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Welcome to Debby Brown The search for the perfect inoculant takes the team Austria.

Advanced Nutrition is just that. Were all


about offering advice which helps you to
match modern cutting edge management
techniques with modern genetics. We are
also able to bring you new products
designed to further help your livestock
performance and ultimately its profitability.
















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In fact, were prepared to travel the world
to search out the latest technology and last
month visited Austria to investigate further
the benefits of Bonsilage, a silage additive
providing exceptional fermentation
characteristics and which weve agreed to
make available for the first time to our
customers. See p4 for more details.

Following our meeting at Lactosan Ltd, a
subsidiary of the Schaumann group where
Bonsilage is manufactured, we went on to
visit a typical family run dairy farm
managed by Anton and Elfriede Leichfried,
located in the south west of the country.
They are currently milking 30 cows (not an
untypical herd size for Austrian farmers)

averaging over 10,000 litres at 4.5% butter
fat and 3.9% protein. The all year round
calving herd with a calving index of 390
days and a farmgate milk price of 37ppl.

The herd was housed throughout the year
and fed a TMR diet comprising a 50/50 mix
of 35kg clover and forage maize silage,
2kgs hay and 3.5kg concentrate. Additional
concentrate was fed from out of parlour
feeders. Concentrate feed rate worked out
at around 0.2kg per litre and cost around
195 per tonne. The concentrate comprised
50% triticale, 30% corn maize, 20% rape
meal plus minerals, and was made on the
farm by a visiting mobile mill which calls
every three weeks.

Producing top quality forage for this high
yielding all year round housed herd was an
obvious priority. The Leichfrieds applied
Bonsilage to their triticale and maize silages
and found that the proof of the pudding
was, literally in the eating. The forage
analysis was not available for this year but
on inspection the forages looked to be in
perfect condition. The best forage lab, (the
cows) certainly gave it the thumbs up and
were devouring the mix at an amazing rate.

The familys plans were to double herd size
and install either a robotic system or
carousel parlour.



more seasonal ideas and sound
technical information all of which are
designed to help you to improve your
businesss efficiency and
sustainability.
We are very happy to be welcoming Debby
to the Advanced Team. Debby qualified as
a Vet at Glasgow University after which
she worked as a mixed vet in Melton
Mowbray. Since then, Debby has worked
as a farm vet in Barnard Castle working
with dairy, beef and sheep farmers of
various sizes and management systems.

Debbys main area of interest has always
been in whole farm management,
especially health management, disease
prevention and control and so she gained
a general practitioner certificate in farm
animal practice a few years ago
(GPcertFAP).

Her skills have widened since being a
consultant with EBLEX and
MyHealthyHerd. Debby is currently in the
process of facilitating a local monitor farm
project which is a great way of working
with all aspects of one farm to ensure it is
working to its full potential.

Debby will now add ruminant nutrition and
sales to her skill set and will help us
provide an ever broader offering of
services to our customers. Debby joins us
in early April.



www.arn-ltd.com 0845 603 1911 office@arn-ltd.com
Spring 2011
James Jottings, feeding the springing heifer.

Rearing a replacement heifer to first
calving is estimated to cost 1,000.
Consequently she needs your
attention; she and her stable mates
are your herds future and life blood.


1 Targets

First, set your targets for calving a heifer,
scheduled to yield 8,000 litres in her first
lactation

23 to 24 months of age
52 to 56 inch wither height
3.25 body condition score
570kg after calving

Unless she reaches her post calving target
weight, she will fail to reach yield
potential. For example, a heifer 45kg
below target weight will result in first
lactation yield reduced by up to 270 litres.
Remember, a heifer should achieve 85% of
her mature body weight at calving.


