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Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 23
SYRIA’S WEAPONS
WORLD PAGE 7
‘INSIDIOUS 2’
IS HAUNTING
WEEKEND PAGE 18
KERRY STRIKES TOUGH TONE IN SYRIA ENCOUNTER WITH
RUSSIA
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California’s minimum
wage would rise to $10 an hour within three
years under a bill passed Thursday by the
state Legislature, making it one of the high-
est rates in the nation.
Washington state currently has the top
minimum wage at $9.19 an hour, an amount
that is pegged to rise
with inflation. Some
cities, including San
Francisco, have slightly
higher minimum wages.
The state Senate
approved AB10 on a 26-
11 vote and the
Assembly followed hours
later on a 51-25 vote,
both largely along party lines. Gov. Jerry
Brown indicated earlier this week that he
would sign the bill, calling it an overdue
piece of legislation that would help work-
ing-class families.
The bill would gradually raise California’s
minimum wage from the current $8 an hour
to $10 by 2016.
It would be the first increase in the state’s
minimum wage in six years and comes amid
a national debate over whether it is fair to
pay fast-food workers, retail clerks and oth-
ers wages so low that they often have to
work second or third jobs.
Democrats said the bill by Assemblyman
Luis Alejo, D-Watsonville, would help
workers left behind during the recent reces-
sion.
Minimum wage set to rise
State Legislature passes bill that would increase pay to $10 an hour within three years
Parents concerned
with redrawing of
school boundaries
Sequoia considers open enrollment,
boundaries to address student growth
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Concerned Menlo Park parents showed up in numbers at a
school board meeting to contest a potential shift that could
send their children to different high schools and bring more
students from East Palo Alto to Menlo-Atherton High
School.
At Wednesday night’s Sequoia Union High School
District board meeting, parents cited separation from a
school they moved to the area to have their kids attend, dis-
connect from their home school, decreased property values
and having to travel farther to get to school as reasons they
oppose adjusting the district’s boundaries and revising the
current open enrollment policy.
“The solution for enrollment should not be at the expen-
sive of my community,” parent Laura Redmond of the North
Fair Oaks neighborhood said at the meeting. “We bought
our house 10 years ago for Nativity [Catholic School] and
Menlo-Atherton. I hope we can find another solution.”
Latest try at jail funding fails
Sen. Jerry Hill vows to continue fighting
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
State Sen. Jerry Hill’s latest attempt to
secure state jail funding for San Mateo
County’s new facility failed to nab even
enough support to warrant a motion in its
committee but the legislator vowed yes-
terday to keeping fighting.
“My experience in Sacramento is that
you never say never,” said Hill, D-San
Mateo. “There’s always an ability somehow, somewhere.”
Hill said he is working on another solution but declined to
Jerry Hill
See JAIL, Page 23
TERRY NAGEL
The Burlingame Green Street Fair offers free activities for children such as face painting, bubbles and spin-art.
By David Egan
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
With more than a fair share of enter-
tainment, demonstrations, free
hands-on art projects, family activi-
ties and more than 60 vendors, the
sixth annual Burlingame Green Street
Fair promises to be the biggest one
yet.
“It is growing with popularity,” said
Kathy Meriwether, treasurer of
Burlingame’s Citizens Environmental
Council.
She has seen an increase due the
awareness people have with the envi-
Get ready for green
Burlingame street fair showcases sustainable lifestyle choices
Jerry Brown
See WAGES, Page 20
See FAIR, Page 31
See CONCERN, Page 31
MAKING SOME
ADJUSTMENTS
SPORTS PAGE 11
Docktown tackles
open space measures
Proponents on both sides of the
brewing open space controversy in
Redwood City gathered the week of
Sept. 13, 2008 in an attempt to
sway members of the city’s Floating
Community Association — one
of the groups possibly
affected if plans for
development of open
space is shifted to vot-
ers rather than elected leaders.
The gathering, held at the
Docktown Marina, was the first panel
discussion since measures Wand V
were placed on Nov. 4, 2008 ballot.
Measure W, initially known as the
Open Space Vote, was to change the
city charter so a two-thirds majority
was needed to approve development
on lands deemed open space. The
measure needed only a simple majori-
ty to pass, leading opponents and
councilmembers to condemn the idea
as letting a minority control develop-
ment decisions.
After weeks of meetings and discus-
sion, the City Council decided to
place an alternative initiative —
known as Measure V— on the ballot
which was specifically tailored to the
Cargill Saltworks site. The site was
the primary target of the original ini-
tiative and city leaders believed it
was better to address the elephant in
the room rather than risk the unin-
tended consequences of a broader pro-
posal.
Transient gets 11
years prison for killing
The transient accused of fatally
beating a fellow homeless man in the
fall of 2007 at a Half
Moon Bay encampment a
day after biting a chunk
from the ear of the man’s
friend was sentenced the
week of Sept. 13, 2008 to 11
years in prison on one count of vol-
untary manslaughter.
The 11-year term was expected after
being reached as part of a plea bar-
gain that spared Brian David Ruckel,
48, trial for murder and the possibili-
ty of a 33-years-to-life sentence if
convicted. Prosecutors offered Ruckel
a negotiated plea in July 2008 after
acknowledging they couldn’t prove
what exactly caused the death of Karl
Stevens.
Brothers get life
for fatal shooting
The two brothers convicted of mur-
dering a South San Francisco man in a
chaotic shootout that left three others
injured — including the dead man's
girlfriend who broke her back fleeing
from a second-story bathroom win-
dow — were sentenced to life in
prison the week of Sept. 13, 2008.
Brian Dean Hedlin, 28, of San
Bruno, received 96 years and eight
months to life in prison. Shawn Paul
Hedlin, 32, of Hayward, received 162
years to life in prison. Both men were
second strikers, doubling their sen-
tences on first-degree murder.
Judge Stephen Hall imposed the
sentence after first denying the
Hedlins' requests to fire their
attorneys and delay imposi-
tion.
About 3:05 a.m. Jan. 31,
2005, South San Francisco
police responded to a report of shots
fired at an apartment in the 600 block
of Third Lane and discovered Gregorio
Chicas, 22, dead and another man and
a woman suffering from gunshot
wounds. They survived their injuries.
Asecond woman suffered a broken
back after jumping out a window to
escape the attack.
Deficit running at record level
The federal budget fell further into
the red in August 2008, pushing the
deficit with one month left in the
budget year to an all-time high, it was
reported the week of Sept. 13, 2008.
The Treasury Department reported
that week the deficit through the first
11 months of the budget year totaled
$483.4 billion, up 76.2 percent from
the same period a year prior.
From the archives highlights stories origi-
nally printed five years ago this week. It
appears in the Friday edition of the Daily
Journal.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor Martin
Freeman is 42.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1892
An early version of “The Pledge of
Allegiance,” written by Francis
Bellamy, appeared in “The Youth’s
Companion.”
“Censorship is the height of vanity.”
— Martha Graham, American
modern dance pioneer (1893-1991)
Comedian Sid
Caesar is 91.
Actor Jonathan
Taylor Thomas is
32.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A rider from Kazkahstan’s team scores during the first Asian Kokpar championship in Astana.Kokpar,also known as Buzkashi,
is a traditional central Asian sport played between two teams of horsemen competing to throw a beheaded goat into a
scoring circle.
Friday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the mid 60s. West
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog after midnight. Lows in the mid 50s.
Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Local Weather Forecast
The incorrect photo ran
with yesterday’s birthday
section. Actor-comedian
Louis C.K., left, turned 46
yesterday and Actor Paul
Walker turned 40.
Correction
I n 1565, a Spanish expedition established the first perma-
nent European settlement in North America at present-day
St. Augustine, Fla.
I n 1761, Britain’s King George III married Princess
Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz just a few hours after
meeting her for the first time.
I n 1900, Galveston, Texas, was struck by a hurricane that
killed an estimated 8,000 people.
I n 1913, the Victor Herbert operetta “Sweethearts” opened
on Broadway.
I n 1921, Margaret Gorman, 16, of Washington, D.C., was
crowned the first “Miss America” in Atlantic City, N.J.
I n 1935, Sen. Huey P. Long, D-La., was shot and mortally
wounded inside the Louisiana State Capitol; he died two days
later. (The assailant was identified as Dr. Carl Weiss, who
was gunned down by Long’s bodyguards.)
I n 1941, the 900-day Siege of Leningrad by German forces
began during World War II.
I n 1951, a peace treaty with Japan was signed by 49
nations in San Francisco.
I n 1974, President Gerald R. Ford granted an uncondition-
al pardon to former President Richard Nixon.
I n 1988, two nuclear-missile rocket motors were destroyed
at an army ammunition plant in Karnack, Texas; they were
the first U.S. weapons to be eliminated under an arms reduc-
tion treaty with the Soviet Union.
I n 1994, a USAir Boeing 737 crashed into a ravine as it
was approaching Pittsburgh International Airport, killing
all 132 people on board.
Ten years ago: The Recording Industry Association of
America, the music industry’s largest trade group, filed 261
copyright lawsuits across the country against Internet users
for trading songs online.
(Answers tomorrow)
RIGID FRAUD FINISH EATERY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: King Kong attended Yankees games because
he was a — HUGE FAN
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PIRCM
HWISS
KENSAY
LIDUET
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Answer
here:
Ventriloquist Willie Tyler is 73. Actor Alan Feinstein is 72.
Pop singer Sal Valentino (The Beau Brummels) is 71. Author
Ann Beattie is 66. Cajun singer Zachary Richard is 63.
Musician Will Lee (“Late Show with David Letterman”) is 61.
Actress Heather Thomas is 56. Singer Aimee Mann is 53. Pop
musician David Steele (Fine Young Cannibals) is 53. Actor
Thomas Kretschmann is 51. Rhythm-and-blues singer Marc
Gordon (Levert) is 49. Gospel singer Darlene Zschech is 48.
Alternative country singer Neko Case is 43. TV personality
Brooke Burke-Charvet is 42. Rock musician Richard Hughes
(Keane) is 38. Actor Larenz Tate is 38.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,
in first place; Solid Gold, No. 10, in second place;
and Eureka, No. 7, in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:40.88.
5 4 8
2 12 18 54 56 1
Mega number
Sept. 10 Mega Millions
11 19 33 42 52 33
Powerball
Sept. 11 Powerball
18 20 25 33 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 2 6 5
Daily Four
9 2 8
Daily three evening
3 5 14 40 46 2
Mega number
Sept. 11 Super Lotto Plus
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
School board unity, new curriculum, fiscal
solutions and enrollment issues are all of
concern to those running for the San Bruno
Park School District Board of Trustees.
There are three seats open on the board.
Patrick Flynn was appointed to replace
longtime trustee Skip Henderson, who
retired. Trustee James Prescott is not run-
ning for re-election since he retired for
health reasons. Flynn, incumbent Henry
Sanchez, John P. Marinos and Charles
(Chuck) Zelnik are all running.
Interviews were held to help the Daily
Journal determine endorsements. To allow
each candidate a forum to express their
opinions on the issues discussed, candidates
were given the same questions and asked to
answer each in 50 words or fewer. Answers
are arranged alphabetically by the candi-
date’s last name.
What curriculum changes would you
like to see at the district?
Patrick Flynn: We are already switch-
ing to the Common Core standards, which I
truly support. Common Core to me is teach-
ing children how to use their knowledge in
real world applications. We know that chil-
dren can acquire knowledge, but testing and
applying that knowledge in a working envi-
ronment will make them more valuable in
the working world. Having El Crystal as our
science, technology, engineering and math
school is a good start.
John P. Mari nos: Full alignment to the
common core, actual professional develop-
ment, increasing technology and moderniz-
ing textbooks.
Henry Sanchez: The complete adaption
of the California Common Core standards
would be a needed change to our current cur-
riculum. CCCS provides the opportunity to
embed technology in a systematically and
thoughtful approach through K-12 grades
for English/language arts, mathematics and
content specific subject matter.
Charl es (Chuck) Zel ni k: The new
Common Core curriculum will create some
delivery changes. I would like to see new
and/or additional electives at Parkside
Middle School; resources and possible
financial assistance for PTA/PTO-funded
programs such as elementary music and art
and financial support for our administrators,
teachers and staff. I will work with other
board members to enhance the quality of
learning at our schools.
Do you think Superintendent David
Hutt is provi di ng sol i d l eadershi p?
Patrick Flynn: No. Public opinion of
the district is pretty low even though our
API scores are not too bad considering our
challenges. The reasons are we sold a
school site. We closed a school site. We
haven’t had a balanced budget in 10 years.
Distrust of the administration probably
caused the failure of two ballot measures for
the district.
John P. Mari nos: The current board
must of felt so since they just renewed his
contract for four years.
Henry Sanchez: He has constantly
demonstrated solid leadership in a multitude
of fiscal, instructional, infrastructural and
personnel issues that the SBPSD has had to
face with integrity and honesty to the San
Bruno community. During his tenure, the
student educational achievement district-
wide has steadily risen.
Charl es (Chuck) Zel ni k: No.
Examples of his disastrous leadership
include, but are not limited to, school clo-
sure, attendance boundary area changes and
lack of fiscal management for the last four
years, which is evident by furlough days and
deficit spending.
3
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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HALF MOON BAY
Control l ed substance. A subject was
found to be in possession of a controlled sub-
stance without a prescription on Kelly
Avenue before 8:53 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10.
Burglary. The window of a vehicle was
smashed and a purse was stolen on the 6000
block of Cabrillo Highway before 5:45 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 9.
Theft. Pumpkins were reported missing from
a trailer on the first block of Jenna Lane
before 6 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 9.
Burglary. Jewelry and gold items were
stolen when a suspect entered a home through
an unlocked window on the 500 block of Le
Conte, Montara before 9 a.m. on Saturday,
Sept. 7.
Burglary. A vehicle was broken into and
more than $1,000 worth of items were stolen
on the 400 block of Valdez Avenue before
4:40 a.m. Monday, Sept. 2.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Welfare check. Awoman holding a bottle
of wine with a screwdriver stuck in the cork
trespassed into the neighbor’s patio asking
for help at El Camino Real before 9:44 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 9.
Disturbance. Areport of two men fighting
at 7-Eleven on Callan Boulevard before 7:58
p.m. Monday, Sept. 9.
Robbery. Aman was robbed at gun point by
three strangers on Aspen and Linden avenues
before 10:41 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 1.
Arre s t. Aperson was arrested for disorderly
conduct at 7-Eleven on Mission Road before
10:06 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 1.
Assault. Aairport shuttle driver was assault-
ed at a McDonalds on South Airport
Boulevard before 11:53 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 1.
Police reports
Sick of sharing the road
Aman was upset about a bicyclist riding
in the street so he tried to hit him with
his car on Burlingame Avenue and
Dwight Road in Burlingame before 6:07
p.m. on Sunday, Sept 1.
San Bruno school candidates respond to district issues
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Redwood City construction firm
owner whose former wife allegedly attacked
him while wrapped in bubble wrap claims
she planned to torch the office to destroy
business records and hide evidence of her
Taser and knife assault.
In a civil suit filed this week, Randy
Wenke claims the Sept. 15, 2011 attack by
former wife, Laura, has cost him financially
because of both his physical injuries and
that no one wants to hire him due to her
actions. Randy Wenke said he is also left the
sole caretaker of the couple’s son because of
her incarceration.
Wenke and Wenke Construction, Inc., are
suing Laura Jean Wenke, 52, for battery,
assault and emotional distress. They alleged
negligence, fraud and breach of fiduciary
trust. The suit also goes after an unnamed
list of medical professionals treating her
who Wenke said knew she was mentally ill
and dangerous.
Wenke’s defense attorney Geoff Carr said
the medical claims actually bolster his
client’s defense of not guilty by reason of
insanity to attempted murder.
“He apparently now admits that he knew
she was mentally ill as did the shrinks,”
Carr said. “In a strange way, we’re now allied
against the same people.”
Wenke begins jury trial in November and
Carr said while he is not representing her in
this civil matter the claims made within are
admissions that can be used in court.
At the time of the alleged attack, Wenke
was vice president and chief financial officer
in charge of all record and book-keeping at
the company, according to the suit. She was
also in the midst of a divorce from Randy
Wenke, living separately but continuing to
work for Wenke Construction.
On the night in question, Laura Wenke
allegedly arranged a fictitious meeting
between him and a potential client at the
office. While he waited,
Laura Wenke allegedly
arrived around 7 p.m.
claiming she needed to
show him a new program
on the computer server.
She was dressed in a
mechanics jumpsuit over
bubblewrap that prosecu-
tors later said was meant
to protect her from injury
during the attack.
The two went into an adjacent office and
she stood behind him under the guise of not
seeing him enter the server password. As he
typed, Laura Wenke stunned him with a stun
gun, stabbed him in the torso and sliced his
neck from left to right ear. As Randy Wenke
grabbed her and tried to get the stun gun, she
reportedly stabbed him in the chest.
He called 911 and was treated for serious
injuries including a punctured lung and
slashed neck.
The suit claims Wenke had also removed
business records from a storage facility to
the office with plans at the time of the
assault to destroy them and evidence of the
attack by torching the business.
At the time of arrest, Wenke possessed
linseed oil, two five-gallon buckets and
shop rags.
Carr said the claims of potential arson and
record destruction is news to him but theo-
rized that the suit is a way to recoup money
lost in the couple’s divorce which was final-
ized days prior to its filing.
Randy Wenke’s attorney Janet Brayer was
out of the office but told the Daily Journal
via email she filed the civil complaint to
avoid any statute of limitation issues. The
attack hits its two-year anniversary on
Sunday.
During a preliminary hearing in the crim-
inal case, a police officer said a “to-do” list
of activities related to the crime was found
Husband, company sue ex-wife for stabbing
Defense attorney calls claims good for the case
Laura Wenke
See WENKE, Page 23
Age: 48
Education:Trade school,
four year apprenticeship
Experience: Chief
stationary engineer,
founding president of the
San Bruno Education
Foundation
Family: Married, three sons
Residence: San Bruno for
43 years total
Patrick Flynn
Age: 45
Education: San Francisco
State University, B.S. finance
Experience: Crestmoor PTO
treasurer, Past San Bruno
AYSO regional treasurer,
DDAC member, Current 7-
11 Committee member
Family: Married, two children
Residence: San Bruno, 45
years
John P. Marinos
Age: 58
Education: M.S., Stanford
University, M.D., University
of Southern California
Experience: Physician, UCSF
professor, current governing
member in district
Family: Married, three
children
Residence: 30 years in San
Bruno
Henry Sanchez
Age: 56
Education: La Sierra High
School, John O’Connell
Trade School, General
Motors University of
Automotive Management
Experience: Member of San
Francisco Local 2
Carpenters Union; General
Motors Service and Body
Shop Manager; inventory
manager of various of
companies, PTA president at Portola and Crestmoor
Family: Married, two adult children
Residence: San Bruno, 27 years
Charles Zelnik Jr.
See ISSUES, Page 23
4
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Man arrested for stealing Porsche
A man was arrested Wednesday night in Belmont after
allegedly stealing a pricey Porsche 991S from a home in
Portola Valley earlier in the day, according to the San Mateo
County Sheriff’s Office.
Police arrested 24-year-old Juan Ortega-Ramos, a Redwood
City resident, after finding the car in Belmont and the sus-
pect close by. Police also discovered stolen items from the
Portola Valley home on Hillbrook Drive, according to the
Sheriff’s Office.
Property thought to be associated with a number of other
burglaries currently under investigation by the Sheriff’s
Office and surrounding jurisdictions was also discovered.
Wildfire destroys 68 homes
Investigators have determined that target shooting
sparked a fire that burned nearly 5 square miles in a San
Francisco Bay Area wilderness park.
