parkway at 6:15
p.m. Wednesday at Wapakoneta
in Division III action.
The Panthers end regular-
season play 10-10 (3-6 NWC).
(No other info was avail-
able).
---
Elida nabs WBL co-cham-
pionship
DEFIANCE — Reggie
McAdams only scored 13 points
against unbeaten Defiance
Friday night.
Fortunately for the Bulldogs,
Dakota Mathias and Cory
Rosyter picked up the slack
by scoring 20 and 14 mark-
ers, respectively, to help Elida
nab a Western Buckeye League
See ROUNDUP, page 7
By BOB WEBER
The Delphos Herald
btzweber@bright.net
OTTOVILLE — The Wayne
Trace Raiders traveled to the
home of the Ottoville Big Green
Friday night for the last regular-
season boys basketball contest for
both squads on the year.
The Raiders were able to
come away with a 42-37 win
over the Big Green behind some
clutch foul shooting in the fourth
quarter.
Friday night was Senior Night
for the Big Green as their lone
senior, 6-6 Kevin Schnipke,
played his final game on the L.W.
Heckman Gymnasium floor.
Coach Todd Turnwald praised
Schnipke’s efforts on the year:
“What a great kid Kevin is on and
off the floor. I’ve enjoyed him as
much as any kid I’ve coached.
I’ve coached all-state players and
I would put him right up there.
That’s how good of a kid he is,
how hard he works and how he
stuck with it throughout the year
when his friends went another
direction. It’s really neat to see
how much he has grown from
the first day I met him till now. I
just can’t say enough good things
about him.”
The first quarter saw the Big
Green take the early lead behind
some sharp shooting from juniors
Ryan Honigford and Derek
Schimmoeller; they were able to
extend their lead to 11-6 with
3:20 to go in the quarter.= The
Raiders fought back in the final
three minutes of the quarter to
tie the game but Honigford con-
nected on another deep 3-pointer
to give the home team a 14-11
first-quarter lead.
The second quarter found both
teams struggling to put points on
the board as the Raiders outscored
the Big Green 7-6 to cut the defi-
cit to 20-18 at halftime. The Big
Green were led by Honigford’s
11 points and Schimmoeller with
seven points.
Coach Turnwald was quick
to point out the play of his back-
court: “We did a ton of things
good tonight. Ryan and Derek
had an awesome night. Those
two and a lot of the guys are
spending time in the gym and it’s
showing.”
As the second half began, the
Raiders came out and quickly tied
the game at 20-20 with 6-5 junior
Ryan Kortokrax’s (9 points for
the game) basket. The Raiders
continued to increase the defen-
sive pressure on the Big Green,
causing several turnovers; cou-
pled with a bad shooting quarter,
the home team found themselves
down 28-23 after three quarters
of play.
Coach Turnwald pointed to his
team’s lack of scoring in the quar-
ter as a big factor in the outcome
of the game: “We had a tough
third quarter. We had a tough time
scoring the ball. Three points in
the quarter really hurt. You have a
tough time winning games when
you score three points in a quarter
of play.”
The Big Green roared
right back in the fourth quar-
ter as Schnipke, along with the
hot shooting of Honigford and
Schimmoeller, brought the home
team all the way back to take
the lead 31-30 at the 5:20 mark
of play. However, it would be
the last lead for the Big Green as
they would be forced to foul the
Raiders to get back into the game.
The Raiders, over the last minute
of play, went 6-6 from the foul
line to seal the win.
Coach Turnwald knows his
team is close: “A little disappoint-
ing that we couldn’t execute at the
end of the game but that’s where
we’re down to. A couple of key
possessions at the end of the game
is the difference between us win-
ning or losing several games this
year. We’re extremely close; it’s
neat to see some of these guys’
hard work is paying off.”
For the Big Green (3-17) they
were led in scoring by Honigford
with a game-high 16 points, fol-
lowed by Schimmoeller with
12 points. The Big Green were
13-of-42 from the field (31%),
7-of-12 from the stripe (58%),
hauled in 16 rebounds and com-
mitted only 10 turnovers.
For the victorious Raiders
(9-11), they were led by junior
Grady Gudakunst with 11 points
(7-7 from the line) and freshman
Corbin Linder with 10 points.
From the field, the Raiders shot
33 percent (13-40) and were an
excellent 82 percent (14-17) from
the foul line. They hauled in 24
rebounds and committed 14 turn-
overs.
The Big Green will start on
the tournament trail next week as
they take on the St. John’s Blue
Jays Wednesday night at Van
Wert in sectional play.
Coach Turnwald is excited
as the second season unfolds
next week: “We’re very excited.
We’ve got a great relationship
with the coaching staff at Delphos
and highly respect them. Our kids
know how we’re playing; our
record may not indicate it but
we’re excited about tournament
play. We’re happy to play the
spoiler. It’s a role we’re happy to
take on.”
The JV game was won by the
Raiders 42-22.
VARSITY
Wayne Trace (42)
Grady Gudakunst 2-0-7-11, Colby
Speice 1-0-0-2, Austin Speice 1-0-0-2,
Dalton Sinn 1-0-3-5, Ryan Kortokrax 4-0-
1-9, Nick McClain 1-0-0-2, Corbin Linder
1-2-2-10, Devin Wenzlick 0-0-1-1. Totals
11-2-14/17-42.
Ottoville (37)
Derek Schimmoeller 5-0-2-12, Ryan
Honigford 2-3-3-16, Luke Schimmoeller
1-1-1-6, Cory Honigford 0-0-0-0, Bryan
Hohlbein 0-0-0-0, Kevin Schnipke 1-0-
1-3, Brandt Landin 0-0-0-0. Totals 9-4-
7/12-37.
Score by Quarters:
Wayne Trace 11-7-10-14=42
Ottoville 14-6-3-14=37
Three-point goals: Wayne Trace,
Linder 2; Ottoville, R. Honigford 3, L.
Schimmoeller.
-----
JUNIOR VARSITY
Wayne Trace (42)
Jake Gerber 0-1-2-5, Jake Arend
4-1-2-13, Brock Worden 2-0-1-5, TJ
Blackmore 2-0-1-5, Caleb Mead 1-0-0-2,
Brian Myers 1-0-0-2, Decvin Wenzlick
3-0-1-7, Cade Harvey 0-1-0-3. Totals
13-3-7/11-42.
Ottoville (22)
Wes Markward 0-2-1-7, Kyle
Bendele 2-0-0-4, Brandt Landin 0-0-1-1,
Cory Honigford 0-0-2-2, Austin Honigford
2-0-4-8. Totals 4-2-8/12-22.
Score by Quarters:
Wayne Trace 4-10-17-11=42
Ottoville 6-6-6-4=22
Three-point goals: Wayne Trace,
Gerber, Arend, Harvey; Ottoville,
Markward 2.
Raiders seal win over Big Green at the foul line
Vikings score early,
often vs. Musketeers
Senior Logan Looser (160 pounds) of St. John’s, here
winning his opening match at the Kettering Fairmont Division
III District Friday night, was one of five Tri-County matmen to
win both of their matches: St. John’s senior teammate Logan
Heiing (195), Jefferson senior Curtis Miller (220) and Columbus
Grove’s Gavin Windau (195) and Tregg Keysor (106). Others
still alive in the consolation bracket are Jefferson’s Darren
Edinger (152), Gaige Rassman (113), Colin McConnahea (195)
and Quinten Wessell (285); St. John’s Brett Schwinnen (182),
Austin Martin (145), Will Buettner (152) and Wes Buettner
(126); Spencerville’s Logan Vandemark (285); Lincolnview’s
Jacquobe Markward (106); and Columbus Grove’s Dylan
Kleman (138) and Brandon Benroth (160). St. John’s Luke
Wrasman (170) and Spencerville’s Cory Binkley (132) were
ousted.
Photo submitted

Description Last Price Change
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NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,963.75 +6.77
S&P 500 INDEX 1,365.74 +2.28
AUTOZONE INC. 359.80 +1.30
BUNGE LTD 67.91 +0.08
EATON CORP. 51.75 -0.12
BP PLC ADR 46.99 -0.28
DOMINION RES INC 51.32 +0.38
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 37.73 -0.18
CVS CAREMARK CRP 44.07 +0.03
CITIGROUP INC 32.35 -0.36
FIRST DEFIANCE 16.77 -0.15
FST FIN BNCP 16.81 -0.19
FORD MOTOR CO 12.23 -0.17
GENERAL DYNAMICS 72.40 +1.80
GENERAL MOTORS 26.07 -0.72
GOODYEAR TIRE 13.11 -0.12
HEALTHCARE REIT 54.30 -0.08
HOME DEPOT INC. 46.98 +0.03
HONDA MOTOR CO 38.50 +1.00
HUNTGTN BKSHR 5.91 -0.10
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 64.46 -0.07
JPMORGAN CHASE 38.28 -0.21
KOHLS CORP. 49.44 +0.33
LOWES COMPANIES 27.16 +0.10
MCDONALDS CORP. 100.32 -0.49
MICROSOFT CP 31.48 +0.11
PEPSICO INC. 63.31 +0.18
PROCTER & GAMBLE 66.71 +0.29
RITE AID CORP. 1.54 -0.07
SPRINT NEXTEL 2.47 -0.05
TIME WARNER INC. 37.69 +0.38
US BANCORP 28.73 -0.26
UTD BANKSHARES 8.00 0
VERIZON COMMS 38.14 +0.01
WAL-MART STORES 58.79 +0.25
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business Feb. 24, 2012
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Same Family – Same Location for 3 generations
Regular Business Hours
Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Saturday 8:00 a.m. until Noon
APPOINTMENTS ARE AVAILABLE.
2103 N. MAIN ST., DELPHOS, OHIO
Ph. 419-695-2000
www.hgviolet.com
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
hgviolet@bright.net
DELPHOS,OH (419) 695-2000
Your Grain Handling Headquarters
Service. Knowledge. Selection. Financing. Delivery.
See us for the complete line of Mayrath
• Swing-Away Augers
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Large selection in stock and ready for delivery.
H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
hgviolet@bright.net
DELPHOS,OH (419) 695-2000
Your Grain Handling Headquarters
Service. Knowledge. Selection. Financing. Delivery.
See us for the complete line of Mayrath
• Swing-Away Augers
• Top Drive/Inline Augers
• Truck Augers
• Drive Over Conveyors
Large selection in stock and ready for delivery.
Saturday, February 25, 2012 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
Weekly Athletic Schedule
For Week of Feb. 27-March 3
TUESDAY
Boys Basketball Sectionals
Division IV
At Van Wert
Lincolnview vs. Lima
Temple Christian, 7 p.m. (win-
ner vs. No. 1 Crestview 6:15
p.m. Friday)
Division III
At Wapakoneta
Jefferson vs. Bluffton, 7 p.m.
(winner vs. No. 1 LCC 6:15
p.m. Friday)
Division II
At Lima Senior
No. 1 Elida vs. Shawnee,
6:15 p.m.; Wapak vs. St. Marys,
8 p.m. (winners to play 6:15
p.m. Friday).