The transition heifer may need more
energy

She is still growing
Her mammary gland is still growing
Increasing demands are being
made by her growing foetus and
uterine tissues

Its desirable to minimise loss of maternal
tissues to support pregnancy and
mammary growth


2 The challenges

A heifers dry matter intake will be
1.8kg per day lower than a cows
An obese heifers intake will be
1.2kg DM per day lower than a
heifer in the correct condition













The energy density of the diet to meet
a heifers requirements is 25% higher
than a cows
A low dry matter or energy intake can
lead to poor immune function, mastitis,
metritis, fat mobilisation, ketosis,
displaced abomasums

3 Management

Maintain forage quality
Provide adequate feed trough space
Minimise cow competition
Introduce a diet to stimulate rumen
development and microbial population
Allow her to spend adequate time on
the pre calving diet
Introduce her to passing through the
milking parlour before calving
Monitor head lock use if in place at the
feed trough


New Calved Heifers

Step up nutrient intake slowly, stabilise
the rumen, optimise dry matter intake
and observe.
Lower feed intake if challenged. If
competition exists, then she is less
likely to compete at the feed trough,
she will fatigue quicker, with weaker
hind limbs. Dominant cows in heat will
tend to pick on fresh and smaller cows.
Avoid overcrowding which leads to less
rumination time.

Turn out, getting to grips with spring grassland management
Making more milk from grass will be
essential to maintaining profit this coming
year says Advanced Nutritions Adam Clay.
Getting the sward management right early
on will be key to maintaining grass quality
throughout the season.













Good grassland management is a challenge;
its about correct allocation, entry levels and
residuals and managing the variables, the
biggest one of course being the weather.

How much?
Spring grass is often dryer than you may
think, so your cows should be able to
achieve 2.2kg dry matter (DM) intake per
hour. For example, a short period at grass
when the weather allows may result
in taking at least four litres from grass, or
reducing the concentrate intake, not to
mention the effect it will have on grass
regrowth.

In practice, if you aim for 5kg DM intake
from grass at 20%DM, then your cows will
need to eat 25kg fresh weight which is
achievable in approximately three hours of
good grazing. If grass DM drops to 15%,
then your cows will need an extra 8kg fresh
weight to achieve the same energy intake
and that will take a great deal more time to
graze.

When to graze?
Cows should be turned into a paddock,
ideally when entry cover is approximately
2,800kgDM/ha, in simple terms thats as
high as a beer can, stood up - any brand!
However, leaf emergence is based on
temperature and growth doesnt start to
take off until soil temperature reaches an
average 70C.

Pull up a fist full of grass and youll find
each plant will never have more than three
viable leaves. As the season progresses,
the plant grows more structural fibre,
another leaf grows and the first dies off
which decays in the base of the sward.
Consequently, in these early growth stages
the grass plant may look immature when it is
in fact actually ready for grazing. So don't
be afraid to open the gate and send the
cows in to a paddock even if it looks like
there isn't much to graze; check if the plant
has three leaves, if it does, graze it.

Gateways and tracks, or lack of, tend to
prevent early turnout. However if you can
get the cows on to a field be careful not to
cause excessive poaching as this can reduce
grass growth rates by 30% to 50%. This is
another reason to put cows to pasture for
just a couple of hours each day while
conditions remain wet.

What and when to supplement &
buffer?

Grass is high in sugars and quickly
degradable protein, so supplements should
ideally be low in protein and higher in starch
and fibre.

As soon as over 2kg DM intake per hour is
being achieved from grazed grass,
supplementation should be reduced to an
18% protein concentrate. As growth
progresses and grass offers more than 5kg
DM intake per hour, drop back to a 16%
protein concentrate. High levels of grass
intake ideally require 14% protein
concentrate, with a high percentage of
bypass protein, to prevent excessive protein
in the total diet which has shown to impact
on both foot health and fertility performance.

Maize silage is an ideal forage buffer, cereals
are also very effective but be aware of
rumen health. Although grass is high in
protein, high yielding cows will require
bypass protein to balance the quickly
degradable protein supplied by the grass.

It also pays to supplement with good
quality digestible fibre such as sugar beet
pulp. Although grass is high in fibre, oils
coat these fibres in the rumen and
encourage the grass to run through the
rumen at high speed. Digestible fibre can
help to bring a balance.