State fire spokeswoman Tina Rose said Thursday the news
serves as a reminder that even the tiniest spark from a rico-
chet can grow into a massive fire.
The so-called Morgan Fire began near the town of Clayton
on Sunday and spread to Mount Diablo State Park in Contra
Costa County. It forced the evacuation of about 100 homes
and spewed a plume of smoke, prompting air quality officials
to issue health warnings for three neighboring counties.
Local briefs
Dorothy Ann Borbidge
Lt. (Ret.) Dorothy Ann Borbidge,
resident of South San Francisco, and
longtime resident of Millbrae, died
peacefully Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013.
She was born in Philadelphia,
Penn. in 1928. She graduated from the
University of Florida where she
majored in English and excelled in
swimming. She then joined the U.S.
Navy and served for 13 years; her last
duty station was the Naval Post
Graduate School, Monterey. Dorothy
worked for the Social Security
Administration in San Francisco, and
later for the Naval Facilities
Engineering Command, Western
Division in San Bruno. She volun-
teered in retirement in hospice and
senior services. Dorothy’s love of
reading led her to Project Read where
she taught other adults. She enjoyed
the arts, theater and lectures. She is
survived by her son Steven Bird and
brothers, Fr. David Borbidge and Lt.
(Ret.) Robert Borbidge. She was pre-
ceded in death by
her parents BG
(Ret.) John J. and
Anna L. Borbidge
and brothers, Lt.
Jack Borbidge and
LCDR (Ret.) George
Borbidge.
Friends are invit-
ed to a 4 p.m. visi-
tation Saturday, Sept. 14 with prayers
to follow at the Chapel of the
Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive,
Millbrae, CA94030.
The family is grateful for the kind
people at Damenik’s Home who cared
for Dorothy and to the Pathways
Hospice nurses.
In lieu of flowers, donations to
Project Read in South San Francisco
are requested.
Michele Marie Sattui
Michele Marie Sattui, born June 1,
1951, died Sept. 10, 2013 after a
lengthy battle with cancer.
She was a 61-year resident of
Millbrae.
She was born in San Francisco and
was the loving daughter of Dorothy
Sattui and the late Melville Sattui;
sister of Melanie Sattui. She is also
survived by many relatives and
friends.
Her loves were people, music, bak-
ing her famous cookies with Jean.
Besides being a party girl, she was an
avid Giants Fan. She will be missed
by all who knew her.
Family and friends are invited to
attend the rosary followed by the
funeral mass 11 a.m. Monday, Sept.
16 at St. Dunstan Catholic Church,
1133 Broadway in Millbrae.
Committal will follow at Holy Cross
Cemetery in Colma.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a
donation in her memory to the
American Cancer Society.
Obituaries
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Daly City woman once found
mentally unfit but later competent to
stand trial for allegedly attempting to
kill her father by torching his home
and attacking a responding police
officer is headed back to Napa State
Hospital.
Min Kyung Bang, 34, was supposed
to have a judge decide yesterday if she
is not able to aid in her own defense
against charges of attempted murder,
arson, battery on a peace officer and
battery on a vehicle operator. Instead,
Napa medical staff sent the court an
addendum with-
drawing their earli-
er conclusion she
was restored to
competency. Bang
was recommitted
for treatment.
Bang had been at
Napa State Hospital
since May 2012 —
two months after
she refused to come to court to enter a
plea and doubts were raised about her
mental competency — and March of
this year when she returned to San
Mateo County. Competency is a per-
son’s ability to aid in his or her own
defense unlike sanity which is a per-
son’s mental state at the time of an
alleged crime.
Bang lived with her father in Daly
City and, on Feb. 21, 2012, prosecu-
tors say she set fire to the residence
along with another unit. The arson
was reportedly captured on a neigh-
bor’s surveillance tape. When Daly
City police officers arrived at the
scene approximately 20 minutes
later, Bang allegedly struck one with
an umbrella and kicked and punched at
the others. Police reported Bang was
rambling and incoherent.
Daughter accused of attempted
murder found incompetent again
Min Bang
5
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
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ated with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The
Daily Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it fnds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the promotion; to be
acting in violation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name & photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the
Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years of age. Call with questions or for clarifcation (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s from all liability, claims, or actions of any kind
whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros
and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE NINTH ANNUAL
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Week Two
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Cleveland Baltimore
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Minnesota Chicago
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Detroit Arizona
New Orleans Tampa Bay
Denver NY Giants
Jacksonville Oakland
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Pittsburgh Cincinnati
TIEBREAKER: Pittsburgh @ Cincinnati__________
ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest is free to play.
Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may
also drop off your entries to our office by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
times as you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
You may also access entry entry forms at www.scribd.com/smdailyjournal
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PHONE ___________________________________
Mail or drop off by 9/13/13 to:
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your personal information for
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your privacy.
By Tracie Cone and Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California would
become the latest state to grant immigrants
who are in the country illegally the right to
a driver’s license under a bill that passed the
Legislature late Thursday and that Gov.
Jerry Brown supports.
The success of the legislation in the state
with the nation’s largest immigrant popula-
tion comes after years of setbacks for
Democratic lawmakers and Latino activists.
The state Assembly approved the bill on a
55-19 vote late in the evening, hours after
the Senate passed it on a 28-8 vote. The
Democratic governor issued a statement
indicating he would sign it into law, which
would make California the 10th state to
allow immigrants to apply for licenses.
“This bill will enable millions of people
to get to work safely and legally,” Brown
said in his statement, issued immediately
after the Assembly vote. “Hopefully, it will
send a message to Washington that immi-
gration reform is long past due.”
The approval on the final day of this
year’s legislative session was a surprise.
The author of AB60, Democratic
Assemblyman Luis Alejo of Watsonville,
was prepared to put his legislation on hold
until next year because of opposition from
immigrant-right groups. They had objected
to a provision that calls for the licenses to
be given a special designation, fearing the
different look could lead to discrimination.
The legislation was revived after lawmak-
ers persuaded some of the activists to drop
their objections.
Alejo was elated as he presented the bill
on the Assembly floor.
“This is a very historic night for all
immigrant communities,” he said, as a
crowd of Latino senators and Assembly
members gathered behind him. They hugged
and cheered when the measure sailed
through on the final vote.
“We have had far too many families who
have been divided, far too many workers
who have been deported, for not having
something so basic, so simple, as a driver’s
license,” Alejo said.
Several other attempts had passed the
Legislature only to be vetoed by previous
governors. Alejo said the author of most of
those, former state lawmaker Gil Cedillo,
had asked him to continue pushing the
issue.
The bill could allow some 2 million peo-
ple in California to drive legally by allow-
ing immigrants with proper identification
to apply for a license.
In the Assembly, Republican lawmakers
who opposed the bill said granting a license
with special markings to undocumented
Californians would put employers and land-
lords in a conflict between complying with
state and federal laws.
Assemblywoman Diane Harkey, R-Dana
Point, pointed to the card’s notice, which
will state that it is only an ID for driving
and that it does not establish eligibility for
employment, voting or seeking public ben-
efit s.
“In essence, it puts a big flag on the card
that this is not for a person that is in this
country legally,” Harkey said. “So I kind of
question the purpose of the bill.”
Bill eases path for firing
teachers for misconduct
SACRAMENTO — The state Legislature has
passed a bill intended to speed and streamline
the process for dismissing teachers accused of
misconduct, despite the opinion of some that
the measure should be improved, possibly
next year.
AB375 by Democratic Assemblywoman
Joan Buchanan of Alamo adds homicide
charges to the list of offenses that can prompt
a teacher’s removal. But it removes posses-
sion of marijuana and some other drugs from
the list of offenses that can trigger immediate
removal from the classroom.
The legislation responds to last year’s
arrest of a Los Angeles elementary school
teacher who was charged with 23 counts of
engaging in lewd conduct with students.
Legislation to ban
high-capacity magazines fails
SACRAMENTO — A proposal that would
have banned ammunition magazines that hold
more than 10 bullets failed Thursday in the
state Legislature.
SB396 by Democratic Sen. Loni Hancock
of Berkeley was placed in the inactive file, a
day after it failed to gain enough votes to pass
the Assembly.
State law already prohibits the sale, gift and
loan of large-capacity magazines that hold
more than 10 rounds. Hancock’s bill would
have forced gun owners who already had such
magazines to dispose of them by July 2014.
During the floor debate on Wednesday,
Republican Assemblywoman Melissa
Melendez of Lake Elsinore spoke against the
bill, saying it would take away opportunities
for mothers such as herself to protect their
families.
Bay Bridge to be named
after former mayor Willie Brown
SACRAMENTO — The state Legislature
on Thursday approved naming the iconic
western span of the San Francisco-Oakland
Bay Bridge for former Assembly Speaker
and San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown, a
towering California political figure who is
both revered and reviled.
Brown was the Assembly’s first black
speaker and the longest-serving speaker in
state history, presiding over the 80-member
house from 1980 to 1995.
His tenure, political acumen and ironclad
grasp on one house of the Legislature made
him the most powerful state politician of
his time, next to the governor.
Legislature OK’s driver’s
licenses for immigrants
Around the state
6
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
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September 13 to 30, 2013
Cameras from $67 to $1549
Bags from $3 to $300 Save up to 50% Tripods from $14.95 to $299.95
154 West 25th Avenue San Mateo 650-574-3429
14th Annual
South San Francisco
Citywide Garage Sale
Saturday, September 14, 2013
9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Website: www.ssf.net
Information: 650-877-8518
REUTERS
Emergency personnel work to rescue a man trapped in his vehicle during a flooding of Rock
Creek in Lafayette, Colo.
By P. Solomon Banda
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LYONS, Colo. — Heavy rains sent walls
of water crashing down mountainsides
Thursday in Colorado, cutting off remote
towns, forcing the state’s largest university
to close and leaving at least three people
dead across a rugged landscape that included
areas blackened by recent wildfires.
After a rainy week, up to 8 more inches
fell in an area spanning from the Wyoming
border south to the foothills west of Denver.
Flooding extended all along the Front
Range mountains and into some cities,
including Colorado Springs, Denver, Fort
Collins, Greeley, Aurora and Boulder.
Numerous roads and highways were
washed out or made impassable by floods.
Floodwaters poured into homes, and at least
a few buildings collapsed in the torrent.
Boulder County appeared to be hardest hit.
Sheriff Joe Pelle said the town of Lyons was
completely cut off because of flooded roads,
and residents were huddling together on
higher ground. Although everyone was
believed to be safe, the deluge was expected
to continue into Friday.
“It is not an ordinary disaster,” Pelle said.
“All the preparation in the world ... it can’t
put people up those canyons while these
walls of water are coming down.”
Jason Stillman, 37, said he and his fiancee
were forced to evacuate their home in Lyons
at about 3 a.m. after a nearby river began to
overflow into the street.
Women outrun men in
regaining jobs since recession
WASHINGTON — The slowly recovering
U.S. job market has helped women rebound
faster than men: They’ve now regained all the
jobs they lost to the Great Recession. Men
are still 2.1 million jobs short.
And the gender gap is expected to persist
until the job market is much healthier.
To understand why, consider the kinds of
jobs that are, and aren’t, being added.
Lower-wage industries, like retail, educa-
tion, restaurants and hotels, have been hiring
the fastest. Women are predominant in those
areas. Men, by contrast, dominate sectors
like construction and manufacturing, which
have yet to recover millions of jobs lost in
the recession.
“It’s a segregated labor market, and men
and women do work in different industries,
and even in different areas within industries,”
says Heidi Hartmann, an economist and pres-
ident of the Institute for Women’s Policy
Research.
Economists have long known that the
recession hit men the hardest. “A man-ces-
sion,” some have called it. Or a “she-cov-
ery.”
Scathing obit about
abusive mother goes viral
RENO, Nev. — The children of an abusive
woman whose horror stories prompted
Nevada to become one of the first states to
allow children to sever parental ties wrote a
scathing obituary that was published in the
local newspaper — and has since become an
Internet sensation.
The obituary opened with a harsh state-
ment about the legacy of Marianne Theresa
Johnson-Reddick: “On behalf of her children
who she abrasively exposed to her evil and
violent life, we celebrate her passing from
this earth and hope she lives in the after-life
reliving each gesture of violence, cruelty and
shame that she delivered on her children.”
Katherine Reddick said she wrote it about
her mother, who died at a Reno nursing home
Aug. 30 at the age of 78.
Now a psychology consultant for a school
district outside Austin, Texas, she said she
decided to share the story of their painful
physical and mental abuse after consulting
with her brother, Patrick Reddick. They said
they grew up with four siblings in a Carson
City orphanage after they were removed from
their mother’s home and had been estranged
from her for more than 30 years.
“Everyone she met, adult or child was tor-
tured by her cruelty and exposure to violence,
criminal activity, vulgarity, and hatred of the
gentle or kind human spirit,” the obit said.
“Our greatest wish now is to stimulate a
national movement that mandates a purpose-
ful and dedicated war against child abuse in
the United States of America.”
NASA: Voyager 1 probe
has left the solar system
LOS ANGELES — NASA’s Voyager 1 probe
has left the solar system, boldly going where
no machine has gone before.
Thirty-six years after it rocketed away from
Earth, the plutonium-powered spacecraft has
escaped the sun’s influence and is now cruis-
ing 11 1/2 billion miles away in interstellar
space, or the vast, cold emptiness between
the stars, NASAsaid Thursday.
And just in case it encounters intelligent
life out there, it is carrying a gold-plated,
1970s-era phonograph record with multicul-
tural greetings from Earth, photos and
songs, including Chuck Berry’s “Johnny B.
Goode,” along with Beethoven, Bach,
Mozart and Louis Armstrong.
Heavy rains cause flooding in Colorado
Around the nation
NATION/WORLD 7
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REUTERS
Barack Obama speaks during a cabinet meeting in the West Wing of the
White House.
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — With a military
strike against Syria on hold,
President Barack Obama tried
Thursday to reignite momentum for
his second-term domestic agenda.
But his progress could hinge on the
strength of his standing on Capitol
Hill after what even allies acknowl-
edge were missteps in the latest for-
eign crisis.
“It is still important to recognize
that we have a lot of things left to
do here in this government,”
Obama told his Cabinet, starting a
sustained White House push to refo-
cus the nation on matters at home
as key benchmarks on the budget
and health care rapidly approach.
“The American people are still
interested in making sure that our
kids are getting the kind of educa-
tion they deserve, that we are put-
ting people back to work,” Obama
said.
The White House plans to use
next week’s five-year anniversary
of the 2008 financial collapse to
warn Republicans that shutting
down the government or failing to
raise the debt limit could drag down
the still-fragile economy. Wi t h
Hispanic Heritage Month to begin
Monday, Obama is also expected to
press for a stalled immigration
overhaul and urge minorities to
sign up for health care exchanges
beginning Oct. 1.
Among the events planned for
next week is a White House ceremo-
ny highlighting Americans work-
ing on immigrant and citizenship
issues. Administration officials
will also promote overhaul efforts
at naturalization ceremonies across
the country.
Syria debate on hold, Barack
Obama refocuses on agenda
By Matthew Lee
and Nancy Benac
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GENEVA — Striking a tough
tone, U.S. Secretary of State John
Kerry opened swiftly convened
talks with Russia on Syria’s chemi-
cal weapons Thursday by bluntly
rejecting a Syrian pledge to begin a
“standard process” by turning over
information rather than weapons
— and nothing immediately.
That won’t do, Kerry declared at
an opening news conference, a
stone-faced Russian Foreign
Minister Sergey Lavrov at his side.
“The words of the Syrian regime in
our judgment are simply not
enough.”
“This is not a game,” Kerry said
of the latest developments in a
series that has rapidly gone from
deadly chemical attacks to threats
of retaliatory U.S. air strikes to
Syrian agreement with a Russian
plan to turn over the weapons and,
finally, to the crucial matter of
working out the difficult details.
“We believe there is nothing
standard about this process at this
moment because of the way the
regime has behaved,” Kerry
declared. And he kept alive the
threat of U.S. military action, say-
ing the turnover of weapons must
be complete, verifiable and timely
— “and finally, there ought to con-
sequences if it
doesn’t take
place.”
Kerry strikes tough tone in
Syria encounter with Russia
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GENEVA — Say what?
Something got lost in transla-
tion between U.S. Secretary of
State John Kerry and Russian
Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov
on Thursday — and it served to
illustrate the level of distrust in
U.S.-Russian relations.
It happened when the two diplo-
mats delivered opening statements
before their high-stakes talks
about how to inventory and dis-
mantle Syria’s chemical weapons.
As their joint appearance ended,
Kerry asked a Russian translator to
repeat the end of Lavrov’s remarks,
saying his headset had cut out
briefly.
When it was clear that Kerry was-
n’t going to get an immediate
retranslation, Lavrov tried to
assure him that he hadn’t missed
anything controversial.
“It was OK, John, don’t worry,”
Lavrov said.
“You want me to take your word
for it?” Kerry said. “It’s a little
early for that.”
Say what? Kerry loses something in translation
REUTERS
U.S.Secretary of State John Kerry delivers his opening remarks to the media
before a meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov.
LOCAL 8
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Pollution
Prevention Week
September 16
th
-22
nd
The City of Millbrae wishes to thank all
residents and businesses for their efforts towards
making a difference by:
Properly Disposing of Medications
Police Bureau, Monday-Friday 9:00 am-5 pm
Properly Disposing of Household Hazardous Waste
Visit fowstobay.org
Gardening with Non-toxic Products
Visit ourwaterourworld.org
Cleaning with Non-toxic Products
Visit the eco-home page @ baywise.org
Keeping Storm Drains Clean
Place waste in trash & maintain vehicles
Remembering Wipes Clog Pipes
Flush only human waste and toilet paper
AND
Participating in the Annual
Coastal/Citywide Cleanup at Central Park
Saturday, September 21 9:00—noon at
For more information contact 650.259.2397
or callin@ci.millbrae.ca.us
ci.millbrae.ca.us/
sustainablemillbrae
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
C
ome one, come all to the
Burlingame Pet
Parade next Saturday,
Sept. 28. Now in its 10th year,
the parade will feature a team of
miniature horses, beginning at 10
a.m. on Broadway in Burlingame.
Pet owners who wish to march
with their pets must report by
9:30 a.m. to the parking lot near
Broadway and Chula Vista Avenue.
There is no charge to participate.
This family-friendly event offers
free entertainment and art projects
for children. Every participant
receives a souvenir ribbon and
fancy ribbons are awarded for the
Best Pet Trick; Most
Unusual Pet; Best Dressed
Pet; and Most Original
Float, Group or Wagon. The
grand prize winner receives a spe-
cial prize. Judging takes place
immediately after the parade at
Broadway and Capuchino Avenue.
For more information visit
www.burlingamepetparade.com
***
Congrats to the county’s Fair
Oaks/Child Support Services
softball team, “99 Probl ems
but Pitching Ain’t One of
Them.” On Aug. 10 and 11, the
team won the county’s softball
tournament by beating the
“Mighty Flea Bags” from
Environmental Health 13-9.
***
Redwood City Councilman
Jeff Ira told an audience Monday
night he is a “real nerd” because
his three favorite phone apps are
PBS, the History Channel and
the Smithsonian Channel.
***
San Mateo County has more
farmers’ markets per capita than
any other county in the state,
according to county
Agricultural Commissioner
Fred Crowder who dropped that
bit of trivia while delivering the
annual crop report to the Board
of Supervisors.
***
The Midpeninsula Regional
Open Space District is mark-
ing 40 years — not to mention
more than 62,000 acres of open
space preservation — with its
inaugural Founder’s Day
Festi val 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept.
14 at the historic Monte Bel l o
Open Space Preserve on Page
Mill Road. Come honor the
founders with a hike, family-
friendly activities and food trucks.
