Lesson Plan #2: Collaboration

Grade: Third Grade Social Studies Strand: Economics
Submitted By: Deavon Hinebauch Partner: Jana Cantos
EDEL 453: Teaching Elementary School Social Science Nevada State College – Spring 2014 Instructor: Karen Powell

Lesson Plan #2 - Economics

submitted by: Deavon Hinebauch

B. Summary of the Lesson Plan: This social studies lesson is designed for third grade students to learn about the Yurok economy. This lesson uses the Houghton Mifflin Social Studies textbook “Communities” (pp. 84-87) both pupil and teachers edition (TE). C. Basic Information:    Grade Level: Third Grade Time to Complete this Lesson: 50 minutes Groupings: Whole group for introduction, vocabulary review, reading, and bubble map review; pairs for creation of bubble maps; individual for study guide and money creation

D. Materials:  Houghton Mifflin 3rd Grade Social Studies Book: Communities (p. 84-87 ): 1 for each student Vocabulary and Study Guide (Unit Resource p. 25) for each students, sample at the bottom of page 85. Smart Board and Pen Sheet of paper for each group for bubble map Writing utensil

  

E. Objectives: o NV State Social Studies Standards  o  F. Vocabulary    Economy-the way people make, buy, sell, and use things. Trade-to exchange things with someone else. Barter-to trade one item for another. E10.3.1 Identify forms of money used by people across time and place. I can describe the forms of money used by the Yurok. Student-Friendly Standards

G. Procedure:
Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page 2

Lesson Plan #2 - Economics
1. Pre-reading (whole group)    

submitted by: Deavon Hinebauch

Introduction discussion about money, how is it used, measured, etc. Why do we need money? Explain that students will be reading about the Yurok economy, using a study guide to assist them as they read. Introduce vocabulary terms to students. Preview the images on the pages 84-87 and make predictions about what they Yurok use as money

2. As a class, read pages 84-87, discussing answers to study guide while reading. Ask students the “Talk about it” questions on page 84 after reading pages 84-85. 3. Teacher models how to create a bubble map, using a shared pen by having the students come up to the Smart Board and write some facts about the Yurok. 4. Organize students into pairs and ask them to create a bubble map that states “Yurok economy” in the center. Students can add anything that relates to the Yurok economy, but should reflect knowledge of forms of Yurok money. Teacher will walk around and meet with each group asking questions about the Yurok economy to gage understanding. Each pair will share one idea at the end; teacher will create a bubble map on the board including each pair’s response. 5. Students will create their own money. Students will draw a picture of their money and explain how much it is worth and what materials are used to make their money. H. Assessment:  What will you use to measure student understanding?  Teacher will informally assess students through group discussions, participation, and bubble maps.  Teacher will formally assess students based upon the study guide and money they create, and “Ticket out the door.”  Explain how you will know students understand the concepts from the lesson. Students will describe the different ways the “Yurok obtained the items they needed” through bubble maps and study guide. The bubble maps and creation of the money activity will show how much students understand of the Yurok economy. Closure:  Students will answer numbers 1 and 4 under “Lesson Review” on p. 85 as ticket out the door on post it note. They can also include any questions or clarifications they need answered about the lesson (be sure to state).

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2014

Karen Powell- Instructor

page 3

Lesson Plan #2 - Economics

submitted by: Deavon Hinebauch

I.

Reflection: 1. Which part of the lesson do you think will be the easiest for you to teach? I think that the pre-reading strategies (vocabulary, preview, etc.), reading, and study guide will be the easiest portions of the lesson. These concepts are very straightforward and informative for the students. 2. Which part will be most challenging for you to teach? Creating the money will be the most difficult to teach because rather than having students fill in the blanks or working together to retell information, students have to use what they have learned about and apply it to a different scenario. This will require imagination and reflection of learning. 3. How will you follow up or extend this lesson? A good extension would be to have the students draw and label some of the items that the Yurok purchased, as well as how much the items cost in Yurok money. 4. What can you do for students who don’t grasp the concepts? For students who did not grasp the concepts I would use the “Extra Support” activity found on page 86 in TE. I would have students string 27 pieces of ziti on a piece of yarn, then work in small groups to decide on items they can buy based on the number of strings they have. This can integrate math by asking students about how much they have spent, how much they have left, etc.

5. Which part of the lesson, if any, do you think might need to change? The lesson may have to be shortened depending on how much time students need to create bubble maps, finish the study guides, etc. In this case, I may omit the creation of the money and focus more on reviewing the topics, or perhaps make it a two-day lesson.
Nevada State College EDEL 453 - Spring 2014 Karen Powell- Instructor page 4

Lesson Plan #2 - Economics

submitted by: Deavon Hinebauch

6. When you were writing this lesson plan, what was the most difficult part? I found it difficult considering time management in the lesson. I wanted to incorporate a variety of activities for students to express what they know and allow them to get an in-depth understanding of the Yurok economy, while also providing modeling and guidance for activities. I had to constantly remind myself of how much can be accomplished in a 50 period. 7. Describe your experience collaborating on this lesson plan. I loved being able to work with a partner for the lesson plan. I feel as though the lesson plan is better than my last because my partner and I brought different ideas and discussed a variety of instruction methods, etc. I can understand why working with a cooperating teacher would improve lesson planning. Jana was a pleasure to work with.

Nevada State College

EDEL 453 - Spring 2014

Karen Powell- Instructor

page 5