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196407 Desert Magazine 1964 July

196407 Desert Magazine 1964 July

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Published by dm1937

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Published by: dm1937 on Mar 30, 2008
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PLY 1964
REVOLUTIONARYWATER SOURCEABOMINABLESANDMANOF BORREGOCOOLTRIPS
FOR
HOT TRAVELERS
V -.
m
'
.-I •*'
.!».
THE MAGAZINE OF THE WEST
J
 
DESERT MAGAZINEBOOK ORDERDEPARTMENT
GHOSTS
OF
THE
ADOBE WALLS
By Nell Murbarger
An intimate chronicle of Ari-zona's deserted mining boomcamps, stage stations, armyposts and amazing human char-acters. See this months DESERTBook Reviews. 380 pages. Il-lustrated. Published Spring,
1964.
Hard Cover, $7.50
A NewService
CORTES
By
Francisco Lopez de Gomara
A vivid personal narration ofthe exploits of Herman Cortesin the Conquest of Mexicowritten by his secretary. Seethis month's DESERT Book Re-views. 480 pages. Illustrated.End - paper maps. PublishedSpring 1964.Hard Cover, $8.50
To accommodate our readers,these and other books of the Westmay be ordered directly from thenew Desert Magazine Book OrderDepartment. Since prices prohibitbilling expense please include acheck or money order with allorders which
will!
be filled immedi-ately.
(California residentsadd 4 percent sales tax)
ON DESERT TRAILS
By Randall Henderson
The founder and publisher of DESERT Magazine for 23years compiled this fascinating book in 1961. It is anaccount of his experiences throughout the West duringthe many years he published and wrote for DESERTMagazine. One of the first good writers to tell of thebeauty of the mysterious desert, Mr. Henderson'sfriends range from old prospectors who died still look-ing for their lost bonanzas to men who today arenationally known in business and politics. The experi-ences, combined with his comments on the deserts ofyesterday and today, make this one of the most out-standing books on the West. 357 pages. Illustrated.Hard Cover, $5.00.
 
