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ABOUT ASEAN

PREPARED BY:MUHAMMAD ZAIRULFIKRI BIN ZAILANI

Overview

ESTABLISHMENT The Association of Southeast Asian Nations, or ASEAN, was established on 8 August 1967 in Bangkok, Thailand, with the signing of the ASEAN Declaration (Bangkok Declaration) by the Founding Fathers of ASEAN, namely Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand. Brunei Darussalam then joined on 7 January 1984, Viet Nam on 28 July 1995, Lao PDR and Myanmar on 23 July 1997, and Cambodia on 30 April 1999, making up what is today the ten Member States of ASEAN.

AIMS AND PURPOSES As set out in the ASEAN Declaration, the aims and purposes of ASEAN are: 1. To accelerate the economic growth, social progress and cultural development in the region through joint endeavours in the spirit of equality and partnership in order to strengthen the foundation for a prosperous and peaceful community of Southeast Asian Nations; To promote regional peace and stability through abiding respect for justice and the rule of law in the relationship among countries of the region and adherence to the principles of the United Nations Charter; To promote active collaboration and mutual assistance on matters of common interest in the economic, social, cultural, technical, scientific and administrative fields; To provide assistance to each other in the form of training and research facilities in the educational, professional, technical and administrative spheres; To collaborate more effectively for the greater utilisation of their agriculture and industries, the expansion of their trade, including the study of the problems of international commodity trade, the improvement of their transportation and communications facilities and the raising of the living standards of their peoples; To promote Southeast Asian studies; and To maintain close and beneficial cooperation with existing international and regional organisations with similar aims and purposes, and explore all avenues for even closer cooperation among themselves.

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FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES In their relations with one another, the ASEAN Member States have adopted the following fundamental principles, as contained in the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia (TAC) of 1976: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Mutual respect for the independence, sovereignty, equality, territorial integrity, and national identity of all nations; The right of every State to lead its national existence free from external interference, subversion or coercion; Non-interference in the internal affairs of one another; Settlement of differences or disputes by peaceful manner; Renunciation of the threat or use of force; and Effective cooperation among themselves.

ASEAN COMMUNITY The ASEAN Vision 2020, adopted by the ASEAN Leaders on the 30th Anniversary of ASEAN, agreed on a shared vision of ASEAN as a concert of Southeast Asian nations, outward looking, living in peace, stability and prosperity, bonded together in partnership in dynamic development and in a community of caring societies. At the 9th ASEAN Summit in 2003, the ASEAN Leaders resolved that an ASEAN Community shall be established.

At the 12th ASEAN Summit in January 2007, the Leaders affirmed their strong commitment to accelerate the establishment of an ASEAN Community by 2015 and signed the Cebu Declaration on the Acceleration of the Establishment of an ASEAN Community by 2015. The ASEAN Community is comprised of three pillars, namely the ASEAN Political-Security Community, ASEAN Economic Community and ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community. Each pillar has its own Blueprint, and, together with the Initiative for ASEAN Integration (IAI) Strategic Framework and IAI Work Plan Phase II (2009-2015), they form the Roadmap for and ASEAN Community 2009-2015.

ASEAN CHARTER The ASEAN Charter serves as a firm foundation in achieving the ASEAN Community by providing legal status and institutional framework for ASEAN. It also codifies ASEAN norms, rules and values; sets clear targets for ASEAN; and presents accountability and compliance. The ASEAN Charter entered into force on 15 December 2008. A gathering of the ASEAN Foreign Ministers was held at the ASEAN Secretariat in Jakarta to mark this very historic occasion for ASEAN. With the entry into force of the ASEAN Charter, ASEAN will henceforth operate under a new legal framework and establish a number of new organs to boost its community-building process. In effect, the ASEAN Charter has become a legally binding agreement among the 10 ASEAN Member States.

The Founding of ASEAN

On 8 August 1967, five leaders - the Foreign Ministers of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand - sat down together in the main hall of the Department of Foreign Affairs building in Bangkok, Thailand and signed a document. By virtue of that document, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was born. The five Foreign Ministers who signed it - Adam Malik of Indonesia, Narciso R. Ramos of the Philippines, Tun Abdul Razak of Malaysia, S. Rajaratnam of Singapore, and Thanat Khoman of Thailand - would subsequently be hailed as the Founding Fathers of probably the most successful inter-governmental organization in the developing world today. And the document that they signed would be known as the ASEAN Declaration. It was a short, simply-worded document containing just five articles. It declared the establishment of an Association for Regional Cooperation among the Countries of Southeast Asia to be known as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and spelled out the aims and purposes of that Association. These aims and purposes were about cooperation in the economic, social, cultural, technical, educational and other fields, and in the promotion of regional peace and stability through abiding respect for justice and the rule of law and adherence to the principles of the United Nations Charter. It stipulated that the Association would be open for participation by all States in the Southeast Asian region subscribing to its aims, principles and purposes. It proclaimed ASEAN as representing "the collective will of the nations of Southeast Asia to bind themselves together in friendship and cooperation and, through joint efforts and sacrifices, secure for their peoples and for posterity the blessings of peace, freedom and prosperity." It was while Thailand was brokering reconciliation among Indonesia, the Philippines and Malaysia over certain disputes that it dawned on the four countries that the moment for regional cooperation had come or the future of the region would remain uncertain. Recalls one of the two surviving protagonists of that historic process, Thanat Khoman of Thailand: "At the banquet marking the reconciliation between the three disputants, I broached the idea of forming another organization for regional cooperation with Adam Malik. Malik agreed without hesitation but asked for time to talk with his government and also to normalize relations with Malaysia now that the confrontation was over. Meanwhile, the Thai Foreign Office prepared a draft charter of the new institution. Within a few months, everything was ready. I therefore invited the two former members of the Association for Southeast Asia (ASA), Malaysia and the Philippines, and Indonesia, a key member, to a meeting in Bangkok. In addition, Singapore sent S. Rajaratnam, then Foreign Minister, to see me about joining the new set-up. Although the new organization was planned to comprise only the ASA members plus Indonesia, Singapore's request was favorably considered." And so in early August 1967, the five Foreign Ministers spent four days in the relative isolation of a beach resort in Bang Saen, a coastal town less than a hundred kilometers southeast of Bangkok. There they negotiated over that document in a decidedly informal manner which they would later delight in describing as "sports-shirt

diplomacy." Yet it was by no means an easy process: each man brought into the deliberations a historical and political perspective that had no resemblance to that of any of the others. But with goodwill and good humor, as often as they huddled at the negotiating table, they finessed their way through their differences as they lined up their shots on the golf course and traded wisecracks on one another's game, a style of deliberation which would eventually become the ASEAN ministerial tradition. Now, with the rigors of negotiations and the informalities of Bang Saen behind them, with their signatures neatly attached to the ASEAN Declaration, also known as the Bangkok Declaration, it was time for some formalities. The first to speak was the Philippine Secretary of Foreign Affairs, Narciso Ramos, a one-time journalist and longtime legislator who had given up a chance to be Speaker of the Philippine Congress to serve as one of his country's first diplomats. He was then 66 years old and his only son, the future President Fidel V. Ramos, was serving with the Philippine Civic Action Group in embattled Vietnam. He recalled the tediousness of the negotiations that preceded the signing of the Declaration that "truly taxed the goodwill, the imagination, the patience and understanding of the five participating Ministers." That ASEAN was established at all in spite of these difficulties, he said, meant that its foundations had been solidly laid. And he impressed it on the audience of diplomats, officials and media people who had witnessed the signing ceremony that a great sense of urgency had prompted the Ministers to go through all that trouble. He spoke darkly of the forces that were arrayed against the survival of the countries of Southeast Asia in those uncertain and critical times. "The fragmented economies of Southeast Asia," he said, "(with) each country pursuing its own limited objectives and dissipating its meager resources in the overlapping or even conflicting endeavors of sister states carry the seeds of weakness in their incapacity for growth and their self-perpetuating dependence on the advanced, industrial nations. ASEAN, therefore, could marshal the still untapped potentials of this rich region through more substantial united action." When it was his turn to speak, Adam Malik, Presidium Minister for Political Affairs and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Indonesia, recalled that about a year before, in Bangkok, at the conclusion of the peace talks between Indonesia and Malaysia, he had explored the idea of an organization such as ASEAN with his Malaysian and Thai counterparts. One of the "angry young men" in his country's struggle for independence two decades earlier, Adam Malik was then 50 years old and one of a Presidium of five led by then General Soeharto that was steering Indonesia from the verge of economic and political chaos. He was the Presidium's point man in Indonesia's efforts to mend fences with its neighbors in the wake of an unfortunate policy of confrontation. During the past year, he said, the Ministers had all worked together toward the realization of the ASEAN idea, "making haste slowly, in order to build a new association for regional cooperation." Adam Malik went on to describe Indonesia's vision of a Southeast Asia developing into "a region which can stand on its own feet, strong enough to defend itself against any negative influence from outside the region." Such a vision, he stressed, was not wishful thinking, if the countries of the region effectively cooperated with each other, considering their combined natural resources and manpower. He referred to differences of outlook among the member countries, but those differences, he said, would be overcome through a maximum of goodwill and understanding, faith and realism. Hard work, patience and perseverance, he added, would also be necessary. The countries of Southeast Asia should also be willing to take responsibility for whatever happens to them, according to Tun Abdul Razak, the Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia, who spoke next. In his speech, he conjured a vision of an ASEAN that would include all the countries of Southeast Asia. Tun Abdul Razak was then concurrently his country's Minister of Defence and Minister of National Development. It was a time when national survival was the overriding thrust of Malaysia's relations with other nations and so as Minister of Defence, he was in charge of his country's foreign affairs. He stressed that the countries of the region should recognize that unless they assumed their common responsibility to shape their own destiny and to prevent external intervention and interference, Southeast Asia would remain fraught with danger and tension. And unless they took decisive and collective action to prevent the eruption of intra-regional conflicts, the nations of Southeast Asia would remain susceptible to manipulation, one against another. "We the nations and peoples of Southeast Asia," Tun Abdul Razak said, "must get together and form by ourselves a new perspective and a new framework for our region. It is important that individually and jointly we should create a deep awareness that we cannot survive for long as independent but isolated peoples unless we also think and act together and unless we prove by deeds that we belong to a family of Southeast Asian nations bound together by ties of friendship and goodwill and imbued with our own ideals and aspirations and determined to shape our own destiny". He added that, "with the establishment of ASEAN, we have taken a firm and a bold step on that road". For his part, S. Rajaratnam, a former Minister of Culture of multi-cultural Singapore who, at that time, served as its first Foreign Minister, noted that two decades of nationalist fervor had not fulfilled the expectations of the people of Southeast Asia for better living standards. If ASEAN would succeed, he said, then its members would

