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INTRODUCTION Way back the past decade, job opportunities for nurses exploded. Nursing, even in hard times, was thought to be recession-proof. But looking now at our present situation, overpopulation of nurses is an issue. Leaving many Filipino nurses underemployed and unemployed" (PNA, Feb 2011). Contrary to the claims of a group of Filipino nurses, the Philippines Department of Labor and Employment (2012) maintained that the global demand for locally-trained medical practitioners remains high especially in Western countries with an aging population. To quote, Kathy Moore, director of admissions and student services at the University of North Carolinas nursing school (2009) said that "The nursing shortage has not gone away, what has happened is that due to the economic downturn, the shortage seems to have temporarily abated. But it is not universal." Hence, nurses are still in high demand despite the economic downturn because nursing is not only a career during our current economy, but a career of a lifetime. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2012) expects demand for nurses to rise 22% from 2008-2018. RNs and other nursing professionals have some of the best job prospects in the nation as well as solid earning potential. To meet the likely need of the growing demand, nursing education must take a big leap in upgrading and developing the curriculum in order to meet the needs of the changing world to make the nursing career more satisfying and rewarding. This study was intended to address the growing need of professional nurses through an educational institution that will produce skilled and competitive nursing graduates that will meet the increasing global demand along with the standard requirements of the Commission on Higher Education as well as to comply with the changes in the curriculum in

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accordance to the central feature of the K to 12 Program. The College of Nursing of the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig will be the center of excellence and the students choice university among Pasig and nearby towns. The school of nursing will offer superior education for the students, providing low cost tuition fees and extend community services in the city of Pasig and other. The college will offer the finest learning with the supplication of well conducive rooms, well-equipped facilities, high-technology tools that will enhance the nursing skills, added the affiliation on a well-known reputable hospital as the base hospital of the school and the three upcoming hospitals of Pasig. The college will hire bests and outstanding instructors and professors who can provide the students with the knowledge, skills and attitude and develop the students with the values the school is presenting. Programs for scholarship will also be offered for students who are exemplary in academics but financially unable. Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig, College of Nursing will assure the graduates for job placement who can make it to the nursing licensure examination, by making an agreement on our base hospital where the registered nurses can undergo post graduate training for free and become a regular staff after the period of probationary.

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A. Feasibility Study Preparation and Business Plan


Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig (PLP) is a local university run by the Pasig City government. Conceived by former Mayor Vicente C. Eusebio, PLP envisions itself to be a local university that is committed to excellence in college education. The school is situated in the town proper of Pasig, aiming the prospective clientele and stakeholders of the college, which are the Pasigueos. The transportation is accessible within the locality; it would be easy for the consumers to travel and to the school, gain popularity and patronage. The PLP-College of Nursing was established in 2002, when the demand for nurses was starting to rise up. In 2006, it produced its first graduates and garnered an average of 77% in the Philippine Nursing Licensure Examinations with a national passing rate of 41.23%. After this historical moment for the PLP-CON, the curriculum and instruction was continuously enhanced and developed to ensure the quality of education being given to its students. Another historical milestone has occurred for the PLP-CON in the following years. PLP-CON ranked 7th in 2008 and 1st in 2009 among Local Colleges and Universities who took the board exams in those respective years. The whole university celebrated as PLP-CON produced a top notcher and garnered an overall average of 93.4% in 2010 and got a 100% passing for the first time takers in 2011. As of today, the PLP-CON is continuing its improvement as it strives for excellence in producing nurses that can compete with the demands of the community and the world.

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Income Class Population Land Area Major economic activity State of Education State of Income

Pasig City General Profile HUC 652,358 31.00 km2 Commercial and Service Centers Simple Literacy Rate is extremely low Income per capita is low

Table1. Pasig City Profile

Industry Analysis

Competitors -Neighboring cities with universities and colleges offering BSN program

Suppliers -- DIfferent public and private secondary high schools in Pasig and neighboring cities

Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig College of Nursing

Customers 2018 Senoir High School Graduates from Pasig City

Substitutes -Practical Nursing -Midwifery

Industry Analysis Figure 1. Michael Porters 5 Forces

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Competitive Rivalry The PLP College of Nursing will be competitive enough in the world of industry due to the known excellence, reputation and performance of the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig. Business strategies for the upcoming years will be developed to sustain the healthy revenues and status of the college. Figure 2 shows the PNLE passing rate of PLP-CON. This shows that PLP-CON can go up against other universities around the city and in neighbouring cities when it comes to the quality of education being offered. Aside from this, PLP-CON graduates have a greater edge of getting employed over other fresh nursing graduates because of their competitiveness. Students are being exposed to different scenarios where in they can carry out different procedures. The institution also ensures that by the time that the student graduates from the university, they are able to do different procedures at a minimal guidance. Because of these highly developed skills, 63% of its graduates are already employed as nurses in different hospitals, clinics or home-care based settings. 20% of these are working in countries outside the Philippines such as Singapore, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Australia and Europe. The remaining percentage are in the country working as staff nurses in different hospitals such as the Pasig City General Hospital, Philippine Heart Center, Cardinal Santos Medical Center, The Medical City, and Amang Rodriguez Medical Center. 5% of the graduates have pursued their careers in the academe, teaching (Venus, et al., 2011). Another edge of the PLP-CON over its competitors is the provision of excellent education with a low cost tuition, providing high quality services and reputable professors who are able to produce competitive and skilled nurses. The college offers the finest learning with the supplication of all the needed facilities. The collaboration with Pasig City General

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Hospital, which is the base hospital of the school, will help to mould the nursing student to become a competent and proficient, thus inculcating them the value of social responsibility and rendering social extension services.

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 First Timers Repeaters National Passing Rate

Figure 2. Philippine Nurse Licensure Examination Results from 2006-2011

In the near future, there are four upcoming hospitals in Pasig City that will be opened. By making an agreement with the local government, PLP-CON will be able to have their nursing graduates, who passed the nursing licensure examination, to practice nursing in the four hospitals, undergo training and be a regular staff nurse after the probationary period, thus the need for the healthcare professionals will be filled with the locals whom are graduates of PLP-CON, with the value of social responsibility and awareness.

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Threat of Substitute Even though that the global demand for locally-trained nurses remains high especially in Western countries with an aging population, there is still an inevitable increase in the unemployment rate of nurses in the country, which may affect the incoming enrolees in doubt to take the BS in Nursing course. So the institution will offer practical nursing and midwifery courses, for those students who want to work immediately.

Threat of New Entrants It is indeed inevitable for companies to put up another nursing school because of the presence of arising school that is carving its own niche in the medical industry, which is the PLP College of Nursing. Nevertheless, the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig already rooted in the municipality, thus reflecting the marketability and reputation that is highly marked, leaving the potential consumers to choose the latter.

Bargaining Powers of Customers The institution will offer a low cost and amenable tuition fees for the deserved students of Pasig, and to add up, the college of nursing offers scholarship grants for those who are financially unable to support studying even they dont have enough money to pay for a prestige school.

Bargaining Powers of Suppliers The suppliers of the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig, College of Nursing are the schools; private and public, that is within Pasigs vicinity. The PLP CON will conduct a

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school to school campaign and enrolment drive, as the marketing strategy. The promotion of the college will be highlighted. Tying up with these schools to promote the PLP CON for their students will enhance the power of the suppliers of the PLP CON, making it stable.

B. Financial and Technical aspects of the project

Target The Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig College of Nursing is aiming to gather students that have finished the senior high education from the K to 12 program of Department of Education within the city of Pasig, as well as some nearly community and municipality, aspiring to be part of the healthcare profession and industry for local and international will be our main target for this program. Table 2 and table 3 shows the public and private secondary schools within Pasig City. Table 2. Public Secondary Schools in Pasig City Eusebio High School Manggahan High School Pasig City Science High School Rizal High School San Joaquin-Kalawaan High School Kapitolyo High School Nagpayong High School Pinagbuhatan High School Sagad High School Sta. Lucia High School

Project Cost The total project cost of constructing college of nursing with own building and facilities is estimated at Php 15- 20 million. This amount covers the construction of the three storey school building, laboratory, library, offices, electrical and plumbing work, as well as purchase of equipments and material required for the project. Also incorporated is an indirect cost for pre-engineering work, supervision, contractors profit, and related taxes.

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Table 3. Private Secondary Schools in Pasig City Academia de Sta. Martha Little Lambs Learning Center ADT Montessori School Makabata School Foundation, Inc. Arellano University- A. Bonifacio Campus Maranatha Christian Academy of Pasig, Inc. Brent International School Nio Jesus House of Studies, Inc. Colegio Nuestra Senora del Buen Consejo Our Lady of Perpetual Help School Dee Hwa Liong Academy, Inc. Pasig Catholic College (DEECO) Escuela Catolica De San Sebastian Pasig Christian Academy, Inc. GCF International Christian School, Inc. Prince n' Princess School Golden Values School Reedly International School, Inc. Greenville School Sacred Heart Academy of Pasig Holy Light School St. Gabriel International School, Inc. La Consolacion College, Pasig St. Paul College, Pasig (La Consolacion Sch.) La Immaculada Concepcion School Sta. Marta Educational Center Light of Life Christian School Sta. Rosa Parochial School

Source of Fund The project proposes to allocate Php 15-20 million from the city annual budget for the infrastructure and equipments. To support this project the Local Government of Pasig shall invest on this project for future preference, as well as for the development and improvement of education program and services of the city Table 4. Breakdown of Project Cost Particular Construction and Building for 4 months Office Equipment and Supplies Medical Equipment and Supplies Grand Total Total Charge 10,420,000.00 1,877,400.40 3,561,426.00 15,858,826.40

Distribution and Allocation of the Cost 1. Building and Construction of three storey school building

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This is a sample breakdown submitted by the constructor thru Pasig City Engineer department. Table 4 shows the breakdown of the construction cost for building the school building.

Waste Disposal PLP-CON will obey the city ordinance on proper waste disposal. Waste segregations of recyclable and non-recyclable wastes will be observed. There will be a separate technique in disposing of the sharp objects that will be used in the laboratories. Wastes will be disposed of daily by the City Waste Management Unit Table 5. Construction Cost Amount Unit 20,000 1 20,000 1 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 *** *** 500,000 500,000 1/4months 1/4months 20/4months 50/4months *** *** 1 1

Particulars Building Permit Location Clearance Manpower includes Engineer Architect Skilled Workers General Construction Workers Construction Equipment (Rental fee) Subcontractor (Materials) Electrical System Activation Plumbing and Water Activation Emergency Purchased Expenses Grand Total

Total Charge Amount 20,000 20,000 25,000/100,000 20,000/80,000 300,000/1,200,000 500,000/2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 500,000 500,000 2,000,000 10,420,000

Fire Protection PLP- College of nursing will make sure that the building passed the security and safety requirements of the city government. Four (4) fire extinguishers will be installed inside a breakable glass. The extinguishers will be placed near the fire exits in each floor and near the science laboratories.

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Security and Safety Implementing safety measures throughout the day, such as counting the students especially when on their related learning experience. The institution will see to it that there is roving security guard inspecting the place from time to time so that students safety will be observed.

2. Office equipment and supplies The building of the institution will have the following furniture, fixtures, and supplies for the daily needs of student and employees: Table 6. Furniture, Fixtures and Supplies Unit Cost Quantity 8,000.00 1,450.00 18,500.00 48,000.00 2,500.00 24,221.65 10,800.00 5,726.80 39,888.00 9,950.00 5,990.00 7,990.00 2,800.00 500.00 1,250.00 1,000.00 1 4 60 1 5 8 1 4 5 2 1 1 1 4 2 2

Product Office Supplies Biometric Fingerprint Scanning System Fire Extinguishers Computer Desktops with 17" LCD screen (Dell) Photocopying Machine - Kyocera Printer - Epson Air-Conditioning Unit (Carrier) Split Type Cash Register - POS Terminal Hot and Cold water dispenser Projector - BenQ LCD TV Screen - Samsung 20" Fax Machine - Panasonic Bar Refrigerator - American Home Karaoke Telephone Speakers Wireless Microphones Furniture and Fixtures Sofa Set (1 pc. 3 seater, 2 pcs. 1 seater) Clerical Table Clerical Chair

Total Cost 8,000.00 5,800.00 1,110,000.00 48,000.00 12,500.00 193,773.20 10,800.00 22,907.20 199,440.00 19,900.00 5,990.00 7,990.00 2,800.00 2,000.00 2,500.00 2,000.00 20,000.00 60,000.00 30,000.00

10,000.00 3,000.00 1,500.00

2 20 20

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Classroom Chairs Round Table Grand Total

500.00 3,000.00

200 3

100,000.00 9,000.00 1,877,400.40

3. Medical equipment and supplies The table 7 show following medical equipment and supplies will be needed for the skills enhancement of the students: Table 7. Medical Equipment and Supplies Unit Cost Quantity 220,000.00 42,800.00 1,103,760.00 1,823,760.00 3,840.00 1,500.00 2,900.00 1,000.00 4,205.00 3,182.00 1,364.00 12,500.00 8,523.00 9,091.00 5,114.00 10,910.00 1,875.00 853.00 2,160.00 2,045.50 5,228.00 182.00 550.00 550.00 350.00 450.00 1 5 1 1 1 2 2 5 5 2 4 2 2 2 4 4 4 4 2 2 1 3 5 5 5 5