WEDNESDAY
Boys Basketball Sectionals
Division IV
At Van Wert
No. 2 St. John’s vs. Ottoville,
6:15 p.m.; Fort Jennings vs.
Perry, 8 p.m. (winners to play 8
p.m. Friday).
At Paulding
Kalida vs. Ayersville, 6:15
p.m.; Miller City vs. Antwerp,
8 p.m. (winners to play 8 p.m.
Friday).
At O-G
Columbus Grove vs. North
Baltimore, 6:15 p.m.; Arcadia
vs. P-G, 8 p.m. (winners to play
8 p.m. Friday)
Division III
At Wapakoneta
No. 2 Spencerville vs.
Parkway, 6:15 p.m.; Allen East
vs. Coldwater, 8 p.m. (winners
to play 8 p.m. Friday)
Division II
At Lima Senior
No. 2 Bath vs. Kenton, 6:15
p.m.; Van Wert vs. Celina, 8
p.m. (winners to play 8 p.m.
Saturday).
THURSDAY
Girls Basketball
Districts
DIVISION IV
At Lima Senior
Jefferson/Crestview winner
vs. Continental/Ottoville win-
ner, 6:15 p.m.; Spencerville/St.
John’s winner vs. Columbus
Grove/Kalida winner, 8 p.m.
Wrestling
State at OSU, 3 p.m.
FRIDAY
Boys Basketball
Sectionals
Division IV
At Van Wert
Lincolnview/Lima Temple
Christian winner vs. No. 1
Crestview, 6:15 p.m.; No. 2 St.
John’s/Ottoville winner Fort
Jennings/Perry winner, 8 p.m.
At Paulding
Kalida/Ayersville winner vs.
Miller City/Antwerp winner, 8
p.m.
At O-G
Columbus Grove/North
Baltimore winner vs. Arcadia/
P-G winner, 8 p.m.
Division III
At Wapakoneta
Jefferson/Bluffton winner
vs. No. 1 LCC, 6:15 p.m.; No.
2 Spencerville/Parkway winner
vs. Allen East/Coldwater win-
ner, 8 p.m.
Division II
At Lima Senior
No. 1 Elida/Shawnee winner
vs. Wapak/St. Marys winner,
6:15 p.m.; No. 2 Bath/Kenton
winner vs. Van Wert/Celina
winner, 8 p.m.
Wrestling
State at OSU, 10 a.m.
SATURDAY
Girls Basketball
DIVISION IV
At Lima Senior
J e f f e r s o n / Cr e s t v i e w-
Continental/Ottoville winner
vs. Spencerville/St. John’s-
Columbus Grove/Kalida win-
ner, 7 p.m.
Wrestling
State at OSU, 10 a.m.
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF
NATURAL RESOURCES
FISHING
LAKE ERIE
Regulations to Remember: The
daily bag limit for walleye on Ohio
waters of Lake Erie is 6 fish per
angler through Wednesday; from
Thursday through April 30, the limit
will be 4 (15-inch minimum-size
limit); The daily bag limit for yel-
low perch is 30 fish per angler on
all Ohio waters of Lake Erie; The
steelhead/salmon (aggregate) daily
bag limit is 5 fish per angler (12-
inch minimum-size limit) until May
15 (12-inch minimum size limit on
both); The bag limit for muskellunge
is 1 per day; The Lake Erie black
bass (largemouth and smallmouth)
daily bag limit is 5
fish (14-inch mini-
mum size limit).
W a l l e y e :
Walleye have been caught by troll-
ers fishing around the Camp Perry
firing range buoys when the weather
has allowed. The northern buoys
have produced the most fish with
Reef Runners and Rapala husky
jerks being the best lures.
Steelhead: All rivers and streams
have moderate to below average
flows and are clear to green. Some
side ice and slush ice has formed
but that will melt off with the ris-
ing temperatures. Under suitable
flow conditions, catches have been
very good throughout all reaches
of rivers and streams, with some
large fish being caught. Spin-fishing
anglers have been using jigs tipped
with maggots, trout or salmon eggs,
egg sacs and shiners. Fly anglers
have been using egg patterns, suck-
er spawn, nymphs, streamers and
woolly buggers. ... The water tem-
perature is 34 degrees off of Toledo
and 34 degrees off of Cleveland,
according to the nearshore marine
forecast.
The Fairport Harbor and
Sandusky Fisheries Research Units
are operated by employees of the
state of Ohio, ODNR Division of
Wildlife. Our primary mission is to
assess and manage fish popula-
tions and fisheries in Lake Erie’s
Western and Central basins and
their tributary streams. We sam-
ple Lake Erie fish populations with
trawls and gill nets aboard our
research vessels, the Grandon and
the Explorer II. We use our research
vessels to monitor the food web and
the spread of exotic species in the
lake. We monitor fish populations’
abundance, growth, age, diet and
health. We also perform seasonal
surveys of Lake Erie’s sport fish-
ing anglers and commercial fish-
ing boats. We assess, protect and
enhance habitat for aquatic life in
Lake Erie and its tributaries. We
complete environmental reviews of
planned development projects in the
watershed to insure habitat protec-
tion and resource integrity.
We provide fishing and fishery
information for the public in the form
of phone information, public speak-
ing at group functions and boat
and lab tours. Our regular business
hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m.. Monday-
Friday We are supported solely by
Ohio fishing and hunting license
sales and a rebate on a federal
tax on fishing equipment and boat
motor fuels.
Lake Erie Birding Trail web-
site honored
COLUMBUS – The Lake Erie
Birding Trail web site is being hon-
ored by the Great Lakes Information
Network (GLIN) as the February
Site of the Month.
The Lake Erie Birding Trail is
a partnership between Ohio Sea
Grant and ODNR’s DOW. This site
offers comprehensive information
for birding at 86 locations along
Lake Erie. The Lake Erie Birding
Trail spans 312 miles and covers
Ohio’s entire shoreline.
The GLIN is a Great Lakes
Commission project and serves as
a gateway to the Great Lakes region
of North America. Its data hold-
ings and services cover the envi-
ronment, economy, tourism, educa-
tion, maps, geographic information
systems (GIS), demographics and
more. Launched in 1993, GLIN has
continued to expand and currently
averages more than 4.5 million hits
per month. Visit GLIN at http://www.
great-lakes.net/.
Dr. Philip Xie of Bowling Green
State University recently released a
study titled ‘Socio-economic Impacts
of Birdwatching along Lake Erie: A
Coastal Ohio Analysis.’ In that study,
he surveyed birders visiting six pop-
ular Lake Erie birding hotspots: Oak
Openings Metropark, Magee Marsh
Wildlife Area, Sheldon Marsh State
Nature Preserve, Old Woman Creek
National Estuarine Reserve, Mentor
Marsh State Nature Preserve and
Conneaut Harbor. These locales
are part of the trail.
In respect to the Lake Erie Birding
Trail, this study found: $26,438,398
was generated by birders visiting
the six study sites; 283 jobs were
created as a result of birding visita-
tion to these sites; $1.9 million was
generated in local taxes.
This study examined only 7
percent of the sites that comprise
the trail. Birder-driven economic
impacts along the entirety of Ohio’s
Lake Erie shoreline are undoubtedly
much higher.
According to the 2006 U.S. Fish
& Wildlife Service Survey, an esti-
mated 3.5 million Ohioans partici-
pate in wildlife-watching activities,
including birding.
The Lake Erie Birding Trail has
been supported by the Wildlife
Diversity and Endangered Species
Fund, which receives donations
from Ohioans through the state
income tax check-off program and
by the sale of cardinal license plates
and the Ohio Wildlife Legacy Stamp.
Individuals wanting to donate can
also make an online contribution at
wildohio.com.
F i s h i n g ,
hunting and
trapping licens-
es will be available Thursday
COLUMBUS – Ohio’s 2012-13
fishing, hunting and trapping licens-
es and permits will be on sale start-
ing Thursday.
“Ohio’s new license sales sys-
tem performed very well in its inau-
gural year,” said Scott Zody, chief of
the Division of Wildlife. “Customer
identification (ID) numbers should
be used whenever possible to help
streamline the license purchasing
process. People can find the num-
ber at the top of last year’s license.”
License sales
for the 2012-13
license year will
be from Thursday
through February
28, 2013, and will
be valid the same
span. Licenses pur-
chased online or at retail outlets
will be printed on paper that can
be folded down to credit card size
but will not be waterproof and must
be protected. Licenses and permits
will be printed along with additional
information relevant to the license or
permit purchased.
Each license buyer must have
a Social Security Number (SSN)
recorded in the system. People who
purchased licenses last year can
now use their customer ID number
and will not have to supply their
SSN again.
SSNs are required to purchase
a recreational license, regardless
of age, for the purpose of child sup-
port collection enforcement under
Federal Statute 42. As a recre-
ational license provider, the DOW
is obligated to comply with this law
and cannot issue a license or permit
without the SSN of the purchaser.
The division will see that a proper
security system is in place to pro-
tect SSNs and any databases that
contain them.
Licenses and permits can be
purchased online at wildohio.com
and at hundreds of agent outlets
throughout the state.
ODNR shooting ranges open
Thursday
Columbus — Public shooting
ranges operated by the DOW will
open for the year on Thursday.
Two different counties in central
Ohio (Delaware and Fayette coun-
ties) offer rifle, pistol, shotgun and
archery ranges.
Ranges are classified by the
type of facilities offered and whether
they are supervised. A class “A”
range requires a shooting range
permit for all persons 18 years and
older. Shooters age 17 and under
are not required to purchase a per-
mit but must be accompanied by
and directly monitored by an adult
(age 18 years or older) holding a
valid shooting range permit. This
permit is available at all hunting and
fishing license outlets and online at
www.WildOhio.com.
In central Ohio, Delaware
Wildlife Area range in Delaware
County and Deer Creek Wildlife
Area in Fayette County are class
“A” ranges. They are open 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. daily Wednesday through
Sunday beginning Thursday.
Hours of operation for other class
“A” ranges may vary; however,
all are closed every Monday and
Tuesday as well as the following
dates: Easter, Memorial Day, July
4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve
and Christmas Day (also closed all
of January and February).
While the Deer Creek rifle range
will be open Thursday, the shot-
gun range area will remain closed
through the middle of March due
to construction on the property.
Shooters should also expect addi-
tional closures in the coming weeks
depending on the progress of the
construction project. Further clo-
sures will be announced on the
DOW’s public shooting ranges web
page.
The annual shooting range per-
mit is $24 and allows the permit
holder to access Class “A” ranges
throughout the year. A 1-day shoot-
ing range permit is $5 and allows
permit holder to access a Class
“A” range for one visit (the permit is
valid only once). These permits par-
tially offset the cost of the shooting
range attendant, restroom facilities,
maintenance, trash removal and
improvements.
NOTE: All ranges are subject
to closing during inclement weather
or flooding conditions. Range users
are advised to contact the District
One office at (614) 644-3925 and/
or www.WildOhio.com for general
information as well as the latest
range closure report.