have to marry national thinking with regional thinking. "We must now think at two levels," Rajaratnam said. "We must think not only of our national interests but posit them against regional interests: that is a new way of thinking about our problems. And these are two different things and sometimes they can conflict. Secondly, we must also accept the fact, if we are really serious about it, that regional existence means painful adjustments to those practices and thinking in our respective countries. We must make these painful and difficult adjustments. If we are not going to do that, then regionalism remains a utopia." S. Rajaratnam expressed the fear, however, that ASEAN would be misunderstood. "We are not against anything", he said, "not against anybody". And here he used a term that would have an ominous ring even today: balkanization. In Southeast Asia, as in Europe and any part of the world, he said, outside powers had a vested interest in the balkanization of the region. "We want to ensure," he said, "a stable Southeast Asia, not a balkanized Southeast Asia. And those countries who are interested, genuinely interested, in the stability of Southeast Asia, the prosperity of Southeast Asia, and better economic and social conditions, will welcome small countries getting together to pool their collective resources and their collective wisdom to contribute to the peace of the world." The goal of ASEAN, then, is to create, not to destroy. This, the Foreign Minister of Thailand, Thanat Khoman, stressed when it was his turn to speak. At a time when the Vietnam conflict was raging and American forces seemed forever entrenched in Indochina, he had foreseen their eventual withdrawal from the area and had accordingly applied himself to adjusting Thailand's foreign policy to a reality that would only become apparent more than half a decade later. He must have had that in mind when, on that occasion, he said that the countries of Southeast Asia had no choice but to adjust to the exigencies of the time, to move toward closer cooperation and even integration. Elaborating on ASEAN objectives, he spoke of "building a new society that will be responsive to the needs of our time and efficiently equipped to bring about, for the enjoyment and the material as well as spiritual advancement of our peoples, conditions of stability and progress. Particularly what millions of men and women in our part of the world want is to erase the old and obsolete concept of domination and subjection of the past and replace it with the new spirit of give and take, of equality and partnership. More than anything else, they want to be master of their own house and to enjoy the inherent right to decide their own destiny ..." While the nations of Southeast Asia prevent attempts to deprive them of their freedom and sovereignty, he said, they must first free themselves from the material impediments of ignorance, disease and hunger. Each of these nations cannot accomplish that alone, but by joining together and cooperating with those who have the same aspirations, these objectives become easier to attain. Then Thanat Khoman concluded: "What we have decided today is only a small beginning of what we hope will be a long and continuous sequence of accomplishments of which we ourselves, those who will join us later and the generations to come, can be proud. Let it be for Southeast Asia, a potentially rich region, rich in history, in spiritual as well as material resources and indeed for the whole ancient continent of Asia, the light of happiness and well-being that will shine over the uncounted millions of our struggling peoples." The Foreign Minister of Thailand closed the inaugural session of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations by presenting each of his colleagues with a memento. Inscribed on the memento presented to the Foreign Minister of Indonesia, was the citation, "In recognition of services rendered by His Excellency Adam Malik to the ASEAN organization, the name of which was suggested by him." And that was how ASEAN was conceived, given a name, and born. It had been barely 14 months since Thanat Khoman brought up the ASEAN idea in his conversations with his Malaysian and Indonesian colleagues. In about three more weeks, Indonesia would fully restore diplomatic relations with Malaysia, and soon after that with Singapore. That was by no means the end to intra-ASEAN disputes, for soon the Philippines and Malaysia would have a falling out on the issue of sovereignty over Sabah. Many disputes between ASEAN countries persist to this day. But all Member Countries are deeply committed to resolving their differences through peaceful means and in the spirit of mutual accommodation. Every dispute would have its proper season but it would not be allowed to get in the way of the task at hand. And at that time, the essential task was to lay the framework of regional dialogue and cooperation. The two-page Bangkok Declaration not only contains the rationale for the establishment of ASEAN and its specific objectives. It represents the organizations modus operandi of building on small steps, voluntary, and informal arrangements towards more binding and institutionalized agreements. All the founding member states and the newer members have stood fast to the spirit of the Bangkok Declaration. Over the years, ASEAN has progressively entered into several formal and legally-binding instruments, such as the 1976 Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia and the 1995 Treaty on the Southeast Asia Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone.

Against the backdrop of conflict in the then Indochina, the Founding Fathers had the foresight of building a community of and for all Southeast Asian states. Thus the Bangkok Declaration promulgated that the Association is open for participation to all States in the Southeast Asian region subscribing to the aforementioned aims, principles and purposes. ASEANs inclusive outlook has paved the way for community-building not only in Southeast Asia, but also in the broader Asia Pacific region where several other inter-governmental organizations now co-exist. The original ASEAN logo presented five brown sheaves of rice stalks, one for each founding member. Beneath the sheaves is the legend "ASEAN" in blue. These are set on a field of yellow encircled by a blue border. Brown stands for strength and stability, yellow for prosperity and blue for the spirit of cordiality in which ASEAN affairs are conducted. When ASEAN celebrated its 30th Anniversary in 1997, the sheaves on the logo had increased to ten - representing all ten countries of Southeast Asia and reflecting the colors of the flags of all of them. In a very real sense, ASEAN and Southeast Asia would then be one and the same, just as the Founding Fathers had envisioned. This article is based on the first chapter of ASEAN at 30, a publication of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations in commemoration of its 30th Anniversary on 8 August 1997, written by Jamil Maidan Flores and Jun Abad.

ASEAN Motto

The motto of ASEAN is One Vision, One Identity, One Community.

ASEAN Flag

GUIDELINES ON THE USE OF THE ASEAN FLAG 1. The ASEAN Flag is a symbol of Member States unity and support for the principles and endeavours of ASEAN and is a means to promote greater ASEAN awareness and solidarity. 2. The ASEAN Flag represents a stable, peaceful, united and dynamic ASEAN. The colours of the Flag blue, red, white and yellow represent the main colours of the flags of all the ASEAN Member States. 3. The blue represents peace and stability. Red depicts courage and dynamism, white shows purity and yellow symbolises prosperity. 4. The stalks of padi in the centre of the Emblem represent the dream of ASEAN's Founding Fathers for an ASEAN comprising all the countries in Southeast Asia, bound together in friendship and solidarity. 5. The circle represents the unity of ASEAN.

6. The ASEAN Flag is the reserved copyright of ASEAN.

7. The specifications of the ASEAN Flag are annexed. A. Dignity of the ASEAN Flag 8. The ASEAN Flag shall be treated with respect and shall not be subjected to any indignity. B. Use of the ASEAN Flag B.1. Use of the ASEAN Flag by ASEAN Member States 9. ASEAN Member States shall use the ASEAN Flag in the manner specified under these guidelines that include the following: a. The ASEAN Flag shall be displayed at all ASEAN National Secretariats. b. The ASEAN Flag shall be displayed on a permanent basis at Diplomatic and Consular Missions of ASEAN Member States alongside the national flag. The ASEAN Flag shall be displayed by the ASEAN Member States in third countries which are recognised by all ASEAN Member States. c. The ASEAN Flag shall be displayed alongside the national flag in the following manner:

Diagram 1: Outdoor Flags

Diagram 2: Venue Flags (Outdoor/Indoor)

d. The ASEAN Flag shall be displayed during ASEAN meetings, ASEAN Day Celebrations, ceremonies and functions held in Member States. e. The display of the ASEAN Flag shall be in accordance with national laws and regulations of the respective countries and the provisions under these Guidelines. B.2. Use of the ASEAN Flag by the ASEAN Secretariat 10. The ASEAN Secretariat shall use the ASEAN Flag in the manner specified under these guidelines that include the following: a. Display at the Secretariat buildings and residence of the Secretary-General; b. During ASEAN meetings; c. On the official vehicle of the Secretary-General of ASEAN during official functions; and

d. During ASEAN Day celebrations, official functions, ceremonies, exhibitions, gatherings or any other occasions organised by the ASEAN Secretariat in its effort to promote the interest of ASEAN. B.3. Use of the ASEAN Flag by ASEAN Committees in Third Countries 11. ASEAN Committees in Third Countries shall also display the ASEAN Flag during ASEAN Day celebrations, official functions, ceremonies, exhibitions, gatherings or any other occasions in its effort to promote the interest of ASEAN. B.4. Use of the ASEAN Flag by ASEAN institutions 12. ASEAN institutions shall display the ASEAN Flag at their premises as well as during ASEAN meetings, ASEAN Day celebrations, official functions, ceremonies, exhibitions, gatherings or any other occasions in its effort to promote the interest of ASEAN. B.5. Use of the ASEAN Flag by Countries, International Organisations and Entities Associated with ASEAN 13. Countries which have relations with ASEAN, International Organisations which work closely with ASEAN and entities associated with ASEAN may display the ASEAN Flag in support of activities related to ASEAN. B.6. Use of the ASEAN Flag in Mourning 14. Upon the passing of a Head of State or Government of a Member State, the ASEAN Flag will be flown at halfmast at the ASEAN Secretariat building and other ASEAN institutional buildings for an official mourning period. The ASEAN Flag may also be flown at half-mast in special circumstances, including natural calamities in ASEAN Member States, upon the approval of all ASEAN Member States. 15. Member States will decide if the ASEAN Flag should be flown at half-mast in their respective countries as well as the period of mourning. C. Position of ASEAN Flag in the Flag Arrangements for ASEAN Meetings 16. The ASEAN outdoor/venue and room flag shall be displayed together with the flags of ASEAN Member States in alphabetical order, based on the names of Member States, starting from Brunei Darussalam on the extreme left and with the ASEAN Flag always on the extreme right after the national flag of Viet Nam, in the following manner:

17. When placed with the flag of a Dialogue Partner, the ASEAN Flag along with the flags of ASEAN Member States shall be displayed in the following manner:

18. The ASEAN table flag shall be displayed at the left side of the name plaque of the ASEAN Secretariat, in the following manner:

D. Disposal of Worn Flag 19. When the ASEAN Flag has become worn or torn or frayed, it shall not be displayed, and shall be properly disposed of. E. Approval of and Amendments to the Guidelines 20. The Guidelines shall be approved by the ASEAN Coordinating Council (ACC). 21. Any Member State may propose amendments to the Guidelines, which shall be submitted to the Committee of Permanent Representatives (CPR) for its consideration and agreed upon by consensus. The agreed amendments shall be submitted to the ASEAN Coordinating Council (ACC) for notation, and thereafter come into immediate effect.

ANNEX A. Specifications

1. The specifications of Pantone Colour for the colours of the ASEAN Flag are:

Background

: Pantone 19-4053 TC/Pantone Blue 286 Outer Ring : Pantone 11-4202 TC/Plain White Circular Area : Pantone 18-1655 TC/Pantone Red 032 Rice Stalks : Pantone 13-0758 TC/Pantone Process Yellow
B. Design of the ASEAN Flag 2. The ASEAN Flag comes in four versions, namely, the Table Flag, Room Flag, Car Flag, and Outdoor/ Venue Flag. While the colour specifications are the same for all versions, the measurements and materials used differ.

ASEAN Emblem

Guidelines on the Use of the ASEAN Emblem

1. The ASEAN Emblem shall be the official emblem of ASEAN. 2. The ASEAN Emblem represents a stable, peaceful, united and dynamic ASEAN. The colours of the Emblem -- blue, red, white and yellow -- represent the main colours of the state crests of all the ASEAN Member States. 3. The blue represents peace and stability. Red depicts courage and dynamism, white shows purity and yellow symbolises prosperity. 4. The stalks of padi in the centre of the Emblem represent the dream of ASEAN's Founding Fathers for an ASEAN comprising all the countries in Southeast Asia, bound together in friendship and solidarity. 5. The circle represents the unity of ASEAN.

6. The ASEAN Emblem is the reserved copyright of ASEAN.

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A. Use of the ASEAN Emblem 7. The ASEAN Emblem shall be used in a manner that promotes ASEAN and its purposes and principles. It shall not be used for political purposes or for activities that harm the dignity of ASEAN. 8. The ASEAN Emblem shall not be used for commercial purposes unless the entities concerned obtain official approval through the procedures stipulated in Article A.4. A.1. Use of the ASEAN Emblem by ASEAN Member States 9. ASEAN Member States are encouraged to use the ASEAN Emblem in official functions relating to ASEAN. 10. The ASEAN Emblem shall be placed to the right of the ASEAN Member States National Symbols, as seen by the viewer. A.2. Use of the ASEAN Emblem by the ASEAN Secretariat 11. The ASEAN Secretariat shall use the ASEAN Emblem in the manner considered appropriate by the Secretary-General which may include the following: a. Display at the Secretariat buildings and residence of the Secretary-General; b. Use in its official correspondence as letterhead; c. Use as the official seal for the ASEAN Secretariat; d. Use in its official publications, stationery and souvenirs; e. Mark or engrave on properties belonging to the ASEAN Secretariat; and f. Display at ASEAN official functions. A.3. Use of the ASEAN Emblem by Entities Associated with ASEAN 12. Entities officially associated with ASEAN as in Annex 2 of the ASEAN Charter may use the ASEAN Emblem in their official correspondences and meetings. A.4. Use of the ASEAN Emblem by Other Entities 13. Other entities based in an ASEAN Member State shall submit their request for the use of the ASEAN Emblem to the ASEAN National Secretariat concerned. 14. Other entities outside the ASEAN region shall submit their request for the use of the ASEAN Emblem to the Public Outreach and Civil Society Division of the ASEAN Secretariat: Public Outreach and Civil Society Division The ASEAN Secretariat 70 A, Jl. Sisingamangaraja Jakarta 12110 Indonesia E-mail: public.div@asean.org 15. Requests for the use of the ASEAN Emblem shall be submitted in writing, and accompanied with the following information: organisational profile; nature and purpose of the proposed activity; duration of the use of the ASEAN Emblem; and prototype of the proposed use of the ASEAN Emblem.

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16. The ASEAN National Secretariats and the ASEAN Secretariat shall consider the requests accordingly. The approval granted shall be exclusive to the proposed activity. Such approval shall not be extended to third parties. 17. Authorisation to use the ASEAN Emblem does not confer on those to whom it is granted any right of exclusive use, nor does it allow them to appropriate the Emblem or any similar trademark or logo, either by registration or any other means. B. Reproduction of the ASEAN Emblem 18. The ASEAN Emblem shall be reproduced in accordance with the Specifications and Colours indicated in the Annex. C. Approval of and Amendments to the Guidelines 19. The Guidelines shall be approved by the ASEAN Coordinating Council (ACC). 20. Any Member State may propose amendments to the Guidelines, which shall be submitted to the Committee of Permanent Representatives (CPR) for its consideration and agreed upon by consensus. The agreed amendments shall be submitted to the ASEAN Coordinating Council (ACC) for notation, and thereafter come into immediate effect.

ANNEX Specifications and Colours 1. The specifications of Pantone Colour adopted for the colours of the ASEAN Emblem are: Blue : Pantone 286 Red : Pantone Red 032 Yellow : Pantone Process Yellow 2. For four-colour printing process, the specifications of colours will be: Blue : 100C 60 M 0Y 6K (100C 60M 0Y 10K) Red : 0C 91M 87Y 0K (0C 90M 90Y 0K) Yellow : 0C 0M 100Y 0K 3. Specifications in brackets are to be used when an arbitrary measurement of process colours is not possible. 4. In Pantone Process Colour Simulator, the specifications equal to: Blue : Pantone 204-1 Red : Pantone 60-1 Yellow : Pantone 1-3 5. The font used for the word "ASEAN" in the Emblem is lower-case Helvetica in bold. 6. The Emblem shall appear either in the specified colours or in a singular colour of black, white, gold or silver. It can be enlarged or shrunk in proportionate size as appropriate for its use and place of display.

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ASEAN Day

8 August is observed as ASEAN Day.

ASEAN Anthem

Guidelines on the Use of the ASEAN Anthem

1. The ASEAN Anthem is an expression of ASEAN unity. It also strengthens the sense of ASEAN identity and belonging among the peoples of the region. 2. The ASEAN Anthem is titled THE ASEAN WAY, with musical composition and lyrics as attached. 3. The ASEAN Anthem is under the copyright of ASEAN with the ASEAN Secretariat as the main body to oversee its proper use. A. Dignity of the ASEAN Anthem 4. The ASEAN Anthem shall be used in a proper and dignified manner. When the Anthem is played, the audience shall rise. 5. The Anthem shall not be used in whole or in parts for commercial purposes or political propaganda. B. Use of the ASEAN Anthem 6. The use of the ASEAN Anthem is encouraged at ASEAN formal meetings and related activities, including those with ASEAN Dialogue Partners. 7. The ASEAN Anthem may be played to commemorate special occasions of ASEAN, such as the anniversary of ASEAN, or in efforts to promote the interests of ASEAN. 8. ASEAN Member States are encouraged to translate the ASEAN Anthem into local languages as a way to promote the Anthem and increase ASEAN awareness within their countries. C. Inquiries on the Use of the ASEAN Anthem 9. Inquiries concerning the ASEAN Anthem should be addressed to: Public Outreach and Civil Society Division The ASEAN Secretariat 70 A, Jl. Sisingamangaraja Jakarta 12110 Indonesia Email: public.div@asean.org D. Approval of and Amendments to the Guidelines 10. The Guidelines shall be approved by the ASEAN Coordinating Council (ACC). 11. Any Member State may propose amendments to the Guidelines, which shall be submitted to the Committee of Permanent Representatives (CPR) for its consideration and agreed upon by consensus. The agreed amendments shall be submitted to the ASEAN Coordinating Council (ACC) for notation, and thereafter come into immediate effect.

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Note: th The Guidelines were adopted at the 6 Meeting of the ASEAN Coordinating Council (ACC), Ha Noi, 8 April 2010.

Audio, The ASEAN Way The Asean Way / Original Version By : Mr.Kittikhun Sodprasert, Mr Sampow Triudom, Mrs.Payom Valaipatchra

Lyrics, The ASEAN Way

Raise our flag high, sky high Embrace the pride in our heart ASEAN we are bonded as one Look-in out to the world. For peace, our goal from the very start And prosperity to last. We dare to dream we care to share. Together for ASEAN we dare to dream, we care to share for it's the way of ASEAN.