Particulars Medical Equipment Sensor Scrub Sink (with Sensor Activated Faucet and soap dispenser; 2-bay; installation included) Electric Bed (Patient) Dummy (HAL) Dummy (NOELLE with Newborn HAL) Human Skeleton Anatomical Model Peri-lamp Suction Machine Hand Gel Dispenser Stethoscope Sphygmomanometer (floor type) Sphygmomanometer (desk type) Physician Scale Mechanical Baby Scale Bedside Cabinet Overbed table Mayo table IV Stand with 2 hooks Footstool Ear Thermometer Wheel chair Ambu-Bag Medical Supplies Oral and Rectal Thermometers (price per dozen) Tuberculin Syringe (100pcs/box) Insulin Syringe (100 pcs/box) 3cc Syringe (100 pcs/box) 5cc Syringe (100pcs/box)

Total Cost 220,000.00 256,800.00 1,103,760.00 1,823,760.00 3,840.00 3,000.00 5,800.00 5,000.00 21,025.00 6,364.00 5,456.00 25,000.00 17,046.00 18,182.00 20,456.00 43,640.00 7,500.00 3,412.00 4,320.00 4,091.00 5,228.00 546.00 2,750.00 2,750.00 1,750.00 2,250.00

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10 cc Syringe (100pcs/box) Asepto Syringe (50/box) Gauze Pads (4x4) / box Cotton Balls / roll Ethyl Alcohol / liter Alcohol Swabs (100pcs/box) Clean Gloves (disposable) / box Face Mask Disposable / box Tongue Depressor / box of 100 Lubricating Jelly / box of 100 sachets Suction Catheter / box of 10 Foley Catheter / box of 10 Urinebag / pc Nasogastric Tube / box of 10 Macroset / pc Microset / pc Micropore (Adhesives) / box of 12 Grand Total

600.00 1,700.00 140.00 97.00 63.00 114.00 150.00 110.00 108.00 550.00 250.00 250.00 25.00 250.00 45.00 55.00 420.00

5 2 2 2 2 5 5 5 5 2 3 3 100 3 100 100 2

3,000.00 3,400.00 280.00 194.00 126.00 570.00 750.00 550.00 540.00 1,100.00 750.00 750.00 2,500.00 750.00 450.00 550.00 840.00 3,561,426.00

Supplier, Purchasing and Inventory Procedures Supplier C & E Publishing Inc. will be the supplier of the Nursing books which is located at 1616 Quezon Ave., Quezon City. Their contact numbers are 02-9282940; 029282677. Jag Medical Inc. will be the supplier of the medical equipment and supplies which is located in Sta. Mesa, Metro Manila. Their contact number is 7126582. The uniform supplier will be the UNIFORM MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION located at 711 Agudo St., Mandaluyong City. Tel: (02) 747-3065 ; 531-0318

Purchasing Procedure The purchasing procedure shall be initiated by a purchase request from the accountant.

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1. The accountant shall secure a purchase requisition form which includes the date, complete description of the items and prices or copy of quotation. 2. The purchase requisition form shall be approved and signed by the manager. 3. The purchase requisition form shall be forwarded to the supplier for order confirmation. 4. The supplier will deliver the items together with the original copy of the invoice. 5. The original copy of the invoice shall be forwarded to the bookkeeper for payment preparation.

Inventory Management Procedures Inventory count of books, medical equipment and supplies shall be conducted by the accountant on a monthly basis to ensure the availability of stocks. The accountant shall always maintain a monitoring report of the items on stock and inform the management when to buy the items which are already running out of stock.

Operations and Manpower The local government of Pasig shall shoulder 35% of the total miscellaneous fees of the students which shall cover operational expenses such as electricity and water expenses and payments for the administrative employees. Further, the city will also shoulder 35% of the total tuition fees of the students which will cover the salaries of the teachers of the College of Nursing. Table 8 shows the operations and manpower expenses of the college for the first four years of its operation. Apendix A further illustrates the breakdown of these expenses.

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Table 8. Manpower Expenses Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Particulars 1,225,575.00 2,740,959.00 4,066,881.00 6,088,524.00 Salaries Expense- Direct Cost Salaries Expense- Indirect Cost 2,846,883.00 3,381,768.00 3,748,680.00 3,874,455.00 754,000.00 829,400.00 912,340.00 1,003,574.00 Agency Cost 4,826,458.00 6,952,127.00 8,727,901.00 10,966,553.00 Grand Total

The remaining expenses will be shouldered by the students. Thus, for a Php 500.00 per unit fee, the student will only pay Php 350.00. because of this, it is highly encouraged that the college admit students residing from Pasig City to ensure that the revenues that the people of Pasig are paying goes back to Pasigueos also. However, if there will be students residing outside Pasig City who will be admitted in the college, the student shall pay 100% of the total miscellaneous and tuition fees to cover for the payment of the universitys employees and operational expenses.

Financial Highlights

Table 9. Financial Highlights YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 Net Revenues 2,696,730.00 Other Income 5,149,140.20 Cost and Expenses Net Income 9,382,626.64 (1,536,756.44) 6,100,778.09 11,509,295.64 1,288,490.45 7,354,421.48 13,897,199.64 4,987,864.23 6,697,008.00 11,530,642.39

YEAR 4 16,244,729.46 8,907,650.72 15,550,969.14 9,601,411.04

On the first year of operation, it is expected that the college of nursing will have low revenue, but revenues are expected to slowly rise in the next years of operation. Table 9 shows the financial highlights of the PLP-CON on its first four years of operation.

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C. Marketing Strategies
PLP CON offers Bachelor of Science in Nursing and other health care related courses, that aims at improving traditional nursing care methodologies and incorporating extracurricular interests such as art, music and parliamentary practice into one program designed for the target clientele who would want to pursue nursing as a course. The college will offer low cost tuition fees, with the finest education by providing a broad range of combine programs and services with an innovative learning approach towards advancement in the nursing profession. The PLP CONs facilities will provide a FEEL REAL set up of a hospital that will aid in the development of the nursing students excellence, a calibre amongst other graduates. The college aims not only for the cognitive and kinaesthetic learning of the students, but also puts attention in inculcating the attitude and interpersonal values of the school, a distinct mark of the PLP CON graduate student. The tag line We reach for excellence and extend our services signifies that the PLP CON intends to prepare the students to excel as globally competitive and skilled nurses of the new generation and develop a sense of stewardship through different community extension programs.

Promotion Five months prior to the opening, the PLP CON will conduct a school to school campaign and enrolment drive. In addition to this, is the effective use of media that will

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promote the PLP CON for its upcoming opening in the year 2016. As part of the strategy, the College of Nursing will tie-up with some public and private schools in Pasig City The logo of the College of Nursing will be displayed together with the tagline to catch attention Flyers and brochures will be dispensed within the vicinity of Pasig most especially in the public schools, bearing the schools educational program. The PLP CON will use the power of its employees interpersonal skills as the colleges spokesperson. The spokesperson(s) will visit public schools, which are the target consumers, and the private schools, to provide oral presentation and visual materials (a career talk) in promoting the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig College of Nursing. They will also conduct entrance examination upon visit, as one of the requirements of the college, making the PLP CON within easy reach. Plus, if the student will passed the exam and qualify, the college will send a letter, addressed to the school and student, pronouncing to pass other requirements to proceed with the enrolment. Direct Mail Sending of mail campaigns to the candidate for this program . PLP-CON will also offer monthly calendars for secondary schools, noting of schedules with particular approaches. Web Site PLP-CON website will be the virtual business card and the portfolio for the school. It will showcase the campus, curriculum and activity calendar for the college. The website will be simple, yet stylish and well-designed, but at the same time, in keeping with the latest trends in user interface design. A site that is illustrates latest technology and state of the art apparatus for

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teaching, the key to the website strategy will be presenting a very welldesigned and informative Web presence that will market the college image, service offerings and commitment, which will be linked to Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasaig and the Pasig City site for better linkage. As part of the services offered and promotion of the college, scholarship grants will also be articulated.

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NAME OF SCHOOL AND COLLEGE SEAL Name of School The school shall be named Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig- College of Nursing.

A. College Seal and Logo

Figure 3. College Seal The seal has been made thru the help of the vision and mission of Pamantasan Lungsod ng Pasig College of Nursing. As we aim for excellence and development we keep in mind the aspect of the value of the college. The circle devote that this profession is eternal, as long as there is continues need of care and attention. The content of the seal are represent as follows:

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The color represents our passion and devotion of giving quality care, and respond to various people, things and idea. Green signifies continues follow of life, love of nature, agent of healing and the life force.

The shield represents the professionalism towards the members of the nursing community and other. It serves as the protection of the college against different circumstances that obstructs the way of success of the profession.

The signification of the lamp is the devotion of faith in the profession, intelligent of the truth and wisdom of good toward the community of Pasig and the country. The light serves as the guide in caring, loving and kindness to individual, family and community. Also a never ending learning, teaching and serving to the society

The emblem serves as the collaboration of the profession on giving quality of care to the society toward the development and improvement in providing health care. The nursing cap symbolizes the profession devotion on giving quality life to aim for excellence and being competent on serving the community of medical alliance.

B. Uniforms 1. School Uniform 2. Clinical Uniform 3. Clinical Uniform with Apron (female) 4. Clinical Uniform in Smock Gown 5. Head Nursing Uniforms 6. Scrub Suit
Uniforms were designed by: Rackell B. Gutierrez (2012) Conceptualized By: Jovero, Gutierrez, Selboza (2012)

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Figure 4. School Uniform Female

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Figure 5. School Uniform

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Figure 6. Clinical Uniform

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Figure 7. Clinical Uniform

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Figure 8. Clinical Uniform with Apron

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Figure 9. Clinical Uniform in Smock Gown

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Figure 10. Clinical Uniform in Smock Gown

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Figure 11. Head Nursing

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Figure 12. Head Nursing

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Figure 13. Scrub Suit

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Figure 14. Scrub Suit

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LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL

Figure 15. Spot Map of the School The city of Pasig is a highly urbanized eastern city found in the island of Luzon in the Philippines. It is surrounded by the cities of Quezon and Mandaluyong in the west, Marikina in the north, Makati, Taguig, and the municipality of Pateros in the south, and in the east by the municipality of Cainta in Rizal province. Pasig has been growing as one of the metros important commercial and business centers. The College of Nursing will be located within the vicinity and environment of the Pamantasan ng Lungsond ng Pasig at Alkalde Jose Street, Barangay Kapasigan with three storey school building that will include, nursing laboratory, nursing library, college office and other offices

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VISSION, MISSION AND OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL PLP-CON Vision The PLP-CON envisions its graduates to be recognized provider of excellent health care services in the country and the world who foster PROFICIENCY, INTEGRITY, COMPASSION, DEDICATION and SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY.

PLP-CON Mission The PLP-CON is dedicated on producing world-class nurses who are committed in providing excellent health care through giving low-cost but quality education to deserving people of Pasig; alleviating poverty, increasing social sensitivity, and promoting change among its constituents.

Objectives: The Nursing graduates of the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig are expected to: 1. Function effectively at a first level position in any nursing care setting; 2. Participate delivering health care in collaboration with other members of the health care team; 3. Display delight in uplifting the Filipino and Pasigueno culture; 4. Engage in activities that will improve and develop their selves as professionals such as pursuing graduate studies and research; 5. Develop a deep sense of awareness of the health needs of society; and 6. Build a commitment in alleviating the health needs of the society, especially of the socially-disadvantaged.

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Philosophy: A PERSON is a unique bio-psycho-socio-cultural and spiritual being, always in constant interaction with the environment. These interactions affect individuals, families, population groups, and societal health status. HEALTH is an indelible component of human social structures. That is, the society views health as a necessary phenomenon of human civilization whereby an individual

continually seeks to improve, mend, and alter the overall nature and quality of his or her life. NURSING is the process of promoting, maintaining, restoring maximum level of wellness, and assisting the individual towards a peaceful and dignified death. NURSING EDUCATION focuses on developing nursing students through didactic and clinical experiences to become competent professional nurse practitioner, researcher, and leader-manager in different fields of practice.

Core Values Proficiency is the performance of care professionally and is skillfully enough to meet the health needs of the society and the world. Integrity refers to showing of honesty, reliability and accountability in his work. Compassion is performing health care with a heart, showing empathy and genuineness at all times. Dedication is the display of devotion in upholding the standards of the nursing profession Social Responsibility is acting as catalysts of change while showing concern and sensitivity, being aware of the impact of his actions on others, particularly the disadvantaged.