Public comment welcome on
wildlife issues
COLUMBUS — ODNR/DOW is
holding open-house meetings in all
five districts to discuss season dates
and bag limits of game species,
which will include Ohio’s most popu-
lar game animal, the white-tailed
deer. The meetings will be March
3 from 12–3 p.m. and are open to
the public.
“Anyone interested in provid-
ing input and participating in Ohio’s
professional wildlife management
process is welcome to attend,” said
Zody. “Each open-house location
will have a fish and wildlife biologist
as well as law enforcement officers
available to answer questions.”
Public input gathered at these
open houses will be forwarded to
the division’s central office and con-
sidered during the formulation of
regulations.
For more information or direc-
tions to the open houses, visit the
DOW’s website at wildohio.com or
call 800-WILDLIFE (945-3543).
Northwest Ohio location: Wildlife
District Two Office,
952 Lima Avenue,
Findlay, 419-424-
5000
A statewide
hearing on all pro-
posed rules will
be held at 9 a.m.
March 8 at DOW’s District One
office, located at 1500 Dublin Road
in Columbus. This hearing is open
to the public and input is permitted.
After considering public input,
the Ohio Wildlife Council will vote on
the proposed rules during the April
4 meeting.
Wildlife - ‘The Good, the Bad
and the Ugly’ is 2012 Conference
Theme
COLUMBUS – Overlooked wild-
life will be the focus of the 2012 Ohio
Wildlife Diversity Conference, which
is scheduled for March 7 at the
Aladdin Shrine Center in Columbus.
The conference, titled “The Good,
the Bad and the Ugly,” is sponsored
by the ODNR, Division of Wildlife
and is open to the public.
“We hope many people are able
to attend this conference to learn
more about the interesting wildlife
we have in Ohio,” said Director Jim
Zehringer, director of ODNR.
The Wildlife Diversity Conference
has steadily grown in popularity. The
first conference, held in 1985, drew
40 people. Last year, 975 people
attended the day-long gathering.
The keynote speaker this year,
Cindy Hale of the University of
Minnesota, will discuss earthworms
and their impact to the environment
in her presentation, “Dances with
Worms: The Great Lakes Worm
Watch.”
Other conference topics include
discussions of freshwater mus-
sel restoration, aquatic invasive
species, a Lake Erie pelagic bird
survey, terrestrial crayfish, wildlife
orphans, wetland restoration, as
well as beavers, porcupines and
fishers in Ohio.
The third Ohio Wildlife Legacy
Stamp, which features the spot-
ted salamander, will be available
to conference attendees. Proceeds
from the sale of the stamp will be
used to support: endangered and
threatened native species; habitat
restoration, land purchases and
conservation easements; and edu-
cational products for students and
wildlife enthusiasts.
Anyone who pre-registers online
for the conference may purchase
this collectable stamp at a discount-
ed price of $12, which is a 20 per-
cent savings. Details about the Ohio
Wildlife Legacy Stamp are available
at wildohiostamp.com.
Representatives from a range of
conservation and natural resource
organizations, such as the Black
Swamp Bird Observatory, Columbus
Audubon and Ohio Biological
Survey, will present displays and be
available to answer questions.
Doors open at 8 a.m. for reg-
istration that day. The conference
begins at 9 a.m. and lasts until
3:30 p.m.
For more information or to register
for the conference online, go to http://
bit.ly/WildlifeDiversityConference or
call 800-WILDLIFE. The registration
cost is $35.
----
ODNR (www.ohiodnr.com)
ensures a balance between wise
use and protection of our natural
resources for the benefit of all. The
Ohio DOW is dedicated to conserv-
ing and improving fish and wildlife
resources and habitats and promot-
ing their use and appreciation by
the public so that these resources
continue to enhance the quality of
life for all Ohioans.
Visit wildlife.matters@wildohion-
ews.com.
WILDLIFE OHIO
VARSITY
JEFFERSON (32)
Austin Jettinghoff 1-0-3,
Zach Ricker 0-0-0, Shayn
Klinger 1-2-4, Nick Dunlap 2-0-
5, Ross Thompson 7-1-15, Seth
Wollenhaupt 0-0-0, Nick Fitch
2-1-5, Dakota Stroh 0-0-0. Totals
11-2-4/7-32.
COLUMBUS GROVE (57)
Jordan Travis 5-0-13,
Collin Grothaus 2-0-5, Dane
Stechschulte 2-0-4, Connor
Kohls 5-0-14, Caleb Grothaus
0-0-0, Wade Heffner 4-0-8, Will
Vorhees 4-0-9, Brady Shafer
0-0-0, Derek Rieman 1-0-2,
Blake Neu 1-0-2. Totals 15-9-
0/0-57.
Score by Quarters:
Jefferson 7 4 12 9 - 32
Col. Grove 17 11 11 18 - 57
Three-point goals: Jefferson,
Jettinghoff, Dunlap; Columbus
Grove, Kohls 4, Travis 3, Col.
Grothaus, Vorhees.
----
JUNIOR VARSITY
JEFFERSON (25)
Kurt Wollenhaupt 0-0-0, Tyler
Roby 0-0-0, Ryan Bullinger
2-0-5, Tyler Rice 2-3-8, Kurt
Hoersten 0-2-2, Tyler Mox 2-3-
7, Justin Stewart 0-0-0, Tyler
Talboom 0-0-0, Jordan Barclay
1-0-2, Carter Mox 0-1-1, Shane
Wilson 0-0-0, Wes Roby 0-0-0.
Totals 5-2-9/15-25.
COLUMBUS GROVE (59)
Colton Grothaus 0-0-0,
Blake Hoffman 6-0-15, Jacob
Schroeder 0-0-0, Josh tussing
2-0-5, Joey Warnecke 0-0-0,
Jace Darbyshire 6-0-14, David
Bogart 0-0-0, Clay Diller 3-1-
7, Brady Shafer 3-0-6, Trevor
Haines 2-0-4, Elijah Jones 1-0-
2, Logan Douglas 0-0-0, Tyler
Roethlisberger 1-0-2. Totals
19-6-3/4-59.
Score by Quarters:
Jefferson 5 9 3 8 - 25
Col. Grove 11 21 14 13 - 59
Three-point goals: Jefferson,
Rice, Bullinger; Columbus
Grove, Hoffman 3, Darbyshire
2, Tussing.
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@
delphosherald.com
COLUMBUS GROVE
— Friday night was special at
Columbus Grove High School.
Not only were they celebrating
the inaugural boys basketball varsi-
ty game at the new gymnasium but
they were also celebrating Senior
Night and honoring the veterans of
our Armed Forces.
Perhaps that — and a talented
roster — is why they smothered
Northwest Conference foe Jefferson
59-32 to end the regular season.
Six seniors played their final
home game — and their only one in
the new gymnasium: Wade Heffner,
Connor Kohls, Jordan Travis, Dane
Stechschulte, Caleb Grothaus and
Blake Neu.
The Wildcats (2-18, 1-8 NWC)
drew first blood on a third-chance
putback by freshman Nick Fitch (5
points) at the 6:50 mark before the
Bulldogs (16-4, 7-2 NWC) took
the lead for good on a triple by
Travis (13 markers - 3 triples - 8
assists) at 6:42. Head coach Ryan
Stechschulte still felt the need to call
an early timeout (5:49). That got the
Bulldogs rolling, with Travis adding
five more markers and the Bulldogs
assuming a commanding 17-7 edge
on a triple by junior Collin Grothaus
with 1:30 on the clock.
“I don’t know if it was the fes-
tivities of the new gym or Senior
Night but we had given up three
offensive boards in the first 2-plus
minutes. I just reminded them of
what we had to do,” the coach
explained.
Grove finished 7-of-15 shoot-
ing in the period (24-of-57 for the
night, a solid 9-of-23 long range,
for 42.1%).
The Red and White struggled
to put the ball in the hole in the
first period — 3-of-12 (13-of-44
overall, 2-of-11 downtown, for a
chilly 29.5%). It was even a rougher
road to hoe in the second when they
hit just once in 12 tries. They did
hit 2-of-3 free throws (4-of-7 for
the game for 57.1%; Grove didn’t
attempt any) with senior Shayn
Klinger having the only hoop-and-
the-harm (2:47) and Fitch (6:04)
the other solo. On the other end, the
Bulldogs were also off — 5-of-17
— but five players put in baskets.
They secured a 28-11 halftime edge
as Grothaus hit a transition layin
(one of seven dimes by Kohls) at
2:01.
“We missed layups, a lot of
them. We counted at least five in
the first half alone; that’s a major
part of the story,” Jefferson coach
Marc Smith noted. “We executed
the offense and got the ball where
we wanted it to be but didn’t finish.
We challenged them at the half to
finish off the shots. We competed
pretty well all night long, especially
the second half. That’s a good team
we lost to but we didn’t help our-
selves.”
Jefferson sophomore Ross
Thompson, who had been a
rebounding machine all night
long, rose up offensively in the
third canto, scoring nine of the Red
and White’s 12 points. Still, they
couldn’t chip away at the deficit
thanks to Grove’s veterans, though
they outscored their hosts 12-11.
They were within 39-23 on a steal
and layin from Thompson at 40.1
ticks.
In the finale, the Wildcats did
not go away, staying within 15
points on a 3-ball by sophomore
Austin Jettinghoff at the 4-minute
mark. However, Grove closed the
contest on a 10-0 spurt to make the
final spread bigger.
The Wildcats were led by a
third straight double-double by
Thompson (15 markers, 16 boards)
as they secured 30 caroms (8 offen-
sive). Senior Nick Dunlap added
five points as he was under the
weather. They collected 13 miscues
and five fouls and will play Bluffton
in the Division III sectional opener 7
p.m. Tuesday at Wapakoneta.
“Ross has been putting up dou-
ble-doubles all year; sometimes, we
forget he’s only a sophomore and
sometimes, he needs to forget that
he is. He holds himself back too
much,” Smith added. “I can go
down the list of the kids that played
much better the second half, Nick
(Dunlap) wasn’t feeling well; he
got really tired but gave it all he
had. We now turn our attention to
Bluffton and we know we’re going
to get a better effort from them this
time than when we beat them last
Friday (66-45); they are too well-
coached.”
Columbus Grove seized 36
rebounds (10 offensive) as junior
Blake Hoffman (8 points) and
sophomore Will Vorhees (9 mark-
ers) had six each. They amassed
six errors and eight fouls and will
battle North Baltimore at 6:15 p.m.
Wednesday at Ottawa-Glandorf in
Division IV action.
“We only had one start back
from last season — Jordan — but
we had some kids really work hard
to step into that lineup,” Coach
Stechschulte added. “Connor
improved so much, going from
about 3 points a game average to
an all-league performer. Dane and
Caleb got so much stronger and
more mature and we had a number
of others do the same. We preach
to our kids that we play nine guys
and it takes all of them and their
best efforts.”