Finally.remember 1kg DM of grass silage
will displace 1kg DM of grazed grass so don't
be afraid to pull back on silage fed as a
buffer to increase grass intakes.
Bonsilage also has the added benefit of making the fibre more digestible.
The enzyme ceases to work once the pH has reached the target of 4.0.
The resulting improved speed of fermentation reduces spoilage and
retains more nutrients, it aids total digestibility in the rumen and
enhances performance.

Bonsilage:
Works across a wide dry matter range
Completes fermentation faster retaining more nutrients
Improves silage palatability
Improves animal performance
Is a proven, tried and tested product

With the current pressure on your margins this spring, quality is one key
step to making more from your forage. Help increase your forage quality
by investing in Bonsilage this season.
James Jottings, feeding the springing heifer.

Rearing a replacement heifer to first
calving is estimated to cost 1,000.
Consequently she needs your
attention; she and her stable mates
are your herds future and life blood.


1 Targets

First, set your targets for calving a heifer,
scheduled to yield 8,000 litres in her first
lactation

23 to 24 months of age
52 to 56 inch wither height
3.25 body condition score
570kg after calving

Unless she reaches her post calving target
weight, she will fail to reach yield
potential. For example, a heifer 45kg
below target weight will result in first
lactation yield reduced by up to 270 litres.
Remember, a heifer should achieve 85% of
her mature body weight at calving.


The transition heifer may need more
energy

She is still growing
Her mammary gland is still growing
Increasing demands are being
made by her growing foetus and
uterine tissues

Its desirable to minimise loss of maternal
tissues to support pregnancy and
mammary growth


2 The challenges

A heifers dry matter intake will be
1.8kg per day lower than a cows
An obese heifers intake will be
1.2kg DM per day lower than a
heifer in the correct condition













The energy density of the diet to meet
a heifers requirements is 25% higher
than a cows
A low dry matter or energy intake can
lead to poor immune function, mastitis,
metritis, fat mobilisation, ketosis,
displaced abomasums

3 Management

Maintain forage quality
Provide adequate feed trough space
Minimise cow competition
Introduce a diet to stimulate rumen
development and microbial population
Allow her to spend adequate time on
the pre calving diet
Introduce her to passing through the
milking parlour before calving
Monitor head lock use if in place at the
feed trough


New Calved Heifers

Step up nutrient intake slowly, stabilise
the rumen, optimise dry matter intake
and observe.
Lower feed intake if challenged. If
competition exists, then she is less
likely to compete at the feed trough,
she will fatigue quicker, with weaker
hind limbs. Dominant cows in heat will
tend to pick on fresh and smaller cows.
Avoid overcrowding which leads to less
rumination time.

To discuss your requirements for Bonsilage please contact us using one
of the methods below or speak to
Mark Gorst on
07880 794004
Are you getting the most from your forages?

With costs increasing and margins tight, making more from your own
forage will be high on your agenda this spring and summer. Its high on
our agenda too and a key part of our 360 approach.
Bacteria Growth (Doubling Time)
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
8000
M
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
Hours
Strain 1
Strain 2
Strain 1 1 45 1998 89322 3992787 178482301 7978370264
Strain 2 1 28 765 21163 585370 16191549 447863923
0 4 8 12 16 20 24
Both bactertia are Lactobacillus Plantarum, strain 1 is the unique strain
contained in Bonsilage developed by Lactosan in Austria
www.arn-ltd.com 0845 603 1911 office@arn-ltd.com
Advanced Nutrition has searched for a
new approach to increase the potential
from silage. We found Bonsilag,
checked its pedigree, reviewed the science,
the evidence, the trial work and the
findings. We even looked at the
manufacturing process and talked with
farmers that used it.

