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Crime, State, Society in Late Colonial Philippines, 1900-1935. Part I

Crime, State, Society in Late Colonial Philippines, 1900-1935. Part I

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Published by Virgilio Rojas
This is an annotated bibliography over selected primary sources on crime and colonial state in late 19th and early 20th century Philippines. Primary sources annotated here have informed the author's empirical groundwork for his dissertation, entitled Civilizing Colonialism, the introductory report of which can also be found and accessed through his Scribd account.
This is an annotated bibliography over selected primary sources on crime and colonial state in late 19th and early 20th century Philippines. Primary sources annotated here have informed the author's empirical groundwork for his dissertation, entitled Civilizing Colonialism, the introductory report of which can also be found and accessed through his Scribd account.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Virgilio Rojas on Dec 11, 2010
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06/19/2013

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TECHNICAL REPORT # 1 PARTS I & II
CRIME & THE INSTITUTIONAL ECONOMY OF CRIMINALPROCESSING & DISCIPLINING AGENCIES IN LATECOLONIAL PHILIPPINES UNDER US OCCUPATION,1900-1935
- AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHYOVER CONTEMPORARY PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES © 2004
Virgilio Rojas
Dept. of Economic History, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden,
ABSTRACT
This annotated bibliography tabulates and condenses information on the
content 
and
relevance
of selected sources central to the thematic concerns of the currentresearch project:
colonial criminality, criminal processing & disciplinaryinstitutions in late colonial Philippines
. It specifies the currency of listed primary and secondary sources critically in terms of extractable quantitativeand/or qualitative data. As
extractability of empirical quantitative data
is acentral concern here, a more exhaustive description of corresponding sources onthis score will follow accordingly. Broadly, within this template, therefore,information entered in the columns designated
content 
and
relevance
willunderscore and refer to qualitative and (as the case may be, coeval) quantitativedata, respectively. Noted template organises the tabulated annotations presented in the first two of three parts of the incumbent report designated as Report # 1. However, unlikethe first two, the third and concluding part of said Report is strictly designed as aquinquennial directory & statistical serial data-base drawn from (753) penalcases transacted by the Supreme Court of the Philippine Islands between 1900-1935. Annotations of supplementary secondary contemporary accounts and afew official publications in Part 2 further shore up this study’s two major empirical serial sources which undergird Parts 1 & 3: The
 PhilippineCommission Reports (PCR)
later to be labeled the
 Report of the Governor General (RGG)
and the
 Philippine Reports.
Altogether the three parts should beread as logistical/technical reports on which empirical grounds the forthcomingmain chapters of the current dissertation will rest.
 
2
Finally, said technical reports (equivalent in fact to an overblown appendix)were designed to raise research
transparency
in three crucial senses: 1) as areferential compass and guide into the main sources for both researcher andreaders; 2) as a venue for raising the latter’s field of vision even in terms of the process of raw data generation itself in the concluding part of the report; 3) as adevise for facilitating in a more open and visible manner the process of finetuning or reformulating preliminary theoretical questions against theavailable empirical evidence.
BACKGROUND
The current stock of sources has been the product of two major visits to threesignificant archives in Manila, Philippines, viz. Philippine National Archives(PNA), Lopez Memorial Museum Library (LMML), and the AmericanHistorical Collections (AHC) at the Rizal Library, Ateneo de Manila University.The first major if exploratory visit took place in 1998 in two consecutive sub- phases (phase 1: February-April; phase 2: September 1998), during which twomain primary serial sources were retireved, reproduced and filed:
 PhilippineCommission Reports (PCR)
later to be labeled the
 Report of the Governor General (RGG)
and the
Census of the Philippine Islands
(1903/1918). Still, ahost of other important statistical and anecdotal sources relevant to the thematicconcerns had then also been acquired. During the second major and recent visit,(September-October 2003) a continuous quinquennial data sampling survey (for the period 1900-1935, amounting to several hundreds of penal cases) based onthe serial material,
 Philippine Reports (PR)
, the bounded muti-volume chro-nological reports on cases determined by the Supreme Court of the Philippines,was conducted. Contemporaneous secondary accounts, monographs, and periodical articles were added to the current stock.Mode and extent of retrieval/reproduction of sources varied according to i.a.existing procedural standards at noted archives, time, resource factors, and, of course, the thematic concerns. Mode-wise, the bulk of sources retrieved in the1998 visits, and a few of those secured in 2003, were photostatic copies.Whereas an overwhelming share of stock acquistion during the latter visit weredigitally reproduced and stored in JPEG image files. In much the same vein,retrieval/reproduction differed widely, extentwise. Save for some importantmonographs, periodical, journal articles and travelogues, and certain volumes of the two consecutive censuses (1903/1918) – which were retrieved
in toto
- alarge portion of the main primary and secondary source reproductions consist of selected pages containing theme-related information.Consequently, for example, only systematically excerpted theme-relatedsegments (those containing qualitative and quantitative data on criminality and
2
 