Grove’s junior varsity finished
at 15-5 with a 59-25 blowout of the
Wildcats (3-17, 0-9 NWC).
Junior Blake Hoffman paced the
Bulldogs with 15 and freshman Jace
Darbyshire added 14.
Sophomore Tyler Rice led the
Wildcats with eight.
Bulldog boys open gym
in style vs. Jeffcats
championship and knock off
the previously-perfect Defiance
Bulldogs 65-61.
Elida (17-3, 8-1 WBL) out-
scored Defiance (19-1, 8-1) 19-11
in the finale.
Josh Scott dropped in 15 for
Defiance, while Andy Kidston
had 11 and Trey Gillium 10.
Elida battles Shawnee 6:15
p.m. Tuesday in the Division II
sectional at Lima Senior.
ELIDA (65)
Ebin Stratton 2-0-4, Mike
MdDonald 2-3-7, Reggie
McAdams 4-4-13, Aric
Thompson 2-2-7, Dakota Mathias
9-1-20, Cory Royster 5-4-14.
Totals 21-3-14/21-65.
DEFIANCE (61)
Shea Murray 1-3-5, Jacob
Moore 3-0-6, Josh Scott 5-4-15,
Tory Gillium 3-1-8, Trey Gillium
3-2-10, Andy Kidston 3-3-11,
Doug Herrett 1-0-3, Jordan
Tobias 1-1-3. Totals 13-7-14/21-
61.
Score by Quarters:
Elida 15 17 14 19 - 65
Defiance 14 15 21 11 - 61
Three-point goals: Elida,
McAdams, Thompson, Mathias;
Defiance, Kidston 2, Tr. Gillium
2, Scott, To. Gillium, Herrett.
JV score: Elida 45, Defiance
40.
----
Kalida wins finale
SHERWOOD — Kalida hit
the road to Fairview High School
Friday to close regular-season
play and came back with a 56-40
victory.
Scorers for the Wildcats (15-5)
were Drew Stechschulte with 24,
Paul Utendorf and Ben Schroeder
10 each, Kevan Unverferth six,
Austin Roebke four and Tyler
Kortokrax two.
Kalida opens Division
IV sectional play at Paulding
Wednesday versus Ayersville,
with a 6:15 p.m. tip.
Roundup (Continued from Page 6)
www.delphosherald.com Saturday, February 25, 2012 The Herald — 8
‘Memories down Main Street’
Roger Geise grew up in
Delphos in the 1950s and
60s. He currently lives in
Chillicothe with Linda, his
wife of nearly 40 years.
He retired from full-time
teaching at Chillicothe
High School and now
teaches at Ohio University.
He has been reminiscing
to help pass the time while
recuperating from an inju-
ry. He began to record
those thoughts in the form
of a story entitled, “Tour
Down 1950s Main Street.”
It is a five-block trip north
in and out of the business-
es on the east side of Main
Street starting at the Penn
Central Railroad and then
a return on the west side of
the street. These memories
are based on the adven-
tures of a curious 10-12
-year-old boy. Here is the
second installment of five
stories.
My first recollection of
Peoples National Bank as
a little boy was the impos-
ing sight of tellers work-
ing behind tall, steel bars
that separated them from
the customers. My mother,
Florence, helped me open
my first savings account
there. Elmer Scherger
typed my name in a little
passbook and with a foun-
tain pen certified that I
had five dollars on deposit.
Watching the growth of
those figures in that lit-
tle book encouraged me
to continue an important
life skill. One night a few
years later as a teenager, I
was part of a huge crowd
formed around the cor-
ner of Second and Main,
watching plate glass win-
dows explode as flames
and billows of black
smoke forced their way
outside. The bank, Vogt’s
Restaurant, Dr. Morgan’s
dental office and Bob
Shenk’s law offices, as
well as other businesses
were destroyed or certainly
disrupted. I had to wonder:
Were my bank deposits
safe?!
As we head north, we
pass the show windows
of Dewey Steinle’s The
Lion Clothing. That store
was in competition with
Odenwellers up the street.
Those two stores were
regarded as the prime
men’s clothiers of the area.
Once my supply of hand-
me-downs ebbed, I patron-
ized both of them.
Drew and Pam Shenk’s
grandparents owned the
family dry-goods business
next door. They dealt in
women’s clothes, mater-
nity outfits and sewing
supplies.
Just south of the alley
was a building which
served temporarily as the
Democratic Headquarters
for presidential candidate
John Kennedy. Bumper
stickers and buttons were
briefly available for the
asking.
My dad’s broth-
er, Hubert, along with
Brownie (Harold Brown),
operated The Chateau
Bar and Grill. Despite the
francophone name of the
business, French food was
never a part of the cuisine
there. Its tin ceiling, now
a home fashion statement,
fascinated me as a young-
ster. Next door, there was
a soda fountain in the rear
of Stallkamp Drug store.
Linda Kill served root beer
to Denny Stemen and me
when she was employed
there by Gerry Will, phar-
macist after Ted Stallkamp
retired. As we leave the
pharmacy but before we
pass the jewelry store,
we’ll see a little door with
access to an old wooden
stairway. At the time, Ott
Holdgreve, an employee
of my dad, lived in one of
the apartments up those
stairs. He drove what may
possibly have been the
only Model A Ford that
was still in daily use. That
square, black vehicle had
running boards and as a
kid, I enjoyed standing on
them. I felt lucky to see
that car as a familiar site in
our driveway.
Alley Staup operated
The Capitol Theater, a
popular locale for both
children and adults. This
building was complete with
a cute teenaged girl in the
ticket booth. It also had a
lobby large enough to hold
40 or 50 patrons in bad
weather until the earlier
patrons were ready to exit
through separate doors.
Every Saturday afternoon,
Mr. Staup presided over
a mass of children whose
parents had given them a
quarter to watch a double
feature movie. Popular
matinee features for kids
were shows such as Tarzan
or the Ma and Pa Kettle
series. These movies were
usually accompanied with
an adventure serial, news-
reel and Disney or Woody
Woodpecker cartoon.
If you were fortunate
enough to have an extra
dime, you could buy a
candy bar or bag of pop-
corn. I avoided the pop
dispenser which usually
tilted the paper cup as it
dropped. Invariably I had
to watch my drink miss
the cup. Consequently I
would lose the dime that I
had earned by selling five
pop bottles to Niedecken’s
Carry-out.
One memorable day
instead of a “show,” the
kids were treated to a
magic display and a draw-
ing complete with prizes.
Eddie Graham, who lived
up the street from us, won
a life-size electric car that
he could actually sit in. He
was truly the envy of the
neighborhood as he passed
our houses. The rest of us
kids had home-made go
carts that we either inher-
ited from older brothers
or that we made from an
old wooden ironing board,
four baby buggy wheels
and assorted parts that we
could salvage from the
garage or Cross’ junk yard
on South Bredeick Street.
In that same magic show
my older brother, Bill
Lauf, won a black satin
rabbit which for a short
time we kept in the cel-
lar, the original basement
for our vintage Victorian
house. I may have been
more proud of that ani-
mal than he. I recall Pat
Reddington at O’Neill’s
Red and White Grocery at
Second and Canal streets
providing me with wooden
grape crates that I disas-
sembled, sawed and rede-
signed to be nesting boxes
and hutches for the many
rabbits that were to fol-
low. Later Cecil Stopher,
another neighbor, built
us a more suitable cage.
What followed was a rab-
bit business that taught me
animal husbandry as well
as responsibility and incip-
ient salesmanship. What
also followed much later
was a building profession
and woodworking hobby
that I enjoy to this day, in
part credited to my broth-
er’s lucky day.
Our visit at the mov-
ies is over. Let’s continue
with the tour up Main.
We’re out on the street
next door to the Capitol
Theater. Give your eyes
time to adjust to the sun-
light. There! You can see
Ben Kill hand-in hand
with his little girl, Linda,
supplying Buss Hoehn’s
Kroger Store with cartons
of ice-cream and gallon
glass bottles of milk from
his double parked Meadow
Gold Truck. Fewer park-
ing places were available
in those days since the
canal lot was not yet built.
As a result, the local police
tended to overlook double
parking.
Owner John DeWeese
just finished sweeping the
sidewalk in front of his
Delphos Hardware. Let’s
follow him in the store as
the little bell rings on the
door, announcing a cus-
tomer. There were won-
derful dreams available in
this store for curious boys.
I’m not referring to the
home furnishings and the
pots and pans. My eyes
were drawn to the left
wall with a glass case dis-
playing a variety of tools,
locks and pocket knives.
Almost every boy of 10 or
12 carried a pocket knife
once in a while. After all,
you never knew when you
might want to whittle, need
to cut a rope or would be
challenged to a friendly
game of “splits.”
But the knives are not
what interested me the
most, because I already
had one. There was some-
thing bigger that I had
spotted the week before.
I was heading for the gun
rack that held a .22 cali-
ber single shot rifle with
a red stock. It was a beau-
ty! That gun attracted me
to the store a number of
times. I never did call it
my own, despite the fact
that it was available for
several years.
Now as we leave the
hardware, glance back
down the aisle and you
may see Leonard Kleer
fixing a screen door or
cutting single strength
window glass behind the
counter. He was a fixture
in that store.
Delphos may have been
the only town in the coun-
try with two hardware
stores almost side by side.
Since we just left the
Delphos Hardware, walk
past the Corner Hardware
to Third and Main. Now
look toward the East
across from Dr. Heitz and
Roth Meat Market. Is that
Zelma Grone with 10-year-
old John leaving Miller’s
Optometry? Ironically,
John was later to become
an optometrist and set up
his own business here.
Glance back almost to
the corner on the north
side of Third Street. Alex
Lindeman had an anti-
quated shoe repair shop.
It resembled an old street
car that must have dated
from early in the centu-
ry. I recall that I tagged
along with my mom here
once or twice as she had
our shoes half-soled or
reheeled. When this shop
was razed to make way
for the Citizen’s Federal
Savings and Loan, we
switched our allegiance
to Zip Kuhn Shoe Repair
located in a garage adja-
cent to his Seventh Street
home. Later on he moved
to Elm Street where he
had built a new home
complete with an interior
swimming pool. On occa-
sion the Sisters of Notre
Dame excused me from
school to take their torn
shoes to Zip for rehabbing.
I remember carrying them
in the saddle bags on my
new Schwinn bicycle.
Norm and Ann Clawson
owned an appliance store
on the corner. In one of
my visits to this store a
few years later, I spotted
a Zenith transistor radio.
Although it would cost me
seven weeks of my wages
from my paper route, I was
determined to make that
radio my first acquisition
in the fledgling electron-
ics age.
Swiharts barbershop
Shenk’s and Lion Clothing
Photos courtesy of Delphos Canal Commission
The author’s uncle Hubert and Harold “ Brownie” Brown, operated The Chateau Bar
and Grill. Stallkamp Drugs was next door and offered hand-poured sodas to thirsty young
lads.
The Capitol Theater was a favorite haunt for children on Saturday morning.