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Figure 16. Organizational Structure of The School

BOARD OF REGENTS University President Vice-President for Academic Affairs Administrative Director

University Librarian

Guidance counselor

College Deans

University Registrar

Finance Officer

HRD

Property Custodian and security unit

Health Services

Community Extension Services

Dean of the College of Nursing College Secretary and Curriculum Chair GEC Coordinator GEC Faculty Clinical Coordinator

Secretary to the Dean

Research, Faculty and Student Development Programs Coordinator Nursing Faculty Nursing Students

Laboratory Coordinator

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CURRICULUM Table 10. FIRST YEAR 1ST Semester Course Code Biochem Ana 1 TFN PD PCL TOTAL Course Name Pre-requisites/ Co-requisites Units

Biochemistry Anatomy and Physiology Theoretical Foundations Nursing Personality Development Pasig Community Life

in

3/2* 3/2* 3 3 3 22

Table 11. FIRST YEAR 2ND Semester Course Code NCM 100 RLE 100 HA HA 1B TC HU 102 RC TOTAL Course Name Pre-requisites/ Co-requisites Units

Fundamentals of Nursing TFN, Ana 110 Chem 102 Practice Related Learning Experience TFN, Ana 110 A, Chem 102 Health Assessment Lecture TFN, Ana 110, Chem 102; Corequisites: NCM 100 Health Assessment RLE TFN, Ana 110 A, Chem 102; Co-requisites: RLE 100 Therapeutic Communication Logic and Critical Thinking Life Works and Writings of Rizal

3 2 3 1 2/1* 3 3 18

*Indicates units for laboratory

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Table 12. SECOND YEAR 1st Semester Course Code Course Name Pre-requisites/ requisites Co- Units

NCM 101 RLE 101 CHN 1A CHN 1 B NS 105 HE 1 Strat 1 TOTAL

Care of Mother, Child and Family

NCM 100, HA 101; Corequisites: NS 105 Related Learning Experience RLE 100, HA 101 Community Health Nursing NCM 100, RLE 100, TFN, Lecture HA Community Health Nursing RLE NCM 100, RLE 100, TFN, HA 1 A, HA 1 B Microbiology and Parasitology Ana 110 Bioethics HU 102 Teaching Strategies in Health Education

4 4 3 2 3/1* 3 3 23

Table 13. SECOND YEAR 2ND Semester Course Code NCM 102 Course Name Care of Mother, Child, Family and Population Group At-risk or With Problems Related Learning Experience Nutrition and Diet Therapy Pharmacology Sociology with Anthropology Pre-requisites/ Co-requisites Units

NCM 101, RLE 101; Co- 5 requisites: NDT, Pharma NCM 101, RLE 101 Chem 102, Ana 110, NS 105 Biochem, Ana 101 6 3/1* 3 3 21

RLE 102 NDT 1 Pharma 101 SS 101 TOTAL

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Table 14. THIRD YEAR 1st Semester Course Code Course Name NCM 103 Pre-requisites/ Co-requisites Units 8

RLE 103 SS 105 NI TOTAL

Care of Clients with Problems in NCM 102, RLE 102 Oxygenation, Fluid & Electrolyte Balance, Metabolism and Endocrine Related Learning Experience RLE 102 Health Economics with Taxation and Land Reform Nursing Informatics

6 3 2/1* 20

Table 15. THIRD YEAR 2ND Semester Course Code NCM 104 Course Name Care of Clients with Problems in Inflammatory and Immunologic Response, Perception and Coordination Related Learning Experience Care of Clients with Maladaptive Patterns of Behavior Related Learning Experiences Nursing Research 1 (Lec) Nursing Research 1 (RLE) Elective Course 1 Pre-requisites/ Co-requisites NCM 103, RLE 103 Units 5

RLE 104 NCM 105 RLE 105 NRES 1A NRES 1B Elective 1 TOTAL

RLE 103 4 NCM 103; Co-requisite: NCM 4 104 RLE 103; Co-requisite: RLE 2 104 1 2 NCM 101, NCM 102 2 20

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Table 16. FOURTH YEAR 1st Semester Course Code NCM 106 Course Name Care of Clients with Problems in Cellular Aberrations, Acute Biologic Crisis including Emergency and Disaster Nursing Related Learning Experience Competency Appraisal 1 Nursing Leadership and Management (Lecture) Nursing Research 2 with Biostatistics (RLE) Elective Course 2 Pre-requisites/Co-requisites NCM 104, NCM 105 Units 6

RLE 106 CA 1 NCM 107 Nres 2 Elective 2 TOTAL

RLE 104, RLE 105 NCM 105, NRES 1 NCM 104, NCM 105 NRES 1 Elective 1

5 3 4 2 2 22

Table 17. FOURTH YEAR 2ND Semester Course Code INP CA 2 RLE 107 FL TOTAL Course Name Pre-requisites/Co-requisites Units 8 3 3 2 16

Intensive Nursing Practicum All professional subjects Competency Appraisal CA 1 Nursing Leadership and Management NCM 107 (RLE) Foreign Languages

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Course Description TFN- THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS IN NURSING This course deals with the meta-concepts of a person, health, environment and nursing as viewed by the different theorists. Likewise, it includes non-nursing theories such as systems, developmental and change theories. It presents how these concepts and theories serve as guide to nursing practice. It further deals with health as a multi-factorial phenomenon and the necessary core competencies that the nurse needs to develop, which includes the role of the nurse in providing spiritual care.

RC- LIFE WORKS AND WRITINGS OF RIZAL A course on Rizal design to familiarize the student with Rizals role in the development of the Philippines progress in political, social, economic and educational aspects. It includes the heros youth and parentage, his schooling here and abroad, his travels and their implications to Philippine progress. Important episodes in his life are emphasized for their educational and nationalistic values, respectively. An intensive reading and interpretation of the original edition of the NOLI ME TANGERE and EL FILIBUSTERISMO are undertaken together with Rizals annotation of Morgas Sucesos de las Isla Filipinas

ANA 1- ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY This course deals with the physiologic concepts, principles and basic anatomical structure. Basis regulatory mechanisms which promote homeostasis, familiarization of some physiological parameters which serve as indicator for the organisms state of health, anatomic

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and physiologic bases of some common medical disorders, recognition of signs and symptoms associated with serious medical conditions requiring expert medical attention

SS 101- SOCIOLOGY WITH ANTHROPOLOGY The course designed to provide prospective majors or minors with appropriate preparation for further study in sociology and anthropology. This course provides an introduction to sociological and anthropological theory, methodology, and research findings. Course may include the methods of social research, cultural anthropology, structure and inequality, criminology and social control, and medical sociology or anthropology.

NCM 100- Fundamentals of nursing practice This course provides the students with the overview of nursing as a science, an art and a profession. It deals with the concept of man as a holistic being comprised of biopsycho-socio and spiritual dimensions. It includes a discussion on the different roles of a nurse emphasizing health promotion, maintenance of health as well as prevention of illness utilizing the nursing process. Furthermore, the following topics are also given attention: Communication skills, health and illness, levels of care and meeting needs related to death, dying/grief and grieving.

HA 1- HEALTH ASSESSMENT This course deals with concept, principles and techniques of health history taking using various tools, physical examination (head-to-toe), psychosocial assessment and

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interpretation of common laboratory findings to arrive at nursing diagnoses for the client across the life span in varied settings.

BIOCHEM- BIOCHEMISTRY This course explores the roles of essential biological molecules focusing on protein chemistry, while covering lipids and carbohydrates. It provides a systematic and methodical application of general and organic chemistry principles. Examine the structure of proteins, their function, their binding to other molecules and the methodologies for the purification and characterization of proteins. Enzymes and their kinetics and mechanisms are covered in detail. Metabolic pathways are examined from thermodynamic and regulatory perspectives. This course provides the linkage between the inanimate world of chemistry and the living world of biology.

HE 101- BIOETHICS The course aims at developing among students an understanding of the importance concepts and principles of Bioethics. At the end of the course, the student should be sensitive to ethical consideration and face ethical issues in health care, community work and public issues, responsibly This deals with the application of ethico-moral and legal concepts and principles to issues that affect the practice of nursing. These provide the basis for appropriate decision making given varied situations, to prepare the learner to render effective, efficient and safe nursing care. Furthermore, related learning experiences provide opportunities to concretize commitment to nursing. The critical thinking process shall be used in the unit with

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the objective of developing the intellectual capacity to conceptualize and contextualize what students know about particular ethico-moral and legal issues.

HU 105- LOGIC AND CRITICAL THINKING An introduction to basic principles and frameworks of logic and critical thinking appropriately used in argument analysis: deduction, induction, fallacy recognition. Emphasis on developing analytical skills and applying principles of good reasoning to the arguments encountered in life.

NDT 1- NUTRITION AND DIET THERAPY This course deals with the study of food in relation to health. It covers nutrients and other substances and their action, and interaction and balance in relation to health and diseases and the process by which organism ingests, digests, absorbs, transports, utilizes and excretes food substances. It also focuses on the therapeutic and food service aspects of the delivery of nutritional services in hospitals and other healthcare institutions.

CHN 1- COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING This course focuses on the care of population groups and community as clients utilizing concepts and principles in community health development. It also describes problems, trends and issues in the Philippine and global health care systems affecting community health nursing practice.

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PHARMA 1- PHARMACOLOGY This course deals with pharmacodynamics, pharmakokinetics, clinical/therapeutic uses and toxicology of drugs. Emphasis is given on how a drug works to anticipate when giving a drug to a patient are of paramount importance since nursing responsibilities include administering drugs, assessing drug effects, intervening to make a drug more tolerable, and providing teaching about drugs and the drug regimen. Also provides the basic understanding of pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacy dynamics of broadcategories of drugs. The student is expected to relate the pharmacologic agents and physiologic/pathologic responses.

STRAT 101- TEACHING STRATEGIES IN HEALTH EDUCATION The course includes discussions on health education concepts, principles, theories, teaching-learning process and strategies as they apply in various nursing practice settings.

TC- THERAPUTIC COMMUNICATION The course includes multiple roles of professional nursing to enhance critical thinking and communication skills in dealing with different type of person in the health care setting. Also utilizes effective channels of communication relevant to client care management and guidelines for trans-cultural therapeutic communication

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NCM 101- CARE OF MOTHER, CHILD AND FAMILY; AND PARENT-CHILD NURSING The course focuses on the principles and techniques of caring for the normal mothers, infants, children and family, and the application of principles and concepts on family and family health nursing process. Furthermore, nursing interventions/strategies for the prevention and/or management of behavioural problems of children arising from parent-child relationship are dealt with the following subconcepts are discussed in the light of nursing: Procreative Health, Antepartum/Pregnancy, Postpartum, Newborn, Growth and

Development, Infant and Family, Toddler and Family, Preschooler and Family, Schooler and Family, Adolescent and Family, and Adulthood.

NCM 102- CARE OF MOTHER, CHILD, FAMILY AND POPULATION GROUP ATRISK OR WITH PROBLEMS: PARENT-CHILD NURSING This course deals with the concept of disturbances and pre-existing health problems of pregnant women and the pathologic changes during intrapartum and postpartum periods. This course further deals with the common problems occurring during the newborn, infancy to adolescence stage and deal with a family with health problems, the course refreshes the students with the Family Health Nursing Process as applied to families with health problems.The programs and services of the DOH which are relevant to taking care of a family are given importance.

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NI- NURSING INFORMATICS This course deals with the use of information technology system and data standards based on nursing informatics principles/theories. It further deals with the utilization of clinical information systems in the management and decision making of patient care.

NCM 103- CARE OF CLIENTS WITH PROBLEMS IN OXYGENATION, FLUID & ELECTROLYTE BALANCE, METABOLISM AND ENDOCRINE This course deals with the principles and techniques of nursing care management of sick clients across lifespan with emphasis on the adult and the older person, population group in any setting with alterations/problems in oxygenation, fluid and electrolyte balance, nutrition and metabolism and endocrine function.

NS 105- MICROBIOLOGY AND PARASITOLOGY This course is designed to assist students in the study of important microorganisms and parasites. It explains the physiology and pathogenic properties of bacteria, fungi and viruses as an introduction to disease causation, their biology, the infections they cause, host response to these infections and their mode of transmission, prevention, treatment and nursing responsibilities. The laboratory experiences provide specimen collection, handling and processing of specimens for isolation and identification of microorganisms and parasites involved in the infectious processes.

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NCM 104- Care of Clients with Problems in Inflammatory and Immunologic Response, Perception and Coordination This course deals with the concepts, principles and theories of human behavior and the care of the sick client across the lifespan with emphasis on the adult and the older person, population group experiencing alterations in Inflammatory and Immunologic Response and perception and coordination in varied settings.

HE 105- HEALTH ECONOMICS WITH TAXATION AND LAND REFORM This course is an introduction to economics, the basic concepts of microeconomics, money and banking, economic growth and development and international economics and its implication to nursing. Also discussed are the basic concepts of taxation and land reform.

NCM 105- CARE OF CLIENTS WITH MALADAPTIVE PATTERNS OF BEHAVIOR This course deals with the concepts, principles and theories of human behaviour and the care of the sick client across the lifespan with emphasis on the adult , the older person, and the population group experiencing disturbances in perception and coordination as well as adjustment or adaptive psychological behaviors. The discussion will focus on critical analyses of psycho-pathophysiologic changes accompanying the disturbances, assessment , laboratory examinations and nursing diagnoses, implementation and evaluation of nursing and medical interventions

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NRES 1- NURSING RESEARCH 1 This is an introductory course intended to equip the nursing students with concepts, principles in research starting from an overview of the major phases of the research process. The course will include discussion from formulation of a research problem to the selection of a research design, planning, and choosing the appropriate research tool for data gathering. This course will require the student or group to present a research proposal in a colloquium to apply knowledge and demonstrate skills and attitude in the conceptual, deign, and planning phase of the research process.

NRE2- NURSING RESEARCH 2 This course is a continuation of the Nursing Research 1 which includes collection, analysis, statistic, and interpretation of data, conclusions and recommendations. This will provide the students or group an opportunity to undergo the final defence to appreciate the research process. Guided practicum sessions are done throughout the course.