***
The San Mateo Event
Center is bidding farewell to
assistant general manager Dana
Stoehr but giving a welcome to
Ronny Tompot as her replace-
ment. Stoehr is headed to the
Craneway Pavilion in Point
Richmond where she will serve as
general manager. During her
seven-year tenure, the county fair
saw its attendance increase.
Tompot worked for Ovations at
the Event Center.
***
Talk about heavy lifting. A1.2-
ton, 100-cubic-foot commercial
washing machine was lifted by
crane onto the roof of the Hi l ton
San Francisco Bayfront
Hotel yesterday morning.
***
San Mateo County’s quarterly
communicable disease report was
released this week. Woohoo!
Where else can you learn fun facts
like Hepatitis B cases are sig-
nificantly down so far over last
year while pertussis (whooping
cough) is on the rise? There is
also an explanation of a new virus
called the Middle East
Respiratory Syndrome
Coronavirus — MERS-CoV
for those who like acronyms. Find
it on the county’s health website.
***
Looking for an armchair trip
abroad? Listen to Patricia
Snowden Saturday share stories
of her recent visit back to her
natie Mayanamr, then called
Burma, as part of a Friendship
Force humanitarian supply deliv-
ery effort. Patricia will share
images and tales of fishermen who
row their boats with one leg and
the Padaung or “giraffe neck”
women who elongate their necks
with brass rings. The program
“Mystical Myanmar, land of
golden pagodas” is 2 p.m. in
the Community Act i vi t i es
Building, 1400 Roosevelt Ave.
in Redwood City.
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly col-
lection of facts culled from the note-
books of the Daily Journal staff. It
appears in the Friday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
STATE GOVERNMENT
• An urgency bill preventing
millions of unspent dollars
used by
local hous-
ing trust
funds to
c r e a t e
affordabl e
units from
b e i n g
swept into
a state program heads to the
governor’s desk for signature.
The bill by Assembl yman
Ri ch Gordon, D- Menl o
Park, will give existing local
housing trust funds access to
$8.8 million set aside for
establishing new funds but not
yet spent. The money in ques-
tion stems from Pro po s i t i o n
1C which California voters
passed in 2006 to provide more
than $2 billion in bonds for the
development of affordable and
emergency housing.
• As s e mbl y Bi l l 1235,
authored by Gordon, would
ensure that local officials
receive training in general
financial management princi-
ples and finance management
laws relevant to their public
service.
Current law requires local
officials to receive ethics train-
ing; however, there is no such
required training surrounding
fiscal management. With assis-
tance from the state treasurer
and controller’s offices, AB
1235 would allow an entity
(such as a local government or
an association of local govern-
ments) to develop curriculum to
meet their relevant needs. Once
the curriculum is developed,
local officials will be required
to attend financial management
training once per term in
office, according to Gordon’s
office.
The bill passed the Senat e
Tuesday and went through the
As s e mbl y on concurrence
Wednesday. It now heads to the
governor’s desk.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• Sout h San Franci sco
Ci t y Counci l removed an
item recommending Jes ús
Armas as city manager and
executive director of the succes-
sor agency to the redevelop-
ment agency on Wednesday
night. This decision came dur-
ing a closed session discus-
sion. The item could make it
onto the agenda as early as the
council’s next meeting Sept.
25.
• The San Mat eo Ci t y
Counci l will consider a con-
sent item Monday night to
award a contract for replacing
windows at Fi re St at i on 21
on Ellsworth Avenue downtown
for about $238,000. The coun-
cil is also expected to approve
a long-range property manage-
ment plan for assets once held
by the city’s Redevel opment
Agency. The council meets 7
p.m., Monday, Sept. 16, City
Hall, 330 W. 20th Ave., San
Mateo.
OPINION 9
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Making safety
a top priority
By Rosanne Foust
P
erhaps more than any other
part of the state and the
country, San Mateo County
is reliant on a sound infrastructure
that fosters innovation and entre-
preneurship. Our communities,
employers
large and
small, our non-
profits, educa-
tional institu-
tions and so
many others
rely on a stable
infrastructure of
transit
options, water
systems and energy to move peo-
ple, activate ideas and power our
growth.
In 2010, we learned first-hand
just how important our energy
infrastructure is. Atragedy defying
definition happened in San Bruno
and the community will never, ever
be the same. This tragedy should
not have happened. The critical
role Pacific Gas and Electric
Company plays in our energy
infrastructure became clear. It is
PG&E’s role as our chief energy
infrastructure steward that causes
me to write today.
I strongly believe that since
2010, PG&E has revamped and
revitalized their commitment to
maintaining a safe and reliable
energy infrastructure. Since the
tragedy in San Bruno, I have
watched firsthand the efforts made
to change the culture within PG&E;
to better communicate with our
cities, elected officials and most
importantly their customers. San
Bruno will never be the same com-
munity and we, collectively, need
to ensure that PG&E will never be
the same company. I want a com-
pany that has the leadership, the
intelligence, the commitment and
the character to ensure a safe and
reliable energy infrastructure for
future generations.
The California Public Utilities
Commission is in the process of
levying a fine on PG&E for the San
Bruno accident. While the CPUC is
well within its rights to levy a
large fine, I am concerned with
news last week that the size of the
fine being discussed may do irrevo-
cable harm to PG&E’s finances.
PG&E’s CEO mentioned the possi-
bility of another bankruptcy if
PG&E is unable to access capital in
the marketplace as a result of the
fine. The financial markets reacted
accordingly and PG&E’s rating
dropped on several major credit
agencies.
Let me be clear: The state of
California and San Mateo County
can ill-afford to have a major
employer, a key infrastructure
steward and one of California’s
most generous and consistent cor-
porate partners enter bankruptcy.
The CPUC should levy a fine that
achieves the dual goals of recoup-
ing costs from the San Bruno acci-
dent and assures that utilities in the
future know they are accountable
for their infrastructure mainte-
nance. Intentionally bankrupting
PG&E achieves neither goal and
should be rethought.
Rosanne Foust is the president and
CEO of the San Mateo County
Economic Development
Association. She lives in Redwood
City.
Letters to the editor
F
or the past several years,
the San Bruno Park
School District has suf-
fered from chronic deficit spend-
ing, infighting and poor commu-
nication.
And just this year, the decision
to close Crestmoor Elementary
School was finally made but after
months of confusion and concern.
While the decision to close the
school had merit, because only 65
of its 157 students lived within
its borders, the opportunity to
have an inclusive and productive
process leading up to its closure
was lost.
In May, State Superintendent
Tom Torlakson released a status
report that showed San Bruno
Park was on a list of districts in
the state they may not meet its
financial obligations in the cur-
rent or two upcoming years.
We could not support a parcel
tax on the November 2012 ballot
that aimed to raise about $2 mil-
lion a year for five years because
of the district’s poor communica-
tion and policy of deficit spend-
ing. Others in the community
could not support it either and it
failed.
The board now needs to focus
on its communication with each
other and the community as a
whole before it can instill confi-
dence that it can solve its issues
and meet new and vast challenges
head on. Anew state funding for-
mula and significant curriculum
changes cannot be absorbed by a
board that cannot communicate
well.
Longtime trustee Skip
Henderson stepped down earlier
this year and, with that decision,
there is an opportunity for
progress. The remaining trustees
unanimously appointed active
parent volunteer and education
foundation leader Patrick Flynn to
the board. That they could all
agree on this choice is telling.
Though new to the board, Flynn
has long been involved in educa-
tion and should provide a calming
presence and a practical communi-
ty-first sensibility.
There are four candidates for
three open seats. The others are
incumbent Henry Sanchez, former
trustee Chuck Zelnik and John
Marinos. Marinos is a straight-
shooter who believes the board
emphasis should be on the class-
room and not on outside issues.
He deserves your vote. So then
the choice comes down to
Sanchez and Zelnik. While Zelnik
represents a point of view in the
community and has long ques-
tioned the board’s actions since
he left in 2006, his strident style
may not be a match for the new
board and Marinos and Flynn may
be able to express similar points
of view in a more productive way.
Sanchez is familiar with the board
and is interested in creating a new
sense of collaboration.
If the district is to move forward
and take on its myriad challenges
with a collaborative spirit that is
responsive to and inclusive of the
community it serves, the best
choices for the three seats on its
Board of Trustees are Flynn,
Marinos and Sanchez.
Conflicting
stories are confusing
Editor,
Conflicting stories are confus-
ing. Ashort time ago, Secretary
of State John Kerry and President
Obama told us that chemical and
biological weapons in the hands
of Assad are unacceptable. Now
we are turning these very same
chemicals to the head of the
KGB? Am I the only one con-
fused?
Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose
Appropriate
checks and balances
Editor,
Sue Lempert stated in her Sept.
9 column “Areal contest in San
Mateo” that an audit of
Community Development
Department in San Mateo “only
adds to the costs of the 7-Eleven
debacle.” What does Sue not
understand? San Mateo city
offices are accountable to the tax-
payers who fund those offices.
City, county and state offices
should have controls in place,
and those controls should be
independently tested to ensure
they are operating effectively.
That includes audits of all signifi-
cant departments. Sue should have
done more research. Examine the
department audits that are a regu-
lar occurrence in Palo Alto and
other cities in our state and see
the significant weaknesses that
have been uncovered and corrected
as a result of department audits.
Many of us were surprised that
such audits have not been in place
already. Kudos to the members of
the City Council — Robert Ross,
David Lim and Maureen Freschet
— who voted “yes” for audit of
the Community Development
Department in San Mateo. Robert
Ross and David Lim are both up
for re-election. They deserve to be
re-elected for many reasons,
including recognizing that City
Hall should not operate
unchecked.
Christine and Peter Stiles
San Mateo
City Council meetings
and online technology
Editor,
I am glad the upcoming
Burlingame City Council candi-
dates forum Sept. 19 will be
streamed and archived on the
city’s website via Granicus, a
technology platform Burlingame
began using several years ago to
make City Council meetings, and
now Planning Commission meet-
ings, accessible online and easy
to search by agenda topic.
To that, I’d be very interested to
hear the nine candidates’ thoughts
on how Burlingame can continue
to harness technology to bolster
efficiencies, transparency and cit-
izen engagement, particularly
since Burlingame is literally
located at the doorstep of Silicon
Valley. For example, two intrigu-
ing platforms which I recently
came across in the national press
are www.opengov.com, which
makes budget and financial data
even more accessible and user
friendly, and
www.seeclickfix.com, a website
and app that lets citizens report
broken infrastructure. I’m not sure
I can make the candidate’s forum
due to back-to-school night, but
at least I can watch it online after-
wards, thanks to the city’s ongo-
ing collaboration with Granicus.
Lorne Abramson
Burlingame
Too many cooks in
middle school kitchen
Editor,
The November election for
three of five seats on the
Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School Board of
Trustees can’t come soon enough.
After years of non-contested elec-
tions, it is apparent that a chang-
ing of the guard is needed. School
district officials are being scruti-
nized for apparently not taking
appropriate steps to protect stu-
dents from a coach/custodian with
prior sexual misconduct com-
plaints at Ralston Middle School
(San Mateo County Times Sept.
6). This school has had five prin-
cipals in two years. Redwood
Shores’ families have been fight-
ing over the district’s moveable
boundaries that result in their
children having to travel over
eight lanes of Highway 101 to
attend school. In addition, the
district has put a new parcel tax
on the ballot to replace two cur-
rent parcel taxes that don’t expire
for one and a half and two years
respectively.
Did I mention the San Mateo
County Civil Grand Jury report
from 2007-08 questioning the
legality of the district’s costly
“Cash Out Refunding” or refinanc-
ing of a $12 million bond with-
out voter approval or knowledge?
BRSSD taxpayers pay five addi-
tional school bonds annually.
Oh, and by the way, one recently
remodeled school in the district
added a commercial size kitchen
even though school lunches are
prepared off sight. The Times
notes that the district has hired a
$150 an hour public relations
expert to deal with some of these
issues. Looks like too many
cooks in the kitchen and taxpayer
money going down the drain. Can
we speed up the election?
Matthew J. Reising
Redwood Shores
Flynn, Marinos and Sanchez for San Bruno schools
Editorial
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,300.64 -25.96 10-Yr Bond 2.91 -0.01
Nasdaq 3,715.97 -9.04 Oil (per barrel) 107.31
S&P 500 1,683.42 -5.71 Gold 1,360.10
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — September was sup-
posed to be ugly for financial markets.
The prospects of a U.S. attack on
Syria and less economic stimulus from
the Federal Reserve only added to
investor worries going into September,
which historically is the worst month of
the year for stocks.
Instead, the Dow Jones industrial
average is up 3.3 percent so far this
month, even after it slipped 26 points,
to 15,300.64 on Thursday. The Standard
& Poor’s 500 index is up 3.1 percent
this month, after falling six points
Thursday to 1,683.42.
The S&P 500 rose for seven straight
days before Thursday, its longest win-
ning streak since July. The Dow climbed
three straight days before Thursday’s
loss.
Another positive sign for markets is
the CBOE Volatility Index, sometimes
referred to as “Wall Street’s fear gauge.”
When the VIX, as it is better known,
moves higher, it means investors
expect more volatility in the next 30
days. It is down more than 15 percent
this month. Gold, another signal of
investor fear, is down more than 5 per-
cent.
What happened to gloomy
September?
The recent de-escalation of the U.S.-
Syria crisis combined with a calming in
the bond market has provided fuel to lift
stocks, market strategists and investors
said. Expectations of stronger corporate
earnings are also helping out stocks,
investors said.
While the ultimate fate of a U.S.
attack on Syria is unknown, it looks
like an immediate missile strike isn’t
happening soon.
Syrian President Bashar Assad said
Thursday his government has agreed to
surrender its chemical weapons in
response to a Russian proposal.
“Syria is still there as a concern, but
it’s starting to de-escalate,” said Richard
Sichel, chief investment officer at
Philadelphia Trust Co., which manages
$1.9 billion in assets.
While Syria’s economy is too small
to have an impact on the global econo-
my, the country is important for oil mar-
kets since a conflict there could escalate
and jeopardize the flow of crude from the
Middle East.
“We’re no longer looking at the
worst-case scenario,” said Burt White,
chief investment officer with LPL
Financial.
It’s also important to look at what’s
happened in the bond market the last
couple of weeks, said J.J. Kinahan,
chief strategist at TD Ameritrade.
Investors had been dumping bonds
most of the summer, Kinahan said, as
investors prepared for the Fed to quickly
wind down a bond-purchase program
that had kept interest rates low for so
long. The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note soared from 1.63 percent in early
May to 3 percent last week. Bond prices
fall as yields rise.
Nearly every major debt investment
in the U.S. is pegged to the 10-year
note, from rates on corporate loans and
home mortgages to student loans. When
yields rise, it raises the cost of lending
for everyone — potentially cutting into
corporate profits, weighing down the
stock and housing markets, and ulti-
mately affecting the economy.
“The yield on the 10-year Treasury
may be the most important number in
the entire world,” White said.
But after the 10-year note struck that
psychologically-important three per-
cent mark, the selloff of the notes
slowed, along with the rise of the yield.
Most investors have become more
comfortable with the Fed’s plan and do
not believe the central bank will reduce
its bond purchases as much as original-
ly anticipated, several investors said.
The Fed is buying $85 billion of bonds
each month. It could limit purchases to
$75 billion or $80 billion a month,
instead of $55 billion.
“The bond market got ahead of itself
and expected a big exit by the Fed and
frankly that hasn’t happened and it’s
unlikely it’s going to happen,” White
said.
Fear of volatile September for stocks fades
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
The Walt Disney Co., up $1.55 to $65.49
The media company plans to “significantly increase”its stock buybacks
next year, its chief financial officer says.
The Men’s Wearhouse Inc., down $4.69 to $34.08
The men’s clothing retailer lowered its full-year earnings forecast and
posted weaker-than-expected second-quarter results.
Weatherford International Ltd., down 77 cents to $14.97
The oilfield services company’s chief financial officer departs abruptly
amid a turnaround effort.
Walgreen Co., up $2.54 to $53.29
Goldman Sachs adds the pharmaceutical retailer to its “Conviction Buy”
list.
Barrick Gold Corp., down $1.03 to $17.61
Gold and silver prices slump to four-week lows,dragging down the shares
of precious metal miners.
Nasdaq
Dominion Resources Inc., up $1.17 to $59.78
The government gives the energy company permission to export
liquefied natural gas from its southern Maryland terminal to countries
that don’t have free trade agreements with the United States.
Lululemon Athletica Inc., down $3.73 to $65.29
A quarterly and full-year oulook from the Canadian yoga gear seller
spooked investors.
The Wendy’s Co., up 37 cents to $8.62
The fast food chain gets an upgrade from Argus,which points out value-
menu items and a new look at its restaurants.
Big movers
By Barbara Ortutay
and Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Twitter has decided to go
public. The company aptly announced on its
short messaging service Thursday afternoon
that it has filed documents for an initial pub-
lic offering of stock.
The documents Twitter filed with the
Securities and Exchange Commission are
sealed, as Twitter is taking advantage of fed-
eral legislation passed last year that allows
companies with less than $1 billion in rev-
enue in its last fiscal year to avoid submitting
public IPO documents.
The confidentiality will likely help Twitter
avoid the public hoopla and intense scrutiny
that surrounded the initial public offerings of
other high-profile social networking compa-
nies, including Facebook Inc., which went
public in May 2012.
The San Francisco-based company
posted on its official Twitter account
that it has “confidentially submitted an
S-1 to the SEC for a planned IPO.” A
subsequent tweet said simply: “Now,
back to work.” It’s accompanied by a
blurry photo of the company’s offices.
Under the law, Twitter’s financial state-
ments and other sensitive information con-
tained in the IPO filing must become publicly
available at least 21 days before company’s
executives begin traveling around the coun-
try to meet with potential investors — a
process known as a “road show.”
Twitter’s IPO has been long expected. The
company has been ramping up its advertising
products and working to boost ad revenue in
preparation. But it is still tiny compared with
Facebook, which saw its hotly anticipated
IPO implode last year amid worries about its
ability to grow mobile ad revenue.
Founded in 2006 and named after a sound
tiny birds make, Twitter has since grown into
a communications medium of remarkable cul-
tural significance despite its relatively small
size. In seven years, Twitter has grown from a
few thousand users to more than 200 million.
Its users include heads of state, celebrities,
revolutionaries and journalists. Unlike
Facebook, which insists that its users go by
their real names, Twitter leaves room for par-
ody and anonymity. As such, there are
accounts for Jesus Christ and Lord Voldemort,
Harry Potter’s mortal enemy.
Twitter tweets it has filed for an initial public offering
Yahoo’s stock tops $30 for
first time in over five years
SAN FRANCISCO — Yahoo is get-
ting closer to propelling its stock
beyond the price that Microsoft
offered to buy the Internet company in
2008, a feat that seemed unattainable
until Yahoo hired Marissa Mayer as its
CEO last year.
The stock crossed a symbolically
important milestone Thursday when it
topped $30 for the first time since
February 2008, when Yahoo co-
founder and then-CEO Jerry Yang was
drawing up ways to fend off an unso-
licited takeover bid from Microsoft
Corp. The bid was later withdrawn after
several months of fruitless negotia-
tions.
Yang insisted that Yahoo Inc. would
be worth more than the $31 per share
that Microsoft initially offered, and
didn’t waver even after the bid was
raised to $33 per share. After
Microsoft scrapped the proposed deal,
Yahoo’s stock went into a prolonged
slide. It fell as low as $8.94 under the
direction of five different CEOs before
Mayer defected from a top executive
job at Google Inc. in July 2012.