O’Neill’s Red and White Grocery at Second and Canal streets.
See MAIN, page 9
1
FEBRUCHERRY
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Jeff Brumbaugh, Attorney at Law
16 East Auglaize Street
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Do you have a loved one who is in the
nursing home, or getting ready to
need long term care? It is not too late!
You do NOT have to spend your life
savings on a nursing home. Let us
show you how to protect your home,
farm and your assets using Ohio law.
Join us for a FREE informational seminar
to learn more about protecting what
you’ve worked all your life to earn
Where: Delphos Library 309
West Second Street
When: March 5th and March 8th
2:00 pm
Refreshments will be served
Seats are limited, please call today to
RSVP @ (567) 356-5070

Jeff Brumbaugh, Attorney at Law
16 East Auglaize Street
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Do you have a loved one who is in the
nursing home, or getting ready to
need long term care? It is not too late!
You do NOT have to spend your life
savings on a nursing home. Let us
show you how to protect your home,
farm and your assets using Ohio law.
Join us for a FREE informational seminar
to learn more about protecting what
you’ve worked all your life to earn
Where: Delphos Library 309
West Second Street
When: March 5th and March 8th
2:00 pm
Refreshments will be served
Seats are limited, please call today to
RSVP @ (567) 356-5070

Jeff Brumbaugh, Attorney at Law
16 East Auglaize Street
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Do you have a loved one who is in the
nursing home, or getting ready to
need long term care? It is not too late!
You do NOT have to spend your life
savings on a nursing home. Let us
show you how to protect your home,
farm and your assets using Ohio law.
Join us for a FREE informational seminar
to learn more about protecting what
you’ve worked all your life to earn
Where: Delphos Library 309
West Second Street
When: March 5th and March 8th
2:00 pm
Refreshments will be served
Seats are limited, please call today to
RSVP @ (567) 356-5070

Jeff Brumbaugh, Attorney at Law
16 East Auglaize Street
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Do you have a loved one who is in the
nursing home, or getting ready to
need long term care? It is not too late!
You do NOT have to spend your life
savings on a nursing home. Let us
show you how to protect your home,
farm and your assets using Ohio law.
Join us for a FREE informational seminar
to learn more about protecting what
you’ve worked all your life to earn
Where: Delphos Library 309
West Second Street
When: March 5th and March 8th
2:00 pm
Refreshments will be served
Seats are limited, please call today to
RSVP @ (567) 356-5070

Jeff Brumbaugh, Attorney at Law
16 East Auglaize Street
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Do you have a loved one who is in the
nursing home, or getting ready to
need long term care? It is not too late!
You do NOT have to spend your life
savings on a nursing home. Let us
show you how to protect your home,
farm and your assets using Ohio law.
Join us for a FREE informational seminar
to learn more about protecting what
you’ve worked all your life to earn
Where: Delphos Library 309
West Second Street
When: March 5th and March 8th
2:00 pm
Refreshments will be served
Seats are limited, please call today to
RSVP @ (567) 356-5070

Jeff Brumbaugh, Attorney at Law
16 East Auglaize Street
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Do you have a loved one who is in the
nursing home, or getting ready to
need long term care? It is not too late!
You do NOT have to spend your life
savings on a nursing home. Let us
show you how to protect your home,
farm and your assets using Ohio law.
Join us for a FREE informational seminar
to learn more about protecting what
you’ve worked all your life to earn
Where: Delphos Library 309
West Second Street
When: March 5th and March 8th
2:00 pm
Refreshments will be served
Seats are limited, please call today to
RSVP @ (567) 356-5070

Jeff Brumbaugh, Attorney at Law
16 East Auglaize Street
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Do you have a loved one who is in the nursing
home, or getting ready to need long term care?
IT IS NOT TOO LATE!
You do NOT have to spend your life savings on
a nursing home. Let us show you how to protect
your home, farm and your assets using Ohio law.
Join us for a FREE informational seminar to learn more
about protecting what you’ve worked all your life to earn.
Where: Delphos Library, 309 W. Second Street
When: March 5th and March 8th • 2:00 p.m.
Refreshments will be served
Seats are limited, please call today to RSVP
@ (567) 356-5070
It is Possible
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WHAT: FREE Informational Seminar
WHERE: St. Rita’s Auxiliary Conference Center
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WHEN: Monday, February 27 at 6:30 pm
To reserve your spot, call 419.226.4300
For Charles and Judy,
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Saturday, February 25, 2012 The Herald — 9
www.delphosherald.com
(Continued from Page 4)
church, praying. The family landed in New
Orleans and went to Cincinnati before com-
ing to Glandorf. Barney was buried in the old
Glandorf Cemetery. His wife later died at the
home of a daughter in Ottoville and is buried
in Ottoville. Most of the Rickers settled in
Fort Jennings, Ottoville and Delphos.
Frances, the author of the Ricker Genealogy,
stated that Bernard Herman Ricker and his
sons helped build the Glandorf churches and
the Miami and Erie Canal. Barney’s brother,
Herman, was captain of a canal boat travel-
ing between Cincinnati and Delphos. He later
became a carpenter and owned a business in
Delphos. The Delphos Canal Commission
Museum proudly displays a beautiful, ornate
buffet built at the Ricker factory. The author
of this Ricker History presented a copy of her
manuscript and documents to the local history
room of the Putnam District Library.
This brings us to the suggestion of keep-
ing a scrapbook to save your family and local
history.
In Scrapbooking II, it was suggested you
start with an acid free scrapbook, along with
some supplies such as a small paper trim-
mer, acid free adhesives, such as photo splits,
double sided tape or glue stick. The most
important thing is to use acid free materials.
Naturally, a good sharp scissors is very
important, and use only acid free pens. You
can start with black but you will find many
colors to choose from. Store your pens hori-
zontally. Journaling is a very important part of
scrapbooking — to tell your story and identify
people in the photos.
You can enhance the photos on your
scrapbook pages with card stock to match
the colors in your pictures or the theme of
the page. Use only acid free card stock not
regular construction paper. Stickers or other
embellishments help to enhance your pictures,
adding to the theme.
Start simple. Some of the scrapbook maga-
zines use a lot of printed theme papers but
some of them just look too busy, making it
difficult to show off the pictures. Just make
a trip to the Delphos Public Library to find a
book on scrapbooking. Enjoy!
The second St. John’s state tournament team leaving for the state championship game
in Cleveland. Pictured are: Ralph Elwer, Ed Utrup, Ron Grothouse, Rudy Grothouse,
Chuck Geise Coach Bob Arnzen, Bob Pothast, Joe Youngpeter, Gerald Wannemacher,
Francis Nomina, Bob Kill, Gib Pohlman, Mike Wulfhorst, Barney Altman and John
Nijasen, the band director. Note the long overcoats and the hats on the players, all dressed
up to go to the city.
Two men making apple butter
Scrapbooking
Main
(Continued from page 1)
was next door. It sported
several chairs. Fergie and the
other barbers actually took
appointments. I was only
aware of this by tagging
along with my friend, Denny
Stemen. My friend, Denny
and his older brother, Dick,
worked here as shoeshine
boys. Simple shines cost 15
cents. White socks demand-
ed more care, and hence, a
nickel more. Boot shines cost
a quarter. Usually they could
expect a 15- to 25-cent tip.
Generally I had no busi-
ness at Swihart’s. My bar-
ber was my mother’s brother,
John Grothouse. His shop
was located at his home on
North Pierce Street before he
located on Third at the Canal.
Haircuts were $1. Flat tops, a
buck and a quarter. They must
have been harder to cut.
Elmer Helmkamp’s Meat
Market was at the alley. They
had a drive-thru window. I
was always glad when mom
said that we had to drop by
Helmkamp’s for some sau-
sage. That meant that she was
going to fix pancakes and
sausage. I still remember the
aroma in her kitchen as those
big links sizzled, all curled
in an iron skillet. That was
one of my favorite meals. I
wonder whether I had ever
told her.
While we’re at
Helmkamp’s, lets stop next
door at McClure’s Army
Surplus and look at the items
left over from World War
II and the Korean Conflict.
The military must have had a
massive over-supply of such
things as army cots, blankets,
folding shovels, canteens and
mess kits.
These stores were all over
the country. That store was an
adventure, too, for a kid. The
Army-Navy Surplus Store in
Columbus didn’t close until
about 1970.
Let’s stop here on the cor-
ner in front of The Delphos
House Hotel before we cross
Fourth Street. I want to clip
a new baseball card on my
spokes. This one’s getting
worn out. You want one?
McClure’s Surplus and Helmkamp Meat Market.
10 – The Herald Saturday, February 25, 2012 www.delphosherald.com
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Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Advertise
Your
Business
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
SWINE PRODUCTION
TEAM MEMBERS
Kalmbach Swine Management, a leading
producer of pork in Ohio, has employment
opportunities available at our sow-unit, near
Van Wert, OH called Noble Pork.
Candidates with previous experience in man-
ufacturing, production or agriculture desired.
Livestock experience preferred, but not nec-
essary. Must have a valid drivers license and
no criminal background. Pre-employment
drug testing required.
For consideration please call:
Phone: 419-968-2238
Monday – Friday
9 AM to 4 PM

EOE M/F/D/V
IMMEDIATE OPENING
EXPERIENCED AUTO BODY
REPAIR TECHNICIAN
Tools Required
We offer Health Insurance,
Retirement Program, Paid Vacation
and Excellent Working Conditions.
Contact Dan Wiseman or Bob Grothouse
DELPHA CHEVROLET BUICK
1725 E. Fifth St., Delphos, Ohio 45833
“The Key
To Buying
Or Selling”
940 E. FIFTH ST., DELPHOS
419-692-7773 Fax 419-692-7775
www.rsre.com
BY APPOINTMENT
1 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-3:00 PM
$79,900-Elida SD
3BD/1BTH ranch, total remodel inside and out. Appli-
ances included. Move in ready! (135) Chad Wright 419-
236-7143
$55,000-Spencerville SD
1-story home with 3 bedrooms, 1 bath located on 1 acre
lot. 2 car attached garage. Above ground pool. (167)
Kathy Mathews 419-233-3786
$79,000-Spencerville SD
Vinyl two-story home with 4 bedrooms, 1 full bath and 2
half baths, approx. 2826 sq. ft., 2 car detached garage,
handicap accessible entry. (141) Mike Reindel 419-235-
3607
$150,000-Spencerville SD
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
Price Reduced! Commercial bldg. with approx. 3300 sq.
ft., includes 2.55 acres, Butler steel building, new addition
in 2009. Concrete floors, new electrical lighting. (126)
Barb Coil 419-302-3478
$71,000-Elida SD
All brick ranch with 3 bedrooms/1.5 baths located on cor-
ner lot. 2 car attached garage with new garage floor. New
roof Nov. 2011. (45) Donnie Nichols 419-303-8577
$33,500-Delphos SD
2BD/2BTH mobile home, freshly painted, new 14í x 30í
carport, appliances included. City water and sewer. (95)
Mike Reindel 419-235-3607
$26,500-Elida SD
BUILDING LOT
100íx200í building lot; city water, sewer & gas available.