ASEAN Member States

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Brunei Darussalam Head of State : His Majesty Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah Mu'izzaddin Waddaulah Capital : Bandar Seri Begawan Language(s) : Malay, English Currency : B$ (Brunei Dollar) Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade of Brunei Darussalam Website: www.mfa.gov.bn

Cambodia Head of State : His Majesty King Norodom Sihamoni Head of Government : Prime Minister Hun Sen Capital : Phnom Penh Language : Khmer Currency : Riel Ministry of Foreign Affairs & International Cooperation of Cambodia Website: www.mfaic.gov.kh

Indonesia Head of State : President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono Capital : Jakarta Language : Indonesian Currency : Rupiah Department of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia Website: www.deplu.go.id

Lao PDR Head of State : President Choummaly Sayasone Head of Government : Prime Minister Thongsing Thammavong Capital : Vientiane Language : Lao Currency : Kip Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Lao PDR Website: www.mofa.gov.la

Malaysia Head of Government : The Honourable Dato' Sri Mohd Najib bin Tun Abdul Razak Capital : Kuala Lumpur Language(s) : Malay, English, Chinese, Tamil Currency : Ringgit Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Malaysia Website: www.kln.gov.my ASEAN-Malaysia National Secretariat Website: www.kln.gov.my/myasean

Myanmar Head of State : President Thein Sein Capital : Nay Pyi Taw

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Language : Myanmar Currency : Kyat Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Myanmar Website: www.mofa.gov.mm

Philippines Head of State : President Benigno S. Aquino III Capital : Manila Language(s) : Filipino, English, Spanish Currency : Peso Department of Foreign Affairs of the Philippines Website: www.dfa.gov.ph

Singapore Head of State : President Tony Tan Keng Yam Head of Government : Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong Capital : Singapore Language(s) : English, Malay, Mandarin, Tamil Currency : S$ (Singapore Dollar) Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Singapore Website: www.mfa.gov.sg

Thailand Head of State : His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej Head of Government : Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra Capital : Bangkok Language : Thai Currency : Baht Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Thailand Website: www.mfa.go.th

Viet Nam Head of State : President Nguyen Minh Triet Head of Government : Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung Capital : Ha Noi Language : Vietnamese Currency : Dong Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Viet Nam Website: www.mofa.gov.vn

The ASEAN Secretariat

The ASEAN Secretariat was set up in February 1976 by the Foreign Ministers of ASEAN. It was then housed at the Department of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia in Jakarta. The existing ASEAN Secretariat at 70A Jalan Sisingamangaraja, Jakarta was established and officiated in 1981 by the then President of Indonesia, H.E. Soeharto.

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The ASEAN Secretariats basic function is to provide for greater efficiency in the coordination of ASEAN organs and for more effective implementation of ASEAN projects and activities The ASEAN Secretariats vision is that by 2015, it will be the nerve centre of a strong and confident ASEAN Community that is globally respected for acting in full compliance with its Charter and in the best interest of its people. The ASEAN Secretariats mission is to initiate, facilitate and coordinate ASEAN stakeholder collaboration in realising the purposes and principles of ASEAN as reflected in the ASEAN Charter.

ASEAN Foundation Multimedia Presentation 2012 Building a Brighter Future for Souteast Asian People In recognition of the fundamental importance of improving the livelihoods and well-being of the peoples of Southeast Asia, and the need to promote ASEAN awareness as well as people-to-people contact through scholarships, fellowships and other exchanges, the Leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) agreed to establish the ASEAN Foundation on 15 December 1997 in Kuala Lumpur during the Associations 30th Anniversary Commemorative Summit. The ultimate aim was to help bring about shared prosperity and a sustainable future to all ASEAN countries which comprises of Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam. On the same day, the ASEAN Leaders reaffirmed their commitment to this purpose with the ASEAN Vision 2020 which foresees ASEAN as a concert of Southeast Asian nations, outward looking, living in peace, stability and prosperity, bonded together in partnership in dynamic development and in a community of caring societies as well as a community conscious of its history, aware of its cultural heritage and bound by a common regional identity." The ASEAN Vision 2020 also stipulated to use the ASEAN Foundation as one of the instruments to address issues of unequal economic development, poverty and socioeconomic disparities. The two-fold objectives of the ASEAN Foundation as reflected in the Memorandum of Understanding establishing it are as follows:

It shall promote greater awareness of ASEAN, and greater interaction among the peoples of ASEAN as well as their wider participation in ASEANs activities inter alia through human resources development that will enable them to realize their full potential and capacity to contribute to progress of ASEAN Member States as productive and responsible members of the society. It shall also endeavour to contribute to the evolution of a development cooperation strategy that promotes mutual assistance, equitable economic development, and the alleviation of poverty.
In order to realize Vision 2020, the Hanoi Plan of Action

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(1998-2004) was adopted at the ASEAN Summit in December 1998, which advocates to use the ASEAN Foundation to support activities and social development programmes aimed at addressing issues of unequal economic development, poverty and socioeconomic disparities and to support the activities of the ASEAN Foundation and other available resources and mechanism to promote ASEAN awareness among its people. Subsequently, the Vientianne Action Programme (2004-2010) adopted at the ASEAN Summit in November 2004, pursued the comprehensive integration of ASEAN towards the realization of an open, dynamic and resilient ASEAN Community by 2020. It specifically called for strengthening the role of the ASEAN Foundation under the political development section of the respective documents in the context of increasing the participation by various ASEAN bodies in moving forward ASEAN political development initiatives through promotion of more people-to-people contacts. Moreover, at the ASEAN Summit held in November 2004, the leaders adopted the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community Plan of Action (ASCCPoA), which outlined the priority areas to be undertaken by concerned bodies to advance ASEANs social agenda that is focused on poverty eradication and human development. In this regard, the ASEAN Foundation has been mandated to play an active role in supporting the implementation of the ASCCPoA which includes promoting access to Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) resources of differently advantaged groups (youth, women, persons with disabilities and rural communities), promoting ASEAN awareness through language training and mass media; and youth exchange activities (such as through volunteer programmes and youth camps) with the view of facilitating greater awareness among ASEAN youth of the regions vision of a cohesive community of caring societies.

ASEAN Political-Security Community To build on what has been constructed over the years in the field of political and security cooperation, the ASEAN Leaders have agreed to establish the ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC). The APSC shall aim to ensure that countries in the region live at peace with one another and with the world in a just, democratic and harmonious environment. The members of the Community pledge to rely exclusively on peaceful processes in the settlement of intra-regional differences and regard their security as fundamentally linked to one another and bound by geographic location, common vision and objectives. It has the following components: political development; shaping and sharing of norms; conflict prevention; conflict resolution; post-conflict peace building; and implementing mechanisms. ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC) Blueprint The APSC Blueprint envisages ASEAN to be a rules-based Community of shared values and norms; a cohesive, peaceful, stable and resilient region with shared responsibility for comprehensive security; as well as a dynamic and outward-looking region in an increasingly integrated and interdependent world. The APSC Blueprint is guided by the ASEAN Charter and the principles and purposes contained therein. It provides a roadmap and timetable to establish the APSC by 2015. It also leaves room for flexibility to continue programmes/activities beyond 2015 in order to retain its significance and have an enduring quality. The APSC Blueprint was adopted by the ASEAN Leaders at the 14th ASEAN Summit on 1 March 2009 in Cha-am/Hua Hin, Thailand.

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ASEAN Ministerial Meeting (AMM) Established in 1967 Meets annually, with informal meetings and retreats in between Last meeting : 43rd AMM, Ha Noi, 15-23 July 2010 ASEAN Defence Ministers Meeting (ADMM) Established in 2006 Meets annually Last Meeting: 5th ADMM, Jakarta, Indonesia, 19 May 2011 The ASEAN Defence Ministers' Meeting (ADMM) is the highest defence mechanism within ASEAN. The annual ADMM facilitates the ASEAN defence ministers to discuss and exchange views on current defence and security issues and challenges faced in the region. The ADMM aims to promote mutual trust and confidence through greater understanding of defence and security challenges as well as enhancement of transparency and openness. To guide the ADMM cooperation, the Three-Year ADMM Work Programme (2008-2010) was adopted at the 2nd ADMM in Singapore in 2007. The Work Programme (2008-2010) included measures and activities in five areas, namely 1) promoting regional defence and security cooperation; 2) shaping and sharing of norms; 3) conflict prevention; 4) conflict resolution; 5) post-conflict peace building. With the completion of the first term in 2010, the 5th ADMM adopted the new ADMM ThreeYear Work Programme (2011-2013), which focuses on measures and activities in four areas, namely 1) strengthening regional defence and security cooperation; 2) enhancing existing practical cooperation and developing possible cooperation in defence and security; 3) promoting enhanced ties with Dialogue Partners; 4) shaping and sharing of norms. Cooperation in the ASEAN defence sector has grown steadily since its inception in 2006. Cooperation in the issue of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief has been progressing significantly in the ADMM. The ASEAN Defence Ministers have adopted concept papers to advance the ADMM cooperation in this area, including the Concept Paper on the Use of ASEAN Military Assets and Capacities in Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) and the Concept Paper on Defence Establishments and Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) Cooperation on Non-Traditional Security. TThe ADMM has also conducted the ASEAN Humanitarian Assistance Disaster Relief Table-Top Exercise (AHX), co-organised by Indonesia and Singapore, and a Table-Top Exercise in HADR under the framework of the Third Workshop of the ASEAN Defence Establishments and CSOs Cooperation in Non-Traditional Security hosted by Thailand in 2011. In an effort to strengthen regional defence and security cooperation, the 5th ADMM adopted the Concept Paper on the Establishment of ASEAN Defence Industry Collaboration (ADIC) and the Concept Paper on the Establishment of ASEAN Peacekeeping Centres Network. The ADMM continues to exchange views on addressing non-traditional security challenges and discusses the need to strengthen and take more practical steps in defence cooperation in order to make further contribution to regional peace and stability. The ADMM also reiterated its commitment to increase interactions at all levels and build a strong foundation to support the 19