Disney plans to boost
buybacks to $6-$8 billion
NEWYORK — The Walt Disney Co.
will buy back between $6 billion and
$8 billion of its shares next year, the
media company’s chief financial offi-
cer said Thursday.
That’s up from the $4 billion a year
that Disney has been spending on
repurchasing its shares, CFO Jay
Rasulo said during an investor confer-
ence.
“Given our confidence in the overall
company and where our share price sits
in the marketplace we intend to signif-
icantly increase our buyback next
year,” Rasulo said. The company may
borrow some money to fund the buy-
backs toward the end of the year, but
not enough to bring its credit rating
down, he said.
Disney’s shares spiked following
Rasulo’s comments, and gained more
than 2.4 percent, or $1.55, to close at
$65.49 Thursday.
FDA panel backs drug for
early stage breast cancer
WASHINGTON — A biotech drug
from Roche moved one step closer
Thursday to becoming the first medi-
cine approved to treat breast cancer
before surgery.
The Food and Drug Administration’s
panel of cancer experts voted 13-0,
with one abstention, that the benefit s
of Perjeta as an initial treatment for
breast cancer outweigh its risks. The
recommendation is not binding, but
sets the stage for the FDA to clear the
drug as the first pharmaceutical option
approved to shrink or eliminate
tumors before surgery.
A study by Swiss drugmaker Roche
Holding AG’s Genentech unit showed
women who received Perjeta as initial
treatment were 18 percent more likely
to be cancer-free after 12 weeks than
women who received older drug combi-
nations.
Ray Dolby, founder
of Dolby Laboratories, dies
PORTLAND, Ore. — Ray Dolby, an
American inventor and audio pioneer
who founded Dolby Laboratories, has
died at the age of 80.
The company said Thursday that
Dolby died in his home at San
Francisco. He had been living with
Alzheimer’s disease for several years
and was diagnosed with acute leukemia
this summer.
Dolby founded his namesake com-
pany in 1965 and grew it into an
industry leader in audio technology.
His work in noise reduction and sur-
round sound led to the creation of a
number of technologies that are still
used in music, movies and entertain-
ment today.
“Today we lost a friend, mentor and
true visionary,” Kevin Yeaman,
President and CEO of Dolby
Laboratories, said in a statement.
United Airlines accidentally
posts $0 to $10 fares
For a little while on Thursday,
United Airlines was giving away air-
plane tickets for free, or close to it.
Passengers reported buying tickets
for $5 to $10. United says it acciden-
tally filed fares for $0, although air-
port charges might have resulted in a
small cost.
United stopped taking bookings
through its website and phone centers
to prevent more of the tickets from
being sold or given away. The website
was accepting reservations again
around 2:45 p.m. Central time.
Business briefs
<< A’s add to AL West lead, page 12
• Kiwis take two more from Oracle, page 12
Friday, Sept. 13, 2013
HOCKEY SEASON IS AROUND THE CORNER: THE SAN JOSE SHARKS RETURN MOST OF THEIR KEY PLAYERS FROM LAST SEASON >PAGE 13
Best bets
El Camino (1-0) at
Aragon (1-0), 7 p.m. Friday
The Colts took down Washington-
SF 28-7 last week. … The Dons
overwhelmed Jefferson 50-0. … El
Camino’s win was the first season-
opening victory since 2010. …
Aragon had 11 ball carriers combine
for 233 yards rushing last week. …
The Dons’ defense held Jefferson to
just 104 yards of offense.
Monta Vista (1-0) at
Sequoia (1-0), 7 p.m. Friday
The Matadors opened the season
with a 42-13 win over Overfelt. …
The Cherokees began 2013 with a
42-14 win over Fremont-Sunnyvale.
… Monta Vista rushed for 363 yards
last week, led by Justin Cena’s 221
yards and four touchdowns on 29 car-
ries. … Sequoia used the big play to
beat down Fremont. The Cherokees
had four scores of 15 yards or more,
led by Cameron Greenough’s 80-
yard strike to Ben Sahl.
San Mateo (1-0) at
Berkeley (1-1), 7 p.m. Friday
The Bearcats beat down Gunn last
week, 43-6. … The Yellowjackets
were stung by Monte Vista-Danville
20-6. … Berkeley went 5-5 last sea-
son, but were undefeated in West
Alameda County’s Foothill
Division and are the favorite again
this season. … The Yellowjackets
are averaging 188 yards passing per
game in 2013, but less than 50 yards
rushing. … San Mateo ran
roughshod over Gunn last week,
gaining 333 yards on the ground. …
RB Line Latu gained 181 yards on 21
carries and scored one of five rushing
touchdowns for the Bearcats.
Menlo-Atherton (0-1) at
Los Gatos (0-1), 7:30 p.m. Friday
The Bears fell to East Bay power
Campolindo, 38-21. … The
Wildcats came up short against
Mitty, 28-14. … Los Gatos featured
a balanced offensive attack last
week, passing for 143 yards and
rushing for 128. … Despite the loss,
M-A still racked up 334 yards of
offense — 199 rushing and 135
passing.
Woodside (0-1) at
Milpitas (0-0), 7:30 p.m. Friday
The Wildcats lost to Dublin 22-
14. … The Trojans went 9-4 last sea-
son. … The Trojans advanced to the
CCS Division I championship game
last season, losing to San Benito,
35-28.
See BEST, Page 14
San Mateo swept by Castilleja
Panthers prevail in tight
tennis match versus Aragon
Week of adjustments
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Capuchino will need a big game from linebacker Royal Ale,right,if the Mustangs have a chance to beat SouthCity.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Any high school football coach
will tell you — Week 1 of the new
football season is full of ups and
downs.
More downs, actually, than ups.
And heading to the first Daily
Journal Game of the Week, South
San Francisco and Capuchino high
schools are teams that took those
swings and did very different
things with them last week.
South City eeked out an over-
time win against Santa Clara,
while the Mustangs fell hard to
Homestead.
But we are now in Week 2. Now
we look forward.
“Last week was tough, against a
tough team that is considered a
contender every year,” said
Capuchino’s first-year coach Josh
Horton. “That’s a good measuring
stick. And kind of giving them a
run for their money was a good
thing to see. Of course, the penal-
ties and all that was bad. But this
is a game that, without a shadow a
doubt, we feel like we can do a ton
better than last week and the week
before (in a scrimmage against
Balboa).”
South City head coach Frank
Moro, despite his win over the
Bruins, echoed a similar thought.
“We had a hard time stopping
them early,” he said. “We made
some adjustments that worked for
us. But the good thing is, we used
a little bit of everything in that
game. Our hands team, our dime
package, our nickel package. We
learned to play from behind and we
learned how to play an overtime
game.”
It’s all a learning experience
right now and going into Friday
afternoon’s game (3:15 kickoff at
Capuchino in San Bruno), the
Warriors and Mustangs will con-
tinue that trend as we inch closer
to the Peninsula Athletic League
season.
“The biggest thing on our end
this week is, we needed to push the
tempo,” Horton said. “We’re look-
ing to convert a lot of what we do
on offense to a no-huddle system.
And, that’s something that we’ve
working with this entire week.
Actually, the execution shows bet-
ter results than us trying to huddle.
It can work and show good
results.”
“They have a couple of good ath-
letes over there,” Moro said. “We
have to do a good job of contain-
ing them, of containing the quar-
terback and just play our game.
Stay in our lanes and not chase. We
have to play football and not get
into a chase match.”
Horton said he’s looking to uti-
lize his players’ abilities to their
utmost. Against a team like South
City, with a fast and hard-hitting
defense, the task is a lot tougher.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Bill Smith, long time head ten-
nis coach for Burlingame High
School, flashed a bit of a smile
when recounting his girls’ team
latest victory — a 4-3 decision
over Aragon.
“It’s an old-school Panther
win,” Smith said. “It’s the way I
would want us to play. ”
In a week that began with losses
to Central Coast Section and
Northern California powerhouses
Monte Vista and Menlo School
(by a combined 14-1), the
Panthers started the new Peninsula
Athletic League season not
dwelling on the defeats. Instead,
down 3-2, Burlingame scratched
and fought its way to a 4-3 win —
sweeping the doubles and getting
a win at No. 1 singles to seal the
deal.
“It definitely helped us in
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Avolleyball team can do all the
little things correctly — defend,
serve, dig, block — but it matters
little if a team can’t end points.
That, in a nutshell, was the dif-
ference in San Mateo’s three-game
loss to visiting Castilleja
Thursday evening. The Bearcats
did everything else right, but just
could not put balls away in a 25-
23, 25-14, 25-17 loss to the
Gators.
“We couldn’t terminate
(points),” said San Mateo coach
Chris Tigno. “We’re young and our
best hitter from last year trans-
ferred out. We’re not very tall this
year. ”
San Mateo (1-1) was even more
shorthanded without the services
of outside hitter Amanda Crosetti,
who twisted an ankle last week.
“When [Crosetti is] out, it caus-
es us to have change around our
system,” Tigno said.
The way Castilleja was putting
balls down, it’s questionable how
much difference Crosetti would
have made. The Gators finished
with 40 kills for the match —
double the Bearcats’ output of 20.
Castilleja’s Jessice Norum led
all hitters with 16 kills. She also
added a pair of service aces.
Madeline Johnson, just a sopho-
more, added 10 kills for the
Gators, while Katya Scocimara
chipped in with seven kills.
San Mateo was paced by middle
blocker Bella Mauricio, who fin-
ished with eight kills.
The Bearcats did OK defensively,
with Mauricio finishing with a
team-high 17 digs, forcing the
Gators to earn every point. But
San Mateo’s inability to end
See GOTW, Page 14
See TENNIS, Page 15 See VOLLEYBALL Page 15
SPORTS 12
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MINNEAPOLIS — With Josh Reddick back and hitting
home runs, the Oakland Athletics are bringing some
more muscle and a bigger lead into a crucial weekend
series.
Reddick homered and had three RBIs, A.J. Griffin
allowed just two hits in seven innings, and the A’s beat
the Minnesota Twins 8-2 Thursday afternoon to increase
their division lead to 3 1/2 games over idle Texas in the
American League West. It is Oakland’s largest lead over
the Rangers since Aug. 3. The teams are to scheduled play
a three-game series this weekend in the Lone Star State.
“We know it’s an important series, but we’re not going
to sweat about it,” Reddick said. “We know we can beat
those guys.”
Reinstated from the 15-day disabled list Wednesday
after missing time with a sprained right wrist, Reddick
hit an eighth-inning pitch from Brian Duensing into the
right field seats for an 8-1 Oakland lead. It was his 11t h
homer of the season in his 99th game. He hit 32 in 156
games last year.
“Being able to hit it hard ... without my wrist hurting
really felt good,” said Reddick, who was also on the dis-
abled list May 7-30 with the same injury. “Watching
these guys the last two weeks it kind of stung not being
able to be a part of it, but I was just hoping to come back
and just jump on board and not screw up the rhythm.
Hopefully, more days like this are coming.”
Adding Reddick to a lineup that already has 26 home
runs from Brandon Moss, 22 from Yoenis Cespedes, 21
from Josh Donaldson and 19 from Coco Crisp makes
things much easier for manager Bob Melvin.
“We’ve got a lot of options right now, a lot of guys
that are heating up offensively,” Melvin said.
In winning his fourth straight start, Griffin (14-9)
struck out eight and walked just one batter.
“I was working well, I was working quick, I had a good
rhythm,” he said.
A’s increase AL West lead
A’s 8, Twins 2
By Bernie Wilson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Even with the most successful sailor
in Olympic history on board, defending America’s Cup
champion Oracle Team USA simply can’t catch Emirates
Team New Zealand.
The plucky Kiwis beat Oracle Team USA twice more on
Thursday, moving closer to taking the America’s Cup Down
Under for the second time in 18 years.
The Kiwis turned a close Race 6 into a 47-second victory.
They then put a whitewashing on Larry Ellison’s syndicate
in the seventh race, leading the whole way for a victory of
1 minute, 6 seconds.
Team New Zealand leads 6 to minus-1 and needs three
more victories to claim the oldest trophy in international
sports for the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron.
The way the Kiwis are sailing, the clincher could come
Sunday afternoon on San Francisco Bay. Friday is a lay day,
with Races 8 and 9 on Saturday. Two more races are sched-
uled for Sunday.
Oracle Team USA, owned by software billionaire Ellison
of Oracle Corp., was docked two points in the biggest
cheating scandal in the 162-year history of the America’s
Cup. It still needs to win 10 races to keep the Auld Mug at
the Golden Gate Yacht Club.
The American syndicate — which has only one American
on its 11-man crew — couldn’t catch Kiwi skipper Dean
Barker even after replacing tactician John Kostecki with
British star Ben Ainslie, the most successful sailor in
Olympic history.
Even though the five-leg course has just one upwind leg,
the Kiwis are simply too good and too quick when the 72-
foot catamarans are zigzagging toward the Golden Gate
Bridge.
After a fierce tacking duel in Race 6 that left the grinders
gasping for air, the seventh race turned into a laugher.
Barker sped across the starting line ahead of rival Jimmy
Spithill and kept his 72-foot catamaran ahead the whole
way. The Kiwis led by 7 seconds at the second gate after the
downwind second leg and then raced away sailing past
Alcatraz Island toward the Golden Gate Bridge. At the third
gate, the Kiwi lead was 56 seconds.
In Race 6, Spithill led by 12 seconds at the downwind sec-
ond gate before the Kiwis reeled in the American syndicate
during a fierce tacking duel past Alcatraz Island that left the
grinders struggling. Among the men who turn the winches
that power the hydraulic system on the 72-foot catamarans
are Rob Waddell, an Olympic rowing gold medalist and for-
mer two-time world champion, and Grant Dalton, the 56-
year-old syndicate head.
Kiwi tactician Ray Davies called for an extra gybe sailing
the downwind second leg, which allowed Team New Zealand
to split from Oracle on the upwind third leg and gain star-
board tack advantage.
After two lead changes, the boats crossed for a third time.
Barker pulled an aggressive move and pointed his cat at
Oracle, forcing it to do a deeper turn. The Kiwis began
pulling away sailing in light wind and led by 44 seconds at
gate three.
On Thursday morning, Spithill replaced Kostecki with
Ainslie, who won four straight Olympic gold medals as well
as a silver for Britain. The 36-year-old Ainslie was knight-
ed in March.
Until Thursday, Ainslie had served as helmsman of the
backup boat, helping to prep Spithill for the regatta. The
move had been expected since Kostecki called for a foiling
tack that the American syndicate failed to execute in a pun-
ishing loss in Race 5 on Tuesday.
Oracle played its one postponement card of the regatta
and delayed Race 6 until Thursday.
Oracle can’t hang with Kiwis
By Beth Harris
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Adrian Gonzalez
singled home the winning run in the
10th inning to give the Los Angeles
Dodgers a 3-2 victory over the San
Francisco Giants on Thursday night.
The Dodgers reduced their magic
number to five for clinching their first
NLWest title since 2009. They won for
the seventh time in eight games
against the rival Giants, a stretch that
began with a three-game home sweep
June 24-26.
The loss ended last-place San
Francisco’s streak of four consecutive
winning seasons.
Carl Crawford opened the 10th with
a single off Jeremy Affeldt (1-5).
Pinch-hitter Nick Punto sacrificed
Crawford to second before Gonzalez
stroked a single into center field for
the Dodgers’ eighth walk-off win of
the season.
Brian Wilson (2-1) earned the win
after pitching against his former team-
mates for the first time since spending
seven seasons in San Francisco, where
he was part of two World Series cham-
pionship teams. He tossed one score-
less inning of relief.
Affeldt was activated from the dis-
abled list before the game.
Gregor Blanco’s RBI single off
Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen tied the
score 2-all in the ninth. Jansen
allowed a leadoff single to Pablo
Sandoval.
Giants fall to L.A. in walk off
SPORTS 13
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — The San Jose
Sharks opened training camp
looking to play like the fast,
aggressive team that had a strong
playoff run last season rather than
the plodding one that struggled for
much of the lockout-shortened
campaign.
The Sharks started Thursday
with a very similar look on the
roster to the team that ended last
season with a Game 7 loss to Los
Angeles in the second round of the
playoffs. The only newcomer on
the top four lines and three defen-
sive pairings on the first day of
practice was forward Tyler
Kennedy, who was acquired in the
offseason from Pittsburgh.
The core of the team led by long-
time stalwarts like captain Joe
Thornton, Patrick Marleau, Logan
Couture, Joe
Pavelski and
Dan Boyle is
back for anoth-
er run in a clear
sign that man-
a g e m e n t
believes the
pieces are in
place to get the
Sharks over the
hump and to the Stanley Cup finals
for the first time in franchise his-
tory.
“We were pleased about how we
played last year from the deadline
on and into the playoffs. The big
key for us is to continue that and
build upon that,” general manager
Doug Wilson said. “The players we
have are the ingredients we’re
looking for to match up with the
system we want to play. We want
to play a north-south game, attack
people, make them defend, and
you’ve got to have players that
have that skill set to be able to do
that. We’re coming back, and if
we’re ready to build on what we did
last year, we’re very excited about
this team.”
The Sharks return players who
accounted for more than 85 per-
cent of the team’s goals and points
last season and almost all the key
contributors from that group that
won 12 of the final 16 regular sea-
son games and swept Vancouver in
the opening round.
That success followed a stretch
of 17 losses in 23 games that led
to a roster re-set by general man-
ager Doug Wilson as he tried to put
together a faster team that he
hoped could have postseason suc-
cess.
“We’ve talked a little already in
camp about finding that new iden-
tity here in the playoffs and now
finding a way to just, boom, pick
that back up and go,” forward
Adam Burish said. “It took six
months just to find it, and we found
it, so now we know what it is. We
found it, we got it, and now after a
couple months off, you kick the
rust off and let’s go pick up right
where we left off.”
The biggest questions for the
Sharks to answer during training
camp are figuring out line combi-
nations and deciding whether Alex
Stalock or Harri Sateri will back
up Antti Niemi in goal.
Neither figures to get a lot of
time as Niemi has started more
than 80 percent of the games since
joining San Jose in 2010-11 ,
including all but five games in the
lockout-shortened 2012-13 sea-
son.
As far as the lines, coach Todd
McLellan wants to keep Marleau
and Couture together on one line,
with Thornton and Brett Burns
together on another after their
strong success as a pair last sea-
son.
The Sharks went to those com-
binations late last season with TJ
Galiardi joining Thornton and
Burns and a variety of players
teaming up with Marleau and
Couture.
Kennedy got the first chance to
work with Thornton and Burns,
while Raffi Torres teamed with
Marleau and Couture after playing
well on that line in the postseason
before a suspension for an illegal
hit on Los Angeles’ Jarret Stoll in
Game 1 of the second round ended
his season.
“We really stress talk, communi-
cate and that’s how you find each
other early on,” Thornton said.
“Hopefully, by the first week of
October we’ll all know where each
other are and be all familiar with
each other. ”
Sharks open training camp with similar look
Joe Thornton
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTACLARA — As safety Eric
Reid exited the tunnel to take the
field for his NFL debut, he received
some words of wisdom from All-Pro
defensive mate Justin Smith: “Stay
back.”
As in, Smith and the defensive
line would do their part up front and
Reid only needed to stick to his
duties in the secondary. All worked
well for both groups in the 49ers’
season-opening victory against
Green Bay.
Reid’s first game as a rookie for
San Francisco came against one of
the league’s best quarterbacks in
Aaron Rodgers. Reid shined, mak-
ing an interception and six tackles.
The next task is equally tough for
the first-rounder: Defending another
dynamic quarterback, Russell
Wilson, in the hostile, ear-piercing
confines of CenturyLink Field,
where Seattle’s raucous fans will try
to set a Guinness World Record for
stadium noise Sunday night.
