You are on page 1of 24

, ,  , 



FA LL  2008 
HARRIS  COUNTY  CRIMINAL  LAWYERS'  ASSOCIATION 
LookatwhatIhavedonetoseeifyou'd likewhatIwilldo
• Began the178
th
CriminalDistrictCourt'sparticipationinCTI(ChangeThrough
Intervention)programthatcombinesclosercourtmonitoring,lowerprobationerto
officerratio, and progressivesanctionstoobtainbehaviormodificationfor
offenders;
• Required compliancewiththeFairDefenseManagementAct(FDMA);
• ExpandedtheGrandJuryselectionprocessastoethnicorigin and gender;
• Providedgreateruseofmental healthresources;
• Improvedcommunitysupervisionofficercommunicationwith CourtLiaison
Officer; and
• Installedacomputerforaccessbymembersofthedefensebartohaveequal
accesstoHarrisCountyJIMSrecordsinthecourtroom.
On November4thVote 
forJudgeRogerBridgwater 
178
th
Criminal DistrictCourt 
www.judgerogerb.com 
AJudgewhowas inthetrenchesandwhoknows howyoufeel............ .. 
Paid by JudgeRogerBridgwaterJudicialCampaign7941  KatyFwy,#140,  Houston,TX, 77024 
In voluntarycompliancewithJudicialCampaign FairnessAct 
2 ................ . From  the  President 
By Mark Bennett
3  ................ . Winning  Warriors 
5 ................ . From  the  Editor 
By Shawna L.  Reagin
7 ................ . Motions  for  New  Trial 
By Patrick F.  McCann
1 0 ................ . Motion  of  the  Moment 
By Shawna L.  Reagin
12 ................ . Alternatives  to  Ja i  I 
By Hon. Roger Bridgwater
14 ................ . 
Modification  of  Disposition  or  VOP 
By JoAnne Musick
16 ................ . The  Dudes  Abide 
By Wendy Miller
1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grace  Notes 
By Jeremy Sierra
19 ................ .
Welcome  New  Members 
HCClA 2008-2009 
PRESIDENT 
Mark  Bennett 
PRESIDENT  ELECT 
JoAnne  Musick 
VICE  PRESIDENT 
Ni col eDeBorde 
SECRETARY 
T. BTodd  Dupont  II 
TREASURER 
Steven  H. Halpert 
PAST  PRESIDENT 
Patrick  f.  McConn 
BOARD  OF  DIRECTORS 
Staci  Biggar 
David  Cunningham 
Tyler  fl ood 
Tucker  Groves 
Mark  Hochgloube 
David  Jones 
Rondoll  Kall inen 
David Kiotto 
Marjorie  Meyers 
David  Mitcham 
Roland  Moore  III 
Earl  D. Musi ck 
John  Porras 
Charles  StanFi eld 
o Tat eWilliams 
Sarah  v. Wood 
PAST  PRESIDENTS 
1971  2007 
C. Anthony  fri loux 
Stuart  Kinard 
George  Luquette 
Morvin  D.  Teague 
Dick  OeGuerin 
W.B. House,  Jr. 
David R.  Bires 
Woody  Densen 
Wi ll  Gray 
Edward  A. Mollett 
Carolyn  Garcia 
Jock  B. Zimmermann 
Clyde Will iams 
Rober t Pelton 
Candelario  flizondo 
Allen  C.  Isbell 
David  Mitchorn 
Jirn  [  Lavine 
Rick  Bross 
Mary [  Conn 
Kent  A. SchoPPer 
Don  Cogdell 
Jim  Skelton 
GeorgeJ.  Pornharn 
Garland  D.  Mcinnis 
Robert  A. Moen 
lloyd  Dliver 
Donny  East erling 
Wayne  Hill 
Richard  fronkoPP 
W. Troy  McKinney 
Cynthia  Henley 
Stanley  G. Schneider 
Wendell  A.  Odorn,  Jr. 
Robert  J.  fickman 
Publisher:  HCClA  Distribution  550  copies  per  issue_ 
Editorial  Staff:  Shawna  L. Reagin 
For  articles and  other editorial
Ads  &Distribution:  JoAnne  Musick  & Christina  Appelt 
contributions, contact Shawna L Reagin
DeSign  &layout:  Limb  Design 
www.limbdesign.com 
at  713-224-1641- To  place an  ad, call 
Illustrator:  Guillermo  Cubillos 
Shawna  L Reagin  at  713-224-1641 
  PRESIDENT
My Friends, I'm  writing  this  in  the  heat of a  Houston  summer,  but by  the  time 
you  read  it  the  kids  will  be  back  in  school  and  temperatures  will  have  started  to 
conle  down.  Vie might  even  have  turned  off the  air  conditioning  for  a  day  or  two. 