(73) Robin Flanagan 419-234-6111
$14,500-Spencerville SD
BUILDING LOT
.460 acre lot located in Spencer Township. (115) Mike
Reindel 419-235-3607
$42,500-Spencerville SD
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
One story commercial building with approx. 1548 sq. ft.,
.085 acre lot, currently a flower shop. (114) Mike Reindel
419-235-3607
18626 Road 9Q, Columbus Grove
$115,000-Columbus Grove SD
Ranch home with 3 bedrooms/2 baths located
on 3.1 acre lot. Gas fireplace and wood burning
stove. New countertops and backsplash. Newer
windows. Includes barn and shed. (83) Don
Hamilton 419-234-6632
OPEN SATURDAY 1:00-3:00
419-692-SOLD
419-453-2281
Check out all of our listings at: WWW.TLREA.COM
303 W. 5th, Delphos: 3 BR, 1
Bath. Affordable Living!!! $55K
Tony: 233-7911.
414 W. 6th, Delphos: 3 BR,
Fenced Yard. Lynn: 234-2314.
390 Wayne, Ottoville: 3 BR,
Remodeled. Reduced to $65K.
Tony: 233-7911.
218 Mahoning, Cloverdale:
House, Garage, Huge Lot.
Asking $29,000. Call Tony.
932 N Washington, Delphos:
Lynn; 234-2314.
Ottoville SD Lots: Next to
school. Call Tony
Kalida Golf Course: 2 Avail.
Tony: 233-7911.
NEW LISTING!: 24921 Rd P,
Ottoville; 3 BR, 2 Bath, Bsmt,
1 Acre, 34’ x 48’Bldg. Tony:
233-7911.
921 N. Canal, Delphos: New
Listing! 3 BR, nice location.
Dbl garage, Big Lot. Call Lynn:
234-2314.
828 N. Main, Delphos: 4 BR,
Newer shingles. Nice interior.
Owner wants offer. Tony: 233-
7911.
466 Dewey, Delphos: Beauti-
ful 2 BR on dead-end street.
Take a look! Gary: 692-1910.
$45,000-$75,000
Under $45,000 $101,000-$150,000
$150,000 +
$76,000-$100,000
GO TO: WWW.TLREA.COM
for color photos and full descriptions of all of these
fine properties. Then, call the agent listed to
arrange a viewing of your new home!!!
337 Walnut, Ottoville: RE-
DUCED! 3 BR, 2 Bath, Up-
dated throughout. Fish Pond,
Garage & Stg Bldg. Owners
re-locating. Tony: 233-7911.
New Listing! 17587 SR 66,
Ottoville: 4 BR, 2 1/2 Bath on
3.74 acres. Updates through-
out. Won’t last long. Tony:
233-7911
40 W 4th, Ft. Jennings: Ex-
cellent 3 BR with big open
basement. Updated nicely
throughout. Tony: 233-7911
126 / 128 Church St., Ot-
toville: Big brick beauty. Cur-
rently a duplex showing good
return. Could be restored to
single family. Huge garage.
Call Tony: 233-7911.
SCHRADER
REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
FOR A FULL LIST OF OUR LISTINGS, PLEASE VIEW:
WWW.SCHRADERREALTY.NET
Ruth Baldauf-Liebrecht ... 419-234-5202
Amie Nungester ............... 419-236-0688
Janet Kroeger .................. 419-236-7894
Jodi Moenter ................ 419-296-9561
Stephanie Clemons...... 419-234-0940
Judy M.W. Bosch ......... 419-230-1983
OPEN HOUSES
SUN.,
FEB. 26
Krista Schrader ................ 419-233-3737
1:30-3:00
20809 Elgin Converse Rd - Venedocia
FIRST TIME OPEN! Beautiful setting! Country cus-
tom built home w/3BR, 3.5BA, finished basement,
10+ wooden acres, garage, small outbuildings,
Spencerville schools, Janet will greet you.
1:30-2:30
834 N. Main St, Delphos
Updated 2-3BR home, playroom, dining room, large
pantry, basement, garage, corner lot with many trees.
Krista will greet you.
3:00-4:00
229 Douglas St, Delphos
FIRST TIME OPEN! Charming and Spacious 4BR,
1.5BA, very large rooms, dining rm, basement, ga-
rage, only $70’s. Krista will greet you.
AlexanderRealtyServices.Net
119 N. Canal St.
Delphos
Lot in Menke Edition..Priced for quick sale...$14,900
THINK SPRING, Buy your lot now!
SHORT SALE
Gas heat, double A/C and drive
up window. Office, 2 storage
rooms plus huge retail area.
$159,900 NOW $99,000
Cindy Alexander 419-234-7208
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*Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel.
*Will be trained by Microtel
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Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage
close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE
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OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 1-3 P.M.
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos
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928 N. Franklin St., Delphos
These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 3:30-5 P.M.
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BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity
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$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!
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$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find
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$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC
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$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury
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$77,000-Ft Jennings SD
Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story
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$148,500-Elida SD
A Charming Personality
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$73,000-Delphos SD
Peace And Privacy
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$84,900-Delphos SD
Enticing Two-story
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w w w . t l r e a . c o m
419-692-SOLD
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GREAT 1
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HOME-BUYER
INCENTIVES
ARE AVAILABLE!!!
CALL US FOR
MORE INFORMATION
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THINKING OF
SELLING??
MAKE THE CALL
THAT SAYS
IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty
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www.jimlanghalsrealty.com
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FEATURED HOMES
Sun., March 9
1 to 3 p.m. OPEN HOUSE
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.
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Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
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KNIPPEN
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CHRYSLER
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Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today
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*Will be trained by Microtel
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Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage
close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE
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OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos
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928 N. Franklin St., Delphos
These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
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BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity
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$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!
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$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find
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$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC
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$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury
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$77,000-Ft Jennings SD
Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story
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$148,500-Elida SD
A Charming Personality
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$73,000-Delphos SD
Peace And Privacy
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Enticing Two-story
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MORE INFORMATION
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THINKING OF
SELLING??
MAKE THE CALL
THAT SAYS
IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty
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FEATURED HOMES
Sun., March 9
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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Call for showing ...
1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.
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Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT
®
BATTERIES
TESTED
TOUGH
®
MAX
with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
KNIPPEN
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2007
CHRYSLER
SEBRING
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14,999
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Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells
Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today
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See me,
BILL HOFFMAN
for the best buy on your
new or used vehicle.
TOM AHL
617 KING AVE., LIMA, OH 45805
419-228-3413 CELL 419-296-7188
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
LEAD RENOVATION, Re-
pair & Painting Program
will be offered March 22nd
in Delphos. Contact the
Delphos Area Chamber of
Commerce to register. 8hr
course. Class size limited.
419-695-1771
010

Announcements
Kreative
Learning
Preschool
340 W. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH
45833
419-695-5934
2012/2013
Registration
Going On
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
COME JOIN our great
team! Vancrest Health
Care & Rehabilitation
Center is now accepting
applications for part time
positions for Nurses -All
shifts available. Work will
include every 3rd week-
end. Benefits include
earned vacation time &
competitive wages. Expe-
rience recognized.
ALSO -STNA CLASSES
will be offered here at
Vancrest*. Apply in person
at Vancrest of Delphos,
1425 E. Fifth St., Delphos,
Ohio -8:00am to 4:00pm,
Monday through Friday.
E.O.E.
DIRECTOR OF Nursing
Roselawn Manor is seek-
ing a Director of Nursing
to manage our care com-
munity’s clinical services.
Be an important part of
this friendly, team oriented
environment.
The candidate must be an
RN and preferably have
administrative and geriat-
ric experience. Our 54 bed
skilled nursing and 8 bed
assisted living facility pro-
vides a variety of services
to the community including
transitional care, demen-
tia, wound management,
outpatient therapy, and
outpatient laboratory serv-
ices. Knowledge of nurs-
ing home regulations and
quality assurance is es-
sential. Applicant should
also be organized and
have excellent communi-
cation skills.
If you are interested, apply
in person or send your re-
sume to Shanna Holland,
LNHA.
Roselawn Manor
420 East Fourth Street
Spencerville, Ohio 45887
(419) 647-4115
EOE
080

Help Wanted
FULL TIME Graphic Artist
is needed by local com-
pany. Website knowledge
and able to do page lay-
outs a plus. Benefits pack-
age includes: Health, Den-
tal, 401K & Vacation.
Send replies to Box 165
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
FURNITURE DELIVER-
IES and warehousing help
needed at Westrich Furni-
t ur e. Cal l Mi k e
419-230-1870 for informa-
tion 8:00am-5:00pm
080

Help Wanted
LOOKING
FOR A JOB?
Axcess Staffing Services
is seeking candidates for
long term temporary
positions for Packers and
Warehouse. 1st and 2nd
shift available. Benefits
available.
707 N. Cable Rd.
Suite H
Lima, OH
(behind Walgreens)
567-712-2200
BK Tool
& Design
Kalida, OH
NOW HIRING
Mechanical
Design
Engineers
Machinists
Automation
Programmers
Send resume to:
BKTool@BKTool.com
PH: 419-532-3890
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
OTTOVILLE
HARDWARE
& FURNITURE
COMPANY
is seeking part-time
SALES HELP in
our Furniture, Floor
Covering, and Ap-
pliance Department,
Dependable, good
personality and cus-
tomer service skills.
To apply send
resume or call to:
Ottoville Hardware &
Furniture Company
P.O. Box 457
Ottoville, OH 45876
Attention: Sue
Bendele
(419) 453-3338
TRUCK MECHANI C
WANTED -Experienced
Truck Technician needed
immediately. Great pay
based on ability. Benefits
offered include: Health,
Dental & Life Insurance,
Short & Long Term Dis-
ability Insurance, Paid
Holidays & Vacation, 401K
with company contribu -
tions. If interested please
send resume to: RODOC
Leasing Sales and Serv-
ices, 5028 N. Kill Rd, Del-
phos, OH 45833
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
MAYTAG
WASHER/DRYER
Combonation. Very Good
condition. Asking $200.00.
May be seen at 432 S.
Bredeick St., Delphos, OH
45833. Call for an appoint-
ment. 419-203-3042
501

Misc. for Sale
FIREWOOD FOR Sale.
$70.00 a truckload. Deliv-
ery available for a fee. Call
419-286-3861
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
MOBILE HOME For Sale.
Clean, 12x65, 2 Bedroom,
All Appliances and many
Updat es. $4300. 00.
419-339-9343
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
$
64
95
4 WHEEL
ALIGNMENT
Includes check
and adjust camber
& toe front and rear.
Additional parts & labor
may be required
on some vehicles.
See Service Advisor
for details.
plus parts
& tax
Over 85
years
serving
you!
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE BIRDS -Only 2
Parakeets left. Come with
a small amount of food.