The 21-year-old Reid says bring it
on. He lives for game day on the big
stage, and hardly considers the pres-
sure but rather
sees this as an
opportunity to
get better and
not make the
same mistake
twice.
“I always
would like to say
that I step up.
That’s some-
thing I always try to do, no matter
what the game is,” Reid said. “I’m
used to the quote unquote pressure. I
think pressure’s what you make of
it. To me, I just try to make it like
any other game. It’s just a football
game, something I’ve been doing
for a long time.”
Coach Jim Harbaugh has been
stressing improved tackling this
week as his team prepares for an
NFC West showdown with the
Niners’ biggest rival, but he was
pleased with Reid’s open-field tack-
ling against the Packers — though
Reid said he missed a couple of
plays he would like back.
On Sunday, Harbaugh happened to
follow Reid and Smith into the sta-
dium and hear their exchange.
And the coach was pleased with
Reid’s adjustments on game day.
“He’s been really diligent, on it
from the time he got here. It’s just
the way he’s wired,” Harbaugh said.
“He’s not an error repeater. He takes
great pride in his own personal per-
formance and he’s really smart. Ever
since he’s been here he’s picked
things up extremely fast, and it’s
early on.”
Reid, drafted with the 18th overall
pick out of LSU, identified a couple
of missed tackles he would have
liked to add to his total. On Sunday,
stopping Marshawn Lynch in the
open field will be a daunting task.
49ers’ Reid eager to face another top quarterback
Eric Reid
SPORTS 14
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Terra Nova (1-0) at St. Ignatius (0-1), 1 p.m. Saturday
The Tigers rolled over Bishop O’Dowd-Oakland last week,
45-7. … The Wildcats fell to Marin Catholic 31-20. … This
is the second year in a row these teams have hooked up. St.
Ignatius beat Terra Nova 46-26 last season. … The Wildcats
are the defending Central Coast Section Open Division cham-
pion. … Terra Nova finished just shy of the 600-yard mark for
total offense last week. … QB Anthony Gordon kicked off his
varsity career with 362 yards passing and three touchdowns.
… John Wallace paced the Tigers’ ground attack with 113
yards and a pair of scores on 11 carries.
Mission San Jose-Fremont (0-1) at
Mills (1-0), 1:30 p.m. Saturday
The Warriors were whipped by Las Lomas-Walnut Creek
last week, 63-6. … The Vikings erupted in a 53-28 win over
Harbor. … Mission went 1-9 overall last season and were
winless in the Mission Valley Athletic League. The Warriors
have been a perennial doormat for years in the MVAL. …
Mills ground out 297 yard rushing, led by Antonio Jeffrey’s
141 yards and three touchdowns on 17 carries.
Continued from page 11
BEST
Mission-SF (0-1) vs.
Menlo School (0-1) at Sequoia, 7 p.m. Friday
The Bears were mauled by Hercules in their home opener, 44-
0. … The Knights ran into a buzz saw last week, falling 84-49
to San Angelo Central in Texas. … Menlo QB Jack Heneghan
kicked off his senior year by throwing for more than 400 yards
and four touchdowns last week. He also rushed for two more.
Gunn (0-1) at Carlmont (1-0), 7 p.m. Friday
The Titans were torched by San Mateo last week, 43-6. … The
Scots slipped past Yerba Buena 17-6. … Gunn went 7-3 overall
last season and 5-1 in Santa Clara Valley Athletic League El
Camino Division play. … Carlmont’s defense suffocated the
Aztecs last week, holding them to 42 yards of offense, includ-
ing minus-1 rushing. … RB Dominic Banks paced the offense
for the Scots, churning out 147 yards on 24 carries.
St. Patrick-St.Vincent at Jefferson (0-1), 7 p.m. Friday
The Bruins pitched a shutout against Albany, 43-0. … The
Indians were run over by Aragon, 50-0. … SPSV opened the
season with a 35-0 loss to San Marin, before rebounding last
week. … Dominic Blandino wasn’t very effective at QB for
Jefferson, but turned into quite a receiver. After Damari Davis
replaced Blandino at QB, Blandino caught three passes for 55
yards.
Half Moon Bay (0-1) at Wilcox (1-0), 7:30 p.m. Friday
The Cougars were upset by Hillsdale last week, 31-28. … the
Chargers outlasted Manteca in overtime, 28-27. … Delshawn
Mitchell led Wilcox with 213 yards rushing and two scores. …
Half Moon Bay’s defense allowed more than 300 yards of
offense to Hillsdale last week.
Mountain View (0-1) at
Sacred Heart Prep (1-0), 1 p.m. Saturday
The Spartan were skewered by Burlingame 45-0. … The
Gators grabbed a 48-0 win over visiting Branham. …
Mountain View managed just 195 yards of offense. … SHP
churned out 366 yards of offense last week — 266 rushing, 100
passing. … QBs Cole March and Mason Randall combined to
go 5 for 5 passing, throwing a touchdown apiece.
Hillsdale (1-0) at Lincoln-SF (0-1), 2 p.m. Saturday
The Knights knocked off Half Moon Bay, 31-28. … The
Mustangs hung tough in a 28-19 loss to Riordan. … Hillsdale
QB Cole Carrithers earned Daily Journal Athlete of the Week
honors following a 196-yard, three-touchdown performance in
last week’s win. … RB Hollon James had 128 yards of total
offense for the Knights — 88 rushing and 4 yards receiving. …
Lincoln rushed for more than 300 yards last week. … Two dif-
ferent runners, Tyree Marzetta and Davion Telfor, each went
over the 100-yard rushing mark.
The rest
“With the type of players we got,” Horton said, “I know
the type of athletes I have and they fit the system. It’s just
trying to figure out what is the best way to get into our set
quicker and be more effective. I think that with us, going
more uptempo, more no-huddle, that’s what is going to be
our final piece that’s missing from our offense.”
For South City, it’s a matter of cleaning things up, espe-
cially up front.
“We have to do a better job of protecting our quarterback,”
Moro said. “And it wasn’t just our line, it’s our running
backs, tight ends protecting the edges and even our quarter-
back. So we spent a little time with that this week.”
Moro added South City renewed its emphasis on defensive
discipline. Against Santa Clara, Moro felt they were overly
aggressive and rushed out of their lanes — this allowed to
the Bruins to do most of the damage between the tackles.
It’s something he said won’t happen Friday against Cap.
Continued from page 11
GOTW
SPORTS 15
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 88 58 .603 —
Washington 77 69 .527 11
Philadelphia 68 78 .466 20
NewYork 64 81 .441 23 1/2
Miami 54 91 .372 33 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 85 61 .582 —
St. Louis 85 61 .582 —
Cincinnati 83 64 .565 2 1/2
Milwaukee 63 82 .434 21 1/2
Chicago 62 84 .425 23
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 86 60 .589 —
Arizona 73 72 .503 12 1/2
Colorado 67 80 .456 19 1/2
SanDiego 66 79 .455 19 1/2
SanFrancisco 66 81 .449 20 1/2
Thursday’sGames
Atlanta 6, Miami 1
Washington7, N.Y. Mets 2
Pittsburgh3, ChicagoCubs 1
Philadelphia 10, SanDiego5
Milwaukee 5, St. Louis 3
L.A. Dodgers 3, SanFrancisco2, 10 innings
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 89 59 .601 —
Tampa Bay 79 66 .545 8 1/2
New York 79 68 .537 9 1/2
Baltimore 77 69 .527 11
Toronto 67 79 .459 21
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 84 62 .575 —
Cleveland 78 68 .534 6
Kansas City 77 69 .527 7
Minnesota 63 82 .434 20 1/2
Chicago 58 88 .397 26
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 85 61 .582 —
Texas 81 64 .559 3 1/2
Los Angeles 70 76 .479 15
Seattle 65 81 .445 20
Houston 50 96 .342 35
Thursday’sGames
Oakland 8, Minnesota 2
N.Y.Yankees 6, Baltimore 5
L.A. Angels 4,Toronto 3
Tampa Bay 4, Boston 3
Cleveland 14, Chicago White Sox 3
AMERICAN LEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 2 0 0 1.000 36 31
Miami 1 0 0 1.000 23 10
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 28 30
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 21 23
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 21 17
Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 16 9
Houston 1 0 0 1.000 31 28
Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 2 28
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 21 24
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 9 16
Baltimore 0 1 0 .000 27 49
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 10 23
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 28 2
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 49 27
San Diego 0 1 0 .000 28 31
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 17 21
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 33 27
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 36 31
Washington 0 1 0 .000 27 33
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 31 36
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 23 17
Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 17 18
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 7 12
Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 17 23
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 34 24
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 24 21
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 34
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 24 34
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000 27 24
Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 12 7
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 34 28
Arizona 0 1 0 .000 24 27
NFL GLANCE
regards to our doubles play, ”
Smith said about the Monte Vista
and Menlo matches. “Our second
and third doubles learned how to
play against teams that would be
pressing them the entire time.
They took something out of it.
Instead of retreating in their
minds, being scarred by it — I
wrote the team, ‘That which does-
n’t destroy you makes you
stronger, ’ so we didn’t a little
Nietzsche the last couple of days.”
“We’re young, but I think the
seniors did a good job with the
leadership today,” said Aragon
head coach Linda Brown. “They
had a tough match against Palo
Alto yesterday (Wednesday) so I
think the singles players were a
little tired. I think a little of that
showed today. Our doubles teams
are still young so I’m hoping as
the season goes on they’ll devel-
op and keep getting better and bet-
ter. ”
Matches don’t come much better
than the back-and-forth affair that
culminated the day. Tied 3-3, the
fate of both teams rested on their
No. 1 singles players. At the end,
Alex Harrigan broke Kaede
Ishikawa’s serve a pair of times to
come away with a 2-6, 6-2, 6-3
win.
“I’ve worked a lot on getting
myself out of my head,” Harrigan
said. “So, out there it was really
me against her. She was playing
really well. She was hitting those
lines, being very aggressive and
hitting a lot of those drop shots
which I don’t like. I needed to stay
consistent and stay aggressive
because that’s when I’m playing
my best.”
Before Harrigan, Sara Arfania
and Lindsey Schloetter picked up a
big win in No. 2 doubles. Also
victorious for the Panthers were
Lisa Patel and Haley Shaffer (No. 1
doubles), and Madeline Somers
and Christina Monisteri (No. 3
doubles).
Vickie Sun, Aislinn Oka and
Melissa Ma won singles matches
for Aragon.
“It’s always good to start off
winning. It’s good to win no mat-
ter when it is in the season,”
Harrigan said. “I think our team,
because we are so young, it’s like
‘Oh, OK, we’ll see how this goes.’
We’re really not sure. We have a
lot of good players that are young.
Today, we proved to ourselves that
we’re better than we thought we
would be.”
Continued from page 11
TENNIS
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Alex Harrigan lines up a return in
her 3-set win over Kaede Ishikawa.
points was its undoing.
Game 1 was the closest of the
three. Castilleja jumped out to a
quick 5-2 lead, but a Gators’ set-
ting error tied the game at 5 and a
kill from San Mateo’s Katrina
Andersen put the Bearcats up 6-5.
There were seven ties in the first
game, the last coming at 19,
before the Gators put the game
away with a flurry of points down
the stretch. Back-to-back kills and
an ace gave the Gators game
point, 24-21, but the Bearcats did
not go quietly. They got kills from
Morgan Ho and Paloma Monesi to
close to 24-23, but a Bearcats vio-
lation gave the game to the
Gators.
In Game 2, San Mateo got off to
the quick start, taking a 3-0 lead
on a pair of Mauricio kills and a
Castilleja hitting error, but the
Gators went on to tie the game at
5. ASan Mateo hitting error jump-
started a Castilleja 6-0 run, turn-
ing a 5-4 Gators deficit into a 10-5
advantage. The Gators then slow-
l y, but surely, pulled away for a 25-
14 win.
Game 3 saw the Bearcats take a
3-0 lead early again, but the
Gators, again, came back to tie the
game at 5. It appeared San Mateo
might have finally found an offen-
sive groove as the Bearcats went
on a 6-0 spurt to take a 12-6 lead.
The Gators, however, answered
with a 5-0 run of its own to cut
their deficit to 12-11.
Aserve into the net only briefly
slowed the Gators’ roll but, down
13-11, Castilleja won six of the
next eight points to take a 17-15
lead. The Gators finished the game
by winning eight of the next nine
points to close out the match.
“We have a lot of young players
who are talented,” Tigno said.
“They just need a little season-
ing.”
Continued from page 11
VOLLEYBALL
16
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
AUTO
Lexus GS is top fuel mileage luxury sedan
By Ann M. Job
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The 2013 Lexus GS 450h offers the best
of two worlds — best-in-class gasoline-
electric hybrid fuel economy when you’re
not in a rush, and pedal-stomping accelera-
tion when you are.
The newly revamped-for-2013 GS 450h
mid-size sedan also has an aggressive,
sporty sedan look and retains the rear-wheel
drive configuration that many sports car afi-
cionados prefer.
In fact, many people don’t realize the GS
450h is a hybrid unless they see the hybrid
badges on the car’s exterior.
Technology, handling, styling and quiet
ride are all noteworthy in this middle-of-
the-Lexus-line sedan that slots between the
larger Lexus LS and entry ES sedans.
The 2013 GS hybrid is the first car to com-
bine rear-wheel drive/front-engine layout
with an efficient Atkinson cycle V-6.
Buyers can even get a distinctive bam-
boo-covered steering wheel and interior
trim on the GS hybrid, in a nod to environ-
mental concerns about using renewable
resources.
The Lexus GS is a recommended buy of
Consumer Reports magazine, which finds
its reliability above average.
The GS 450h is the top model of the GS
line in both horsepower and price. Starting
manufacturer’s suggested retail price,
including destination charge, is $60,360
for the 338-horsepower GS hybrid; this
does not include navigation system, trunk
cargo net or front passenger seat memory.
The 2013 GS hybrid is the first car to combine rear-wheel drive/front-engine layout with an efficient Atkinson cycle V-6.
See LEXUS, Page 17
By Tom Krisher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich. — The big
SUV rolls on.
Five years ago, when gas hit $4 per gal-
lon, auto industry analysts boldly predicted
that enormous SUVs would vanish like the
automobile tail fin.
On Thursday, General Motors is unveiling
a completely redesigned lineup of its truck-
based SUVs, three-ton behemoths that are
still popular with drivers hauling around
boats, campers and large families, or who
like to sit high or feel safer in a heavy vehi-
cle. The 2015 Chevrolet Tahoe and
Suburban, GMC Yukon and Cadillac
Escalade will hit showrooms in either late
winter or early spring.
“There are some people, especially in our
market, who want a product in that seg-
ment,” says Ed Williamson, part-owner of
two GMC and Cadillac dealerships near
Miami, where people often use the V8-pow-
ered SUVs to tow boats to the ocean.
In recent years, buyers have flocked to
crossovers, which are car-based sport utili-
ties that are easier to drive, carry just as
many people and get better gas mileage. Yet
there’s still a lucrative U.S. market for the
truck-based SUVs, and GM controls more
than 70 percent of it.
Americans bought more than 132,000
big SUVs from GM from January through
August, compared with around 114,000 in
the same period a year ago, even though the
sticker price can top $50,000 and a fill-up
can cost close to $100. With gas mileage
around 17 mpg in city and highway driving,
those fill-ups come more often than with
many other vehicles.
GM executives aren’t sure if this genera-
tion of SUVs will be its last. Government
pollution limits and stricter fuel-economy
requirements in the future could force the
company’s hand.
ENTHRALLED WITH TRUCKS
The giant SUVs became the rage in the
late 1990s. Gas mileage was of little con-
cern with fuel at just over $1 per gallon.
Nissan and Toyota joined the market with
the Armada and Sequoia SUVs, trying to
take a piece of Detroit’s action. By 2001,
big SUV sales hit a record of just over
917,000, according to Ward’s Automotive.
The SUVs accounted for about 5 percent of
all car sales that year, driven mostly by
people who weren’t going off-road or tow-
ing something.
“We were really in sort of a truck craze at
that time,” said Bill Visnic, senior analyst
with the Edmunds.com auto website.
Sales were fairly stable until 2005, when
gas spiked over $3 per gallon as hurricanes
pounded Gulf Coast refineries. About the
Big SUVs rumble along as GM shows new models
See GM, Page 17
AUTO 17
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By comparison, the base, 2013 GS
350, which is powered solely by a
306-horspower V-6, has a starting
retail price of $48,150.
Competitors to the GS hybrid are
the major luxury brands with hybrid
powertrains. For example, the 2013
Mercedes-Benz E400h is a luxury,
mid-size sedan with 302-horsepower,
gasoline-electric hybrid power.
Starting MSRP, including destination
charge, is $57,625. Infiniti’s 2013
M35h hybrid starts at $55,655 and
has a 360-horsepower V-6 mated to an
onboard electric motor system.
None of these luxury hybrids is a
plug-in. Rather, drivers generate elec-
tricity while driving, and it is stored
in the onboard battery pack. In the GS
450h, the battery pack is the older-
style nickel metal-hydride. Battery
packs in the M35h and E400h are the
newer lithium ion.
The GS hybrid is tops among luxury
branded hybrid sedans in fuel mileage,
according to the U.S. government. It
is rated at 29 miles per gallon in city
driving and 34 mpg on the highway.
These numbers, which are a 35 per-
cent increase from the previous GS
hybrid, are not far-fetched. The test
car, with uplevel 18-inch wheels, eas-
ily averaged 28.4 mpg in driving that
was mostly in the city and included
constant use of air conditioning.
This translated into a single-tank
range of nearly 500 miles.
All the driver did to achieve the
mileage was activate “eco” mode,
which changed throttle mapping and
made other adjustments to conserve
fuel. It is one of five selectable modes
on the car.
The Infiniti M35h fuel economy
rating by the government is 27/32
mpg, and the Mercedes E400h is rated
at 24/30 mpg.
The most memorable part of driving
the GS 450h is how quiet the ride is —
conversations can be held in nearly
hushed tones inside — and how
smoothly power comes on.
Virtually all transitions among
engine, the two electric motors and
the battery pack were seamless in the
tester. Indeed, if a driver didn’t notice
the word “ready” in green in the
instrument cluster after pushing the
start button, the lack of engine sound
and engine vibration could make it
seem as if the GS 450h hadn’t turned
on.
In eco mode, power came on gradu-
ally and steadily. But in sport-plus
mode, throttle response was quick and
engine sounds were prominent.
In just 5.6 seconds, according to
Lexus, the GS hybrid can go from 0 to
60 miles per hour.
The V-6 is 3.5 liters, which is the
same displacement as the engines in
the E400h and M35h. But only the GS
has an Atkinson cycle V-6, which is
designed for fuel efficiency, and it’s
mated to a fuel-conserving continu-
ously variable transmission (CVT)
that sounds and acts mostly like a reg-
ular automatic.
Continued from page 16
LEXUS
same time, companies figured out ways to put big people-
haulers on car underpinnings. The new vehicles became
quick hits.
As the Great Recession arrived, the truck-based vehicles
also drew scorn from environmentalists who viewed them
as icons of excess. Gas topped $4 nationwide in the sum-
mer of 2008. Hummer, the poster child for gas-guzzling
waste, went out of business. By 2009, large SUV sales had
plummeted to 228,000.
A COMEBACK, OF SORTS
Sales of big SUVs hit 237,000 last year, up 4.5 percent
from the 2009 trough but still only a quarter of what they
were in the boom years. Experts suspect drivers have
become accustomed to high gas prices, which have aver-
aged around $3.50 nationwide since 2011. Because they
carry up to eight people, Suburbans and Yukons are more
efficient than driving two cars, said Chris Hemmersmeier,
CEO of a 10-franchise dealership chain in Salt Lake City,
where there’s an abundance of big families and people who
travel into nearby mountains.