NCM106-

CARE

OF

CLIENTS

WITH

PROBLEMS

IN

CELLULAR

ABERRATIONS, ACUTE BIOLOGIC CRISIS INCLUDING EMERGENCY AND DISASTER NURSING It deals with the principles and techniques of nursing care management of sick clients across the lifespan with emphasis on the adult and older person with alteration/problems in cellular aberration, acute biologic crisis, including emergency and disaster nursing and IV Therapy This course deals with the care of clients across the lifespan with disturbances in cellular structure and development and Cardiovascular functioning. Furthermore concepts on

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emergency and disaster nursing, & Care of the Chronically Ill & the Older Person in the Philippine setting will be discussed. The discussion will focus on critical analyses of pathophysiologic changes accompanying the multisystem disturbances, assessment, laboratory examinations and nursing diagnoses, implementation and evaluation of nursing and medical interventions. It will also include a discussion on disaster protocols, critical incident stress debriefing and special needs of the chronically ill and the geriatric patient. The students apply the knowledge they learn in the classroom in the Medicine, Surgery, Paediatric, Emergency room rotations as well as will have exposures to the intensive care units and specialized areas like the dialysis and endoscopy units.

CA 1- COMPETENCY APPRAISAL 1 This course deals with the application of concepts , principles and processes basic to the practice of nursing with emphasis on health promotion, health maintenance, preventive, risk reduction, curative and rehabilitative aspects of care for the mother, child and family, population group and community with problems of oxygenation, fluid and electrolyte balance, metabolism and endocrine systems. It includes the utilization of the nursing process and the core competencies under the eleven (11) key areas of responsibility, research and management, and the leadership skills in the practice of nursing.

CA 2- COMPETENCY APPRAISAL 2 This course deals with the application of concepts , principles and processes basic to the practice of nursing with emphasis on health promotion, health maintenance, preventive, risk reduction, curative and rehabilitative aspects of care of sick individuals with alterations

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in immunologic and inflammatory reactions, cellular aberrations, perception and coordination, adjustment problems, maladaptive patterns of behavior, acute biologic crisis, disaster and emergency. It includes the utilization of the nursing process and the core competencies under the eleven (11) key areas of responsibility, research and management, and the leadership skills in the practice of nursing.

NCM 107- NURSING LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT This course deals with the application of concepts, principles, theories and methods of developing nursing leaders and managers in the hospital and community-based settings. The students apply the knowledge they learn in the classroom in the Medicine, Surgery, Pediatric, emergency room, and community rotations. It also includes ethico-moral/legal aspects of health care and nursing practice and the nurses responsibilities for personal and profession al growth.

INP- INTENSIVE NURCING CARE PRACTICUM Actual application of the theories, principles and concepts of clinical nursing practice to groups of clients in varied settings to refine nursing skills in the different basic nursing services including community. Emphasis is placed on integrating the multiple roles of professional nursing as a vehicle to enhance critical thinking and communication skills. Provides setting for the application of concepts/principles in the management of patients/families and demonstration of skills and desirable attitudes in carrying out the roles, functions and responsibilities of a beginning practitioner in Nursing.

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ELECTIVE 1 Nursing interventions/strategies for the prevention and/or management of behavioral problems of children arising from parent child relationship, deals with the history, philosophy, theories, principles, process, modes and interventions of spiritual care, course includes the concepts, principles and theories of hospice palliative care.

ELECTIVE 2 This course is designed to introduce the student to care for critically ill patients. Emphasis is on rapid assessment, setting priorities, rapid decision-making and appropriate nursing interventions, deals with the concepts, principles and dimensions o fquality health care, quality standards for Health Provider Organizations is and implementing a Performance Improvement/management program in the health care system and with the concepts, principles and techniques of nursing care management of those with chronic illness and the older persons

FL- Foreign Languages An elective course where in the students may choose what language they would want to learn such as Korean, Niponggo, Chines, Spanish or Norsk. This subject prepares the students to be linguistically inclined with the culture and language of whichever country they would want to serve.

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PAMANTASAN NG LUNGSOD NG PASIG COLLEGE OF NURSING Alkalde Jose Street Kapasigan, Pasig City 2nd Semester AY 2010-2011 SUBJECT CODE: NCM 101 SUBJECT TITLE: Care of Mother, Child and Family SUBJECT CREDIT: 4 UNITS CONTACT HOURS: 72 Hours of Lecture SUBJECT DESCRIPTION: Principles and techniques of caring for the normal mothers, infants, children and family and the application of principles and concepts on family and family health nursing process.

COMPETENCY STANDARDS: Course Objectives: At the end of the course, given actual or simulated/conditions involving the client (normal pregnant woman, mother anad/or infant, children and the family), the student will be able to: 1. Utilize the nursing process in the holistic care of client for the promotion and maintenance of health. 1.1. Assess with the client her health condition and risk factors affecting health. 1.2. Identify wellness and risk diagnosis. 1.3. Plan with client appropriate interventions for health promotion and maintenance of health. 1.4. Implement with the client the progress of ones health condition and outcomes of care. 1.5. Evaluate with the client the progress of ones health condition and outcomes of care. 2. Ensure a well-organized recording and reporting system. 3. Observe bioethical principles and core values (love of God, caring, love of country and of people). 4. Relate effectively with clients, members of the health team and others in work situations related to nursing and health.

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Time Frame Day 1

Topics

Specific Objectives

Table 18 Methodolo gies Lectures Group Discussions Videos

Activities

I. Orientation II. Human Sexuality 1. Concepts of Human Sexual Response III. Reproductive and Sexual Health 1. Female and Male Reproductive System 1.1. Physiology of Menstruation 1.2. Human Reproduction 1.3. Fertilization 1.4. Implantation 1.5. Human Genetics 1.5.1. Common Test for Determinati

After the lecture and discussions, the students will be able to: 1. Understand the concepts of human sexual response 2. Differentiate the female and male reproductive system 3. Identify the different phases of the menstrual cycle and the physiological processes that occur in each phase. 4. Explain how human reproduction and fertilization occurs. 5. Describe the different tests that is used in determining genetic abnormalities.

-game Jeopardy of the male and reproductive system

Expected Learning Outcomes -Explain the Given an actual human client, the sexual student will be response able to: -Identify the 1. Utilize concept of structures and functions human sexuality and procreative of the male health in and female understanding reproductive reproductive system and health. 2. Apply -Determine knowledge of the different normal processes Anatomy, that a woman Physiology and undergoes functions of the during female/male menstrual reproductive system, human cycle genetics and -Determine human sexuality the different in performing tests to be nursing care to used to check clients during for genetic prenatal period.

Observable KSA

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on of Genetic Abnormalit ies

abnormalities

Day 2

IV. Care of the Mother and the Fetus during the Perinatal Period A. Prenatal Care 1. Fetal Circulation

After the lecture and discussions, the students will be able to: 1. Explain the fetal circulation. 2. Describe the milestones of fetal development

Lectures Discussions Computatio ns Videos

- Discussion of assigned readings -Examinations Recitations

understandin g of the fetal circulation and milestones of the fetal

Given an actual patient, the student will be able to: 1. discuss the fetal circulation and milestones

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2. Milestones of Fetal Growth and Development 3. Common Teratogens and their Effects 4. Assessment of the Mother 4.1. History: Past, Present, Potential, Biographic al Data, Menstrual history, Current Pregnancy (EDD, AOG, Gravid, Para, Nageles, Mc Donalds Rule, Bartholome

3. Identify common teratogens that may affect the growth and development of the fetus 4. Identify the necessary information to be assessed in a mother during the pre-natal visit.

growth and development -assessment of the presence of common teratogens and its effects -conduct a thorough assessment of a pregnant mother -identify health problems that could be deterrent to her and her childs health -

of fetal growth and development 2. Assess for the presence of teratogens in the environment 3. Conduct a thorough assessment Identify presence of nursing problems during her pregnancy 4. Collaborate with different community agencies in order to facilitate prenatal health care.

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ws Rule, Haases Rule), previous pregnancies and outcomes (TPAL Score), gynecologi c history, immunizati ons and medical history 4.2. Prenatal Visit (Frequency of Visit, Personal Data, Baseline Data, Weight Monitoring during first, second and third

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trimester, Criteria in Computing BMI)

Day 3

5. Normal Changes during pregnancy 5.1. Local and Systemic physical changes including vital signs, review of systems and discomforts of pregnancy 5.2. Emotional Changes during first, second and third trimester including

Given relevant questions, the Lectures students will be able to: Discussions 1. Identify the local and Videos systemic changes that a mother experiences during pregnancy. 2. Identify the danger signs of pregnancy 3. Differentiate between the normal and abnormal laboratory findings. 5. Explain the different procedures done in assessing the fetal-well being.

Examinations Recitations Role Playing

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angers in pregnancy 5.3. Leopolds Maneuver 6. Danger Signs of Pregnancy 7. Normal Diagnostic/Labo ratory Findings and Deviations 7.1. Pregnancy Test 7.2. Urine Test 7.3. Blood Test (CBC) 8. Assessment of the Fetal WellBeing 8.1. Ultrasound 8.2. Daily Fetal Movement Counting (DFMC) 8.3. Nonstress Test 8.4.

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Biophysical Profile 8.5. Contraction Stress Test Day 4 9. Recommended Nutrient Requirements During Pregnancy (Calories, Proteins, CalciumPhosphorus, Iron, Zinc, Folic Acid/Folacin/Fo late, Iodine, Magnesium, Selenium and other essential minerals) 10. Sexual Activity 11. Exercise (Walking, Squatting, Tailor Sitting, Kegel, Abdominal After the lecture and Lectures discussions, the students will be Discussions able to: Videos 1. Explain the recommended nutrient requirements during pregnancy. 2. Design a plan of activity suitable fro pregnant women. Examinations Recitations

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Exercise, Pelvic Rocking) Day 5 12. Preparation for After the lecture and Lectures Labor and discussions, the students will be Discussions Delivery able to: 1. Describe the different 12.1. techniques that a mother Psychophysical can use in preparation 12.1.1. for labor and delivery. Bradley 2. Recognize the signs and 12.1.2. symptoms of labor Grantly 3. Distinguish between Dick true and false labor contractions. Read 4. Identify the different Method stages of labor and 12.2. delivery. Psychos 5. Identify the roles that a exual nurse should perform 12.3. during the different Psycho stages of labor and delivery. prophyl axis 12.3.1. Lamaze 13. Different Methods of Delivery 13.1. Birthing Chair Examinations Recitations

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13.2. Birthing Bed 13.3. Squatting 13.4. Leboyers Method B. Intrapartal Care 1. Theories of the Onset of Labor 2. The 4 Ps of Labor 3.1. Passenger 3.2. Passage 3.3. Power 3.4. Psyche/Person 4. Pre-eminent Signs of Labor 5. Difference Between True Labor and False Labor 6. Duration of Labor 7. Stages of Labor and delivery

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7.1. First Stage 7.1.1. Latent, Active and Transiti on 7.1.2. Station, Present ation/Li e, Position , Fetal Contrac tions and Fetal Heart Tone (Accele ration, Early Deceler ation, Late Deceler ation

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Day 6

and Variabl e Deceler ation) 7.2. Second Stage 7.2.1. Mechan ism of Labor 7.2.2. Two Major Divisio ns of Pelvis 7.2.3. Three Parts of Pelvis 7.2.4. Modifie d Ritgen s Maneuv er 7.3. Third After the lecture and

Lectures

Examinations

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Stage

discussions, the students will be Discussions 7.3.1. Signs able to: Videos 1. Identify the different of stages of labor and Placent delivery. al 2. Identify the roles that a Separati nurse should perform on during the different 7.3.2. stages of labor and Types delivery. 3. Recognize the presence of of danger signs of labor. Placent 4. Perform nursing al interventions based on Deliver plan. y 5. Discuss the different 8. Danger Signs pharmacologic of Labor measures to manage discomforts of labor and 9. Nursing delivery. Interventions in each Stage of Labor 10. Pharmacologic Measures to Manage Discomforts of Labor and Delivery 9.1. Pitocin

Recitations

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Day 7

9.2. Systemic Analgesics 9.3. Nerve Block Anesthesia 9.3.1. Local Anesthesia 9.3.2. Pudendal Block 9.3.3. Epidural Block 9.3.4. Low Spinal (Saddle ) Block 9.3.5. General Anesthe sia After the lecture and Lectures C. Post-partum 1. Maternal discussions, the students will be Discussions Observ able to: 1. Perform comprehensive ations assessment utilizing the 2. Placement of nursing process during Fundus the post-partum period. 3. Perineum 2. Utilize assessed data in 4. Vital Signs order to prioritize 5. Pain nursing diagnosis.

Examinations Recitations

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6. Psychic State 7. Bonding 8. Lochia 9. Phases of Puerper ium 9.1. Taking In 9.2. Taking Hold 9.3. Letting Go 10. Episiotomy Healing 11. Involution 12. Possible Compli cations During Postpartum 13. Nursing Care of Mothers During Postpartum 14. Different Health Practices and Beliefs of Different Culture in

3. Plan care of clients utilizing evidence based nursing research and applying ethico-moral and legal principles. 4. Implement individualized nursing care plan.

