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"Architecture should speak of its time and place, but yearn for timelessness.

" Frank Gehry

SLAVE DYNASTY KHILJI DYNASTY TUGHLAQ DYNASTY SAYYID DYNASTY LODHI DYNASTY

DELHI SULTANATE HISTORY

Major developments of Slave Dynasty

Qutb Minar Quwat-ul-islam Tomb of Iltutmish Tomb of Balban

Starting from its base of 47 ft (14.3 m) diameter, it tapers to a width of 9 ft (2.7 m). The top storey is approached by a central spiral staircase with 360 steps as it stands today. The four balconies projected out over an elaborate system of Stalactite-like pendentives. The multiple Niches below the balcony mark the Hindu carvers graduation in the art of nonfigurative Islamic carving.

QUTAB MINAR

THE CALLIGRAPHY AND PENDENTIVES ON QUTB MINAR

The Qutb complex consists of a mosque and two minarets enclosed within a series of cloistered precincts. Complex measures about 235 m (north-south) by 155 m (east-west) along the exterior. It was entered via four monumental gates along the north, east and south walls, of which only the southern gate (Alai Darwaza) remains. Quwwat ul Islam Mosque, occupies the southwest corner of the complex.

A tall screen wall with pointed archways runs along the western edge of the precinct, creating a qibla wall for the prayer spaces. Also contains several smaller buildings: the Tomb of Iltumish, Ala al-Din Khalji's madrasa, and the Imam Zamin Mosque The Qutb Minar (minaret) stands in the southeastern part of this enclosure.

QUWWAT UL ISLAM

Iltutmish managed to build the initial arch across the right-angular junction corners of the walls below. These arches in turn were covered with intricate and beautiful Islamic arabesques delicately sunk both into sandstone and marble panels. Today theres just a square base of 30 ft (9m) diameter dome having collapsed long ago.

TOMB OF ILTUMISH

TOMB OF ILTUMISH

Here for the first time a True Arch was put together (in India) and bonded on the scientific system originally formulated by the Roman engineers. For the unobtrusive true arches built with radiating voussoirs symbolises the confidence with the subsequent Islamic dynasties to continue.

TOMB OF BALBAN

TOMB OF BALBAN

Ala-ud-din khilji was one of the most prominent ruler of the dynasty that attracted most of the Muslim luminaries like Amir Khusaro. He inscribed his name as Alexander II in his coins His architectural projects reflected his character. In his rule, Islamic builders took a definitive step forward in their art, venturing into many a grandiose and foolhardy projects.

While Iltutmish had been content with increasing the size by three times, Ala-ud-din increased it by more than six times. This was achieved by throwing yet another asymmetrically arranged cloister around the existing one. In the center of Northern extn. there were foundations of Alai Minar At asymmetrical intervals along the outer walls, it was proposed to install six gateways.

EXPANSION OF QUWAT-UL-ISLAM

Alai Darwaza at the Qutb Complex has been built in red sandstone and marble. It has exquisite inlaid marble decorations and latticed stone screens. Displays remarkable artisanship of Turkish and local artisans who worked on it. The main structure of the Alai Darwaza consists of a single hall 34 feet on the inside and 56 feet on the outside. Domed ceiling rises to a height of 47 feet.

The three doorways on the east, west, and south are lofty pointed arches, in the shape of a horseshoe, which rise above the flanking side bays. A series of squinches of pointed shape, one recessed within the other, in the upper section of each angle of the hall, changes the square into an octagon, and then the octagon into the circle of the dome with an interweaving sixteen-sided shaft formed by a bracket at each end of the octagon.

ALAI DARWAZA

The first of these large spaces to be produced by rationally conjoining together three cubic compartments each with its own dome , was assembled in the building of Jamat Khana. For the first time, the prosaic liwan is transformed into one composite rectangular hall, uninterrupted by columns. The three arched openings in the eastern wall satisfactorily replace the maqsura or attached screen of arches.

JAMAT KHANA MASJID WITH THE JAMA MASJID VISIBLE BEHIND

Tomb of Ghias ud din Tughlaq Tughlaqabad Feroz Shah Kotla Khirki Masjid Hauz Khas Tomb of Telangani

Buildings were constructed with walls at 75 with ground. The tomb is connected to the fortress by a 250 yard (228.6m) long causeway, built over what at one time must have been a large sheet of water. the tomb has 61ft (20 sqmt) square base. Has arched form of constructing and the lintel beam method.