“When you look at it in miles per passenger, it’s pretty
good,” Hemmersmeier said.
There are still buyers who just want something big. GM’s
own data show that more than half of Tahoe buyers never
tow anything, and only 1.3 percent go off the road at least
monthly. Only 35 percent have children in their homes.
THE NEXT STEP
For GM, the business case for updating the SUVs makes
perfect sense. They sell to high-income households for an
average of $47,000 each, about $20,000 above last year’s
average price of a new vehicle in the U.S. Analysts say GM
makes at least $10,000 per SUV.
GM had already designed new engines, transmissions and
suspensions for its full-size pickup trucks. Those will be
used in the SUVs. All it took was a minimal amount of engi-
neering to make the SUV bodies a little sleeker, update the
interiors and add third-row seats that fold into the floor.
GM says the new models will be more efficient than the
current ones. Actual mileage won’t be announced until a
later date. The company unveiled the Chevy and GMC mod-
els Thursday, with the Cadillac to follow. No prices were
announced.
Continued from page 16
GM
‘Insidious: Chapter 2’
has scares and laughs
By Sandy Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Three years after “Insidious” intro-
duced moviegoers to the Lambert fam-
ily and its troubling connection to the
spirit world, the stars and filmmakers
have reunited for another install-
ment. “Insidious: Chapter 2” picks
up where the first story ended, but
the sequel has enough scares,
laughs and a story of its own to
stand alone.
Like its 2010 predecessor,
“Insidious 2” is a haunted-
house tale with supernatural
elements. The typical horror-
movie tropes are at play here:
Creaky doors, creepy appari-
tions and long, dark hallways
explored by flashlight.
There’s also a haunted
piano that repeats
the same eerie
melody and an
outrageously
loud and col-
orful baby
walker that
s p o n t a -
n e o u s l y
lights up and
m o v e s
around.
P a t r i c k
Wilson and
Rose Byrne
return as Josh and
Renai Lambert,
wel l -
meaning parents who moved into a new
home after fearing their last one was
haunted. Their eldest son, Dalton (Ty
Simpkins), has recovered from a myste-
rious coma (a reference to the first film),
but he’s still plagued by nightmares. He
doesn’t just see dead people; they want
something from him. When the frights
become too much for Renai, the family
decides to stay with grandma for a
while.
Lorraine Lambert (Barbara Hershey)
has been through this kind of thing
before, when her own son, Josh, was
haunted as a child. She knows who to
call. Josh was treated by ghost special-
ists as a child, and a flashback to his
youth reveals even more about the
source of his troubles.
Carl (Steve Coulter) is a serious ghost
hunter, while his assistants, Specs
(screenwriter Leigh Whannell) and
Tucker (Angus Sampson), provide
much of the comic relief, including the
always-amusing tranquilizer mishap.
Directed by James Wan (“The
Conjuring,” “Saw”) from a story creat-
ed by Wan and Whannell, “Insidious:
Chapter 2” deftly juggles various
responsibilities: It offers a good dose of
non-gory scares, tells a story of super-
natural time travel that recalls elements
of “Inception,” and pays homage to the
genre Wan and Whannell love. In a
tribute to its horror lineage, look for
thematic and visual nods to “Pyscho,”
“Poltergeist” and “The Blair Witch
Project” in “Insidious: Chapter 2.”
See INSIDIOUS Page 20
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Playwright Amy Herzog looks at
what happens when an idolized
ancestor turns out to have been
human in “After the Revolution,”
staged by Aurora Theatre Company
to open its 22nd season in
Berkeley.
This two-act play focuses on
three generations of the Joseph
family, who proudly call them-
selves Marxists. Their venerated
ancestor is the late Joe Joseph, a
Marxist who worked for the Office
of Strategic Services, a World War
II forerunner of the Central
Intelligence Agency.
When he testified at a congres-
sional hearing during the infamous
communist witch hunts during the
early 1950s, he denied passing
U.S. secrets to Russia and refused
to name possible communists,
thus being blacklisted.
Now his 26-year-old granddaugh-
ter, Emma (Jessica Bates), a freshly
minted law school graduate in
1999, has started the Joe Joseph
Foundation dedicated to fighting
injustice.
When she learns that what she
had been told about her grandfather
isn’t entirely true, she triggers a
major family crisis aimed mostly at
her father, Ben Joseph (Rolf
Saxon), for having withheld the
information from her.
His partner Mel (Pamela Gaye
Walker), his brother Leo (Victor
Talmadge), Emma’s sister Jess
(Sarah Mitchell), their stepgrand-
mother Vera (Ellen Ratner) and
Emma’s boyfriend Miguel (Adrian
Anchondo) all get involved in the
father-daughter rift.
The person who seems to be the
most helpful is an outsider, 77-
year-old Morty (Peter Kybart), a
major donor to Emma’s foundation.
Director Joy Carlin keeps the
action moving briskly and has a
solid cast. Bates as Emma is
onstage through most of the two-
act play and carries the heaviest
load in a role that temporarily
devolves into depression that can
seem self-indulgent.
Saxon is convincing as the car-
ing father who has to admit he
made mistakes. Talmadge as Leo
and Walker as Mel come across as
reasonable and caring as they try to
serve as peacemakers.
Mitchell’s Jess is refreshingly
blunt as a young woman trying to
get through rehab. Ratner as Vera
is feisty as she portrays an aging
woman beset by difficulties hear-
ing, walking and remembering
words.
Kybart embodies Morty’s gen-
erosity, wisdom and sense of
humor, while Anchondo is caring
and then conflicted as Miguel.
Because the plot tends to be
detailed, one must listen carefully.
This is especially true in Aurora’s
intimate space, where the audience
sits on three sides of the stage. If
an actor is turned away from one
side, he or she might be difficult to
hear.
The play makes extensive use of
telephone calls, especially in the
second act when Ben is trying to
get through to Emma. J.B.
Wilson’s set design plays up this
device with telephone poles and
wires upstage.
For the most part, “After the
Revolution” is an involving drama
with believable characters and cir-
cumstances.
It will continue at Aurora
Theatre, 2081 Addison St.,
Berkeley, through Sept. 29. For
tickets and information call (510)
843-4822 or visit www.aurorathe-
atre.org.
Marxist family confronts truth in ‘After the Revolution’
DAVID ALLEN
Miguel (left, Adrian Anchondo) tries to convince Emma (right, Jessica Bates) to speak to her father (Rolf Saxon)
in Aurora Theatre Company’s production of ‘After the Revolution.’
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: September 30, 2013
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The film is also self-aware and self-refer-
ential, rewarding viewers of the original
film with additional explanations in the
sequel. And, like its predecessor, “Chapter
2” leaves open the possibility of more to
come.
“Insidious: Chapter 2,” a Film District
release, is rated PG-13 for intense sequences
of terror and violence, and thematic ele-
ments. Running time: 105 minutes. Two and
a half stars out of four.
Continued from page 18
INSIDIOUS
“It simply gives hardworking
Californians the dignity and respect to pro-
vide for their families with their own hard-
earned wages,” Alejo said in arguing for the
bill before his Assembly colleagues.
Sen. Marty Block, D-San Diego, said rais-
ing the minimum wage will stimulate the
economy by giving lower-wage workers
more money to spend.
“They’re not going to put it into a hedge
fund,” he said.
But Republican lawmakers said it would
do the opposite, encouraging businesses to
cut jobs and automate.
“This is a classic example with how out-
of-touch state leaders are,” said Sen. Jim
Nielsen, R-Gerber.
Sen. Ted Gaines, R-Rocklin, said liberals
want to raise the cost of tobacco to discour-
age its use without realizing the same prin-
ciple applies to labor: “If you make some-
thing more expensive, people will buy less
of it.”
The California Chamber of Commerce
opposed the bill, saying it will drive up
businesses’ costs by ratcheting up other
wages and workers’ compensation pay-
ments.
“We have it tagged as a job killer, given
the increased costs businesses will be faced
with,” Jennifer Barrera, an advocate for the
chamber, said before the vote.
Federal law sets a minimum wage of $7.25
per hour, but California is among 19 states
and the District of Columbia that set a high-
er state minimum wage.
The federal minimum provides $15,080 a
year assuming a 40-hour work week, which
is $50 below the federal poverty line for a
family of two. More than 15 million work-
ers nationally earn the national minimum,
which compares to the median national
salary of $40,350, according to the U.S.
Bureau of Labor Statistics.
President Barack Obama has sought an
increase of the federal minimum wage to $9
an hour. San Francisco currently has the
nation’s highest minimum wage at $10.50
an hour.
California’s minimum wage would
increase to $9 an hour next July 1 and to
$10 on Jan. 1, 2016. The bill does not
index the rate to inflation, however, mean-
ing it would remain at $10 per hour unless
the Legislature raises it again in the future.
Washington and other states that index
minimum wage rate hikes to inflation each
year would, over time, outpace California’s
rate unless the state made an adjustment.
A$10 minimum wage would increase earn-
ings for a projected 2 million Californians
by $4,000 a year and put $2.6 billion into
the economy, Assembly Speaker John
Perez, D-Los Angeles, estimated in a state-
ment supporting the increase.
Opponents say businesses would suffer
because owners also face voter-approved
increases in sales and income taxes, and
because of the uncertain costs of the federal
Affordable Care Act.
Businesses are likely to cut jobs, increase
consumer prices or both, they argue, citing
a study by the National Federation of
Independent Business. The group projects
that mean the loss of between 46,000 and
68,000 jobs by 2023, depending on other
factors including inflation.
Continued from page 1
WAGES
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
MATISSE JAZZ AT THE CANTOR ARTS CENTER
AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY. Henri Matisse, one of
the most influential artists of the 20th century, refused to
leave France after the outbreak of World War II, even as the
Germans occupied Paris and his children began working for
the Resistance. In 1941, Matisse underwent radical surgery
for cancer and thereafter was obliged to work either from a
wheelchair or from bed. Despite these circumstances, in
1943, at the age of 74, Matisse began Jazz, a much-cele-
brated portfolio of works characterized by brilliant colors,
poetic texts and joyful circus and theater themes. The works
represent the artist’s lifelong unflagging creativity.
Limited in his mobility, Matisse could not paint or sculpt.
Instead, he cut out forms from colored papers that he
arranged as collages. His assistants then prepared the col-
lages for printing in a stencil process referred to by the
French term “pochoir.” Matisse worked on the series for
two years, with the act of cutting shapes from brightly col-
ored sheets of paper linking in a single process both draw-
ing and color, two important elements in Matisse’s work.
In 1947, Matisse’s publisher Tériade issued the prints in an
artist’s portfolio that included 20 color prints, each about
16 by 26 inches, with handwritten texts by Matisse
expressing his thoughts as he created the images. The
bright colors and lively subject matter, combined with the
text, evoke a joie de vivre that mark this project as one of
the most beautiful artist’s books of the 20th century.
Tériade came up with the title Jazz, which Matisse liked
because it suggested a connection between art and musical
improvisation.
In 1948, Matisse gave an edition of Jazz to Sarah Stein,
sister-in-law of author Gertrude Stein, an important patron.
Sarah Stein, Matisse’s confidante and also his patron,
donated the edition, along with numerous prints by
Matisse, to Stanford University after she moved to Palo
Alto from Paris. The works then joined the major collection
of rare books and works of art on paper under the care of the
Stanford Library. This exhibition presents all 20 prints
from the edition of Jazz held in the Gunst Collection in
Special Collections at the Stanford University Library.
Connie Wolf, the John and Jill Freidenrich Director of the
Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University, said, “The Jazz
series by Matisse is truly extraordinary. Matisse so beauti-
fully displays his ability to combine color and shape to cre-
ate images that are compelling, enlightening and full of
energy. It is a delight to see the original works and be able
to look closely and directly experience the lively forms and
beloved style typical of Matisse’s later career. These works
are the perfect complement to our other special exhibitions
of French art now on view. We invite the community to
come to the Cantor, enjoy these works and discover all the
Cantor has to offer. ”
MORE ABOUT POCHOIR. Pochoir, a stencil-based
printing technique popular from the late 19th century
through the 1930s, was primarily used by illustrators and
designers to create patterns and architectural design prints.
It was used during the Art Nouveau and Art Deco periods, and
at the peak of its popularity in the early 20th century there
were as many as 30 graphic design studios in France using
this technique, each employing up to 600 workers. Pochoir
was used by artists, in conjunction with other media such as
engraving, lithography or photography, as a means of
adding color to a print. Each print is unique because it is
done by hand and each remains vivid in both tactile and
visual sense. Artists in addition to Matisse who used
pochoir as a printing technique included Man Ray, Georges
Braque, Pablo Picasso, Albert Gleizes, Juan Gris, Fernand
Léger and Sonia Delaunay.
MUSEUM PARTICULARS. “Matisse Jazz” joins five
other exhibitions this season, presenting a special oppor-
tunity for visitors to experience French art at the Cantor
Arts Center. The other exhibitions feature prints from the
School of Fontainebleau; graphic arts by Edouard Manet
and his contemporaries; 400 years of French drawings from
the Blanton Museum of Art; old master figure drawings from
the Cantor’s collection; and lithographs by Symbolist
artist Odilon Redon. The Cantor is open Wednesday to
Sunday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Thursday until 8 p.m. and is
located on the Stanford campus, off Palm Drive at Museum
Way. Parking is free on weekends and after 4 p.m. on week-
days. Information can be obtained by calling 723-4177 or
visiting museum.stanford.edu. Matisse Jazz is on display
through Sept. 22.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com or
www.twitter.com/susancityscene.
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Henri Matisse (France,1869–1954),Le Cirque from the portfolio
Jazz, 1947. Pochoir. On display as part of Matisse Jazz, at the
Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University through Sept. 22.
Fox ending Smith’s
nightly newscast
By David Bauder
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Fox News Channel is eliminating one of
Shepard Smith’s two daily newscasts and putting him in
charge of a news team designed to quickly break in to other
Fox shows when something big is hap-
pening.
Smith, the network’s top news anchor,
signed a new multi-year contract, the net-
work said Thursday. He will keep his 3
p.m. Eastern newscast while the 7 p.m.
show is eliminated.
“We don’t have to wait ‘til 7 anymore,”
said Smith, named managing editor of the
breaking news unit. “When it’s ready,
we’ll put it on the air. When it’s breaking,
I’m ready to do it.”
Fox News Chairman and CEO Roger Ailes described
Smith’s new role as a quarterback able to call an audible when
news is happening and get it on the air quickly. Except for
Smith’s show and Bret Baier’s Washington report, Fox’s
evening schedule is driven by opinionated, personality-driv-
en programming.
Fox is building a new studio, calling it the “Fox News
Deck,” for Smith to operate. The changes are likely to take
place in October.
“This is the way news should be presented in today’s world
with the equipment and the amount of technology that is
available,” Ailes said. “We’re making a major investment in
journalism here and it’s going to require journalists to be bet-
ter.”
The changes are among several taking place at Fox, the
top-rated cable news network and the one with the most per-
sonnel stability. This summer, Fox said that Megyn Kelly
would move into the network’s prime-time lineup when she
returns from maternity leave, but hasn’t said where she will
go and who she will displace.
Shepard Smith
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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165 North Amphlett Boulevard
San Mateo • 650-685-1250
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
We tend to associate pulled pork with
Southern-style barbecue. But for this hearty
fall soup, we decided to take our favorite
moist and tender pork in a decidedly
Japanese direction.
We started by marinating medallions of
pork tenderloin in garlic and oil. Time is
your friend here, so don’t hesitate to let it
go overnight. Then we saute onions and
shiitake mushrooms until brown, and bring
that and the pork to a simmer in chicken
broth. Once the pork is tender, we use forks
to pull it into delicious strands.
Add some fresh ginger and soba noodles
and you have a fresh, warming take on
pulled pork.
SHIITAKE GINGER NOODLE
SOUP WITH GARLIC PORK
Start to finish: 3 hours
Servings: 8
1-pound pork tenderloin, cut into 1-inch
medallions
4 cloves garlic, minced
3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
Two 6-ounce containers shiitake mush-
rooms, stalks discarded, sliced
1 large yellow onion, sliced
6 cups (1 1/2 quarts) low-sodium chicken
broth
2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger
6.2 ounces soba noodles (two-thirds of a
9.3-ounce package)
3 scallions, sliced
Salt and ground black pepper
In a zip-close plastic bag, combine the
pork medallions, garlic and 1 tablespoon of
the vegetable oil. Shake to coat evenly,
then refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to
overnight.
When ready to cook, in a large saucepan
over medium-high, heat the remaining 2
tablespoons of vegetable oil. Add the mush-
rooms and onion and cook until lightly
browned, stirring frequently, about 10 min-
utes. Add the pork and garlic from the bag,
along with the chicken broth. Bring to a
boil, then reduce to a simmer, cover and
cook for 30 minutes.
Use a slotted spoon to transfer the pork to
a plate. Using two forks, shred the pork
pieces, then return the meat to the pot. Add
the ginger and bring to a boil. Add the noo-
dles and cook until tender, about 4 minutes.
Stir in the scallions and adjust the season-
ing with salt and pepper.
Nutrition information per serving: 230
calories; 60 calories from fat (26 percent of
total calories); 7 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g
trans fats); 35 mg cholesterol; 26 g carbo-
hydrate; 2 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 18 g protein;
260 mg sodium.
Pulled pork makes friends with soba noodle soup
Take tender pork in a Japanese direction with this soba soup.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, SEPT. 13
Preserving Your History. 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. The National Archives at San
Francisco, 1000 Commodore Drive,
San Bruno. Genealogical workshop
on how to care for your personal
family papers and photographs. $15
payable in advance. For more infor-
mation or to reserve a space call
238-3488.
Free preview: American Line
Dancing — Levels Zero and One
Series. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Foster
City Recreation Center, 650 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. For more informa-
tion call Allen at 515-2320 or go to
www.LDVALI.com.
‘Life Begins at 70.’ Noon. Twin Pines
Senior and Community Center, 20
Twin Pines Lane, Belmont. Join us for
a pizza luncheon followed by a per-
formance by Norm Coleman.
Admission is $2 payable at the door.
Reserve a seat by calling 595-7444.
Women’s Recovery Association
Open House. Noon to 2 p.m. The
Open House will include unveiling of
the new logo, inspiring stories of
recovery and a tour of the new facil-
ities. Refreshments will be available.
To RSVP call Amy at 348-6603 or
email her at aphan@womensrecov-
ery.org. For more information con-
tract bbrown@womensrecovery.org.
Happy Hour: Dinner, Drinks and
Dancing. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. ‘Full House Band’
will be there. $6. For more informa-
tion call 616-7150.
Music on the Square: Foreverland.
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
For more information go to red-
woodcity.org/events.
Wildlife and Nature Photo Exhibit.
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Reach and Teach, 144
W. 25th Ave., San Mateo. Reception
for month-long photo exhibit by San
Mateo photographer Bruce
Finocchio. The exhibit will be avail-
able at Reach and Teach through the
rest of September during regular
business hours. For more informa-
tion email
craig@reachandteach.com.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Foster City Social Dance. 7:30 p.m.
Foster City Recreation Center, 650
Shell Blvd., Foster City. An evening of
ballroom, Latin, club and social
dances. No partner necessary and
casual dress is fine. Admission
includes a one hour dance lesson,
three hours of dancing, light snacks,
prize drawings, mixer dances and
professional performance. Tickets
are $12 from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
and $10 after 8:30 p.m. For more
information call 571-0836.
The Half Moon Bay Shakespeare
Company presents ‘The Tragedy
of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.’
7:30 p.m. Cameron’s Outback, 1410
Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay.