(We  also  might  have  been  threatened  or  hit  by  tropical  storms  or  hurricanes  or 
other  life- and  practice-altering  events .  Ah,  the  joy  of writing  this  message  with  3 
one-month  lead  time.)  If you're  a  fan  of culture  or sports,  Houston's  got  it  - pro, 
semi-pro,  and  amateur.  Sure,  the  region  is  a  little  bit short on natural  splendor, and 
yes,  ifyoll  like  mountains  YOll've  got a long haul.  And  the  weather ... well ,  there  may 
be places  in  the  United States  better suited  to human  habitation  than  HOllston . Not 
to  mention  that,  from  the  point of view  of lawyers  who  stand  up  for  people,  Texas's  partisan  system  of 
electing judges  is  a  scabrous  blight  on  Justice. 
Notwithstanding  all  of that,  Houston  is  the  Promised  Land  for  criminal  defense  trial  lawyers:  the 
fourth  biggest  city  in  the  U.S.  ( with  lots  of.  business),  with  the  lowest  cost  of living  of any  of 
America's  20  largest  metropolitan  areas,  and  an  aggressive  and  competent  (and  I  don't care  what  Kelly 
Siegler  now says  about  that)  prosecutor's office  that sharpens  us  as  steel  sharpens steel. 
Nobody  wants  this  work  to  be  easy  (where'S  the  fun  in  that»),  but  in  Texas  we  benefit  ti-om 
laws  that  favor  the  accused  (and  sometimes  the  defense  bar)  in  ways  that  other  states'  laws  wouldn't. 
For example: 
•  Except  in  very  narrow  circumst,lnces ,  all  defendants  are  entitled  to  reasonable  bail  (and  their 
lawyers  can,  even  in  those  constitutionally defined  circumstances,  make  it  difficult  to  deny  bail). 
•  Defendants can  have  jury trials  for  anything.  The  U.S.  Constitution  doesn't  require  jur),  trials  for 
"petty  offenses",  but  the  Tex,ls  Constitution  requires  them  in  all  criminal  cases.  The  benefit  to 
the  criminal  defense  bar should  be  as  obvious  as  the  benefit  to  the  accused. 
•  Defendants  can't  be  prosecuted  for  felonies  except  on  the  presentation  of a  grand  jury  indictment. 
As  a  result,  we  get an  opportunity to head  off fllrther litigation  if we  think we can  persuade  the grand 
jury  that  prosecution  is  inappropriate. 
•  Texas  Code of Criminal  Procedure Article  38.23, the statutOry exclusionary rule , gives juries authority 
to determine suppression  fact  jssues. 
•  Texas  Code  of Criminal  Procedure  Article  38.22  presents  statutory  obstacles  to  the  admission  of 
statements  made  by  an  accused  in  response  to custodial  interrogation. 
•  Punishment  ranges  as  wide  as  probation-to-life  and  jury  punishment  allow  us  to  bring our advocacy 
skills  more  to  bear  to  try  to  achieve  some  measure  of justice  instead  of relying  upon  bureaucrats  to 
sentence by  the  numbers. 
•  An  accused has a right to a lawyer no matter the offense; an  indigent accused  has the right to appointed 
counsel,  no matter the offense. 
•  Texas  Code  of  Criminal  Procedure  Article  38.14  provides  that  nobody  can  be  convicted  on  the 
uncorroborated  word  of an  accomplice,  and  Texas  Code of Criminal  Procedure  Article  38.141 
that nobody can  be convicted on  tJle  uncorroborated word of a police informant. 
It  occurs  to  me  that  I've  just  given  the  pro-government  reactionaries  a  wishlist  for  the  next  legislative 
session.  The  point,  though,  is  that  all  of these  factors  - as  well,  probably,  as  some  that  I  haven't  thought 
of - contribute  to make Texas  an  interesting,  profitable,  and  lively  place  to  be  a criminal  defense  trial  lawyer. 
A  friend  of mine  who  practices  in  Manhattan  claims  that  New York  criminal defense  lawyers  who try  lots  of 
cases  try  one  every  three  years  or so.  I  don't  know  how  many  trials  is  "a  lot"  for  Houston  criminal  defense 
lawyers,  but  I  know  that the  halfdozen  or so that  I  have  been  trying  annually  is  not  "a  lot." 