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Day 8

Pregnancy, Labor and Delivery and Puerperium 15. Current Trends in Maternal and Child Care V. Family Planning 1. Natural 1.1. Standard Days Methods with Cycle Beads 1.2. Billings Method 1.3. Sympthothermal Method 1.4. Lactation Amenorrhea Method 2. Artificial 2.1. Pills 2.2. Injectables 2.3. Intrauterine Device 2.4. Barrier

After the lecture and discussions, the students will be able to: 1. Describe the different methods of family planning.

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Methods 2.5. Tubal Ligation 2.6. Vasectomy Day 9 Day 10 VI. The Newborn A. Profile of the Newborn 1. Physiologic Function and Appearance 1.1. APGAR Score 1.2. Ballard Score 1.3. Review of Systems 1.4. Anthropom etric Measureme nts 2. Vital Signs and Patent Airway 3. Newborn Screening Day 11 B. Nursing Care of the Newborn MIDTERM EXAM After the lecture and discussions, the students will be able to: 1. Perform the different assessment methods of assessing the physiologic well-being of newborns 2. Recognize presence of possible problems in the newborns.

Given actual newborn, the students will be able to:

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Day 12

1. Establishment of Respiration 2. Maintaining Patent Airway 3. Oil Bath, Water Bath and Tub Bath and Changing Diaper 4. Eye Prophylaxis 5. Cord Care 6. Vitamin K administration 7. Regulation of Temperature 8. Sensory Stimulation (Audio and Tactile) 9. Vestibular Stimulation 10. Breastfeeding 11. Burping 12. Elimination 13. Cuddling C. Concept on Growth and

1. Identify the nursing needs of the newborns. 2. Demonstrate different procedures in rendering care for the newborns.

After the lecture and discussions, the students will be

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Development 1. Definition of Growth, Development, Maturation, Cognitive Development 2. Major Factors Affecting Growth and Development 3. Principles of Growth and Development 4. Developmental Milestone 5. Theories of Development 5.1. Psychosexual 5.2. Psychosocial 5.3. Cognitive 5.4. Moral 5.5. Relational 5.6. Behaviorism 6. Development

able to: 1. Describe the principles of growth and development and the developmental stages according to major theorists. 2. Assess the child as to: a. Physical growth and development utilizing the information from several theoretical approaches. b. Major developmental milestone from infant, toddler, preschool, school-age and adolescent

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of Sexuality 7. Basic Divisions of Life Day 13 After the lecture and D. The Infant and discussions, the students will be Family 1. Play able to: 1. Describe the principles 2. Prevention of of growth and Injury development and the 3. Theories developmental stages 4. Fear according to major 5. theorists. Character/Behav 2. Assess the child as to: ioral Traits a. Physical growth and 6. Significant development Person utilizing the 7. Significant information Development from several 8. Problems theoretical approaches. b. Major developmental milestone from infant, toddler, preschool, school-age and adolescent After the lecture and E. Toddler 1. Play discussions, the students will be

Day 14

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2. Prevention of able to: 1. Describe the principles Injury of growth and 3. Theories development and the 4. Fear developmental stages 5. according to major Character/Behav theorists. ioral Traits 2. Assess the child as to: 6. Significant a. Physical growth and Person development 7. Significant utilizing the Development information 8. Problems from several F. Pre-school theoretical 1. Play approaches. 2. Prevention of b. Major developmental Injury milestone from 3. Theories infant, toddler, 4. Fear preschool, 5. school-age and Character/Behav adolescent ioral Traits 6. Significant Person 7. Significant Development 8. Problems Day 15 G. School-age After the lecture and

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Day 16

1. Play discussions, the students will be 2. Prevention of able to: 1. Describe the principles Injury of growth and 3. Theories development and the 4. Fear developmental stages 5. according to major Character/Behav theorists. ioral Traits 2. Assess the child as to: 6. Significant a. Physical growth and Person development 7. Significant utilizing the Development information 8. Problems from several theoretical approaches. b. Major developmental milestone from infant, toddler, preschool, school-age and adolescent After the lecture and H. Adolescence 1. Play discussions, the students will be 2. Prevention of able to: 1. Describe the principles Injury of growth and 3. Theories development and the 4. Fear developmental stages 5.

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Day 17

according to major theorists. 2. Assess the child as to: a. Physical growth and development utilizing the information from several theoretical approaches. b. Major developmental milestone from infant, toddler, preschool, school-age and adolescent After the lecture and I. Adulthood 1. Early discussions, the students will be Adulthood able to: 1. Describe the principles 1.1. Theories of growth and 1.2. development and the Physiologica developmental stages l, Cognitive, according to major Moral and theorists. Psychosocial 2. Assess the child as to: Developmen a. Physical growth and t development 2. Middle utilizing the Character/Behav ioral Traits 6. Significant Person 7. Significant Development 8. Problems

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Adulthood 2.1. Physiologica l, Cognitive, Moral and Psychosocial Developmen t 3. Late Adulthood 3.1. Theories of Aging 3.2. Biologic, Psychologic, Sociologic Changes 3.3. Needs of Older Persons Day 18

information from several theoretical approaches. b. Major developmental milestone from infant, toddler, preschool, school-age and adolescent

FINALS

Reference: Pillitteri, Adelle; Maternal and Child Health Nursing: Care of the Childbearing and Childbearing Family 6th edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2010

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Grading System: Attendance: Quizzes: Major Exam: Requirement: TOTAL:

10% 40% 30% 20% 100%

Prepared by: ____________________________ Lecturer

Recommending Approval: ____________________________ Program Coordinator

Approved: ____________________________ Dean

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SCHEDULE OF FEES A. PASIG RESIDENTS LEVEL I PARTICULAR S 1st Semester (22 UNITS) 7,150.00 2nd Semester (18 UNITS) LEVEL II 1st Semester (22 UNITS) 2nd Semester (18 UNITS) LEVEL III 1st Semester (20 UNITS) 2nd Semester (20 UNITS) LEVEL IV 1st Semester (22 UNITS) 2nd Semester (16 UNITS)

Tuition Fee (Php 500.00/unit less 35%) Miscellaneous Fee (Less 35%) Anatomy Lab Fee Science Lab Fee RLE Fee Affiliation Fee Locker Fee Student Organization TOTAL

5850.00

7,475.00

6825.00

6,500.00

6500.00

7,150.00

5200.00

3,770.00

3490.50 ----496.80 4222.80 ----50.00 70.00 14,180.10

3,313.05 ----496.80 7,038.00 ----50.00 70.00 18,442.85

3313.05 ----496.80 8445.60 ----50.00 70.00 19,200.45 Table 19

3,274.38 ----496.80 6,951.11 ----50.00 70.00 17,342.29

3274.38 ----496.80 11260.80 690.00 50.00 70.00 21,651.98

3,249.35 --------8,109.63 690.00 50.00 70.00 18,628.98

3249.35 ---------15483.60 ----50.00 70.00 24,052.95

2,484.00 2,160.00 --------50.00 70.00 14,517.60

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B. NON-PASIG RESIDENTS

LEVEL I PARTICULAR S 1st Semester (22 UNITS) 11000.00 2nd Semester (18 UNITS)

LEVEL II 1st Semester (22 UNITS) 2nd Semester (18 UNITS)

LEVEL III 1st Semester (20 UNITS) 2nd Semester (20 UNITS)

LEVEL IV 1st Semester (22 UNITS) 2nd Semester (16 UNITS)

Tuition Fee (Php 500.00/unit less 35%) Miscellaneous Anatomy Lab Fee Science Lab Fee RLE Fee Affiliation Fee Locker Fee Student Organization TOTAL

9000.00

11500.00

10500.00

10000.00

10000.00

11000.00

8000.00

5800.00 2,484.00 993.60 --------50.00 70.00 20397.60

5370.00 ----496.80 4222.80 ----50.00 70.00 19209.60

5097.00 ----496.80 7,038.00 ----50.00 70.00 24251.80

5097.00 ----496.80 8445.60 ----50.00 70.00 24659.40 Table 2

5037.50 ----496.80 6,951.11 ----50.00 70.00 22721.94

5037.50 ----496.80 11260.80 690.00 50.00 70.00 26915.10

4999.00 --------8,109.63 690.00 50.00 70.00 24228.63

4999.00 ---------15483.60 ----50.00 70.00 28602.60

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FLOOR PLAN Figure 17. PLP-CON Building Structure

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Figure 18. First floor

Designed by: Mariel B. Gutierrez (2012)

Conceptualized by: Jovero, Gutierrez, Selbosa (2012)

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Figure 19. Second floor

Designed by: Mariel B. Gutierrez (2012)

Conceptualized by: Jovero, Gutierrez, Selboza (2012)

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Figure 20. Third Floor

Designed by: Mariel B. Gutierrez (2012)

Conceptualized by: Jovero, Gutierrez, Selboza (2012)

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Description

Library Library services shall provide the instructional and research needs of the staff and students making it one of the most important service units within a higher education institution. It is for this reason that libraries should be given special attention by the administrators of the institution. Libraries should be maintained it with a wide and up-to-date collection, qualified staff, communications and connectivity portals. Library Holdings. Library holdings should conform to existing requirements for libraries. There should be five (5) book titles per professional subject found in the curriculum at a ratio of one (1) volume per fifteen (15) students enrolled in the program. Book titles must be of recent edition, published within the last five (5) years. The Higher education institutions [HEI] are encouraged to maintain periodicals and other non-print materials relevant to the nursing program to aid the faculty and students in their academic works. CD-ROMs may complement a librarys book collection but should not be considered a replacement for the same. Journals. For the opening of new BS nursing program, the HEI shall have a regular and updated subscription to at least seven (7) professional foreign nursing journals and at least two (2) local journals in the following areas: a. Maternal and Child Nursing b. General Nursing c. Nursing Research d. Psychiatric Nursing

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e. Nursing Management/Leadership f. Pediatric Nursing g. Medical-Surgical Nursing For the recognition of the BS nursing program, the subscription of foreign nursing journals should be regularly updated and maintained. The number of copies of these journals shall be increased depending upon the student population.

Facilities and Equipment Laboratory Requirements: Laboratories should conform to existing requirements as specified in RA 6541, The National Building Code of the Philippines and Presidential Decree 856, Code of Sanitation of the Philippines. List of required and recommended equipment are listed in each course requirement.

Classroom Requirements: a. For regular lecture class, the class size shall have a maximum of 50 students. b. For science laboratory class, the class size shall have a maximum of 25 students c. For special lectures, a class size of more than 45 students may be allowed as long as the required facilities are provided.

Nursing Skills Laboratory: The nursing skills laboratory must be well-lighted and well-ventilated. Its demonstration room and practice area for return demonstration The nursing skills laboratory simulates

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major areas in hospital setting and equipped with basic instruments, equipment and supplies, to aid in the development of the competencies in performing nursing procedures. a. An amphitheater-style demonstration room that can accommodate a maximum of 50 students at one time with lavatory and running water; b. Ratio of bed to practicing students is 1:2 or a practice area for return demonstration where there is one (1) bed to two (2) students at any given time; c. At least two (2) doors which will serve as an entrance and exit; d. At least one (1) fire extinguisher placed outside the door in each science laboratory/nursing skills laboratory. The fire extinguisher must have a record of refill and expiry date attached to the unit; e. Basic demonstration models namely: 1. parenteral/intravenous (IV) 2. Birthing model 3. Newborn Model 4. Adult bisexual model with the following contraptions for: 4.1 basic life support 4.2. tracheostomy care 4.3. colostomy care 4.4 catheterization 4.5 enema 4.6. parenteral/intravenous (IV)

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QUALIFICATIONS OF DEANS AND FACULTY MEMBERS A. Dean 1. 2. 3. a Filipino citizen; a Registered Nurse in the Philippines with current and valid PRC ID; a holder of Masters degree in Nursing (MAN, MN, MSN) conferred by a college or university duly recognized by the Commission on Higher Education; 4. has at least one (1) year of clinical practice and a total of at least five (5) years teaching, administrative and supervisory experiences in nursing education; 5. 6. 7. should be physically and mentally fit; must be of good moral character; has no other teaching assignments or administrative function in other public/private institutions or higher education institutions; 8. 9. a member of good standing of accredited professional nursing organization; upon appointment, he/she must be an active member of good standing of the Association of Deans of Philippine College of Nursing (ADPCN); and, 10. upon appointment, he/she should have a duly notarized employment contract of at least one (1) academic year renewable annually. The contract should specify the academic rank.

B. Faculty The faculty shall have academic preparation appropriate to his/her teaching assignment. In addition to being a Filipino citizen and having good moral character, the following qualifications must be observed:

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For faculty members teaching professional courses:

a. a Registered Nurse in the Philippines with current/valid PRC ID; b. a holder of Masters degree in Nursing (MAN, MN, MSN), Education or other allied medical and health sciences conferred by a college or university duly recognized by the Commission on Higher Education; c. shall have at least one (1) year of clinical practice d. a member of good standing of accredited professional nursing organization; For faculty members teaching other courses: e. a holder of at least masters degree of other allied medical and health science. The BSN program is allied to the following health related programs: Medicine Dentistry Optometry Physical Therapy/Occupational Therapy Pharmacy Public Health Medical Technology Radiologic Technology Respiratory Therapy Nutrition and Dietetics Midwifery

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f. a holder of at least masters degree in their area of specialization for faculty members teaching general education courses and should only teach courses in their area of specialization.