Call 419-233-2588
Place A Help
Wanted Ad
In the Classifieds
Call
The Daily Herald
419 695-0015
Place a House
For Sale Ad
In the Classifieds
Call
The Daily
Herald
419 695-0015
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
999

Legals
The Marion Township
Zoning Board will
hold a puBlic hearing
on an applicaTion for
a proposed Zoning
change on The 5Th day
of March, 2012 aT 7:00pM
aT The Marion Township
Building. The applicaTion
suBMiTTed By naThan
lee, requesTing ThaT a
parcel of land along
grone road in Marion
Township Be reZoned
froM agriculTural and
residenTial To Business.
(The Marion Township
Zoning Board will, wiThin
30 days afTer The hearing,
refer To The Marion
Township TrusTees, a
recoMMendaTion on The
proposed aMendMenT.)
Marion Township
Zoning Board
James Miller, secretary
2/25, 2/29, 3/5
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword
Puzzle
ACROSS
1. Type of eclipse
6. *1941’s “How Green
___ My Valley”
9. Drink too much
13. Being of service
14. Gilligan’s home
15. Chicago’s ORD
16. Smelling _____, pl.
17. In the past
18. Type of beam, also
an acronym
19. *Best Picture nomi-
nee set in Jackson, MS
21. “Ripley’s Believe It or
Not” showpiece, e.g.
23. Accused by some of
breaking up The Beatles
24. Obama to Harvard
Law School, e.g.
25. Bud or chum
28. Cough syrup balsam
30. To mark with spots
35. ____ vera
37. *Nominated for role in
“Moneyball”
39. Like sound of pinched
nose
40. Chess piece that
looks like castle
41. Barges
43. Circus venue
44. Reason by deduction
46. “The Iliad,” e.g.
47. *Mechanically-in-
clined flm orphan
48. Seaman or sailor
50. Bus ____
52. Room in a house
53. Like acne-prone skin
55. Charlotte’s creation
57. Hotel meeting place
60. *”The Descendants”
nominee
64. Wavelike patterned
silk
65. Make imperfect
67. Home to BYU
68. Curving outward
69. “___ to Joy”
70. Pivoted about a ful-
crum
71. It usually contains the
altar in a church
72. Women’s organiza-
tion
73. Rub out
DOWN
1. A deadly sin
2. Beehive State
3. World’s longest river
4. Even though, arch.
5. Wish ill
6. Smack or sock
7. Leo month
8. It has no back and no
arms
9. Bangkok inhabitant
10. Kiln for drying hops
11. The hunted
12. “Ever” to a poet
15. *He played Cold War
spy
20. Grommets, e.g.
22. Milk ___, popular at
the movies
24. Coroner’s perfor-
mance
25. *Place of Woody’s
midnight magic
26. Unaccompanied
27. Used for washing
29. Often spread in the
classroom
31. Beaten by walkers
32. Imposter
33. *Best Actress winner
in “Tootsie”
34. “Crocodile Rock” per-
former
36. Augmented
38. Foolish person
42. Frown with anger
45. *”The Girl with the
Dragon Tattoo”
49. Band event
51. “We the ______” in
the Constitution
54. “30 Rock” character
56. Emerald Ash _____
pest
57. “Wolf” in French
58. Great masters’ me-
dium, pl.
59. Strong desire
60. *It works with the cast
on flms
61. Most luminous star
62. Day before, pl.
63. Yesteryear
64. Earned at Sloan or
Wharton
66. “Much ___ About
Nothing”
The Oscars
Dear Annie: My
90-year-old mother is
an Alzheimer’s patient.
In her younger
days, she was
very active in
the community
and belonged to
many organiza-
tions and social
clubs.
M o m
doesn’t get out
of her assisted-
living com-
munity much.
Occasionally, I
take her in her
wheelchair to a local
restaurant or a doctor’s
appointment. Because of
her former high profile
in the community, many
people recognize her,
but she no longer knows
them. I always tell them
to please identify them-
selves so she doesn’t
get confused. Yet even
with this warning, some
people insist on saying,
“Hi, Mary! Do you know
who I am?”
Of course, I imme-
diately tell Mom their
name and how she
knows them so she can
put them in context.
But what amazes me is
that some people have
the nerve to ask, “Why
did you tell her?
I wanted to see
if she recognized
me!” Mind you,
she often does not
know me. Why
on earth would
she remember
some acquain-
tance from 30
years ago?
Mom knows
enough to be
aware that she has
a problem with her
memory. The shock and
despair on her face dur-
ing these encounters is so
sad, it makes me want to
smack these idiots. I’m
amazed at the stupidity of
some people and wanted
to tell them so. -- Pissed
Off in El Paso
Dear El Paso: It is
always wise to identify
yourself when approach-
ing someone. It is both
inconsiderate and egotis-
tical to assume everyone
knows who you are. This
is especially important
when dealing with a per-
son with Alzheimer’s.
Thanks for saying so.
Compassion needed when dealing
with Alzheimer’s patients
Annie’s Mailbox
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Sunday Evening February 26, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Oscars 84th-Academy Awards Local Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS The Amazing Race The Mentalist CSI: Miami Local
WLIO/NBC Celebrity Apprentice Celebrity Apprentice Local Dateline NBC
WOHL/FOX Simpsons Napoleon Fam. Guy Amer. Dad Local
ION The Terminator Fast & Furious Backdraft
Cable Channels
A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
AMC The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Comic Book Men The Walking Dead Talk Dead Walk:Dead
ANIM Handfishin' Rattlesnake Republic Finding Bigfoot Rattlesnake Republic Finding Bigfoot
BET Mother's Cour. The Game Together Together Together Paid Inspir.
BRAVO Housewives/Atl. To Be Announced To Be Announced What Happens Housewives/OC
CMT Grease Redneck Vacation Redneck Vacation Redneck Vacation Redneck Vacation Grease
CNN CNN Presents Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom CNN Presents Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Super Troopers Tosh.0 Katt Williams Hustle Key
DISC Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush
DISN Austin Shake It ANT Farm Jessie Austin Austin ANT Farm Jessie Wizards Wizards
E! Khloe Ice-Coco True Hollywood Story Khloe Ice-Coco Ice-Coco After Party: Academy Awards
ESPN Track and Field Goose SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 Catching Hell The Real Rocky Goose World, Poker
FAM Aladdin Pirates-Carib. J. Osteen Ed Young
FOOD Cupcake Wars Worst Cooks Iron Chef America Chopped Worst Cooks
FX Zombieland Zombieland Death Proof
HGTV Holmes on Homes Holmes Inspection Holmes Inspection Property Brothers Holmes Inspection
HIST Ax Men Ax Men Full Metal Jousting Top Gear Ax Men
LIFE Capture-Green Capture-Green
MTV The Challenge The Challenge The Challenge Teen Mom 2 Jersey Shore
NICK '70s Show '70s Show My Wife My Wife George George Friends Friends Friends Friends
SCI Resident Evil Resident Evil Hills-Eyes 2
SPIKE The Rundown Seven
TBS Mean Girls Mean Girls The Sweetest Thing
TCM The Star What-BabyJane Divorce
TLC My 600-lb Life My 600-lb Life My 600-lb Life
TNT NBA All-Star NBA All-Star Falling
TOON Level Up Level Up King/Hill Squid Chicken Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Robot Chicken
TRAV Manliest Restaurants Hamburger Paradise Hot Dog Paradise Bacon Paradise Hamburger Paradise
TV LAND M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King King
USA NCIS NCIS NCIS Troy
VH1 Stomp the Yard Basketball Wives Mob Wives Mob Wives
WGN How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met News/Nine Replay The Unit Monk
Premium Channels
HBO Big Mommas Luck Eastbound Too Short Luck Eastbound Too Short
MAX Dinner for Schmucks Gladiator Emmanuel
SHOW Lies Lies Lies Lies Lies Lies Lies Californ. Next Day Air
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Saturday Evening February 25, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Wipeout Devil-Prada Local
WHIO/CBS Rules Two Men The Mentalist 48 Hours Mystery Local
WLIO/NBC Smash The Firm Law & Order: SVU Local Saturday Night Live
WOHL/FOX Cops Cops The Finder Local Alcatraz New Girl Local
ION Psych Psych Psych Psych Psych
Cable Channels
A & E Parking Parking Parking Parking Billy Billy Billy Billy Parking Parking
AMC Coach Carter Two for the Money
ANIM Too Cute! Too Cute! America's Cutest Dog Too Cute! America's Cutest Dog
BET John Q Half Past Dead Eve Bayou
BRAVO The Bourne Supremacy The Bourne Supremacy
CMT Sweet Home Alabama Bayou Redneck Vacation Bayou Redneck Vacation Redneck Vacation
CNN Big Hits-Drms Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom Big Hits-Drms Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY 40-Year-Old Vir Super Troopers Spears
DISC Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush
DISN Shake It Jessie Austin Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck Phineas Fish Hook
E! I Now Pronounce You The Soup Fashion Chelsea A-List The Soup
ESPN College GameDay College Basketball SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 College Basketball Ali 70 College B NBA
FAM The Lion King Aladdin The Mask
FOOD Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Iron Chef America Restaurant: Im.
FX UFC 144 Japan Prelim Star Trek
HGTV Candice Genevieve Color Interiors House Hunters House Hunters Color Interiors
HIST Mudcats Mudcats Mudcats Cajun Pwn Cajun Pwn Mudcats
LIFE Drew Peterson Craigslist Killer Drew Peterson
MTV Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 Jersey Shore Jersey Shore Fired Up
NICK Victoriou Rock Bucket iCarly Friends Friends Friends Friends George George
SCI Black Forest Witchslayer Gretl Black Forest
SPIKE Ink Master Ink Master Ink Master Starsky & Hutch
TBS Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang My Best Friend Confessions
TCM The Grapes of Wrath Bound for Glory
TLC 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid.
TNT Tip-Off NBA Basketball Falling Skies Falling Skies
TOON Inspector MAD God/Devil King/Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Aqua Teen Metal Bleach Fullmetal
TRAV Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
TV LAND Home Imp. Home Imp. Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King King
USA Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU No Country
VH1 Women in Music Basketball Wives Barbershop 2: Back T.I.-Tiny
WGN Funniest Home Videos Funniest Home Videos Videos News/Nine 30 Rock Scrubs Scrubs Sunny
Premium Channels
HBO Big Mommas Boxing F. Roach Luck
MAX Man Fire The People Under the Stairs Unknown Emmanuelle
SHOW The King's Speech The Tempest Shameless
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Saturday, February 25, 2012 The Herald – 11
Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
www.delphosherald.com
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
In the year ahead, you might
experience some exciting changes
triggered by outside influences
over which you’ll have no control.
Fortunately, they’ll work out as well
as if you had authored them.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Conditions are ripe for you to do
things on a rather grand scale. If you
have any bright ideas or concepts that
you’d like to expand, don’t be fearful
of doing so.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- There is a good chance that recent
events have been showing you that
Lady Luck is in your corner when it
comes to your financial involvements.