The name might be a bit unusual, simply
French for Good Silage but, it does what
is says on the tin. Bonsilage is currently
used on over 17 million tonnes of forage
on the Continent. Thats a lot of proof the
product works! Its aim is to accelerate the process of fermentation; it
contains enzymes which provide the grass with 3% sugar in the clamp by
breaking down some of the fibre structures in the grass. This feeds a
unique and very prolific strain of lactic acid bacteria (see chart below),
resulting in the bugs growing faster and reducing the pH over a shorter
period of time.
Overseeding boosting sward potential
by Mark Gorst

Do you want to make sure you have sufficient grass
silage in the pit at the end of this season for the coming
winter? If the answer is yes, then think about developing
a reseeding or overseeding plan in the next few weeks.

Why? Because reseeding or overseeding will inject new
life into existing swards and improve your forages
quality dry matter, ME and protein, if the correct
mixtures are chosen. In return there are financial
benefits; youll achieve more milk or liveweight gain from
conserved or grazed grass.

Swards naturally deteriorate over time. In fact after five to six years, as little as
50% of the original sown grasses may remain in an average ley, see Figure 1. The
remainder have been overtaken by natural grass species, which are less productive
in terms of protein, energy and sugar.

















If you decide to overseed, then yields could increase by 30% within the first year.
The system involves scarifying and applying a quantity of seed to top up the
existing sward. Overseeding subsequently helps to prevent the ingress of weeds
that lead to sward decline in later years.

If time and conditions permit, then species such as festulolium, hybrid or perennial
tetraploid ryegrasses should be included in the mixture. To boost establishment,
then consider using iSeed. iSeed is coated with essential nutrients making them
immediately available for the seedling and subsequently helping establishment.

The fertiliser, nitrogen and phosphate, feeds the seed and not the weed,
consequently improvements in establishment of more than 50% can be achieved
according to findings from extensive trials. Furthermore, seed mixtures with iSeed
ensure that the fertiliser can be utilised up to four times more efficiently compared
with broadcasting onto the seedbed, thereby bringing significant savings to the
variable costs.

This picture demonstrates a trial plot
featuring iSeed planted to the left of
the line and conventional seed planted
to the right. Introducing an
overseeding plan can help you to fill
the pits with quality silage and
minimise the risk of reduced silage
crops, in particular second cut.
Remember, the leys that produced
good growth for second cut during the
drought conditions in 2010 were those
that were newly sown the previous
year.
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
1
2
3
4
5-10
10-20
20+
natural
sown
Figure 1: Sward species content over a 20 year period
Output
20.5 kg lamb @ 3.92 per kg 80.36
Less mortality (2 lambs) 2.00
78.36

Variable Costs
12.5 kg lambs milk replacer 20.00
69.7 kg lamb finisher pellets @ 19.8p/kg 13.80
Vet and medicine 2.00
Sundries (bedding, elec, tags etc) 3.00
GROSS MARGIN per lamb 39.56

Technical Performance
Birthweight 4.1kg
Weaning weight 19.7kg
Finishing weight 42.1kg
Days to weaning 36 days
Days to slaughter 102 days
Feed consumed after weaning 67.5kg
Feed conversion after weaning 3.01
Feed cost per kg liveweight gain 54.2p
Daily liveweight gain 373g
Killing out % 48.7%

Finishing surplus lambs -
profitably

Finishing foster lambs this coming season
is likely to be a cost effective exercise. With
market prices set to remain firm, then
respectable gross margins are scheduled to
be in the order of 40 per head.

Advanced Nutrition reviewed an on farm
trial last year rearing 80 Texel cross lambs
artificially to target finishing weight and
marketing them deadweight. After ensuring
each lamb had received sufficient quality
colostrum within the first six hours, they
were introduced to a machine, fed milk
replacer and also provided with access to
lamb finisher pellets and clean water on an
ad lib basis. Weaning was abrupt at around
five weeks of age. Feed intakes and lamb
weights were recorded see below. They
achieved target weight at an average 14.5
weeks and a DLG of 0.37kgs.

While the system appeared to be expensive
at approximately 40 per lamb, a figure
that includes milk replacer, creep, vet and
med, bedding, and electricity, the strong
marketplace enabled us to achieve a gross
margin of almost 40 a lamb. Good
hygiene was critical to the systems
success.


www.arn-ltd.com 0845 603 1911 office@arn-ltd.com