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MATRIX OF FACULTY CLASSIFICATION, RANK AND SALARIES Table 21 Rank Instructor I Salary Grade 12 Basic Salary (Php/mo) 19, 940.00 Qualifications B.S. Degree, MA graduate; Experience: 1 yr. of relevant experience; Training: 4 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) B.S. Degree, MA graduate; Experience: 3 yrs. of relevant experience; Training: 8 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) B.S. Degree, MA Graduate; with 12 units Doctoral, Experience: 5 yrs. of relevant experience; Training: 8 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) B.S. Degree, MA Degree Holder; 12 Units Doctoral, Experience: 7 yrs. of relevant experience; Training: 8 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) B.S. Degree, MA degree holder; 16 Units Doctoral, Experience: 9 yrs. of relevant experience; Training: 12 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) B.S. Degree, MA degree holder, 24 Doctoral units; Experience: 12 yrs. of

Instructor II

13

21,436.00

Instructor III

14

23,044.00

Assistant Professor I

15

24, 867.00

Assistant Professor II

16

26,878.00

Assistant Professor III

17

29,028.00

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relevant experience; Training: 15 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) Associate Professor I 18 31, 351.00 B.S. Degree, MA degree holder, 32 Doctoral units; Experience: 15 yrs. of relevant experience; Training: 15 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) B.S. Degree, MA degree holder, 32 Doctoral units; Experience: 15 yrs. of relevant experience; Training: 15 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) B.S. Degree, MA degree holder, 38 Doctoral units; Experience: 12 yrs. of relevant experience; Training: 15 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) Doctorate degree holder, Experience: 15 yrs. of relevant experience; Training 30 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) Doctorate degree holder, Experience: 15 yrs. of relevant experience; Training 30 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) Doctorate degree holder, Experience: 15 yrs. of relevant experience;

Associate Professor II

19

33, 859.00

Associate Professor II

20

36,567.00

Professor I

21

39,493.00

Professor II

22

42,652.00

Professor III

23

46,064.00

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Training 30 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility) Professor IV 24 49,750.00 Doctorate degree holder, Experience: 15 yrs. of relevant experience; Training 30 hrs. of relevant training; Eligibility: None required; RA 1080 (for courses requiring BAR or BOARD eligibility)

*Overload rate/hour Php 250.00- MAN holder Php 450.00- Doctorate Degree Holder

1. Part-time Degree Masters Degree Holder Doctoral Degree Holder Rate(Php/hour) 250.00 450.00 Table 22 2. Preceptors Rates will be based on what has been agreed upon with the affiliating institution.

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ADMISSION, PROMOTION, AND RETENTION POLICIES A. Admission and Promotion BSN I Incoming first year students shall submit and meet the following requirements: For new graduates: 1. 2. Senior High School Diploma; General weighted average of 85% and above with no grade deficiencies in Science, English and Math subjects; 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. NCAE result; Form 138; NSO Birth Certificate; Certificate of Good Moral Character; Voters ID or Voters Certification of either parents (Original and Photocopy) Current year residence certificate (Cedula) of Photocopy) 9. 10. Updated Barangay Clearance of the applicant (Original and Photocopy) Hand written letter of application addressed to the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig Admission Office stating personal reason for seeking admission to the university 11. 12. Passed the interview with the guidance councelor; Passed the university entrance examinations with an overall rating of average or higher; 13. Passed the personal interview by the CON Admissions and Screening Committee; either parents (Original and

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14. 15.

Passed the Nursing Aptitude Test with an overall rating of average or higher; Physical Examination & Laboratory Examination from hospital or clinics recognized by the college: chest x-ray, CBC, urinalysis, hepatitis B screening and medical certificate of fitness ( enrolled students are required to begin the series of Hepatitis B vaccination);

16.

No gross physical deformity, diseases or conditions which Admissions Committee feels would be insufficient to the study and practice of nursing;

17. 18.

2copies of 2x2 colored ID pictures with printed name and signature at the back; 2 Long brown envelope with printed name at the back (surname, given name middle name); and

19.

Completed College of Nursing Information Sheet.

For transfer students or those who wish to enroll in the Nursing Program after having enrolled in other college courses in Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig or in other institutions are discouraged. However, upon consideration, the following are required in addition to the aforementioned requirements: 1. Be an incoming sophomore; 2. Certified true copy of grades; 3. No academic deficiencies and has met the grade requirements of the College of Nursing; 4. No record of disciplinary sanctions; 5. Original copy of Honorable Dismissal; and 6. Sign waiver that only subjects with the same course description as those of Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig will be credited

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Returning Students (Regular Students with Leave of Absence) 1. Certificate of Good Moral Character from at least three (3) former professors. 2. Three (3) recent 2x2 ID pictures ( colored with printed name and signature at the back) 3. Leave of absence must not be more than two (2) consecutive semesters. In case the leave is more than the usual, the College Admission Board will decide if the returnee will be accepted 4. Letter of intent to be submitted one (1) month before enrollment. To qualify for promotion to the Second Semester of BSN I, a student should: 1. 2. Pass all subjects in BSN I of the first semester; Have General Weighted Average of 85%, with no grades lower than 85% in major subjects and 83% in minor subjects; 3. 4. 5. Passed the annual comprehensive examination; Have not been subjected to any disciplinary action; Submit Certificate of First and Second doses of Hepa-Vaccination.

BSN II To qualify promotion to the First Semester of BSN II, a student should: 1. 2. Pass all subjects in BSN I for two semesters; Obtain a General Weighted Average of 85%, with no grades lower than 85% in major subjects and 83% in minor subjects; 3. 4. Have not been subjected to any disciplinary action; and Submit Certificate of complete doses of Hepa-B Vaccination.

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To qualify for promotion to the Second Semester of BSN II, a student should: 1. 2. Pass all subjects in BSN II in the First Semester; Obtain a General Weighted Average of 85%, with no grades lower than 85% in major subjects and 83% in minor subjects; 3. Pass the Medical Examination from hospitals and clinics recognized by the College of Nursing consisting of the following requirements: a. Physical Assessment b. Chest x-ray c. Complete Blood Count (CBC) d. Negative Throat swab test (if the result of throat swab is positive then he/she is subjected for treatment until negative result is obtained). e. Vaccination: MMR, FLU and chicken pox; and 4. Have not been subjected to any disciplinary action.

BSN III To qualify for the promotion to the First Semester of BSN III, a student should: 1. 2. 3. Complete the BSN I & II requirements; Have no failing/dropped grade in all subjects from the preceding semester; Obtain a General Weighted Average of 85%, with no grades lower than 85% in major subjects and 83% in minor subjects; 4. 5. Pass the annual comprehensive examinations; Have not been subjected to any disciplinary action;

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6.

Pass the personal interview conducted by the CON Admission and Screening Committee; and

7. 8.

Have not been subjected to any disciplinary action. Criteria for promotion to Level III: General weighted average Annual Comprehensive Examinations Panel Interview 50% 40% 10% 100%

Overall grade should be not lower than 83%.

To qualify for the promotion to the Second Semester of BSN III, a student should: 1. 2. Pass all subjects in the preceding semester; Obtain and maintain a General Weighted Average of 85%, with no grades lower than 85% in major subjects and 83% in minor subjects; 3. 4. Passed the annual comprehensive examination; and Have not been subjected to any disciplinary action.

BSN IV To qualify for promotion to the First Semester of BSN IV, a student should: 1. 2. Pass all the subjects in BSN III; Obtain and maintain a General Weighted Average of 85%, with no grades lower than 85% in major subjects and 83% in minor subjects; and 3. Have not been subjected to any disciplinary action.

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To qualify for promotion to the Second Semester of BSN IV, a student should: 1. 2. Pass all subjects in the preceding semester; Pass the subject Comprehensive Review and passed the final comprehensive examination. 3. Obtain and maintain a General Weighted Average of 85%, with no grades lower than 85% in major subjects and 83% in minor subjects; 4. 5. Have not been subjected to any disciplinary action; and Complete all the required PRC cases.

B. Probation and Dismissal If a student was not able to meet the necessary grade requirements or has violated any rules and regulations of the Pamantasan and the College of Nursing, he/she may be put under probationary status for one (1) semester and sign a memorandum of agreement with the dean provided that the student was not yet subjected to such conditions before. Students are put under probationary status only once. At any point during the semester when the student again incur a grade below 83% or has violated any rule as stipulated in the university and college handbook after she had signed a MOA, the student will be completely disqualified from the College of Nursing.

C. Academic Credit System 1. The number and length of class meeting per term determine course credits. A class meeting for three (3) hours per week for one term translates to three units of credit the maximum load of students depend on course and year level.

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For subjects with laboratory, one (1) unit is equivalent to three hours a week.

For subjects with related learning experience (RLE), one (1) unit is equivalent to 51 hours of clinical exposure per semester or 3 hours per week. 2. Students shall follow the sequence of subjects according to the approved curriculum. Subjects with pre-requisites are marked as such in the curriculum.

D. Grading System The PLP-CON adopts a grading system based on the knowledge, skills and attitude of students to create and sustain a positive learning environment and create consistency in grading the students. The numerical system for grading system is as follows:

Grade Point 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 2.25 2.50 2.75 3.00

Description Excellent Superior Very Good Above Average Good Very Satisfactory Satisfactory Fair Passed

Equivalent 98-100 95-97 92-94 89-91 86-88 83-85 80-82 77-79 75-76

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4.00 5.00 INC OD UD

Conditional Midterm Grade Failed Incomplete Officially Dropped Unofficially Dropped

70-74 Below 75 Below 75

PLP-CON sets the following guidelines in the grading system: 1. Computation of Lecture and RLE grades are based on the following criteria:

LECTURE Quizzes Major Exams Requirements 40% 30% 30% 100%

RLE PET Major Exams Requirements 40% 30% 30% 100%

2. The above breakdown of the grading system will be used in computing the Midterm Grade and Final Grade for professional nursing subjects. The semestral grade of a student is computed as follows: To compute for Midterm Grade 50% of Midterm Grade + 50% of Final Grade = Semestral Grade 3. The passing raw score in all quizzes and long examinations will be 70% which is equivalent to a grade of 75% 4. The grade for lecture and RLE are as follows: a. Lecture grade and RLE grade will be treated separately.

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b. Computation for subjects with RLE: Lecture grade X 50% + RLE grade X 50% = Semestral Grade b.1 The two (2) grades will be combined only if the student did not fail neither the lecture part nor the RLE. b.2 If the student failed the lecture part then the grade in RLE will be disregarded and the final grade will be 5.0. b.3 If the student pass the remedial examination the final grade will be 3.0.

E. Academic Grade Appeals 1. If the student wants to clarify his/her grade, he/she should write a formal letter to his/her teacher furnishing the Deans office with a copy. The student must submit this within a week after the deliberation and posting of result. 2. The Dean will set for another deliberation and discuss the concern of the student/s. a. If the faculty member agrees to the change of the grade; he /she should notify the Registrar in writing and to be noted by the dean. b. If the faculty member justifies that the grade is correct then the grade will remain in status quo. 3. Other basic academic policies are closely stipulated in the institutional student manual.

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F. Academic Awards and Honors 1. Graduation with Academic Distinction

Three categories are awarded for superior academic achievement leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. This honor, based on the graduation general weighted average (GWA) becomes part of the official record, is awarded upon graduation and appears at the transcript and diploma of the recipient.

Summa Cum Laude 1.00 to 1.25

Magna Cum Laude 1.26 to 1.5

Cum Laude 1.51 to 1.75

Lowest grade allowed is Lowest Grade allowed is 2.25 2.0 Table 23 2. Academic Awards

Lowest Grade allowed is 2.50

Honors are also bestowed in recognition of outstanding academic achievement. It is awarded to any undergraduate student, with proficiency and exemplary academic performance.

2.1 Deans List A full time student who obtains a weighted average of 1.75 or above in a semester may be included in the Deans List of Honor students which is compiled at the end of each semester.

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2.2 Awards Candidate eligible for the Bachelors degree may receive distinction awards under the following conditions: 2.2.1. At least one-half of the total number of academic units (all lectures and laboratory units/subjects) prescribed for graduation has been completed In Adamson University. 2.2.2. All College Academic units are included in the weighted average whether earned in Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig or in other institutions and whether the subjects taken are required for the particular degree or not. 2.2.3. The moral Character of the candidate is found to be beyond reproach. 3. Academic and Related Learning Experience Awards 3.1 Best in Clinical Practice 3.2 Student Leadership Award 3.2 Best in Community Health Nursing 3.3 Best in Nursing Research 3.4 College Service Award 3.5 Florence Nightingale Award This award is given to students qualify in the following criteria: a. b. c. General Weighted Average of 2.00 in all subjects. No grade below 2.5 in all nursing subjects. A role model to fellow students. c.1 No violation College rules and regulations since first year. c.2 Actively participates in college activities

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c.3 Actively participates in social and civic activities/ organizations of the University. 4. Academic Infractions 4.1 Any violation of the rules and regulations of the university c by any student is considered a grave offence punishable by expulsion. Any sanction lower than expulsion may be considered subject to the approval by the University President. All persons who allegedly committed academic infractions shall be given a chance to explain and defend his side in accordance with policies and procedures of the University on due process. In case of a student, an incident report shall be submitted by the teacher or concerned personnel to the Level Coordinator or Dean of the affected student specifying the time, date, subject, and nature of offence. The Academic Dean shall handle the cases involving students. In case of the faculty members or academic or co-academic employees, complains or charges shall be handled by the Human Resource Development Office in accordance with established rules and procedures. In case of Academic officers, the Office of the Vice-President for Academic Affairs shall assume jurisdiction.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS No student will be recommended for graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing unless all the academic and clinical requirements prescribed by the Adamson University College of Nursing and the Commission on Higher Education are accomplished.