establishment of the ASEAN Community as indicated in the ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC) Blueprint. The 6th ADMM will be convened in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, in May 2011. ADMM-Plus Established in 2010 Meets triennially Last Meeting: Inaugural ADMM-Plus, Ha Noi, Viet Nam, 12 October 2010 Consistent with the ADMM guiding principles of open and outward looking, the 2nd ADMM in Singapore in 2007 adopted the ADMM-Plus Concept Paper.The ADMM-Plus process is a tool to engage ASEAN Dialogue Partners in dialogue and cooperation on defence and security matters. In preparing for the establishment of an ADMM-Plus, the Concept Paper on ADMM-Plus Principles for Membership was adopted by the 3rd ADMM in Pattaya in 2009; followed by the Concept Paper on ADMM-Plus: Configuration and Composition and the Concept Paper on ADMM-Plus: Modalities and Procedures, which were adopted by the 4th ADMM in Ha Noi in 2010. The Inaugural ADMM-Plus was convened in Ha Noi, Viet Nam, on 12 October 2010. At the Inaugural ADMM-Plus, the Defence Ministers agreed on five areas of practical cooperation to pursue under this new mechanism. These areas are maritime security, counter-terrorism, disaster management, peacekeeping operations and military medicine. To facilitate cooperation on these areas, five Experts' Working Groups (EWGs) are established. By the end of 2011, all of the EWGs have held their inaugural meetings. The 2nd ADMM-Plus will be convened in Brunei Darussalam in 2013. ASEAN Law Ministers Meeting (ALAWMM) Established in 1986 Meets once in 36 months Last meeting: 8th ALAWMM, Phnom Penh, 4-5 November 2011 ASEAN Ministerial Meeting on Transnational Crime (AMMTC) Established in 1997 Meets once in two years Last meeting: 7th AMMTC, Siem Reap, Cambodia,16-19 November 2009

ASEAN Economic Community

The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) shall be the goal of regional economic integration by 2015. AEC envisages the following key characteristics: (a) a single market and production base, (b) a highly competitive economic region, (c) a region of equitable economic development, and (d) a region fully integrated into the global economy.

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The AEC areas of cooperation include human resources development and capacity building; recognition of professional qualifications; closer consultation on macroeconomic and financial policies; trade financing measures; enhanced infrastructure and communications connectivity; development of electronic transactions through e-ASEAN; integrating industries across the region to promote regional sourcing; and enhancing private sector involvement for the building of the AEC. In short, the AEC will transform ASEAN into a region with free movement of goods, services, investment, skilled labour, and freer flow of capital. ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) Blueprint The ASEAN Leaders adopted the ASEAN Economic Blueprint at the 13th ASEAN Summit on 20 November 2007 in Singapore to serve as a coherent master plan guiding the establishment of the ASEAN Economic Community 2015.

ASEAN Free Trade Area (AFTA Council)


The ASEAN Free Trade Area (AFTA) The ASEAN Free Trade Area (AFTA) has now been virtually established. ASEAN Member Countries have made significant progress in the lowering of intra-regional tariffs through the Common Effective Preferential Tariff (CEPT) Scheme for AFTA. More than 99 percent of the products in the CEPT Inclusion List (IL) of ASEAN-6, comprising Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand, have been brought down to the 0-5 percent tariff range. [Figure 1]

ASEANs newer members, namely Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Viet Nam, are not far behind in the implementation of their CEPT commitments with almost 80 percent of their products having been moved into their respective CEPT ILS. Of these items, about 66 percent already have tariffs within the 0-5 percent tariff band. Viet Nam has until 2006 to bring down tariff of products in the Inclusion List to no more than 5 percent duties, Laos and Myanmar in 2008 and Cambodia in 2010. Following the signing of the Protocol to Amend the CEPT-AFTA Agreement for the Elimination of Import Duties on 30 January 2003, ASEAN-6 has committed to eliminate tariffs on 60 percent of their products in the IL by the year 2003. As of this date, tariffs on 64.12 percent of the products in the IL of ASEAN-6 have been eliminated. The average tariff for ASEAN-6 under the CEPT Scheme is now down to 1.51 percent from 12.76 percent when the tariff cutting exercise started in 1993. The implementation of the CEPT-AFTA Scheme was significantly boosted in January 2004 when Malaysia announced its tariff reduction for completely built up (CBUs) and completely knocked down (CKDs) automotive units to gradually meet its CEPT commitment one year earlier than schedule. Malaysia has previously been allowed to defer the transfer of 218 tariff lines of CBUs and CKDs until 1 January 2005. Products that remain out of the CEPT-AFTA Scheme are those in the Highly Sensitive List (i.e. rice) and the General Exception List. The Coordinating Committee on the Implementation of the CEPTScheme for AFTA (CCCA) is currently undertaking a review of all the General Exception Lists to ensure that only those consistent with Article 9(b)1 of the CEPT Agreement are included in the lists. ASEAN Member Countries have also resolved to work on the elimination of non-tariff barriers. A work programme on the elimination of non-tariff barriers, which includes, among others, the process of verification and cross-notification; updating the working definition of Non-Tariff Measures (NTMs)/Non-Tariff Barriers (NTBs) in ASEAN; the setting-up of a database on all NTMs maintained by Member Countries; and the eventual elimination of unnecessary and unjustifiable non-tariff measures, is currently being finalized. In an effort to improve and strengthen the rules governing the implementation of the CEPT Scheme, to make the Scheme more attractive to regional businessmen and prospective investors, the CEPT Rules of Origin and its Operational Certification Procedures have been revised and implemented since 1 January 2004. Among the features of the revised CEPT Rules of Origin and Operational Certification Procedures include: (a) a standardized method of calculating local/ASEAN content; (b) a set of principles for determining the cost of ASEAN origin and the guidelines for costing methodologies; (c) treatment of locally-

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procured materials; and (d) improved verification process, including on-site verification. In order to promote greater utilization of the CEPTAFTA Scheme, substantial transformation has also been adopted as an alternative rule in determining origin for CEPT products. The Task Force on the CEPT Rules of Origin is currently working out substantial transformation rules for certain product sectors, including wheat flour, iron and steel and the 11 priority integration sectors covered under the Bali Concord II. Direction of Trade ASEANs exports had regained its upward trend in the two years following the financial crisis of 1997- 1998 reaching its peak in 2000 when total exports was valued at US$ 408 billion. After declining to US$ 366.8 billion in 2001, as a result of the economic slowdown in the United States and Europe and the recession in Japan, ASEAN exports recovered in 2002 when it was valued at US$ 380.2 billion. The upward trend for ASEAN-6 continued up to the first two quarters of 2003. Intra-ASEAN trade for the first two quarters of 2003 registered an increase of 4.2 and 1.6 percent for exports and imports respectively. [Figures 2, 3 & 4] Direction of Trade ASEAN's exports had regained its upward trend in the two years following the financial crisis of 1997-1998 reaching its peak in 2000 when total exports was valued US$ 408 billion. After declining to US$ 366.8 billion in 2001, as a result of the economic slowdon in the United States and Europe and the recession in Japan, ASEAN expots recovered in 2002 when it was valued at US$ 380.2 billion. The upward trend for ASEAN-6 continued up to first two quaters of 2003. Intra-ASEAN trade for the first two quarters of 2003 registered an increase of 4.2 and 1.6 percent for exports and imports respectively. [Figures 2,3 & 4] ASEAN Trade with Selected Trading Partners The United States, the European Union and Japan continued to be ASEANs largest export markets. Japan, followed by the U.S. and EU, were the largest sources of ASEAN imports. During the first half of 2002-2003, ASEAN-6 trade with major markets as a whole increased by 11.71 percent for exports and 6.91 percent for imports. However, ASEAN exports to the U.S. and India and imports from Canada and India declined during the same period. [Figure 5]

ASEAN Ministers on Energy Meeting (AMEM)

The ASEAN Ministers on Energy Meeting (AMEM), held in Langkawi in July 2003, called for intensified cooperation in the development and exploitation of the energy resource potentials in the ASEAN region, as well as in attracting private sector participation and investment in the ASEAN energy sector. The Ministers agreed to work collectively in moving forward the Trans-ASEAN Gas Pipeline (TAGP) and the ASEAN Power Grid Projects to provide greater stability and security of energy supply in the ASEAN region. The Ministers also agreed to enhance the ASEAN Energy Business Forum (AEBF) as an important platform for facilitating business interaction, technology exchange and project financing opportunities between ASEAN energy authorities and the private sector. The ASEAN Gas Consultative Council (AGCC) has been established to serve as an advisory body to the ASEAN Council on Petroleum (ASCOPE) in the implementation of the TAGP Project. The ASCOPE Gas Centre (AGC), to be hosted by Malaysia, will be established to serve as the strategic technical and information resource and capacity building center in the facilitation and implementation of the TAGP and gas development programmes in ASEAN. ASEAN is updating the 1986 ASEAN Petroleum Security Agreement (APSA) with a view to adopting strategic options to enhance petroleum security in times or circumstances of both shortages and oversupply in the ASEAN region. The Final Report of the ASEAN Interconnection Master Plan Study (AIMS), a reference document to guide the implementation of the electricity interconnection projects, indicates that there are 11 potential power interconnection projects for implementation up to 2020, which are expected to generate potential savings of about US$ 662 million (year 2000 prices) in new investment and operating costs resulting from such interconnections. There are currently eight interconnection projects at various stages of implementation in ASEAN. The ASEAN Ministers on Energy agreed to strengthen partnership with China, Japan and ROK to address mutual issues and concerns in energy security, natural gas development, oil market studies, oil stockpiling and renewable energy. The ASEAN Senior Officials Meeting on Energy (SOME) Plus Three Energy Policy