3
corresponding colonial control institutions) from the annual
 PhilippineCommission Reports
 
(PCR)-Report of the Governor General 
 
(RGG)
for the period 1900-1935 (with the exception however of a dozen of later volumes inthe series available in complete copies: see note on sources below), were photostatically reproduced and filed. Similarly, for the
 Philippine Reports (PR)
systematic extraction and digital recovery were confined exclusively to SupremeCourt decisions on penal cases at five-year intervals between 1900-1935.Besides widely contrasting procedures at noted archives, the fact that certainserial materials (e.g.
 PCR-RGG
) were unavailable in complete sets in any one place made retrieval and reproduction work on some of the main sources morearduous and time-consuming than expected. In the bracketed case, filling the“cavities” in the serial source meant i.a. a lot of time lost on the road,negotiating traffic while shuttling between two archives (Philippine NationalArchives & Lopez Memorial Museum Library) located at opposite ends of Manila.The following annotated inventory of sources is subdivided into primary andcontemporary secondary sources.
PRIMARY SOURCES
Census of the Philippine Islands (CPI), 1903/1918Census of the Philippines (CPI) 1903 Bulletin 1-3Penal Code of the Philippine Islands (PCI), 1904/1911/1932Civil Code (CC) 1932/1948Code of Civil Procedure (CCP) 1921Report of the Philippine Commission (RPC)-Report of the Governor General (RGG), 1900-1935Philippine Reports (PR), 1900-1935Statistical Bulletin (SB), 1918-1928 # 1-11
SECONDARY SOURCES (contemporary)
Blair & Robertson (1907) The Philippine Islands 1493-1898
Chronology of contemporary monographs and accounts1846
/Mallat, Jean/The Philippines,History, Geography, Customs1899/Fischer, Horace/Principles of Colonial Government. Adapted to the present needs of Porto Rico, Cuba, andthe Philippines
1899
/Boutwell, George S/The War of Despotism in the Philippine Islands
1899
/Adams, Charles Francis/“Imperialism” and “Tracks of our Forefathers”
1899
/Ireland, Alleyne/Tropical Colonisation- An introduction to the study of the subject
1900
/Sawyer, Frederick/The Inhabitants of the Philippines
1902
/Anti-Imperialist League/Report of the Fourth Annual Meeting of the New England Anti-Imperialist League(Nov 29- Dec. 2)
1902
/The World’s Work/Vol 4 (May-Oct), “Living with Filipinos” pp.2238-39; “The Philippine Problem”pp. 2344-2352
1903
(1971)/Taylor, John RM/The Philippine Insurrection against the United States, Vols. 1-5
1904
/The World’s Work/August issue, “The Philippine Peoples,” Newell, Alfred C, pp.5128-5145
1905
/Ireland, Alleyne FRGS/The Far Eastern Tropics
1905
/Willis, Henry Parker/Our Philippine Problem: A Study of American Colonial Policy
1905
/LeRoy, James/“The Philippines and the Filipinos” (In Ireland’s, The Far Eastern Tropics); reprinted inBulletin of American Historical Collection Foundation Vol 27 #3 (July-Sept 1998)
1906
/Foreman, John/The Philippines
1907
/Hord, John/International and Colonial History Vol XXV #1: 7-45, “Internal Taxation in the Philippines”
1909
/Villamor, Ignacio/Criminality in the Philippine Islands
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