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Asia Srilanka 2004

Asia Srilanka 2004

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Published by Bala Subra
Armed violence and poverty in Sri Lanka
A mini case study for the Armed Violence and Poverty Initiative
November 2004
Miranda Alison
University of Warwick
Armed violence and poverty in Sri Lanka
A mini case study for the Armed Violence and Poverty Initiative
November 2004
Miranda Alison
University of Warwick

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Published by: Bala Subra on Nov 21, 2008
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Armed violence and poverty in Sri Lanka
A mini case study for the Armed Violence and Poverty InitiativeNovember 2004
Miranda AlisonUniversity of Warwick 
 
Armed violence and poverty in Sri Lanka, Alison, Nov 2004
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The Armed Violence and Poverty Initiative
The UK Department for International Development (DFID) has commissioned the Centre forInternational Cooperation and Security (CICS) at Bradford University to carry out research topromote understanding of how and when poverty and vulnerability is exacerbated by armedviolence. This study programme, which forms one element in a broader “Armed Violence andPoverty Initiative”, aims to provide the full documentation of that correlation which DFIDfeels is widely accepted but not confirmed. It also aims to analyse the
processes
throughwhich such impacts occur and the
circumstances
which exacerbate or moderate them. Inaddition it has a practical policy-oriented purpose and concludes with programming andpolicy recommendations to donor government agencies.This report on Sri Lanka is one of 13 case studies (all of the case studies are available atwww.bradford.ac.uk/cics). This research draws upon secondary data sources includingexisting research studies, reports and evaluations commissioned by operational agencies, andearly warning and survey data where this has been available. These secondary sources havebeen complemented by interviews with government officers, aid policymakers andpractitioners, researchers and members of the local population. The analysis and opinionsexpressed in this report are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views orpolicy of DFID or the UK government.
 
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Armed violence and poverty in Sri Lanka, Alison, Nov 2004
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Executive summary
Macro-economic effects of the war
The case of Sri Lanka exhibits certain exceptional qualities in that its economy grew onaverage faster during the war than in the pre-war period. In addition, its growth comparesfavourably with other developing countries not at war. However, there have beenconsiderable fluctuations in Sri Lanka’s growth rates that correspond with episodes of armedviolence in the country. The Sri Lankan economy could have grown at a much higher rate if it did not have to bear the costs of the war. In contrast with other foreign-exchangeconstrained economies at war, Sri Lanka’s exports did not drop dramatically during theconflict, though greater investment levels in the absence of conflict would have led to higherexports. It is significant, however, that the major export-earning industries are concentratedoutside the war area and so have been fairly isolated from disruptions. In contrast, the warhas had a severe impact on tourist earnings and employment. Others assert that the lostpotential economic growth of Sri Lanka is greater than has been acknowledged and that highdefence expenditure is the primary cause of economic problems. Defence expenditure as aproportion of the GDP in Sri Lanka is the second highest in South Asia and has surpassedsocial expenditures since 1995. Peaks in expenditure match up with periods of heightenedviolence and security problems.
SALW, disarmament, demobilisation, crime and violence
The question of the disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration into society of ex-combatants from both sides of the conflict is one of the most significant political anddevelopmental issues currently facing Sri Lanka. The International Organisation for Migration(IOM) is about to launch a reintegration programme for a limited number of ex-combatantsand their families from both sides of the conflict, intended as a pilot for a larger futureprogramme should a political settlement be achieved. Problematic categories of combatantsnot covered by the programme are deserters from both the army and the LTTE; retired LTTEmembers; certain categories of child soldiers; the Home Guards and the National ArmedReserve; and members of Tamil groups opposed to the LTTE, state-funded and armed. In thedesign of demobilisation and reintegration programmes, these potentially vulnerablecategories need to be targeted as well as those more immediately visible. For all ex-combatants the problems of finding employment, supporting their families and settling intocivilian roles are considerable but for female ex-soldiers there are some gender-specificissues. Reintegration programmes need to address gendered issues in a more radical wayincluding grappling with the needs of female ex-combatants in an emancipatory way ratherthan reinforcing expected gender roles and inequalities.Sri Lanka also faces the integrally related problem of the threat to society posed by ex-combatants. Particularly troublesome is the category of Sri Lankan state military deserters, of whom it is estimated there are over 50,000. Evidence from other contexts suggests thatreducing one type of violence can actually lead to an increase in other types, particularlywhen there is a problem with small arms and light weapons left over from a conflict – soceasefires and peace processes often witness an increase in economic and inter-personalcrime. This appears to be occurring in Sri Lanka, where violence all over the country seemsto be on the increase. Further, other contexts also suggest that in the post-conflict era thewartime proliferation of small arms and light weapons contributes to a rise in levels of domestic violence against women. Data in this area appears to be lacking in Sri Lanka and is
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