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Governing Group (EPGG) has been established. Within the ASEAN Plus Three framework, four forums of experts were convened and served as platforms for information and best practices sharing towards greater understanding of global and regional issues in energy security, natural gas, oil markets and oil stockpiles. These forums have agreed to develop an ASEAN Plus Three Energy Security Communications System and to enhance cooperation in natural gas through infrastructure development, investment promotion, trading arrangements and application of new technologies. The ASEAN Plus Three Energy Ministers will meet on the occasion of the 22nd AMEM in June 2004 in Manila. The ASEAN-Japan Framework for Comprehensive Economic Partnership provides for cooperation in the energy sector, particularly in oil stockpiling, natural gas utilization and promotion of energy efficiency. ASEAN and Japan leaders, at the Commemorative Summit in December 2003, called for enhancing cooperation in energy security under the overall theme of Consolidating the Foundation for Economic Development and Prosperity with the following agreed actions: (a) develop energy policy dialogue and support ongoing capacity building programmes under ASEAN-Japan cooperation such as the Energy Supply Security Planning in the ASEAN (ESSPA) and the Promotion of Energy Efficiency and Conservation (PROMEEC) to enhance energy security in East Asia; and (b) cooperate in developing infrastructure, including energy facilities such as power stations, oil and gas pipeline network by using concessional loans, other schemes or private finance. The ASEAN Centre for Energy (ACE) continued to serve a key role in the facilitation of regional energy programmes and activities. ACE facilitated cooperation between ASEAN and its partner countries (e.g. EU, Germany, Japan, Australia and Switzerland) and international organisations (e.g. UNESCAP, IEA, etc.). Through the ACE, ASEAN was represented as an observer organisation in the Brussels-based Energy Charter Conference held in December 2003. The ASEAN Plan of Action for Energy Cooperation (APAEC) 2004-2009, the successor plan to the APAEC 1999-2004, has been finalized for adoption by the 22nd AMEM. The APAEC 2004-2009 will enhance the integration of the regional energy infrastructures, promote energy security, create responsive policies to progressively enhance market reforms and liberalisation, as well as on the sustainability of the environment. The Plan consists of sectoral plans of action and roadmaps related to the ASEAN Power Grid; TAGP; Energy Efficiency and Conservation; New and Renewable Sources of Energy and Regional Energy Policy and Planning. A Ministerial Declaration on the ASEAN Coordinated Response Manual for Petroleum Security Emergency Preparedness has also been finalized for adoption in June 2004. The proposed manual sets the standard operating procedures for expeditious consultation and coordination amongst the ASEAN Member Countries during periods of petroleum shortages and emergencies. The 20th Meeting of the Heads of ASEAN Power Utilities/Authorities (HAPUA) was convened in Siem Reap, Cambodia on 3-5 May 2004. HAPUA reviewed the progress of implementation of its projects in the areas of (a) renewable energy; (b) power interconnection; (c) research, development and engineering; (d) human resources management and development; (e) geothermal energy; (f) rural and urban electrification; (g) Electric Power Information Centre; (h) use of combined cycle power plants; and (i) deregulation and reform of power utilities.

ASEAN Ministerial Meeting on Agriculture and Forestry (AMAF)

ASEAN cooperation in the agriculture sector dated back as early as 1968, with cooperation in food production and supply. In 1977, the scope of cooperation was broadened to include the greater area of agriculture and forestry as the needs have increased. Currently, the specific areas under the ASEAN cooperation in food, agriculture and forestry includes food security, food handling, crops, livestock, fisheries, agricultural training and extension, agricultural cooperatives, forestry and joint cooperation in agriculture and forest products promotion scheme. Objective The basic objective of the ASEAN cooperation in food, agriculture and forestry is to formulate and

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implement regional cooperation activities to enhance the international competitiveness of ASEANs food, agriculture and forestry products as well as further strengthen the food security arrangement in the region and joint positions in international fora. Mandate and Policy Guidance In line with the guidance of the Fourth ASEAN Summit in 1992 to strengthen regional cooperation in the areas of development, production, and promotion of agricultural products, the ASEAN Ministers on Agriculture and Forestry (AMAF) identified seven priority areas as reflected in the Ministerial Understanding (MU) on ASEAN Cooperation in Food, Agriculture and Forestry signed in October 1993 in Bandar Seri Begawan. The MU acts as the umbrella of the ASEAN cooperation in food, agriculture and forestry. i. Strengthening food security in the region; ii. Facilitation and promotion of intra- and extra-ASEAN trade in agriculture and forestry products; iii. Generation and transfer of technology to increase productivity and develop agribusiness and silvobusiness; iv. Agricultural rural community and human resource development; v. Private sector involvement and investment; vi. Management and conservation of natural resources for sustainable development; and vii. Strengthening ASEAN cooperation and joint approaches in addressing international and regional issues. For the forestry sector, ASEAN, specifically developed five strategic thrusts, namely: i. Sustainable forest management ii. Strengthening ASEAN cooperation and joint approaches in addressing international and regional forestry issues iii. Promotion of intra- and extra-ASEAN trade in forest products and private sector participation iv. Increasing productivity and efficient utilisation of forest products v. Capacity building and human resources development. In response to the sharp increase in international food prices in 2007/2008, the Leaders pledged to embrace food security as a matter of permanent and high priority policy and adopted a Statement on Food Security in the ASEAN Region, which commits, among others, to the implementation of the ASEAN Integrated Food Security (AIFS) Framework and the Strategic Plan of Action on Food Security in the ASEAN Region (SPA-FS) (2009-2013). Implementation Mechanism The SOM-AMAF is the main ASEAN body that oversees the overall ASEAN cooperation in food and agriculture, with the guidance of the ASEAN Ministers on Agriculture and Forestry (AMAF). Sectoral working groups/ joint committee/ board, and experts groups have been established to implement the respective cooperation sectors of food, and the various sub-sectors of agriculture and forestry, as well as in the trade promotion of agriculture and forest products. In this mechanism, the ASEAN Secretariat acts as the overall coordinator and provides necessary assistance in all aspects to ensure successful undertaking of the cooperation programmes and projects in collaboration with sectoral working groups, national focal points and relevant institutions. Areas of Cooperation ASEAN has implemented numerous cooperation projects in food, agriculture and forestry sectors, which cover a wide spectrum of activities ranging from exchange of information, crop production, postharvest and handling, training and extension, research and development as well as trade promotion in the areas of crops, livestock, fisheries, and forestry. In order to respond to trade globalisation, ASEAN cooperation in food, agriculture and forestry is now more focused on the enhancement of food, agricultural and forestry products competitiveness in international markets, while sustaining agricultural production. Harmonisation of quality and standards, assurance of food safety, and standardisation of trade certification are amongst the priorities being addressed, building upon the experience of some Member States and existing international standards. Most of the ASEAN programmes and projects are implemented under a networking arrangement, where

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cooperation is implemented through the focal point in each ASEAN Member States and utilises national funds.

ASEAN Finance Ministers Meeting (AFMM)

REGIONAL COOPERATION IN FINANCE

ASEAN Finance Cooperation ASEAN economies are now recovering from the global financial crisis, due to the effective economic stimulus measures that the various ASEAN governments have implemented to support domestic demand, restore market confidence and stabilise financial markets. As a result, ASEAN grew by 1.5 percent in 2009 and is expected to grow further by 4.9-5.6 percent in 2010. Going forward, the challenge for ASEAN is to sustain the economic recovery by implementing appropriate monetary and fiscal policies and strengthening the various reform measures that have been in place since the Asian financial crisis in 1997/98. At the 14 ASEAN Finance Ministers Meeting (AFMM) in Nha Trang, Viet Nam, in April 2010, the Ministers committed themselves to further promote financial stability in the region. Despite the regions dynamism, robust financial system and strong economic frameworks, the Ministers agreed to remain vigilant against the uncertainties in major advanced economies and committed to maintain growth momentum in order to achieve a stable, efficient and resilient financial system in the region. The Ministers also reaffirmed their commitment to implement policies that favour strong and sustainable growth as well as promote domestic demand, boost productivity and enhance the integration of ASEANs markets. ASEAN Surveillance Process (ASP)
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The ASP started in 1999 as a mechanism for peer review and exchange of views among the senior officials (central bank and finance) and Finance Ministers on recent economic developments and policy issues in ASEAN. Since then, it has evolved into an important mechanism in ASEAN on regional economic monitoring and surveillance. Key achievements to date include: establishment of a dedicated unit at the ASEAN Secretariat (ASEC) to conduct regional surveillance and facilitate regional cooperation activities in finance; establishment of national surveillance units in selected countries (Indonesia, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam) to assist in building capabilities in surveillance related work; capacity building training programmes for ASEAN finance and central bank officials on regional economic monitoring and surveillance, conducted by the Asian Development Bank (ADB); conduct of technical studies and policy papers on finance and economic issues (e.g., fiscal sustainability, banking and corporate restructuring, and monitoring of capital flows). At the Special AFMM in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, in May 2010, the Ministers endorsed the Terms of Reference and initial budget for the establishment of the high-level finance and macroeconomic surveillance office at ASEC, called the Macroeconomic and Finance Surveillance Office (MFSO). The MFSO will be responsible for implementing surveillance in ASEAN and monitoring regional economic integration initiatives such as financial integration. The MFSO is currently being set up at ASEC and is expected to be fully operational in 2011.