$20, $15 for students and seniors. For
more information email halfmoon-
bayshakes@gmail.com or go to
hmbshakespeare.org.
Monty Python’s ‘Spamalot.’ 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. An irreverent paro-
dy of the legendary tale of King
Arthur and his knights. Through
Sept. 22. Tickets start at $23 and can
be purchased at hillbarntheater.org
or by calling 349-6411.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 14
Kaplan PSAT Practice Test. 9 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. For high school-
ers only. Free. for more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
Free document shredding and
Goodwill drive. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The
dirt lot at the northeast corner of
Holly Street and El Camino Real in
San Carlos. On-site document
destruction is free for three standard
size bankers boxes. Participants
must show proof of residency.
Goodwill donation drive of clothing,
housewares, computers and e-waste
(working or not). For more informa-
tion call 802-4228 or go to www.city-
ofsancarlos.org.
Recycling ‘UnWaste’ Event. 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Parking Lot W adjacent to
the Burlingame Green Street Fair,
Burlingame. Items, including elec-
tronics, whether working or not, will
be accepted. No charge for smaller
items; small fees for larger ones. You
can drive through to drop off items.
Enter lot from Howard Avenue near
Park Road. For more information call
(888) 832-9839 or go to
unwaste.com.
Kimochi Inc. Third Annual Show‘n
Shine Car Show. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
College of San Mateo, 1700 W.
Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. Free
Admission. For more information call
(415) 931-2294 or go to
www.kimochi-inc.org.
St. Peter’s Second Annual Antique
and Collectibles Show. 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. St. Peter Catholic Church, 700
Oddstad Blvd., Pacifica. For more
information call (415) 602-6702 or
go to
www.stpeterantiqueshow.com.
First Baptist Church of San Carlos
Kids Carnival. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. First
Baptist Church, 787 Walnut St., San
Carlos. Free games and prizes. Two
bounce houses, velcro wall, Police K-
9 unit and more. Free.
Founders’ Day Festival. 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Monte Bello Open Space
Preserve, Page Mill Road, Palo Alto.
The event site is located about 7.5
miles west of Interstate 280 on Page
Mill Road, about 1 mile east of
Skyline Blvd; the event site is about
half an mile from main Monte Bello
staging area. This family-friendly fes-
tival will include live music, an
opportunity to meet rangers, a kids’
area, a historic exhibit, gourmet food
trucks, information booths and fami-
ly-friendly activities, including a
short hike to the official Founders’
rock. For more information or to
RSVP, visit
www.openspace.org/foundersday.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage
Lane, Twin Pines Park, Belmont.
Paperbacks are three for $1, trade
paperbacks are $1, hardbacks are $2,
children’s books are $.25 cents. For
more information call 593-5650.
Presentation by T. Jack Foster Jr.
on the creation of Foster City. 1 p.m.
San Mateo County History Museum,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
Foster will discuss how he, with his
father and two brothers, trans-
formed 4 miles of Bayfront lands into
what has become a thriving city of
30,000 people. Book signing will fol-
low. Free with the price of admission
to the museum. $5 for adults, $3 for
students and seniors. For more infor-
mation call 299-0104 or go to
www.historysmc.org.
Millbrae Library Mid-Autumn
Festival. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.
Musical instruments, singing, callig-
raphy demonstration and traditional
Asian children’s arts and crafts.
Sample Chinese moon cakes,
Japanese rice cake and Korean
sweets. Free family event. For more
information call 697-7607.
Friendship Force Program:
‘Mystical Myanmar, Land of
Golden Pagodas.’ 2 p.m.
Community Activities Building, 1400
Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City. Free.
For more information email presi-
dent@ffsfba.org.
Tricycle Music Fest presents: The
Corner Laughers. 2 p.m. Portola
Valley Library, 765 Portola Road,
Portola Valley. Family music event to
promote literacy. For more informa-
tion go to www.smcl.org.
An Afternoon with Author Oliver
Potzsch. 3 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Oliver Pötzsch is a German
writer and filmmaker. Free. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
The Half Moon Bay Shakespeare
Company presents ‘The Tragedy
of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.’
7:30 p.m. Cameron’s Outback, 1410
Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay.
$20, $15 for students and seniors. For
more information email halfmoon-
bayshakes@gmail.com or go to
hmbshakespeare.org.
Monty Python’s ‘Spamalot.’ 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. An irreverent paro-
dy of the legendary tale of King
Arthur and his knights. Plays until
Sept. 22. Tickets start at $23 and can
be purchased at hillbarntheater.org
or by calling 349-6411.
Coastal Repertory Theatre pres-
ents ‘The Diary of Anne Frank.’ 8
p.m. Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. This moving
adaptation confronts a new genera-
tion with the horrors of the
Holocaust. Tickets start at $27. For
more information or to purchase
tickets go to www.coastalrep.com or
call 569-3266.
Groovy Judy Gets Funky. 8:30 p.m.
St. James Gate Irish Pub and
Restaurant, 1410 Old County Road,
Belmont. Ages 21 and up. For more
information go to
www.groovyjudy.com.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 15
Burlingame Green Street Fair and
Recycling Event. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Burlingame Avenue at Park Road,
adjacent to Burlingame Fresh
Market. More than 60 vendors, free
children’s crafts and activities, enter-
tainment and hourly drawings for
prizes. Free gift to first 500 visitors.
Free. For more information visit
www.burlingamegreenfair.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
inside Wenke’s purse.
Prosecutors also contend that, aside
from a contentious custody battle with
her husband, Wenke stood to benefit
from $2 million in life insurance if he
died and was quite jealous of his new
girlfriend. Carr has dismissed both
claims as untrue and the civil suit makes
no mention.
Wenke actually began a jury trial in
May but, just days into jury selection,
Judge Stephen Hall declared a mistrial
after Carr indicated his client’s intent to
claim insanity based on a defense-hired
psychiatrist’s late conclusion that she
was mentally compromised at the time.
Wenke remains in custody without
bail.
Continued from page 3
WENKE
The district pursued a parcel tax
in November 2012. It was unsuc-
cessful, do you think it should
try again?
Patrick Flynn: Yes. We need the
money to help our schools get back to
class size reduction. At least in the lower
grades, 31 kids per teacher is too much
to ask in K-1. We also need to reduce
split classes to zero. That will take
ongoing income.
John P. Marinos: Depends on the
new state funding formula.
Henry Sanchez: The SBPSD has
lost $4-$5 million in state funding
since 2007 and the district is considered
a “poor small basic aid district,” which
has forced the district to take drastic
measures including school closure, etc.
Therefore, we should pursue again an
educational parcel tax for the children of
San Bruno.
Charles (Chuck) Zelnik: Wi t h
no opposition to the last parcel tax,
voters showed they do not trust the
current board and superintendent. If
three new board members are elected,
it will re-establish community trust
and if the uses of the parcel tax are
spelled out clearly, in other words,
specificity is applied to the parcel tax
language, then it may stand a better
chance of passing.
What is your stance on enro l l-
ment issues and school closures?
Patrick Flynn: It wasn’t the clos-
ing of a school that got me to run, it was
how it was done. Crestmoor wasn’t just
closed, it was tortured and slain. By that
I mean that over five years there were
committees that scared families at
Crestmoor into leaving the school. The
Crestmoor issue needed better communi-
cation. Why are you closing our school?
Do you plan on selling it? Where will
my children go? These questions needed
answering a year prior to closing the
school.
John P. Marinos: We need to do
more things to make them more attrac-
tive so students come here.
Henry Sanchez: Recently, the
SBPSD has been having an increasing
enrollment, and has had one school clo-
sure to save money and reduce combina-
tion classes throughout the district.
School closure is only used as a method
to address fiscal issues and improve the
quality of education of the children and
professional staff experience.
Charles (Chuck) Zelnik:As far as
school closures and enrollment issues
are concerned, fiscal management drives
them. We need to quit deficit spending,
develop and implement a five-year plan.
Then school closures and enrollment
will not be issues in the near future.
What qualities would you like
to see brought to the Board of
Trustees?
Patrick Flynn: Honesty and clear
concise communication are most impor-
tant. Stop deficit spending. Support the
San Bruno Education Foundation. I wish
the board would realize that we, as board
members, represent the public as the
leadership of this school district. Too
many times have I seen the board
attempting to lead the public. For
instance, did the public ever ask for
solar on the roofs of our schools?
Shouldn’t we have finished our middle
school first? Where exactly did the $30
million from the sale of the Sandburg
site go?
John P. Marinos: Open communi-
cation and knowing the difference
between understanding and agreeing.
Henry Sanchez: The needed quali-
ties of the Governing Board of Trustees
are honesty, integrity, transparency,
consistent messaging, good self-gover-
nance practices and full participation of
all five governing board members.
Charles (Chuck) Zelnik: Trust,
forthrightness, quality of listening and
hearing the school staff and parents who
are the first and foremost teachers of our
children. I want to break down the ani-
mosity barrier between the district office
administration/trustees versus the par-
ents and school staff. This can only be
accomplished if three new board mem-
bers are elected.
Continued from page 3
ISSUES
show his hand just yet.
The last jail funding effort was a gut-
and-amend bill that would have relin-
quished state money declined by San
Joaquin County to Monterey and
Sonoma counties, allowed Colusa, Yuba
and Sutter counties to collaborate on
regional detention facilities for juve-
niles and — the piece crucial to Hill —
prevent San Mateo County from being
disqualified from funding simply
because it has already broken ground on
its new $165 million jail.
The now-defunct bill would not have
moved San Mateo County ahead of
other counties based on its shovel-
readiness which was the crux of Hill’s
previous bill which also failed to
move from committee. However, late
Wednesday night it fell flat in the
Assembly Public Safety Committee.
Hill has led the charge, albeit unsuc-
cessful so far, in Sacramento to secure
the county money by contending the
funds awarded to conceptual rather than
actual jail plans elsewhere are simply
collecting dust because they aren’t
required to prove a need or site until
2017.
In 2008, the state awarded San Mateo
County $100 million from a new facil-
ities bill aimed at easing prison over-
crowding but passed on the money
because it refused the requirement to
house state inmates. The state
revamped its funding requirements and
issued another round of grants but San
Mateo County was not even invited to
apply because other counties had larg-
er populations and inmate pools. The
third round excludes San Mateo County
because jail construction is already
underway — the technicality Hill
hoped to remedy with this week’s
Senate Bill 611.
Regardless of the state subsidy, San
Mateo County’s new 576-bed jail is
expected to open in 2015. The county
spent $17 million for land in Redwood
City on which it will construct a three-
story hybrid jail topped by 40 feet of
unfinished space for future use if neces-
sary. The price tag is estimated at rough-
ly $165 million for construction and
another $40 million annually in opera-
tions. The county expects to issue
bonds and County Manager John
Maltbie is expected to soon bring for-
ward a financing plan.
On Tuesday, Sheriff Greg Munks will
ask the Board of Supervisors to author-
ize his asking the state for $80 million
in jail funding. While Hill believes the
county will receive a conditional award,
he also thinks the Department of
Finance will disqualify it because the
project is already underway.
Despite the jail appearing to be a real-
i t y, opponents like Redwood City
Council candidate and activist James
Han continue fighting both it and Hill’s
attempts to secure state dollars. In a
Sept. 11 letter to the committee Chair
Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, D-San
Francisco, Han said reimbursing the
county for money it already spent with-
out a state allocation first on the jail sets
“a very bad precedent for state agencies
and their funding methods.”
Han also questioned the gut-and-
amend process which turned a public
utilities bill about the Division of
Ratepayer Advocates into a piece about
jail funding.
Continued from page 1
JAIL
COMICS/GAMES
9-13-13
thurSday’S PuZZLE SOLVEd
PrEViOuS
SudOku
anSwErS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Pince- —
4 Edible tuber
7 Size above med.
10 Tribute in verse
11 Found a perch
13 Actress — Sorvino
14 HMO staffers
15 Senor’s house
16 Sporty trucks
17 Small car brand
19 Celebration
20 Ms. Hagen
21 Prefx for red
23 Big umbrella
26 African tribe
28 Hirt and Gore
29 — ammoniac
30 Gold brick
34 Air rife (2 wds.)
36 Fossil fuel
38 Detective’s cry
39 Like some communities
41 In a dither
42 Contour
44 Sense organ
46 Pharaoh’s god
47 Reaching across
52 Require
53 Converse
54 That lady
55 Zilch
56 Window part
57 Bond rating
58 Mantra chants
59 Wood ash product
60 Parched
dOwn
1 Average
2 — St. Vincent Millay
3 Gusto
4 Pleasure craft
5 Crimson Tide
6 Japanese soup
7 Bottle size
8 Actress Garbo
9 Facility
12 Cabs
13 Bran goody
18 Hold gently
22 Finger feature
23 Schmooze
24 Linen vestment
25 Flavor enhancer
27 Lotion additive
29 Purse closer
31 Joke
32 Discoverer’s cry
33 Label
35 Sudan neighbor
37 Perfectly
40 Auditions
41 Prince Val’s son
42 Kind of bath
43 Minds
45 Sprain locale
46 Livy’s year
48 Beach toy
49 “If — — a Hammer”
50 Approach
51 Cloudy
diLBErt® CrOSSwOrd PuZZLE
futurE ShOCk®
PEarLS BEfOrE SwinE®
GEt fuZZy®
friday, SEPtEMBEr 13, 2013
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Travel plans will lift
your spirits. Even if you take a short trip or sign up
for an evening of fun and games, it will do much to
enliven your day.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Emotional involvements
will escalate if you don’t take care of them. Walk
away from anyone who’s too demanding or not
looking out for your best interest. Don’t be afraid to
do your own thing.
SCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Put some creative
thought into your home and family life. Consider
changes that will encourage you to be more
innovative and adventurous. Personal improvements
will build confdence.
SaGittariuS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Do what you
can to help others, but don’t make any fnancial
contributions. Offer suggestions, hands-on help or
even a shoulder to cry on, but nothing more.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Mix business with
pleasure and you will make new friends and improve
your reputation. Include someone you are involved
with personally, or you may face a dilemma at home.
aQuariuS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You’ll come up with
interesting ideas, but not everyone will share your
vision. Don’t invest in a scheme if it’s too ahead of its
time; it’ll keep.
PiSCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — If you devote some
time to a physical improvement regimen, you’ll be
pleased by the results. You’ll have a whole new sense
of confdence, which could lead to romance.
ariES (March 21-April 19) — Take on a physical
challenge today. Size up an emotional situation and
defuse it before it’s too late, or prepare to walk away
for good.
tauruS (April 20-May 20) — Put relationships and
your future intentions in the spotlight, and discuss
your plans with the people who count. A face-to-face
encounter will help settle matters quickly.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) — You’ll have some good
ideas, but not everyone will be prepared to receive
them. Prepare to do the legwork and clear up any
weak links before presenting your plans.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) — Take some time to
hang out with someone you fnd intriguing. Express
your thoughts and make long-term plans that will
ensure your security.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Bring about certain
changes that will make you happy. You won’t please
everyone, but you will at least know where you stand
and how you can and should proceed. It’s a good time
to begin afresh.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Friday • Sept. 13, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
ASSISTANT MANAGER,
SPORT CLUB
STUDENT UNION, INC. -
SJSU
FT-EXC. BENEFITS
$3800-$5500
PLEASE APPLY AT
www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp
AA/EOE/ADA EMPLOYER
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training-800-603-1072.
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
110 Employment
JOB TITLE: HR COORDINATOR
Job Location: San Mateo, CA
Requirements: MA in HR Mgmt or MBA
or equiv. + 2 yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS + 5).
Exp. w/ HRIS, ATS, Jira, OBS, Oracle
and Concur VMS, MAC OS, MS OS,
CMS, MS Office and HTML reqd. Mail
Resume: RingCentral, Inc. Attn:HR Dept.
1400 Fashion Island Blvd, 7th Floor
San Mateo, CA 94404
26 Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
124 Caregivers
TOM’S
COMPASSIONATE CARE
Are you in need of home
patient care?
We've got you covered.
Please call us.
You won't regret it.
650-515-0669
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257236
The following person is doing business
as: AGA Consulting, 214 7th Ave., #4,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Aimee
Girouard, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Aimee Girouard /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/23/13, 08/30/13, 09/06/13, 09/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257390
The following person is doing business
as: Santinarose Boutique, 3814 South-
wood Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Julia Forte, same address and Laura
Forte 751 Acacia Ave., San Bruno, CA
94066. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s / Julia Forte /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/30/13, 09/06/13, 09/13/13, 09/20/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523240
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Adil Waliuddin, Ashley Waliuddin
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Adil Waliuddin, Ashley Eliza-
beth Waliuddin filed a petition with this
court for a decree changing name as fol-
lows:
a) Present name: Adil Waliuddin
b) Present name: Ashley Elizabeth Wa-
liuddin
a) Proposed name: Adil Wali
b) Proposed name: Ashley Elizabeth Wa-
li
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 25,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room, at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/21/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/13/2013
(Published, 08/23/13, 08/30/2013,
09/06/2013, 09/13/2013)
CASE# CIV 523249
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Anna Christine Morris
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Anna Christine Morris filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Anna Christine Morris
Proposed name: Annabelle Christine
Jones
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 10,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/13/2013
(Published, 09/06/13, 09/13/2013,
09/20/2013, 09/27/2013)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523259
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Tuikolongahau Halafihi
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Tuikolongahau Halafihi filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Tuikolongahau Halafihi
Proposed name: Litili Mailau
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 8,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/13/2013
(Published, 08/30/13, 09/06/2013,
09/13/2013, 09/20/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256906
The following person is doing business
as: AR Cleaning Services, 70 Lodato
Ave., #5, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ana Rojas Hurtado, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Ana Rojas Hurtado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/23/13, 08/30/13, 09/06/13, 09/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257314
The following person is doing business
as: DCM International, 111 St. Matthews
#401, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ricar-
do B. De Jesus, 660 Calderon St, Man-
daluyong Rizal Philippines. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 1983.
/s/ Ana Rojas Hurtado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/13. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/23/13, 08/30/13, 09/06/13, 09/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257188
The following person is doing business
as: 1) New-Flow, 2) Inflow Controls, 131
Glenn Way Ste. 2 SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: AEH International, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by Limited Li-
ability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Ya-Ling Hou/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/23/13, 08/30/13, 09/06/13, 09/13/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257187
The following person is doing business
as: Flowie, 131 Glenn Way Ste. 2, SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Ya-Ling Hou, 715
Vera ave., Redwood City, CA 94061.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
008/01/2008.
/s/ Ya-Ling Hou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/23/13, 08/30/13, 09/06/13, 09/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257104
The following person is doing business
as: Crazy 8, Store #6379, 2535 El Cami-
no Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Gymboree Retail Stores, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 09/25/2013.
/s/ Lynda Gustafson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/23/13, 08/30/13, 09/06/13, 09/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257169
The following person is doing business
as: Jack’s Restaurant and Bar, 1750 S.
El Camino Real SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Jacks SM, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ John Marcoviai /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/23/13, 08/30/13, 09/06/13, 09/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257408
The following person is doing business
as: Novigo, 247 N. San Mateo Dr., SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: GOPA IT Consul-
tants, Inc, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s / Joerg Rohde /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/30/13, 09/06/13, 09/13/13, 09/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257413
The following person is doing business
as: Mathnasium of San Mateo, 3172
Campus Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lifstream Learning, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s / Yinzhi Yuan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/30/13, 09/06/13, 09/13/13, 09/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257498
The following person is doing business
as: CRUSH Community, 132 Bancroft
Road BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Gale Green, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Gale Green /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/06/13, 09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257456
The following person is doing business
as: Woodside West Apartments, 1937-
1947 Woodside Rd. Bldg. 1937, RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Gary C.
Hunt, 858 Braeman Dr., Hillborough, CA
94010. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Gary C. Hunt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/06/13, 09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257591
The following person is doing business
as: Manila-Bay-Area Driving School, 550
Washington St., Ste. 114, DALY CITY,
CA 94015 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners:Roberto Banez Mabunga,
23 Treeside Ct., South San Francisco
CA 94080. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Roberto Banez Mabunga /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257595
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Real Deal Enterprises, 36 W.