ftufoj
ty
ftack ?epp&i
CONTENTS
Volume
27
Number
7
JULY,
1964
This Month's Cover
Alonci
the
Apache
Trail,
Canyon Lake, ArizonaBy DARWIN
VAN
CAMPEN
4 Books
for
Desert Readers6 "Dichos"
By RICARDO CASTILLO
7
The Man and the
Process
By CHORAL PEPPER
9 Abominable Sandman
of
Borrego
By VICTOR STOYANOW
11 Wealth
of San
Gabriel
By ARTHUR ROULEAU
14 Whatever Became
of
Jenny?
By HARRIET FARNSWORTH
16 Coyotes Howl
in the
Lava Beds
By
L. L.
PROUT
20 Saga
of the
Sagamore
By BILL BRYAN
22:
Red
Rock Crossing
By JANICE BEATY
23 Photo
of Red
Rock Crossing
DARWIN
VAN
CAMPEN
24 Sierra's Sing
a
Siren Song
By DOROTHY ROBERTSON
26
Pan It In The
Cariboo
By THOMAS
H.
WISER
28 America's Stone
Age
Neighbors
By
H. N.
FERGUSON
32 Bewitched
By
Baia
By CHORAL PEPPER
36 Ghost Town Series
By LAMBERT FLORIN
37 Desert Dispensary
By
SAM
HICKS
38 DESERT Cookery
By LUCILLE
I.
CARLESON
39 Snakes Alive!
By EVELYN CONKLIN
42 Letters from
Our
ReadersDAMN DAMS.
As far as
water
is
concerned, we'll wager Secretoryof
the
Interior Stewart
L.
Udall
at
this point wishes
his
Republican
pre-
decessor Fred
A.
Seaton were sitting
in the hot
seat back
in
Washing-ton. Already engulfed
in a
squabble over allocation
of
ColoradoRiver water between Arizona
and
California,
he's now in the
middle
of
the Lake Mead versus Lake Powell controversy. When
he
recentlyopened
the
gates
of the
one-year-old Glen Canyon
Dam
(which formsLake Powell)
to
allow Colorado River water
to
fill badly depleted LakeMead (formed
by
Boulder
Dam) he was
damned
by
Northern Arizonaand Utah. When
he
once again closed Glen Canyon
Dam, the
peoplein California, lower Arizona,
and
Nevada screamed.
At
this pointSecretary Udall
is
damned
if he
does
and
damned
if he
doesn't.
GREAT BASIN NATIONAL PARK.
A
long struggle
to
have
an
area
of
"striking terrain, geologic features, weather conditions
and
plant
and
animal life"
in the
picturesque Snake Mountain Range
of
east-centralNevada declared
a
national park received
a
shot
in the arm
when
it
was endorsed
by the U. S.
Department
of the
Interior. Although endor-sing
the
proposed park,
the
Interior Department says
it
favors
a
123,360-acre area rather than
a
53,120-acre park
as
proposed
in a
Houseof Representative bill. Ironic part about
the
proposal
is
that
the
origina-tors
of the
park idea
and
long-time supporters have always advocateda larger area,
but had to
start compromising when
hit by
hunters
and
mining interests, plus hesitancy,
on the
part
of a
Nevada congressman.Lehman Caves National Monument will
be
part
of the
Great BasinNational Park
if and
when selfish interests start thinking
of the
areaas
a
place
for the
"greatest good
for the
greatest number
of
people."This might
be the
time
for
another
of
Teddy Roosevelt's sweeping
pro-
clamations.
SPEAKING
OF
PARKS.
Travel
to
National Parks
and
other units
of
the National Park System rose
6.4
percent
in 1963
with visits totalling94,092,900, compared
to
88,457,100
in 1962,
according
to
National ParkService Director George
B.
Hartzog,
Jr. An
even greater number
is pre-
dicted
for
this year. However, considering
our
population increase,
the
6.4 jump
is not as
much
as it
should
be. The
parks
and
facilities
are
there,
now the
problem
is to get
people away from their televisionsets
and
night clubs
and out
into
the
fresh
air
where they will startto enjoy life. They will
be
amazed
at how big the
world,
and how
small their problems!
IULY CALENDAR.
Nevada
is
celebrating
its
100th Anniversary thisyear.
So
many events
are
scheduled throughout
the
Silver State theycannot
be
listed.
For
times
and
places write
for
"Nevada CentennialEvents", Nevada Centennial Commission, State Bulding, Reno, Nevada.July
4th
holidays will also
be the
date
for
celebrations throughout
the
West, including Prescott's Frontier Days Centennial Year Rodeo
and
Flagstaff's
All
Indian
Pow Wow in
Arizona
and the
Victorville,
Calif.
Stellarbration, among many others.
San
Diego County Fair
and Sou-
thern California Exposition,
San
Diego,
Calif.
June 26-July
5.
NavajoTribal Fair, Prescott, Arizona, July 17-29. Culver City Rock
and
MineralClub's
3rd
Annual Fiesta
of
Gems, Rock
and
Mineral Show, CulverCity,
Calif.
July
25 and 26.
(Editor's Note:
If you
want events listed theymust
be
sent
in two
months
in
advance
of
date.)
is published monthly
by
Desert
Ma
under
Act of
March
3, 1879.
Title
r
Magazi
it
le,
Palm Desert, Calif. Second Closs Postage paid at Palm Desert, Calif., and at additional mailingjrad No. 358865 in U. S. Patent Office, and contents copyrighted 1964 by Desert Magazine. Un-icirea manuscnpTs and photographs cannot be returned or acknowledged unless full return postage is enclosed. Permission to reproduce contentsist be secured from the editor in writing. SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: $4.50 per year (12 issues) in the U.S.; 15 elsewhere. Allow five weeks for changeaddress, and be sure to send the old as well as new address.
JACK PEPPER,
Publisher
CHORAL PEPPER,
Editor
Elta Shively
Executive Secretary
Al Merryman
Staff Artist
Rose Holly
Circulation Manager
Marvel Barrett
Business Manager
Address Correspondence
To:
Desert Magazine, Palm Desert,
Calif.
92260 Phone:
FI
6-8144
July,
1964 /
Desert Magazine
/ 3

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