Roadmap for Monetary and Financial Integration of ASEAN (RIA-Fin)

Endorsed by the AFMM in Manila in 2003, RIA-Fin consists of steps, timelines and indicators of activities in four areas: (a) Capital Market Development, (b) Liberalisation of Financial Services, (c) Capital Account Liberalisation and (d) ASEAN Currency Cooperation, with the ultimate goal of greater economic integration in ASEAN by 2015. Capital Market Development: Intended to build capacity and lay the long-term infrastructure for development of ASEAN capital markets, with a long-term goal of achieving cross-border collaboration between the various capital markets in ASEAN. Key achievements to date include the adoption of a proposed Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) to guide the work of the Working Committee on Capital Market Development and to align capital market development to

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the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) Blueprint; enhancing market access, linkages and liquidity through such proposed initiatives as ASEAN Exchanges linkages, Bond Markets linkages; and promoting credit ratings comparability between domestic and international credit rating agencies. A Bond Market Development Scorecard is currently being developed to identify market gaps and to develop a framework for ASEAN to take stock of the progress of its work in relation to the agreed priorities. Financial Services Liberalisation: Intended to achieve free flow of financial services by 2015. Liberalisation is carried out based on a positive list approach modality, where Member States will prepare an indicative list of financial services sub-sectors and modes for liberalisation. Negotiations are undertaken based on the combined unilateral and/or request/offer mechanisms. To date, four rounds of negotiations have been completed, including the package of commitments and offers. In April 2010, a new modality for financial services liberalisation which is based on preagreed flexibilities was endorsed by the Finance Ministers. This modality will guide the negotiations for the fifth round of financial services liberalisation to be completed by endDecember 2010. The Working Committee is also involved in negotiations of financial services with several ASEAN Dialogue Partners. Capital Account Liberalisation: Intended to achieve freer flow of capital by 2015. Member States agreed to take stock of current status of, and prepare, and implement national work programmes for capital account liberalisation, including capacity building. The progress of implementation of national work programmes will be monitored annually. To date, Member States have finalsed their self-assessment and identification of rules appropriate for liberalisation of regulations related to foreign direct investment (FDI). The results of that assessment indicate that most Member States have been open in their FDI regimes. Assessment and identification of regulations for portfolio flows is currently being undertaken. ASEAN Currency Cooperation: Intended to explore ways that could further facilitate intra-regional trade and investment and economic integration, including through some forms of currency arrangements. As preconditions for closer currency cooperation, efforts would be made toward maintaining appropriate macroeconomic policies and foster greater macroeconomic convergence. ASEAN Plus Three (ASEAN+3) Finance Cooperation Chiang Mai Initiative Multilaterisation (CMIM)

The Chiang Mai Initiative (CMI) was established by the ASEAN Plus Three Finance Ministers Meeting (AFMM+3) in 2000 as a network of bilateral currency swap arrangements to: (a) address short-term liquidity difficulties in the region and (b) supplement the existing international financial arrangements. The CMI has two phases. In 2004, the AFMM+3 agreed to have a more advanced framework for liquidity support that focuses on the multilaterisation of CMI (CMIM). An enlarged US$120 billion swap arrangement under the CMIM took effect in March 2010. The CMIM signifies the most significant collective response of ASEAN, China, Japan and the Republic of Korea to the global financial crisis. To support the implementation of the CMIM, an independent regional monitoring and surveillance unit, called the ASEAN+3 Macroeconomic Research Office (AMRO), will be established in Singapore in early 2011.

Asian Bond Markets Initiative (ABMI)

ABMI was launched in 2003 with two objectives: to (a) develop local-currency denominated bond markets, and (b) develop more accessible and well-functioning regional bond markets both for issuers and investors. th Following the new ABMI Roadmap endorsed by the 11 ASEAN+3 Finance Ministers Meeting (AFMM+3) in Madrid in May 2008, the four ABMI Working Groups have evolved into Task Forces addressing the four key areas namely: i) promoting key issuance of local currency-denominated bonds; ii) facilitating the demand of local currency-denominated bonds; iii) improving regulatory framework and iv) improving related infrastructure for the bond markets. The Technical Assistance Coordination Team (TACT) has continued to provide technical assistance in bond markets to interested members. One of the key initiatives under the ABMI framework is the establishment of the Credit Guarantee and Investment Facility (CGIF) aimed at supporting the issuance of local currency-denominated bonds in the region. The CGIF is expected to operate by the end of December 2010. Under the new Roadmap, Task Forces have been streamlined to develop work programmes and

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focus on key priorities under each area. ASEC has been assisting the ABMI as administrator of technical assistance programmes being implemented by the Japanese Ministry of Finance under the Japan Technical Assistance Fund (JAFTA). The technical assistance focus on building capacities of ASEAN countries in various aspects of bond market development (e.g., infrastructure support). ASEAN+3 Research Group

To identify policy issues and support exchange of views among ASEAN+3 finance officials, the ASEAN+3 Research Group has been undertaking policy-oriented studies since 2003. Since the establishment of the Research Group in 2004, a network of 22 research institutes in ASEAN+3 countries has been established, resulting in the conduct of major studies focusing on financial stability issues. In 2009/2010, the Research group has concluded research on two topics namely: i) Ways to Promote Foreign Trade Settlements Denominated in Local Currencies in East Asia and ii) Regulation and Supervision for Sound Liquidity Risk Management for Banks. For 2010/2011, the ASEAN+3 Research Group will tackle three issues namely: i) Possible Use of Regional Monetary Units Identification of Issues for Practical Use; ii) Lessons from Asias Experiences with Sudden Capital Flows and iii) Fiscal and Financial Impacts of the Climate Change and Policy Challenges in East Asia. These studies are expected to be completed and endorsed by AFMM+3 in May 2011. To further access the Studies under the purview of ASEAN+3 Research Group, please click the following page. To promote financial stability in ASEAN+3 countries, the Ministry of Finance of Japan has been providing Technical and Research Assistance support (under the purview of ASEAN+3 Research Group) as well as capacity building programme for ASEAN Member States through the Japan ASEAN Financial Technical Assistance (JAFTA) Fund. To date, JAFTA has provided technical assistance in Managing Capital Flows, Capacity Building for Macroeconomic Statistics and Developing Bond Markets (Phase I IV) as well as Promotion of Medium Term Note Programme. Moreover, Symposiums on Development of the Corporate Credit Information Database and Credit Guarantee System were successfully held in Bali and Manila in June 2009 and June 2010 respectively.

Other Finance Cooperation Initiatives

ASEAN Capital Market Forum (ACMF): Current efforts focus on projects to harmonise standards in capital market regulations in ASEAN in two areas: (a) disclosure requirements for equity securities; and (b) distribution rules. Two other projects on harmonisation of accounting standards and auditing standards, and mutual recognition of certification and qualification of market professionals, have been concluded last year. Following the endorsement in April 2009 of the Implementation Plan to Promote the Development of an Integrated Capital Market, disclosure standards for multi-jurisdictional offerings of securities have been adopted in Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. A Memorandum of Understanding among six ASEAN Exchanges (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam) was signed to establish an electronic link among ASEAN Exchanges and an ASEAN Electronic Board. Work on cross-border offerings, particularly on the development of a mutual recognition framework for market professionals as well as cross-border offerings of debt securities and collective investment schemes, is also underway. ASEAN Insurance Cooperation: Current efforts by the ASEAN Insurance Regulators Meeting (AIRM) include sharing of insurance statistics among countries with the end goal of achieving a unified form of statistics; exchange of views on regulatory issues and observance of core principles related to insurance markets; consultations with private sector (Council of Bureaux) to implement compulsory insurance for motor-vehicles under the Blue Card System; and conduct of research and capacity building programmes for insurance regulators through the ASEAN Insurance Training and Research Institute (AITRI). Cooperation with APG on Anti-money Laundering: Since 2006, ASEC has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the Asia Pacific Group (APG) Secretariat to coordinate training and capacity building programmes on anti-money laundering and counter financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) for ASEAN countries that are also members of the APG. Both ASEC and the APG Secretariat are in the process of exploring areas where coordination between the two secretariats can be further strengthened in order to identify/develop regional programmes on AML/CFT. East Asia Finance Cooperation (EAS): Cooperation in finance for the East Asia Summit (EAS) participating countries is still at its early stage of development. Currently, such cooperation takes the form of an informal dialogue among the EAS Finance Ministers and senior finance officials, where the Ministers and officials explore possible areas of cooperation under the EAS. At the inaugural EAS Finance Ministers Meeting held in Tashkent, Uzbekistan on 2 May 2010, the

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Ministers discussed the work of the G-20, including how the region's economic development could better fit within the framework for strong, sustainable and balanced growth established by the G20 Leaders, as well as EAS regional cooperation and capacity building. To date, two capacity building programmes under the EAS informal finance dialogue have been co-organised by Australia and Malaysia: in 2009 in Cambodia and in 2010 in Lao PDR.

ASEAN Investment Area (AIA) Council

The goal of the ASEAN Economic Community is to establish ASEAN as a single market and production base that will make ASEAN more dynamic and competitive. In this context, one of the five core elements of an ASEAN single market and production base is the free flow of investments. A free and open investment regime is key to enhancing ASEANs competitiveness and attracting foreign direct investment (FDI) as well as intra-ASEAN investment. Sustained inflows of investments will promote and ensure the dynamic development of ASEAN. ASEAN cooperation in promoting investment flows was implemented through the 1998 Framework Agreement on the ASEAN Investment Area (AIA) and the ASEAN Agreement for the Promotion and Protection of Investment 1987 or commonly known as the ASEAN Investment Guarantee Agreement (IGA). In 2007, the 39th ASEAN Economic Ministers Meeting agreed to review the AIA Agreement the ASEAN IGA, with a view towards consolidating these two agreements towards creating a free and open investment regime to attract investments and to achieve ASEAN economic integration. In February 2009, the ASEAN Comprehensive Investment Agreement (ACIA) was signed. The Agreement is scheduled to enter into force by the end of 2009. ACIA is a comprehensive agreement covering liberalisation, protection, facilitation and promotion and includes new provisions as well as improvements to AIA/IGA provisions. With the conclusion of ACIA, ASEAN is confident of remaining in the forefront as a major recipient of FDI flows. In 2008, FDI flows to the region remained resilient even in the face of adverse global circumstances. Since the Asian financial crisis, FDI inflows into ASEAN has regained its strength, tripling from its low of US$ 23 billion in 1998 to a high of US$ 69 billion in 2007. Despite the 2008 global economic and financial crisis, FDI inflows into ASEAN remained strong at US$ 59 billion. In particular, intra-ASEAN FDI flows have proven more robust than anticipated, expanding by an exceptional 13.4% in 2008 to US$ 10.7 billion. The increase in intra-ASEAN flows reflects well on ASEAN integration efforts and the success of trade and investment policies that promote intra-ASEAN liberalisation through strengthened rules for trade in goods, services and investment. The European Union remains ASEAN single largest investor in 2008, with a share of 21.9% or investment amounting to US$ 12.9 billion, followed by Japan at 12.1% or US$ 7.1 billion. The United States was third with a share of 5.1% or US$ 3.0 billion in 2008. FDI flows continued to predominate in the services and manufacturing sector, accounting for 51.0% and 29.7% of total FDI flows into ASEAN or US$ 30.1 billion and US$ 17.5 billion in 2008 respectively. The mining and quarrying sector is also becoming more important, with a share of 5.0% or US$ 2.8 billion in 2008.