28th Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Richard A. Villarea and Maylonn
Chan-Villareal same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Married Couple.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Richard A. Villareal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257503
The following person is doing business
as: La Belle Vie Cleanse, 204 Second
Ave., Ste. 508, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Troo Spark, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
10/15/2013.
/s/ Cindy Sohn /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257503
The following person is doing business
as: ITT Consulting, 23 Bayport Ct., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Irene Torres-Ta-
bor, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 12/01/2012.
/s/ Irene Torres-Tabor /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257541
The following person is doing business
as: Bail Hotline Bail Bonds, 630 El Cami-
no Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
IDMCG, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 10/01/13.
/s/ Daniel McGuire /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257592
The following person is doing business
as: Konnaim Chan, 215 Anita Rd., #2,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: LS Asso-
ciates Corporation, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Konnaim Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Aug. 12, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
La Corneta, Inc
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
1147 San Carlos Ave.
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070-2417
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 6, 13, 20, 2013
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: Sept. 5, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
SNC CRAB, LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
25 Southgate Ave.
DALY CITY, CA
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer and Wine - Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 13, 2013
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Wilma Louise Miles
Case Number: 123182
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Wilma Louise Miles. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by
Matilda O’Toole in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Paul
Kraft be appointed as personal represen-
tative to administer the estate of the de-
cedent.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: October 22, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
David C. Becker (111010)
263 Main St.
PLACERVILLE, CA 95667
(530)295-6400
Dated: August 29, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on September 6, 13, 20, 2013.
PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Susana Solache
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Susana Solache filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Lesley Michelle Escobar
Proposed name: Lesley Michelle Sol-
ache
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A copy of this
Order to Show Cause shall be published
at least once each week for four succes-
sive weeks prior to the date set for hear-
ing on the petition in the following news-
paper of general circulation: Daily Jour-
nal
(Published, 08/23/13, 08/30/2013,
09/06/2013, 09/13/2013)
27 Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Nina Christine Westerlund
Case Number: 123704
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Nina Christine Wester-
lund, aka Anne Christine Stinson, aka Ni-
na Christine Stinson. A Petition for Pro-
bate has been filed by Burton Christo-
pher Stinson in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Burton
Christopher Stinson be appointed as per-
sonal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are availa-
ble for examination in the file kept by the
court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: October 11, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
H. Alan Huovinen, SB#50793
5517 Langford Ct.
CONCORD, CA 94521
(925)837-1850
Dated: September 5, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on September 6, 13, 20, 2013.
SUPERIOR COURT OF
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA
IN AND FOR
THE COUNTY OF SAN MATEO
CASE NO. 122929
Conservatorship of
TOD EIDSON
Conservatee
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO SELL
REAL PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
subject to confirmation by this court,
September 21, 2013 at: 10:00 a.m., or
thereafter within the time allowed by law,
the undersigned, as Conservator of the
Person and Estate of Tod Eidson, will
sell at private sale to the highest and
best net bidder on terms and conditions
hereinafter mentioned all right, title and
interest of Tod Eidson, in the real proper-
ty located in San Mateo County, Califor-
nia, as follows:
PARCEL I:
LOT 42, AS SHOWN ON THE MAP OF
TERRABAY, FILED JULY 2, 1990 IN
MAP BOOK 121, PAGES 65 THROUGH
79, INCLUSIVE, SAN MATEO COUNTY
RECORDS.
PARCEL II:
EASEMENTS APPURTENANT TO PAR-
CEL 1 ABOVE AS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TIONS 3.5.2, 3.5.5, 3.5.7, 3.5.8,
3.5.913.5.10, 3.5.11, AND 3.5.15 OF
THE DECLARATION OF COVENANTS,
CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS OF
TERRABAY VILLAGE ASSOCIATION
RECORDED OCTOBER 24, 1996, SER-
IES NO. 96131901, SAN MATEO
COUNTY RECORDS: 007-590-420
This property is commonly known as 55
Windcrest Lane, South San Francisco,
California.
The sale is subject to current taxes,
covenants, conditions, restrictions, reser-
vations, rights, rights of way, and ease-
ments of record, with any encumbrances
of record to be satisfied from the
purchase price.
The property is to be sold on an as is
basis, except for title. Buyer must exe-
cute an Addendum.
Bids or offers are invited for this property
and must be in writing and can be mailed
or delivered to Patrick C. Kerwin, broker
for Conservator, at 968 Woodside Road,
Redwood City, CA 94061 personally, at
any time after first publication of this
notice and before any sale is made.
The property will be sold on the following
terms: cash, or part cash and part credit,
the terms of such credit to be acceptable
to the fiduciary and the court, 3% (three
percent) of the amount of the bid to
accompany the offer by certified check,
the balance t be paid after confirmation
of the sale by the court at the date set for
close of escrow. If purchaser fails to
complete the purchase because of pur-
chaser’s default, seller shall retain as liq-
uidated damages 3% of the purchase.
Taxes shall be prorated, as of the date of
recording of conveyance. Examination of
title, property inspection reports, record-
ing of conveyance, transfer taxes, and
any title insurance policy shall be at the
expense of the purchaser or purchasers.
The undersigned reserves the right to
refuse to accept any bids.
For further information and bid forms,
contact Patrick C. Kerwin at
(650) 366-8060 or 968 Woodside Road,
203 Public Notices
Redwood City, California
Dated:
September 6, 2013
/s/CAROLYN J.SADLER /
Conservator of the Person and Estate of
Tod Eidson
/s/ HAROLD O. HUGHES /
Attorney for Conservator
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/11/13,
09/13/13, 09/19/13, 10/01/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, (650)322-
6641
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
WHITE CRIB / toddler bed with mattress
excellent condition $95 (650)345-9595
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
298 Collectibles
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA, Jerry Rice & Ronnie
Lott separate action figures. Original box-
never displayed.. $49 for all three fig-
ures. Cash. SOLD!
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SIGNED MARK MCGWIER BASEBALL
- 70th Home Run, $30., (650)595-3933
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STERLING SILVER Cigarette Case.
Made by silversmith E.A. Bliss circa
1910. Excellent condition. $99 firm.
Cash.(650)654-9252
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ALL METAL TONKA TRUCK -great
condition, $25., 650-595-3933
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LEGO, UNOPENED, 299 pieces Mon-
ster Truck Transporter, 3 projects to build
, 3 action figures, tools, 5-12, $27.00
(650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 MP3 multi media player new in box
(both) for $20 (650)726-1037
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
303 Electronics
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PHOTOSMART Printer, mint condi-
tion, 2 sided, view & print color & black,
multi-functions, includes 2 unopened car-
tridges $45.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manuel included. $575 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA SECTIONAL RECLINER - 3
piece, $75., (650)591-2720
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, SOLD!
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, SOLD!
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
KITCHEN POTS - (3) stainless steel
with black handles - 21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5
gal. Asking $10 all. Will sell separately,
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET - lid
cover and mat, beige. Asking $10. Call
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINYL SHOWER CURTAINS (3) one is
beige/coral floral; one is aqua/black/
gold floral, and one is royal blue solid
with white nylon over-curtain. Asking
$10 each. Call (650)574-3229 (Foster
City) between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCH - INVICTA, ProDiver, new, still
in box, $100., (650)726-1037
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
10" MAKITA mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
B & D 17" HEDGE TRIMMER - pro mod-
el, sharp blades, only $19, 650-595-3933
BLACK AND Decker electric 18" blade
lawn mower, rated at 4 HP,
$45.(650)367-8146
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21" belt sander $35 also 10
boxes of belt make offer, SOLD!
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
SOLD!
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10" STERLING silver loving cup circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)315-5902
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, SOLD!
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRAND NEW TARP - 7' X 5' sealed fac-
tory package, Only $9., 650-595-3933
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
model #38640, lead drisel dome, 44 car-
ot plated, $45., (650)315-5902
28 Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Smooth to a fault
5 Song on a CD
10 Have chills,
perhaps
13 Vidal’s
Breckinridge
14 Oh so very
15 Messenger __
16 Legs
18 Scrap
19 Provide with
necessities
20 Great Lakes’ __
Canals
21 Cold Stone
Creamery buy
22 Legs
25 Fluffy toy
28 Turkic flatbread
29 Ivory poacher’s
prize
30 Name on 2008
and 2012
campaign posters
33 Thurman of
“Gattaca”
36 Legs
40 “__ on a Grecian
Urn”
41 Start of a child’s
rhyme
42 The “kid” in
“Here’s looking at
you, kid”
43 Done to death
44 “Serious
Moonlight” actress
47 “Legs”
52 Frontier lawman
53 Strike with force
54 Expensive
outing, probably
57 CCCV ÷ V
58 Legs
61 Veggies go-with,
perhaps
62 Rodeos, e.g.
63 “Works for me”
64 Biblical mount
65 Vail alternative
66 Dairy farmer’s
fistful
DOWN
1 Canyon or Sierra
2 Harp relative
3 Where the Tigris
meets the
Euphrates
4 Russian head
scarf
5 Only Canadian
MLB team
6 Martini’s partner
7 Used for dinner
8 Cosmetics
counter array
9 Flattens
10 Turn lane signal
11 Fatuous
12 Yuengling
offering
14 Utah’s state gem
17 Kitchen protector
21 Cell user
23 Kraft coffee
brand
24 Gasp
25 A.L. West player,
informally
26 Shaded
27 Vacation site
31 Here, in Le Havre
32 Regards
33 Hardly fair?
34 Rise in the West
35 Wise-owl link
37 [You stepped on
my paw!]
38 1864 Geneva
Convention
creation
39 Blimps, e.g.
43 “Alley __”
45 They’re
common in
Mississippi
46 Reagan’s role in
“Knute Rockne,
All American”
47 “Save Me the
Waltz” author
Fitzgerald
48 3-D graph line
49 Sends
sprawling
50 Many a fast-
break result
51 Outstrip
expectations
55 Buffalo’s lake
56 Sicilian tourist
attraction
58 By means of
59 Rev
60 Filming site
By Patti Varol
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/13/13
09/13/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
COLEMAN CAMPING equipment
12'X12' tent, lantern, & stove all for $60
(650)697-5405
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT POCKET/PANINI MAKER - elec-
tric, heat top & bottom only, $9., 650-
595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
310 Misc. For Sale
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NEW NEWTONE DOOR BELL -factory
pack, complete only $15, 650-595-3933
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), clay colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), gold colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 SOLD!
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
310 Misc. For Sale
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suit case
1950's collectibles perfect condition large
size pearl color hard surface $50
(650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10.00 all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
SUMMER READING, 100 paperbacks
and hard cover, popular authors, Cuss-
ler, Patterson, Brown, Steele, more.
$30.00 all obo (650)578-9208
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10., Call (650)574-3229
(Foster City) between 10 am - 7 pm.
310 Misc. For Sale
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited edi-
tion with Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-
5902
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched Seams. Internal Knee
Protection. New, Tags Attached. Mens
Sz 34 Grey/Blue Denim $50.00
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 (650)341-1628
DENIM JACKET - faded but in good
condition, man's XL, $19., 650-595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box, video. Excellent con-
dition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens Sz XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
316 Clothes
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - $.25 each, or all for
$100., (650)921-6741
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)315-5902
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TRAINING BASEBALLS - Soft center
(3) $2. each and Regular Softballs (2)
$3. each, (650)595-3933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
318 Sports Equipment
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
COMMUNITY-WIDE
GARAGE SALE
AT THE ISLANDS
FOSTER CITY
(End of Balboa)
Saturday,
September 14th
9 am - 4 pm
***
Treasures Abound
FLEA MARKET
3015 E. Bayshore Rd.
In Redwood City
September 14th
Between 8am & 3pm
MULTI-FAMILY
GARAGE SALE!!
Saturday Sept 14,
8AM-4PM
(maybe Sunday too!)
BRIARFIELD WAY,
BELMONT
Antiques, fishing gear, tools,
furniture, PS2 and games,
brass bed, household item
from downsizing and
Estate Sale!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
29 Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 NISSAN Xterra XE-V6, 4x4 228k
miles. Runs good, needs minor exhaust
work, $2300, (650) 255-9866
620 Automobiles
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
FORD THUNDERBIRD ‘95 LX Coupe -
$1900., (650)245-1386
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE HELMET - New With
Tags, Modular Dual Visor M/C Helmet,
only $69., (650)595-3933
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
FREE 14' boat with trailer (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100.,
(650)726-1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning Cleaning
Neat Nit’s
Natural
Home
Cleaning
Te peninsula’s genuinely all natural
cleaning company, using all natural,
non-toxic cleaning agents.
Chemical free! Ideal for those with
small children and pets.
We have your good health in mind!
Mention this ad for a 15% discount
on your frst two cleanings!
800.339.6020
www.neatnit.com
-ڀInterior Residential
- Oďce
- Move Ins/Move Outs
- Friendly & Eďcient StaČ
- Licensed/Insured/Bonded
- FREE Estimates
Concrete
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
30 Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Housecleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650)453-3002
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Carpet, Tile
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tree Service
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
DR. NANJAPA DDS
DR. SABOOWALA DDS
DR. VIRAPARIA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
We Moved:
1528 S. El Camino Real, #408,
San Mateo 94402
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
Health & Medical
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Health & Medical
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
LOCAL 31
Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
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DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
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* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
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& Diamonds.
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(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
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provide self help services at your
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Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
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Marketing
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The board, in turn, said this is all part of a
larger process to address growing enroll-
ment in the district, along with addressing
long-standing equity issues that date back
to the desegregation of the district which
brought some students in the Ravenswood
City Elementary School District in East
Palo Alto to high schools farther away than
nearby Menlo-Atherton. According to a
study, the district will grow from 8,200 stu-
dents currently to 10,000 students in 2020.
The board said there is a need to adopt a
revised open enrollment policy by no later
than early October to adequately alert fami-
lies to the proposed changes for the 2014-
15 school year. A facilities task force will
also meet beginning Sept. 27 to explore
options such as boundary changes, open
enrollment or even opening a new school to
discuss enrollment growth. Other tasks
ahead include the development of a tentative
boundary map and the scheduling of more
community meetings to give input into the
map. The board has also discussed the pos-
sibility of seeking a construction bond to
go on the June 2014 ballot that would pay
for the additional classrooms and site infra-
structure.
For now, the issue is balancing what dis-
trict officials see are the needs of students
with community concern over what the
changes may mean.
An interim revised open enrollment poli-
cy would grant preference for Ravenswood
students to attend Menlo-Atherton, North
Fair Oaks neighborhood students assigned
to Menlo-Atherton the preference to attend
either Sequoia or Woodside, and the prefer-
ence for Tierra Linda Middle School students
in San Carlos assigned to Sequoia to attend
Carlmont. Currently, travel times to
Carlmont from the Ravenswood area are
upwards of 45 minutes.
Potential school boundary changes are
also part of the package, most directly
affecting three communities within the dis-
trict: Ravenswood City and North Fair
Oaks, both of which sends its students to
three different high schools, and Tierra
Linda, which send the majority of its stu-
dents to Carlmont High School and a small-
er number of students to Sequoia High
School.
North Fair Oaks residents expressed their
concern for the new boundaries, including
that Sequoia and Carlmont would mean
longer travel times for their students and
less academic and athletic options.
At the meeting, parent and North Fair
Oaks resident John Lukas said there was
inadequate notice regarding the meeting and
other aspects of the redrawing.
Prior to community meetings,
Superintendent Jim Lianides said the dis-
trict sent 8,000 letters out to every parent
that has a child in the district and that the
times of the meetings are certainly out
there.
On the other hand, Kendra Gragg, a social
studies teacher in the Ravenswood district,
said she encourages the board to consider
making decisions based on what is equitable
and good for all students, not just on prop-
erty values.
Trustee Carrie DuBois is looking for more
of that type of perspective.
“My concern right now is there’s been
this heavy weight in getting feedback from
parents that are heavy advocates for chil-
dren,” DuBois said. “Every time I see a yel-
low bus I get sad, I see many kids in East
Palo Alto not served. I want to fix those
problems. I want to hear all those perspec-
tives before we make a really big decision.”
The issue of proximity to schools was a
major concern for Trustee Olivia Martinez.
“It’s hard for me to reconcile changes if
Menlo-Atherton families went to school
elsewhere,” Martinez said. “I am comfort-
able with making changes to the existing
open enrollment policy. ”
Parents said during past community meet-
ings that keeping communities intact and
keeping the options available for open
enrollment were the priority, Lianides said.
The superintendent plans to bring back
further information on open enrollment
policy at the next board meeting Sept. 25.
Continued from page 1
CONCERN
ronment. People need to realize there isn’t
an unlimited supply of resources that will
last forever, said Meriwether, which is on
what the fair will educate.
Since 2008, the Burlingame Green Street
Fair has been providing resources for citi-
zens, businesses and institutions through
local green efforts. With the help of volun-
teers, Burlingame was one of the first cities
to hold a green fair in the Peninsula,
Meriwether said. It is organized by the
Citizens Environmental Council
Burlingame and sponsored by nonprofit
project of Acterra: Action for a Healthy
Planet. The event’s primary focus is to
encourage environmental awareness for
future generations.
Burlingame High School’s environmental
and ecology club will volunteer for the chil-
dren’s activities as well as counting the
attendance. The arts and crafts will be pre-
pared by the Burlingame Department of
Parks and Recreation with free activities for
the children such as face painting and spin-
art.
“The spin-art is where kids will do pedal-
powered art by using bicycles to generate
something mechanical,” said Meriwether.
Families will have a look at all the latest
in green technology and green cars while
learning about living sustainable and being
more concise, she said.
Representatives from the University of
California at Berkeley will hold a seminar
on Sudden Oak Death and the importance of
trees to the environment. The San Mateo
County Bottle Monster will make its debut
at the fair.
“The Bottle Monster is on a war path to
get rid of bottles clogging up the Bay, ”
Meriwether said.
Last year, the San Mateo County Bag
Monster had retired with the adoption of
San Mateo County’s Reusable Bag
Ordinance, said Meriwether.
If interested in doing more than just learn-
ing, parking lot W will have the two-day
recycling event Sept. 14 and 15 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. It is a drive-through recycling
event where individuals can drop off
unwanted household items.
“Anything you bring is not going into
some dumpster, it’s going to be recycled,”
said Meriwether.
Books, CDs, DVDs and VHS tapes will go
to the Burlingame Library Foundation, an
organization that raises funds for the
Burlingame library. All electronics will be
recycled by the Universal Waste
Management.
Universal Waste Management was voted
greenest business in Oakland for properly
recycling and disposing off harmful prod-
ucts from ending up in landfills, said
Meriwether.
There will be no charge for small items,
but a small fee for larger ones. Recycled
items will be reused locally in compliance
with U.S. and state standards; nothing will
be shipped to landfills or overseas.
Even with the streetscaping project on
Burlingame Avenue, Meriwether hopes
attendees will stop by and see the cities
local businesses. The fair will be on Park
Road, between Howard and Burlingame
avenues, next to the Burlingame Fresh
Market 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14.
“All in all it is a great opportunity to go
downtown and have a pleasant day with the
family and see new things,” said
Meriwether. “People are going to learn how
to live more sustainably. ”
For more information go to
www.burlingamegreenfair.com.
Continued from page 1
FAIR
32 Friday • Sept. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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