Don’t ignore this opportunity -- make
the most of it.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- It
behooves you to be as self-sufficient
as possible, because you are likely to
be far more fortunate when you are in
control of your own affairs.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Conditions in general look to be
exceptionally promising, making you
lucky in ways you’d least expect. This
will be especially true concerning all
competitive involvements.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
The possibilities regarding projects
for which you have high hopes
appear to be as good as you’d like
them to be. Continue to be optimistic
while all the time thinking, “Win!”
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- There’s
a chance that you’re not fully aware
of all the ramifications of something
promising in which you’re involved.
Take another look at whatever it is
you’re doing in order to make the
most of it.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If
there is something you’d like to do
in order to influence public opinion,
you couldn’t find a better time than
now to get the endeavor started and
underway.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- It’s
quite possible that some changes
could transpire over which you’ll
have little or no control. What
occurs could affect your status and/
or reputation, but the outcome should
please you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Fortunately for you, an individual
whose influence and authority
exceeds yours views you as an equal.
In fact, this person might approach
you in order to form some kind of
propitious alliance.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- The chances for advancing an
ambitious objective that is extremely
important to you are improving
immensely. Take advantage of what
occurs to give it a push.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Friends are likely to be
drawn to you because they’ll sense
you’ll be fun to be around. There is
an appealing charisma about you,
enhancing all of your involvements.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- Even if there is no visible
endorsement of that innate lucky
feeling you’re experiencing, it’s
likely to be accurate. The fates
are busily working out favorable
outcomes for you.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2012
A progressive individual who will
become your friend in the year ahead
is likely to be the catalyst that will
help you trigger your imagination
and seek success in a new area. Once
you branch out, you’ll find the perfect
career for yourself.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- If you feel that it’s necessary
for someone to be more assertive
in making a group decision, step
forward. There’s no need to be
tentative -- your judgment is good
and you’ll make the right call.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- Although most of your
personal endeavors will easily be
accomplished, you may have to put
in some extra hours and/or resources
on your work-related efforts in order
to get what you want.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
If there is someone you recently met
whom you find to be quite appealing,
don’t keep Dan Cupid waiting in the
wings. Instead, you should be the one
who makes the first move.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- You’ve been lucky so far in that
you’ve been getting away with
neglecting a responsibility entrusted
to you. Before the powers that be find
out about it, you need to halt your
procrastination and get crackin’.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- That restless spirit of yours won’t
easily be appeased unless you use
your time productively. Why not
make efforts to acquire some new
knowledge that you can use to
enhance your skill set?
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- It isn’t
likely to be easy for you to dismiss a
certain commercial matter from your
thoughts. In order to remove it from
your mind, take care of it as soon as
you can.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- You’ll have no trouble attracting
others to your banner once they see
how fervently you believe in your
cause. Get on your soapbox and start
proselytizing.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Should you discover that an associate
is doing a better job than you can do
in a joint endeavor, don’t hesitate
to relegate yourself to the sidelines
and let him or her take the lead. Be a
valuable backup.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- If you believe there is something
that could be of mutual benefit to you
and a partner, don’t allow too much
time to go by without checking it out.
It could be exactly what you both
need.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- It’s imperative that you make
all of your own major decisions
instead of delegating any of them to
others. A surrogate’s thinking might
be inferior to yours.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Sometimes it’s difficult to learn
anything new from someone whose
ideas parallel yours, but today could
be an exception. It’s OK to stick with
people who think as you do.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Instead of waiting for others to
get things rolling, take the initiative
and do so yourself. Once you do, the
entire group will be glad you did, and
will happily jump on board.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.
Answers to Friday’s questions:
Golfer Bobby Jones and golfer/track-and-field star Babe
Zaharias were featured on the first U.S. postage stamp hon-
oring individual American athletes. Both were pictured on
18-cent stamps issued on Sept. 22, 1981.
The character Alonso Quijano is better known in the
world of literary classics at Don Quixote de la Mancha.
Today’s questions:
What is the resplendent quetzal — the Guatemalan
national symbol?
What two terms were combined to create the name TiVO
for the digital video recorder?
Answers in Monday’s Herald
Today’s words:
Nearomatria: being a young mother
Zubr: the ancestor of modern cattle
12 – The Herald Saturday, February 25, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
Olympics finish FFA Week
FFA members Austin Reindel, left, Chris Martin dig in soybeans for farm animals.
The Delphos FFA held its Olympics Friday afternoon to mark the culmination of FFA Week.
The senior, junior, sophomore and freshmen classes competed against each other in a series
of events that required skill and strength. Among the events were old favorites like tug-of-war
and a wheelbarrow race. At each station of the wheelbarrow race, participants needed to eat
four saltine crackers before they were allowed to move on to the next station. A mini-tractor
race was included, during which the drivers were required to balance an egg on a spoon held
in their mouths while pedaling.
FFA members also participated in a balloon battle where they tied balloons around their
ankles and fought to pop the other teams’ by stomping on them. Other activities were a blind-
folded hidden-object search and a cow-milking race with the FFA’s wooden cow.
Competitors had to “milk” the FFA’s wooden cow.
Front: Sara Burwell munches on a Saltine cracker as her wheeler, Veronica Vulgamott
waits during the Wheel Barrel Races. Back: Andy May tries to open his crackers at his
wheeler Jason Wittler waits.
FFAers Brock Bonifas, left, and David Leathers race their tractors across the gym while
balancing an uncooked egg on a spoon.
FFAers, right to left, Tim Pohlman, Jessica Hammons Lindzi Hoersten, David
Lindeman, Julie Noonan and Nadine Clarkson hold the line during the Tug of War.
FFA members Sara Burwell, left, Veronica Vulgamott, Ryan Baldauf and Brian Lisk try
to pop balloons tied to opponents ankles.
Coil
(Continued from page 1)
they’re their own little
person and they aren’t
interested in cooperating.
We’ve had everything from
crying to puking to diaper
changes. Kids have a melt-
ing point.”
Even if everything goes
perfectly during the photo
shoot, editing is still needed
to take the photos from great
to perfect.
“We can edit skin tone
so that you don’t look like
an Oompa Loompa in one
picture and a vampire in
another. We can edit out
blemishes, freckles, remove
tattoos. We could even put
one person’s head on anoth-
er person’s body,” she said.
Having an artist for a
mother, Coil grew up with
a love of fine arts. As she
got older, she moved more
toward graphic design.
“After high school,
I attended the School
of Advertising Art in
Kettering and the skills
I learned there can be
applied to so many differ-
ent things,” she said. “I’ve
worked in marketing and
creating ads, dabbled in
photography and videog-
raphy. I get to use most of
those skills here. I do all
of our marketing, business
cards, ads and banners.
Pretty much everything
that goes out the door that
has been designed is mine.
I put together the albums,
composites, brochures.”
“I also spend a lot of
time keeping up on photog-
raphy trends because they’re
changing all of the time,”
Coil continued. “People
are moving towards a more
candid style. They love the
pictures we snap when they
aren’t aware, like when an
engaged couple are look-
ing at each other or making
funny faces, or if a little boy
is picking his nose. We also
create videos of the photo
shoots, sort of like a behind
the scenes thing that our
clients really love and can
purchase if they want. While
the photographer is shooting
the pictures, I’m shooting
the video.”
Coil says she loves pro-
viding clients with photo-
graphs they can cherish for
years to come.
“I always tell people it’s
important to have pictures
around the home,” she said.
“When kids see pictures of
themselves it gives them
a sense of confidence and
makes them feel loved. It’s
the same with spouses and
grandparents.”
Coil lives in Delphos
with her husband Nick and
their two children, 5-year-
old Kendall and 3-year-old
son Zander.
COLUMBUS (AP) — New
efforts to crack down on drug
trafficking in Ohio include the
introduction of legislation tar-
geting hidden compartments
in vehicles and changes in
how drivers can use the State
Highway Patrol hotline, which
will get a new number.
Authorities are using a mul-
tifaceted approach to try to stop
people from transporting ille-
gal drugs through Ohio and to
its communities, said Lt. Anne
Ralston, a patrol spokeswom-
an. Last year, troopers seized
nearly 6 million grams of illegal
narcotics and contraband val-
ued at more than $69 million
and made more than 6,000 drug
arrests.
“When we look at how
drugs are moving across the
U.S., Ohio is really in the thick
of this,” she said. “A major-
ity of the routes that drugs are
taking either go through or to
Ohio.”
State Sen. Jim Hughes, a
Columbus Republican, intro-
duced legislation this week to
make it a fourth-degree felony if
a hidden metal compartment for
stashing drugs is found inside a
vehicle. Offenders could spend
18 months in prison or be fined
$5,000.
He said the patrol approached
him with pictures of the com-
partments and told him the leg-
islation was needed. He said
traffickers sometimes place the
compartments inside gas tanks
or somewhere along the under-
side of the vehicle as they move
drugs across state lines.
“I had no idea,” he said
Friday. “It’s very creative,
unfortunately, to get by law
enforcement.”
Ralston said current law
makes it tough for law enforce-
ment officers to pursue charges
if they discover a hidden com-
partment but no drugs inside it,
she said.
Meanwhile, troopers are
turning to the public for help.
The patrol will encourage driv-
ers to call its hotline not only
when they need help or spot
an impaired driver, but also to
report drug activity.
More than 125 existing blue
signs posted along Ohio high-
ways instruct travelers to dial
1-877-7-PATROL if they need
help, but the patrol is replacing
that number with a simpler one,
(hash)677, at no extra cost to
phone users. Part of the reason-
ing is that it can be tough to
dial the old hotline when but-
tons on some modern phones
aren’t labeled with letters in
the traditional style of older
phones, Ralston said. On cell-
phones with buttons arranged
like a standard computer key-
board, for example, hitting the
letter “P” isn’t necessarily the
same as punching in a “7,” as it
would be on older phones.
The patrol will reinforce its
anti-drug message by putting
signs at entrances to the state
along major routes, warning
travelers that “Drug Traffickers
Go to Prison.”
The switch in hotline num-
bers won’t affect how those
calls come in for regional dis-
patchers, who are getting extra
training to handle any new drug
activity reports.
When such calls come in,
dispatchers will route them
to the patrol’s criminal intel-
ligence unit unless they require
an immediate response from a
trooper or local law enforce-
ment, Ralston said. A call about
a driver spotted using drugs
behind the wheel likely would
prompt authorities to follow up
immediately, but a tip about
more ambiguous suspicious
activity would likely be rout-
ed to the intelligence unit and
could be used to help identify
trends.
The hotline project, which
includes replacing the phone
number on the blue highway
signs, is costing the patrol more
than $22,000. It’s paying for the
project with funds from collect-
ed from previous cases, such as
currency seized in drug busts.
The patrol also plans to
increase its collaboration with
other law enforcement agen-
cies, including more so-called
“shield details” in which law
enforcement saturate a geo-
graphic area for a set time to
target traffic problems and
crime in that area.
Ohio unveiling new efforts geared for targeting drug traffcking

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