TOMB OF GHIAS-UD-DIN TUGHLAQ

The walled city and fort of Tughlaqabad with its 13 gateways lies east of the Qutab Minar.The third city of Delhi, it was built by Ghiyas-ud-din Tughlaq.Its construction involved a legendary quarrel with the saint Nizamuddin, when the Tughlaq ruler took away the workers the latter wanted for work on his shrine.

RUINS OF THE CITY OF TUGHLAQABAD

The city is planned as a slightly irregular rectangle, half a mile (800m) long a quarter mile (400m) wide, defined by moderately defensive walls. The eastern side and longer side are parallel and face the bank of the river. Main entrance is in the middle of the side opposite to the river. Directly opposite to this was the Diwan-i-am and just behind was the Diwan-I-khas. The areas of North and South of the central axis were divided into smaller rect courtyards which had water gardens, tanks, barracks, armoury and servants.

VIEW OF FEROZ SHAH KOTLA

TOMB OF FEROZ SHAH TUGHLAQ

The mosque's interior is divided into a series of bays by pillars and topped by individual domes. To let enough light in, Junan Shah left four large openings in the roof besides building a series of windows in the outer walls. Steps lead up to the mosque's roof, from where you have an excellent view of the domes: there would have been 81 in all but nine have collapsed.

KHIRKI MASJID

TIERED DOMES OF THE MASJID

600 meters wide by 700 meters long and 4 meters deep, the tank has a storage capacity of 800,000 cubic meters of water. The Hauz Khas madrasa complex comprises a madrasa, mosque, Firuz Shah's tomb, and six domed pavilions. The madrasa complex measures 76 meters N-S by 138 meters along the E-W. The six individual domed pavilions are all scattered in the gardens of the eastern part of the complex.

HAUZ KHAS

The madrasa complex measures 76 meters N-S by 138 meters along the E-W. The six individual domed pavilions are all scattered in the gardens of The main structure, which consists of the connected pavilions and domed towers, is a single building in the shape of two arms (or an "L") that run along the south and east edges of the reservoir and intersect at the southeast corner in Firuz Shah's tomb. the eastern part of the complex. South pavilion - One enters through a forecourt facing a two-storied domed tower, of which the central dome has a diameter of 6.15 meters.

This was the tomb of Firuz Shahs Prime Minister, Khan-e-Jahan Telangani. Its square in plan except for the Sultan Ghari which was octagonal in plan. The spread out base provided by the surrounding veranda certainly lent visual credence to the structure. Small kiosks are installed along the base of the dome and the veranda.

TOMB OF TELANGANI

Khizar Khan, the founder of the Saiyids Dynasty, claimed to be a descendent of the Prophet of Islam, Hadrat Muhammad (S. A. W.). Thus his established rule is known as the Saiyids Dynasty. Khizar collaborated with Timur during his invasion on India. As a reward, on his departure from the area. When Mahmud Shah, the last of the Tughlaq rulers, died in 1412, Daullat Khan Lodhi and Khizar both attempted to occupy the throne of Delhi. In 1414, Khizar won the battle and established the rule of his dynasty in Delhi.

Tomb of Muhammad Shah Sayyid

The Lodi Gardens are located at the formerly Lady Willingdon Park, New Delhi. Two tomb designs were developed, one was Octagonal and the other was conventional familiar cube with domed roof.

Only the kiosks on the veranda roof were eliminated and replaced by semi-minarets or guldastas attached to the base of the tomb. By addition of a verandah to the western wall, the court became the liwan and mosque attached to the funerary chamber. Impressive gateways were also installed at the cardinal points in the centers of the surrounding walls.

The Delhi Sultanate is the only Sultanate to stake a claim to possessing one of the few female rulers in India, Princess Razia Sultana (1236-1240). The Sultanate ushered in a period of Indian cultural renaissance. The resulting "Indo-Muslim" fusion left lasting monuments in architecture, music, literature, and religion. The architecture of this period greatly influenced the further Mughal style to great extents and also succeeded in changing the face of the city of Delhi.

Presented By
Mayank