Matching Instruction to the

Gifted Student’s
Learning
Style
&

Multiple
Intelligences

Learning Style Inventory

Please take about 5 minutes
to answer the 12 question
learning style inventory.
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Learning styles vary for gifted children
• Visual learners are attracted to studying
paintings or posters, reading books, or watching
programs such as documentaries.
• Auditory learners retain information by
listening. These students enjoy lectures,
class discussions, and Q & A sessions.
• Kinesthetic learners learn the most by
working with hands-on projects in
which they can learn new concepts and
manipulate ideas while using their hands.
(Strip, C. A. & Hirsch, G.)

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Learning Styles
• Cranton (2000) suggests that, “Learning
styles are preferences for certain
conditions or ways of learning. Although
we can learn in ways we do not actually
prefer, when given a choice, we have
favorite strategies and approaches. Since
we can be more flexible in our learning
style, it should be considered as one
of our personality characteristics
rather than an intellectual
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component” (p.38).

Learning Style Inventory (LSI)
Some learning style inventories include:
-Kolb’s Learning Style Model (LSI)
-Conner Learning Style Assessment
-Student Perception Inventory (SPI)
-CAPSOL Inventory
- Canfield Learning Style
Inventory (CLSI)
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Multiple Intelligences
To qualify as an ‘intelligence’ the particular capacity under study was
considered from multiple perspectives consisting of eight specific
criteria drawn from the biological sciences, logical analysis,
developmental psychology, experimental psychology, and
psychometrics. The criteria used to consider "candidate
intelligences“ or simply put, the 8 criteria for intelligence are:
1) the potential for brain isolation by brain damage,
2) its place in evolutionary history,
3) the presence of core operations,
4) susceptibility to encoding,
5) a distinct developmental progression,
6) the existence of idiot-savants, prodigies and other
exceptional people,
7) support from experimental psychology, and
8) support from psychometric findings
(Gardner, 2003)

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(VanTassel-Baska, J.L., Cross, T. L., & Olenchak, F. R., pg. 82)

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Implications of Higher
Intelligence
“It is clear that, in general, gifted studentsespecially those who are challenged and
who have developed healthy habits of selfappraisal and application- tend to excel
over other students in their views of their
academic ability…” (pg. 67).

(Niehart, M, Reis, S. M., & Moon, S. M.)

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Mississippi Department of Education
Regulations for the Gifted Education Programs in Mississippi 2006
INSTRUCTIONAL MANAGEMENT PLAN (IMP)
Each local school district shall have a written IMP for the intellectually gifted
program and for all other gifted programs (academically gifted, artistically
gifted, and/or creatively gifted) that the district offers. The IMP shall include, at a
minimum, the following components:
• District mission/philosophy statement, including goals and objectives,
• The components of the Mississippi Gifted Education Program Standards,
a. Differentiated activities,
b. Scope and sequence of program process skills (outcomes),
c. Career exploration and life skills,
d. Exposure to and appreciation for the visual and performing arts,
e. In-class counseling for gifted students,
f. Address the socio-emotional needs of gifted students,
g. Address the affective needs of gifted students, and
h. Address the needs of gifted at-risk students.
• Program outcomes for the specific gifted program(s) offered.
(pages 27-28)

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Activities in the Spanish Classroom

Spanish Colors
amarillo
Days of the Week anaranjado
azul
blanco
lunes
Monday
gris
martes
Tuesday
cafe
miércoles Wednesday morado
negro
jueves
Thursday
rosado
viernes
Friday
rojo
sábado
Saturday
verde

domingo

Sunday

yellow
orange
blue
white
gray
brown
purple
black
pink
red
green

La Cucaracha
Spanish
La cucaracha, la
cucaracha, ya no puede
caminar porque no tiene,
porque le falta las dos
patitas de atrás.
English
The cockroach, the
cockroach, can't walk
anymore because it
doesn't have, because it's
lacking its two back feet.

References
• Cranton, P. (2000) Planning Instruction for Learners: Second
Edition. Canada: Wall & Emerson.
• Gardner, H. (2003). Multiple Intelligences After Twenty Years.
American Educational Research Association, 1-15.
• Mississippi Department of Education. (2006). Regulations for the
Gifted Education Programs in Mississippi, 1-39.
• Niehart, M, Reis, S. M., & Moon, S. M. (2002). The social and
emotional development of gifted children: What do we know?
Washington, D.C.: Prufrock Press.
• VanTassel-Baska, J.L., Cross, T. L., & Olenchak, F. R.
(2009). Social-emotional curriculum with gifted and
talented students. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
• Strip, C. A. & Hirsch, G. (2000). Helping gifted
children soar: A practical guide for parents and
teachers. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press.

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Final Thoughts
As educators, we must go beyond the
more traditional methods of
instruction and counseling in order to
facilitate meaningful learning and
engage students in either a regular
or gifted environment. Identifying
various methods of learning
will help us with that challenge.
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