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These are the following: 1. Pass all subjects in the BSN Curriculum; 2. Passed the Comprehensive Examination given by the College; 3. Completed cases for DR, Cord Care, Major and minor operative procedures. 4. Submitted all the necessary requirements for graduation; and 5. Never been subjected to any disciplinary action

Code of Discipline, Conduct and Decorum

A. Classroom Policies 1. Student Discipline 1.1.Must be demonstrated in classroom, campus and out-campus area (Policies are the same as those stipulated in the PLP student handbook) 2. Attendance 2.1. A student is obliged to attend all classes, and will be given the mark failure due to absences if she/he misses more than 20% of designated class hours. (Computation may vary depending on the number of subject units. Refer to PLP student handbook) 2.2. A certificate of illness does not automatically excuse the student. Only medical certificates from recognized institutions are accepted. 2.3. A re-entry permit must be secured from the Nursing Office to be assessed and signed by the respective class adviser before a student can be accepted in class/clinical duty.

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Absences are recorded from the first scheduled meeting. An absence is considered unexcused based on the following criteria: 2.3.1 Failure to notify the level/ team leader/ class adviser/ Nursing Office Staff 2.3.2 For illness or other reasons without a doctors certificate and letter from parents or guardian. 2.3.3 Failure to present re-entry permit 24 hours after student attends classes. 2.3.4 Absence due to tardiness. 2.3.5 The excuse letter is found to be inauthentic after proper investigation (Rules on forgery will apply) 2.4. A student is considered tardy if he/she arrives 1 minute after classes have started. If he/she arrives 15 minutes after the start of the class, he/she is considered absent but can attend the class. 2.5. Three (3) tardy marks will be counted as one unexcused absence for clinical duty, and rules on make-up duty will apply. 2.6. A student shall be duly penalized for unexplained and habitual absences as stipulated in the College Student Handbook, Parent/Guardian will be notified after the student has incurred 50% of the allowed absences. 2.7. Class hours are reserved for the curricula program. Co-curricular activities should be held during the scheduled activity hour. 2.8. Excused Absence from periodic test will require special periodic test. 2.9. Students are held responsible for lessons and assignments given during absences.

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3. Relationship with Faculty Members 3.1 Courtesy and respect must be rendered to all faculty members regardless of the College they belong to. 3.2. Knock before entering the Faculty room and other offices. Students are not allowed to enter the faculty room and offices with no faculty and staff in used. 3.3. Students are expected to submit requirements in the classroom or as designated by the concerned faculty member. In case the faculty is not around, the student may ask another clinical instructor to sign the requirements received and return it to the student. Requirements should not be left in any office or instructor other than the clinical instructors concerned. 3.4. Students should not submit requirements at the faculty residence after office hours. 3.5. Students are not allowed to show over familiarity with faculty members, i.e. holding hands.

B. Clinical Duty 1. Clinical Assignment 1.1. The assignment made by the college according to the master schedule for clinical experience will be strictly followed. The Clinical Coordinator of the College of Nursing and the respective Clinical Instructor will do changes in assignments that are deemed necessary or appropriate only after proper consultation with the approval of the Dean. 1.2. Difficulties encountered with the assignments or schedule will be settled with the Clinical Coordinator and approved by the Dean.

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1.3. Changing/pre-arranging or swapping of assignment/duty schedule is not allowed. 2. Inspection/Check-up Inspection is done every morning before duty. During this time, checking of This period also includes

attendance and grooming of the students are done. announcements and prayers.

2.1.Students should report punctually to their clinical duty fifteen minutes before the scheduled time. 2.2.Students are expected to be in their proper places in complete uniform during the preconference 2.3.Students who are late must present themselves to the Clinical Instructor who checks the attendance and their respective area Clinical Instructor so they will be marked TARDY instead of ABSENT. 2.4.A student who reports 15 minutes after the preconference will be marked absent but should still go on duty. 3. Absences Excused Absence (1 day absence =1 day make-up duty) Due to any of the following causes: a. Severe illness of the student or illness with recommendation from the school physician. This must be supported by a medical certificate. b. Force majeure such as typhoon, earthquake, and other calamities. c. Death of an immediate family member. d. Any other condition(s) considered by the authorities.

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Unexcused absence (1day absence=3 days make-up duty) a. Failure to notify the clinical instructor prior to an absence. b. Failure to notify the clinical instructor prior to an absence. c. Failure to submit an excuse letter or medical certificate when returning for duty after absence. d. Changing ones area of assignment or shift without the knowledge of the clinical instructor. e. Unexcused absences of 3x in a given rotation gets a mark of zero (0) in the said rotation and make-up duties shall be scheduled in the same area where the student was assigned. 4. Make-up Duty Related Learning Experience should be completed for the number of hours scheduled for the semester. Hence, absences have equivalent make-up duties. The student makes up for every hour of absences. 4.1.Make-up duty is required for excused and unexcused absences in the clinical area. 4.1.1 Student with excused absences will render make-up duty equivalent to the number of hours of absences incurred. If the absence is unexcused, the duty hours are tripled. 4.1.2 Student is held responsible for the payment of extra remuneration of the clinical instructor and affiliation fee to agency wherever and whenever necessary. 4.1.3 It is necessary that the student complete his/her make-up duty before admission to the next level. Failure to complete make-up duty on designated schedule without valid reason would mean non-admission to the next level.

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5. Conduct in the Clinical Area 5.1. Silence and order should be maintained. 5.1.1 Speak in modulated voice. No shouting. 5.1.2 The nurses station is for studying the patients records, charting and preparing medication and instruments. Loitering, eating and unnecessary chatting is not allowed. 5.1.3 Students are discouraged from flocking in the Nurses station. 5.2 Observance of decorum at all times. 5.2.1 Always knock before entering a room unless otherwise specified. 5.2.2 Address one another by name. Name calling is not allowed. 5.2.3 Speak English when communicating with doctors, nurses and others who initiate conversation in English. 5.2.4 Be courteous, polite and honest 5.2.5 Relationship with members of the health and nursing teams and patients should be strictly professional. Patients should be called by name and not by bed or room number. 5.2.6 Sitting in the patients bed/chair/or anywhere as well as borrowing of magazines and other personal item of the patients during duty hours are not allowed. 5.2.7 Abide with all hospital/agency rules, policies and regulations. 5.2.8 Be punctual for conferences. 5.2.9 Students should stay in their assigned areas. Permission should be asked before going to other units. If the student has to leave ahead because of

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emergency reasons, he/she should present a written explanation to the respective Clinical Instructor. 5.2.10 Social visit to patient not assigned to the students are not permissible during duty hours. 5.2.11 Students are not allowed to entertain visitor during duty hours, except in cases of emergency, and provided that the Clinical Instructor is informed. 5.2.12 Gathering of additional information from the patient and patients record require the following: o A duly signed visiting slip by the team leader or any team member. o Presentation of the slip to the Nursing Service and Head Nurse of the Unit. o Wearing of a smock gown during visitation. o Gathering of data from the Medical Records is subject to the policy of the Hospital. 5.2.13 Students are not allowed to use the nurses station telephone, mobile phones, nor pay phones for personal purposes. If it is deemed necessary to make a call, permission from Clinical Instructors should be obtained. 5.2.14 Only handy and quick reference books maybe brought to the clinical area. 5.2.15 Receiving gifts from patients should be avoided; if unavoidable, present the gift item to the clinical instructor or to the clinical coordinator. 5.2.16 Mobile cell phones should be on silent mode or put off during duty hours, except during break time, snacks and meals. Use of gadgets (MP3s, iPods, etc.) are not allowed during duty hours including break time. 5.2. 17 Waivers should be duly submitted when:

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Reporting for duty to areas outside the Base Hospitals (for completion of OR and DR cases) Reporting from pm, night, NOC duty outside the scheduled duty. Community exposure Home visits and other related activities 5.3 Use of facilities 5.3.1 Use the facilities of the agency properly and economically. 5.3.2 Borrowed equipments must be cleaned, inspected and completed before returning. 5.3.3 In case of breakage or loss, inform the clinical instructor and make proper arrangement for replacement within 24 hours. 5.4 Snacks and Meal Break Fifteen minutes is allotted for snacks and thirty minutes for meal break. In consideration of patients needs, the following should be observed: o Take turns in taking a break. o Obtain permission from the clinical instructor and/or nursing staff on duty o Observe proper endorsement of patients. 5.5. Reporting/Recording Report promptly to proper authorities pertinent observation/findings. Documentation should be accurately and legibly written. Orderliness and

cleanliness must be observed at all times. A complete and thorough endorsement, written or oral, must be given to the

Nursing Staff before leaving the clinical area.

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5.6 Errors/Accidents When error or accident is committed, the following should be observed:

o Immediate notification of clinical instructor, head or staff nurse. o Submission of duly accomplished incident report in triplicate copies within 24 hours of incident to: Clinical Instructor Clinical Coordinator Nursing Service Office

o Obedience to impose disciplinary measure o In case of breakage of ampules or medication error, students will be responsible to replace lost/breakage of medication.

C. Conduct in the Community 1. Immersion guidelines Going home is not allowed during community immersion. Students are not allowed to receive visit from their relatives, friends, suitors, boyfriends or girlfriends during the course of their community immersion. Students should stay in their assigned communities. Should the students leave ahead or do some linkaging/coordinating outside the community, a written permit from the Clinical Instructor must be secured. They should be in their community uniform. The community uniform plus the nameplate must be worn during related learning experience at all times.

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Abide with the norms of behavior set by the communities you will be working with all times.

Observe curfew hours as specified. Relationship with the team must be based on mutual trust, respect and cooperation. Students are not allowed to go back to the community without written permission from any of the following: ~ Clinical instructor concerned ~ In the absence, any Clinical Instructor available ~ Clinical Coordinator/ Program Director ~ Program Directors permit is granted for the following reasons:

o Collection of data o Official interview with community leader, key informants, local health unit, LGU. o Religious affairs baptism, wedding, funeral. o To provide essential health services other than the scheduled dates. Utilize available resources for cooking, drinking, sleeping and other household needs. Students should not enjoin in any irrelevant social activities such as parties or drinking sessions. Students should not be involved in any water activities such as swimming. Students should not sleep over to other houses. Students are not allowed to drive any vehicle.

2. Conduct in Field Observe proper decorum at all times. Relationship with members of the community should be strictly professional.

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Observe modesty and decency in speech manners and clothes at all times. The following are hereby not encouraged: Females: Shorts, sleeveless T-shirts/blouses, transparent housedresses, getting out of bathroom with towel wrapped around body. Males: Short, sleeveless T-shirts, towel wrapped around the body, walking around with no shirt on.

Be tactful in all that you do. Drinking sessions, smoking, gambling, betting are prohibited.

Attendance to benefit dance is not allowed. Students must refrain from: ~ Using obscene language, signs or gestures. ~ Chewing candies, bubble gum and lollipops, while interviewing or giving care to clients. ~ Borrowing personal belongings from the clients. ~ Discussing confidential matters pertaining to clients and peers. ~ Returning to the community without written permit from the instructor. ~ Holding hands with female or male classmates and/or showing public display of affection. ~ Using cell phones publicly is not allowed.

Initiate/Participate actively in all community immersion activities. Be punctual to all conferences, team meetings or any community activity conducted. Always conduct home visits or any other community activity by pairs. Never go out to the community alone.

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Avoid utilizing Related Learning Experience (RLE) hours for leisure and relaxation.

3. MAJOR OFFENSES & SANCTIONS IN COMMUNITY IMMERSION All major offenses and their corresponding sanctions and disciplinary actions included in the Pamantasan Student Handbook shall also apply in the Community Immersion set-up. These shall include but not limited to the following: a. Students sleeping in another house other than that of the designated foster familys residence. b. Students of different gender sleeping together in one room. c. Students allowing their boy/girlfriend who are not even part of the class to visit and stay in the site of the immersion. d. Students who allow and/or do not report the above 3rd entry. e. Driving of any motorized vehicles. f. Drinking any intoxicating drinks. g. Violating the curfew hours. h. Violating any local ordinances of the host community. i. Leaving the community without any form of permission. j. Any actions that blemishes the name of the school.

These major offenses shall receive a corresponding deductions of 5 points from the final, plus community/school service. Shall be rendered 4. MINOR OFFENSES & SANCTIONS IN COMMUNITY IMMERSION

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All minor offenses and their corresponding sanctions and disciplinary actions included in the Pamantasan Student Handbook shall also apply in the Community Immersion set-up. These shall include but not limited to the following: 1. Eating of meals in another house other than that of their foster familys. 2. Refusing to eat or being choosy in the food served to them. 3. Bringing of own meals and eating them rather than the food served to them. 4. Washing/ironing of clothes in foster familys house, this is not allowed in the immersion. 5. Violation of any house rules.

These minor offenses shall receive a corresponding deductions of 3 points from the final grade, plus community/schoo; service shall be renderred.

Section D. Uniform and Paraphernalia 1. Uniform The students should take pride in their appearance when in uniform and should use the appropriate and complete uniform at all times. 1.1. Types of Uniform Duty Uniform (General Units) Female: PLP Official Duty Uniform with green and white apron, nurses cap, thick white stockings, closed white duty shoes, nameplate. Green aprons should be worn once outside the clinical area (e.g. travelling). White aprons are worn in their respected clinical assignments.