ASEAN Ministerial Meeting on Minerals (AMMin)


Established in 2005 Meets at least once in three years Last Meeting : Inaugural AMMin, Kuching, Malaysia, 4 August 2005

ASEAN Mekong Basin Development Cooperation (AMBDC)


Established in 1996 Meets annually

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Last Meeting : 11 Ministerial Meeting on AMBDC, Bangkok, 16 August 2009

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ASEAN Telecommunications and IT Ministers Meeting (TELMIN)

The 3rd Meeting of the ASEAN Telecommunications and IT Ministers (TELMIN), held in September 2003, adopted the Singapore Declaration - an action agenda to harness technological advances in Information and Communications Technology (ICT) to create digital opportunities for ASEAN and to enhance ASEANs overall competitiveness. The TELMIN has taken over the technological aspects of the e-ASEAN work programme from the auspices of the ASEAN Economic Ministers. The Telecommunications Senior Officials Meeting (TELSOM) Working Groups are carrying out the four objectives of the e-ASEAN Framework Agreement, namely (a) to develop, strengthen and enhance the competitiveness of the ICT sector; (b) reduce the digital divide within and amongst ASEAN Member Countries; (c) promote cooperation between the public and private sectors; (d) develop ASEAN Information Infrastructure. Efforts to establish the ASEAN Information Infrastructure continued with a view to promote interoperability, interconnectivity, security and integrity. A database of National Information Infrastructure profiles has been created to encourage competition, rapid deployment of new technology and ICT investment in the region. The Ministers of Telecommunications and IT decided that all ASEAN Member Countries develop and operationalise national Computer Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) by 2005 in line with mutually agreed minimum performance criteria. A virtual forum for ASEAN cybersecurity is being formed to develop a common framework to coordinate exchange of information, establishment of standards and cooperation among enforcement agencies. Intra-ASEAN trade and investment in ICT is being enhanced through identification and elimination of impediments, fostering pro-business policies on ICT trade and investment and establishing regulatory environments which are transparent, predictable, and non-discriminatory. The ICT products list and the tariff reduction schedule have been updated. Creation of a database of trade and investment policy and regulatory practices is under consideration. Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam have indicated their readiness to implement the first phase of the ASEAN Telecommunications Regulators Council Mutual Recognition Arrangements (ATRC MRA) in 2003. Bilateral MRAs were carried out between Brunei and Singapore and between Indonesia and Singapore. ASEAN continued to develop the ecommerce legal infrastructure to promote trust and consumer confidence. ASEAN is building a network of ICT skills competency centers/agencies to promote collaboration amongst these centers and agencies, including training of ASEAN SMEs to harness the benefits of ICT applications. ASEAN has developed a Digital Divide Database to promote understanding of the dimensions of the ASEAN digital divide, exchange information on Universal Service Obligation (USO) schemes and develop joint studies and projects. An ASEAN-China Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in Information and Communications Technology was signed in October 2003. Among the areas agreed include Chinas commitment to utilize its domestic training bases to provide training for personnel of ASEAN Member Countries. ASEAN and China have agreed to cooperate in developing MRAs for ICT Skills Certification. Furthermore, China will assist in the construction and development of information infrastructure such as fixed/mobile communications networks, multimedia applications and Internet in ASEAN Member Countries. ASEAN submitted a joint statement to the World Summit on the Information Society, held in Geneva on 10 December 2003, which advocated the following: (a) the global strategy to realize the Information Society must be based on concrete milestones rather than broad visions; (b) the Plan of Action should be adapted to each regions unique and diverse needs; and (c) existing regional initiatives such as e-ASEAN should be leveraged upon when implementing ICT programmes.

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ASEAN Tourism Ministers Meeting (M-ATM)

As one of priority sectors for ASEAN integration, ASEAN tourism performed an outstanding growth in 2010 with total international arrivals of more than 73 million and increase of 11 per cent compared to 2009. IntraASEAN travel was the major source market for the region with share of 47 per cent in 2010.
Figure 1: Total International Visitor Arrivals to ASEAN (1991-2010)

The ASEAN Tourism Forum (ATF) continued to be the landmark of annual tourism event in the region. The ATF 2011 held on 15-21 January 2011 in Phnom Penh with the theme: ASEAN- a World of Wonders and Diversity was attended by more than 442 international buyers and more than 380 sellers with 512 booths in ASEAN. Acknowledging the importance of tourism as an economic engine and a tool for development and change in the region, the ASEAN Tourism Strategic Plan (ATSP) 2011-2015 was endorsed by the ASEAN Tourism Ministers at their 14th Meeting as the successor of the Roadmap for Integration of Tourism Sector (RITS) which was completed in 2010.This ATSP will contribute to the overall goals of the ASEAN Community by 2015 through promotion of growth, integration and competitiveness of the tourism sector and at the same time deepen social and cultural understanding as well as facilitating travel into and within ASEAN. The ATSP provides a balanced set of actions and activities to realise the following vision: By 2015, ASEAN will provide an increasing number of visitors to the region with authentic and diverse products, enhanced connectivity, a safe and secure environment, increased quality of services, while at the same time ensuring an increased quality of life and opportunities for residents through responsible and sustainable tourism development by working effectively with a wide range of stakeholders ASEAN adopted a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) on tourism professionals that will increase the equality of tourism human resource and will facilitate the mobility of tourism professionals within the region using the ASEAN Minimum Competency Standards for Tourism as the basis. In further enhancing ASEAN as a world-class tourism destination, the ASEAN Member States also adopted the standardization of tourism services covering Green Hotel; Food and Beverage Services; Public Restroom; Home Stay; Ecotourism and Tourism Heritage. The ASEAN Green Hotel Award was held in 2008 and 2010 to provide recognition to hotels that fulfilled the ASEAN Green Hotel Standards. The 4thASEAN Tourism Investment Forum (ATIF) was successfully held on 29-30 September 2010 in Hoi

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Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The next ATIF will be held in Manado, Indonesia in 2012. The ASEAN joint tourism promotion to create brand awareness and promote ASEAN as a region in major markets for 2010 was conducted by the ASEAN Tourism Promotional Chapter (APCT) in Australia through participation in major tourism consumer shows in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney. In further expanding the ASEAN joint marketing efforts in major source markets, ASEAN is establishing APCT in Mumbai and Dubai in 2011. ASEAN Member States currently developing a new ASEAN tourism marketing strategy that would review the implementation of the Visit ASEAN Campaign and existing ASEAN tourism marketing activities, including the policy framework of the marketing strategy, market review, brand strategy, and implementation and distribution strategy. The outcomes of this exercise are expected to strengthen and renew the activities of Visit ASEAN Campaign activities in line with the ASEAN Tourism Agreement signed by the ASEAN Leaders in 2002.

ASEAN Political-Security Community

To build on what has been constructed over the years in the field of political and security cooperation, the ASEAN Leaders have agreed to establish the ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC). The APSC shall aim to ensure that countries in the region live at peace with one another and with the world in a just, democratic and harmonious environment. The members of the Community pledge to rely exclusively on peaceful processes in the settlement of intraregional differences and regard their security as fundamentally linked to one another and bound by geographic location, common vision and objectives. It has the following components: political development; shaping and sharing of norms; conflict prevention; conflict resolution; post-conflict peace building; and implementing mechanisms. ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC) Blueprint The APSC Blueprint envisages ASEAN to be a rules-based Community of shared values and norms; a cohesive, peaceful, stable and resilient region with shared responsibility for comprehensive security; as well as a dynamic and outward-looking region in an increasingly integrated and interdependent world. The APSC Blueprint is guided by the ASEAN Charter and the principles and purposes contained therein. It provides a roadmap and timetable to establish the APSC by 2015. It also leaves room for flexibility to continue programmes/activities beyond 2015 in order to retain its significance and have an enduring quality. The APSC Blueprint was adopted by the ASEAN Leaders at the 14th ASEAN Summit on 1 March 2009 in Cha-am/Hua Hin, Thailand.

ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community

The ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community aims to contribute to realising an ASEAN Community that is peopleoriented and socially responsible with a view to achieving enduring solidarity and unity among the peoples and Member States of ASEAN. It seeks to forge a common identity and build a caring and sharing society which is inclusive and where the well-being, livelihood, and welfare of the peoples are enhanced. ASCC is focused on nurturing the human, cultural and natural resources for sustained development in a harmonious and people-oriented ASEAN. ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community (ASCC) Blueprint The ASCC Blueprint represents the human dimension of ASEAN cooperation and upholds ASEAN commitment to address the regions aspiration to lift the quality of life of its peoples. The goals of the ASCC

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are envisaged to be achieved by implementing concrete and productive actions that are people-centred and socially responsible. This set of cooperative activities has been developed based on the assumption that the three pillars of the ASEAN Community are interdependent and interrelated and that linkages are imperative to ensure complementarity and unity of purpose.

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