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Aprons should be 1 to 1 inches below the base of the duty uniform. Male: PLP Official loose polo with pins, white slacks, closed white duty shoes, white socks, white plain undershirt, name plate. Community Health Nursing Uniform Female: Official PLP Community health uniform, black slacks, black closed shoes with 1-1 inches heels, black socks, nameplate. Male: PLP Community health uniform, black slacks, black closed shoes, black socks, nameplate. Special Area Uniform PLP official duty uniform with green apron for females (for travelling), PLP official scrub suit uniform with cap and mask, smock gown (2 to 2 inches below the knee), white washable canvas shoes, nameplate. 1.2 Guidelines in wearing prescribed uniforms o Students should wear the uniform only for duty. Uniforms must not be worn in movie houses and when attending social gatherings and public places. o Students are required to wear a complete uniform consist of: -prescribed uniform for the specific clinical area -Nameplate -Silver wristwatch with second hand and functioning properly o Maintaining a professional appearance is called for and the responsibility of every nursing student. Each students should:

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-For ladies with long hair, hair should be caught up in a bun covered with hairnet; for ladies with short hair, hair should not touch the collar. Hair style should be simple and bangs are not allowed. -No nail polish is allowed. Nails should be cut short and filed. -Only light colored lipstick and face powder with light blush-on make-up is allowed. -Do not use strong perfumes or colognes. -Jewelry should not be worn except a conservative wristwatch with a second hand as stated in the prescribed uniform. -Wear only clean, neatly pressed nurses cap and uniform with complete set of buttons - Duty shoes should always be clean and presentable. -Duty uniform must be neatly pressed or ironed. -Earphones and any gadgets are not allowed -A white chemise should always be worn with a uniform. -Sports bra/colored bra/x bra is not allowed. Only flesh and white bra is allowed. -For male students, they must have a clean tidy look with no mustache, with white sando, white socks and shoes. o The school ID and nameplate must be worn at all times, even during snacks or meal breaks within the designated duty hours in all clinical settings. o In case where an ID is lost or misplaced, a temporary ID with picture must be used.

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2. Paraphernalia Each student is required to report for duty in any clinical setting with the following paraphernalia:

BP apparatus Stethoscope Bandage scissors Pencil w/eraser Red, blue and black ball pen 6 ruler Medicine glass Clip board Small notebook Penlight Thermometer Tourniquet Drug handbook Medicine tray Tape measure adhesive tape/plaster wet and dry cotton balls kidney basin pair of sterile and clean gloves

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povidone iodine cotton applicators tripen sharpened pencils pentel pen CHN bag with the same content Section E. Offenses and Sanctions 1. Major Offenses Cheating ~ allowing others to copy from ones examination paper ~ unauthorized possession of notes or any material relevant to the examination ~ deliberately looking at others examination papers ~ having somebody else take the examination or taking the examination in behalf of the other ~ copying the assignments of other students or submitting a report, term paper, thesis, reaction paper that belongs to another Forging, falsifying, tampering of academic record or documents or papers of any kind related to the school or to his status as student. Making false statement or misrepresenting any material fact, attempting or causing any deception and/or fraud in relation to his admission, enrollment, registration, retention, readmission, and graduation. Lying, attempting or causing any deception or fraud to or before any personnel of the school and/or student.

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Circulating oral or written and/or publishing false derogatory information about any member of the school administration, faculty, personnel and students.

Entering the campus under the influence of liquor or in a drunken state Unauthorized entry into the school premises Stealing and monetary or material goods inside and outside the school Possession, use and distribution of illegal drugs and marijuana Deliberate insubordination to school authorities, lawful orders, sign and instrumentalities

Causing trouble that resulted to physical injury on another person Threats, coercion, intimidation, compulsion, or physical assault, committed within or outside against any person connected or affiliated to the school

Vandalism against any person or property Gambling in any form Immorality, disgraceful conduct, any form of indecent behavior, acts of lewdness and other similar acts such as exhibitionism, rape, adultery, and sexually deviant acts

Possession of pornographic materials Bribery Hazing Forging, falsifying, mutilating, or tampering of ID card Unauthorized use of the name of the university in any manner and form Sexual harassment or acts of lasciviousness Unauthorized collection of money and selling of tickets

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Extortion Destroying schools property or property of any member of the school community Any other act adjudged as major offense as may be determined by the school through the Office of the Prefect of Discipline

2. Minor Offenses Violating the dress code Wearing incomplete uniform Littering Loitering ~ along corridor, hallway during school hours ~ sitting on the stairs Disturbing classes ~ shouting and howling ~ using cellular phone during class ~ eating inside the classroom Public display of affection ~ lips to lips greetings ~ placing the hand around the shoulders or waist ~ reclining against the body of the other ~ sharing one chair ~ sitting on the lap ~ embracing ~ kissing

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~ holding or touching delicate parts of the body of the other ~ suggestive, vulgar or indecent poses Not wearing ID card inside the campus Lending or using someone elses ID Wearing of caps or scarves inside the building Violating the silence on designated areas Discourtesy towards any member of the school community and visitors Making malicious catcalls; malicious whistling Refusal or non-presentation of ID card upon request by a security personnel or any designated authority Sitting on the stairs and deliberate blocking of stairs and passage ways Refusal to pay accounts Any other act adjudged as minor offense as may be determined by the school through the Office of the Prefect of Discipline

3. Sanctions 3.1 Offender/s who is/are adjudged guilty of major offense/s after due process depending on the degree of the offense shall be penalized with any of the following: Suspension: This can be punitive or preventive. Punitive suspension is applied for student who is found guilty of the offense. However, preventive suspension may be imposed to a student who is under investigation. If a student under preventive suspension is found guilty, sanction imposed is carried over to the sanction that may be imposed on him, however if found innocent of the charges, a student is

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allowed to make up for all the classes lost be and allowed to take missed tests and examinations. Absences due to punitive suspension are not excused. Exclusion: A student is being dropped from the list of officially enrolled students and transfer of credential is immediately issued. Expulsion: A student is dismissed from the school and is barred from admission to any private or public school anywhere in the country. Erring students will pay for any destroyed material or property in relation to committing such act. 3.2 Offender/s who is/are adjudged guilty of minor offense shall be penalized accordingly: First Offense: Verbal reprimand and submit a written apology to the Office of the Prefect of Discipline Second Offense: Render eight (8) hours detention and audience with the parents or guardian. Third Offense: Considered as major offense and as such shall be dealt with corresponding action. 4. Sanctions for the violation of the policies and procedures for the proper wearing of uniform First Offense Confiscation of school ID, written warning with a letter of explanation by the student.

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Second Offense The student will be marked with an excused absence for the shift and will be sent to the college office. The student must present an excuse letter signed by the parent/guardian.

Third Offense Suspension for 1 week. Absences incurred during the period of suspension will be considered as unexcused absence. Meeting of the Dean with the parents of every student is a requirement for readmission to class.

5. Sanctions for Errors in Medication For Category A (without adverse physiologic effect) First Offense Anecdotal Report, Demonstration with oral recitation before a panel of College of Nursing faculty of the proper preparations and administration of medications. Second Offense expulsion from the College of Nursing.

For Category B (with adverse physiologic effect) First Offense Student pays for the expenses incurred because of the effect of the error. Expulsion from the College of Nursing 6. Sanction for Unprofessional and Improper Conduct and Decorum Minor Offense First Offense Confiscation of ID, Anecdotal Report, 3-days make-up duty. Second Offense - Confiscation of ID, Anecdotal Report, Suspension from duty for one rotation, the absences as a result will be counted against the attendance record of the student.

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Major Offense First Offense Confiscation of ID, Anecdotal Report, Suspension from duty for one rotation, the absences as a result of which are counted against the attendance record of the student, which is tantamount to dropping the student from the subject. Second Offense Anecdotal report. Expulsion of the student from the College of Nursing and possibly from PLP. Grave Offense Anecdotal Report, expulsion from the College of Nursing and possibly from PLP. The following are considered Grave Offenses: 1. Smoking and/or holding a lighted or unlighted cigarette 2. Cursing and use of foul languages 3. Using the hospital phone for outgoing and incoming personal calls except for emergencies 4. Vandalism 5. Use and/or possession of deadly weapons, drug, liquor and other chemical substance abuse 6. Public display of affection anywhere within the school and clinical area 7. Overt manifestation of homosexuality 8. Insubordination 9. Tampering of schools and/or clinical area record 10. Stealing in any manner or form 11. Causing damage to any school and/or clinical area property

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SUBMISSION OF DOCUMENTS TO CHED Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig Alkalde Jose Street, Barangay Kapasigan, Pasig City 30th of May, 2012

Patricia B. Licuanan, PhD Chairperson Commission on Higher Education

Dear Ms. Licuanan: To answer the need of the Pasig community to have an educational institution that will produce globally competitive and skilled nursing graduates, the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig attempts to promote the institutions vision and philosophy. On behalf of the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig, I wish to inform you that we are planning to open up a College of Nursing as a pledge of a community oriented university who aims to reach our hand in giving the finest education with a low cost tuition on the citizens of Pasig City. We would like to apply our college for an accreditation to operate, that will cater quality education and will strictly comply with the rules and regulations given by the Commission of Higher Education. Please see the attachments for our compliance. We are looking forward for your affirmative response. Thank you and may the Lords grace be with you.

Very Sincerely yours,

Dr. Eison Selbosa, RN, RM, MAN, PhD

President

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REFLECTIONS OF THE TEAM Looking back on my undergraduate years, curriculum as we all known, was not been appreciated much. As I and my group mates go along with this project, to come up with the hypothetical school of nursing of the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Pasig College of Nursing, we learned that curriculum and instruction is a very meticulous and easier said than done item. At first we are really been having a hard time to come with a good outcome, but we had taken it as a challenge, and I know that this had made us stronger and discover that we can take a leap and make a stand. Proposing a university is hard, this needs a lot of detailed research, study, a combination of patience and virtue plus the compassion in producing a graduate with the attributes that will make them distinct and popular amongst others. We should consider putting up a curriculum that will aid students to develop their cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains in learning. Having this hypothetical school of nursing needs a lot of hard work but a great and overwhelming experience for our group. Through this study, I learned that I can do more than I can, I gain knowledge more than I thought I would and I believe that this had help me and will help me in the future as a professional nurse and a professor. Roana Marie B. Gutierrez, RN

As an educator, Ive always thought that being in the academe is tough. The work has been very tedious for me since there are a lot of things to accomplish. I also thought that I already know all the technicalities of the work. However, when I took the course Curriculum and Instruction, I realized that there are still many things for me to learn and the importance of why I need to finish these tasks. The greatest thing that I learned from this subject is to begin with the end in mind, as what Prof. Maria Luisa Lopez would say. It is because you will not be an effective teacher if you do not have a goal or a purpose, which should be aligned with the vision and mission

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of the institution that you are in. You should always think of what kind of students would I like to produce? or what would my profession be like a few years from now?. These questions made me realize the weight of my responsibility as a teacher. The profession may be on its down time now, but with great minds put together, like how we worked on this project, I know that the profession will soar high again, like a skyscraper. Angela Carla C. Jovero, RN

At first, I do not have any idea about the course Curriculum Development. This course has served as an eye opener for me to understand every detail in the curriculum and the school development process. I have learned a lot during the process of this project actually I have learned more than I thought I would, and I am very surprised on how hard I actually worked to get this project done it was a big success.

Going into this project I thought of it as a more of a screwing around opportunity then once I actually started working on the project I got more interested and thought of it as more of a learning opportunity. It was very helpful to learn about this process in the nursing school. These projects help me a lot in understanding the nursing profession and the faculty that sacrifice in the development and molding a student. This project and proposal was proofed that nursing profession was not an ordinary profession but an extra ordinary profession among all professions.

Eison F Selboza RN, RM

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REFERENCES 1. KAISER HEALTH NEWS . http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2009/August/28/medill-nurses.aspx 2. ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, NURSING 3. NURSING CRI. http://nursingcrib.com/nursing-notes-reviewer/nursing-as-aprofession 4. Saudi gazette. http://www.saudigazette.com 5. Over supply of nurses forces them to pay to work for free. http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/213475/news/specialreports/oversupply-ofnurses-forces-them-to-pay-to-work-for-free 6. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (www.bls.gov) 7. http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/163611/the-k-to-12-curriculum-our-first-step-to-recovery 8. http://www.ched.gov.ph 9. CHED MEMORANDUM ORDER (CMO) No. 14 Series of 2009, POLICIES AND STANDARDS FOR BACHELOROF SCIENCE IN NURSING (BSN) PROGRAM 10. K to 12 Basic Education Program. http://www.deped.gov.ph 11. Code on Sanitation of the Philippines Chapter 6- School Sanitation and Health Services. http://www.doh.gov.ph Presidential Decree No. 856, 12. REPUBLIC ACT NO. 6541, National Building Code Of the Philippines AN ACT TO ORDAIN AND INSTITUTE A NATIONAL BUILDING CODE OF THE PHILIPPINES. http://www.civilengineeringdegrees.net 13. Carroll Iwasiw, Mary-Anne Andrusyszyn , Dolly Goldenberg. Curriculum Development in Nursing Education