We  live  among  a  populace  that  has  been  conditioned  to  be  terrified  that  our  efforts  to  secure  their 
freedom might keep  the  trains from  running on  time.  They fear  that if we  are  free  to ply our trade, and  ifour 
clients  receive due course  oflaw, society will  be more  chaotic and  less  safe . They are  entirely correct:  jf we do 
Ollr  jobs properly, society will  be less  ordered.  Freedom  is  neither  tidy  nor safe. 
What  we  do  is  mueh  larger  than  merely  trying  to  keep  people out of jail.  We  have  one  of the  few  jobs 
that the founders  of our country - whose  primary concern was  preventing the  resurgence  of tyranny - thought 
important enough  to memorialize  in  the C"(mstitution.  \Ve  have  a sacred  duty  not only  to our clients  but also  to 
the  liberties  that  made  America  free.  HCCLA stands  with  you,  its  members,  on  tJle  front  line  of the  struggle  to 
make a decent living,  to defend  your clients, and  to preserve liberty  for  our children  and  tJleir  children. 
Your board of directors  meets on  the second Thursday of every month at  11 :30 a.m.  on  the 7th floor  of 
the  Criminal  "Justice" Center.  This  is  your organization, and  you  are  alwa)'s  welcome  at  its  board  meetings. 
-----------------------____Mark Bennett 
• •
THEDEFENDER] FALL  08 
+
DANNY EASTERLING beat the State on 3 out of4 theft indictments
after a grueling 1 O-day trial in the 337th District Court, where
his client was charged with computer repair fraud over a 2-year
period. One case was dismissed and the jury acquitted on two
others, but convicted on the remaining 1st degree theft. The
prosecution urged the jury to start at 25 years in considering
punishment, but DANNY persuaded them to return much less;
his client should be free in a little more than a year.
+
BRIAN WICE convinced the First Court of Appeals to set aside a
70-year sentence from the 262nd District Court and remand for
a new punishment hearing in Lair v. State, 2008 WL 2611879
(Tex.App. -- Houston [1st Dist.]' No. 01-07-00414-CR,
delivered July 3, 2008), PDR filed 8/15/08. Justice Terry
Jennings once again chastised the majority in a 27-page dissent
to its decision to reject an insufficient links argument. BRIAN
plans to appeal that issue and the failure to find harm in the
prosecutor's fmal argument that was a direct comment on the
accused's failure to testif)l.
+
This same prosecutor's improper argument caused a CCA
reversal the day before in York v. State, 2008 WL 2677368
(Tex.Crim.App. 2008) [unpublished], on a brief authored by
TROY MCKINNEY. Maybe some of tllis recidivist misbehavior
would be curtailed if the courts would publish the reversals
and name the offending prosecutors - Thomas Pheiffer, in
wese cases.
+
The jury took only an hour to find ALEXANDER GUREVICH'S
17-year-old client Not Guilty of aggravated sexual assault of a
child in the 176th District Court. The 4-year-old complainant
claimed anal penetration in a delayed outcry. Dr. Carmen
Petzold testified for the defense and greatly helped to neutralize
me testimony of the State's experts.
+
In a one-week personal record, ROLAND MOORE had three cases
dismissed in tllree difkrent courts on Monday - a murder and
two robberies, a felony MRP dismissed on Wednesday and then
tllree felony dope cases dismissed against one c\jent on Friday.
THE  DEFENDER  * 3
+
LEE  GUERRERO  of GUERRERO  &BIGGAR  LLP  worked diligently with
the prosecution for several months before finally obtaining a
dismissal of the criminaJly negligent homicide charges against
her client, who was involved in a car crash with a H arri s County
Sheriff's deputy found to be driving while intoxicated at the
time of his death.
+
Once she educated the prosecution about a particular DPS
trooper' s career-long habit of stopping African-Americans with
out-of-state plates - in this case, for "following too closely"
on U.S. 59 - KATHERINE  SHIPMAN  got her habitualized client
charged with 3rd degree possession of cocaine and possession
of marijuana a mere 120 days in jail under Sec. 12.44(a) , Tex.
Penal Code.
+
The amazing MUSICK  LAW  FIRM  just keeps on doing it:
EARL  MUSICK  and KYlE  VANCE  won a trial day dismissal on an
assault case in CCCL#7after announcing ready; EARL annihilated
the technical supervisor in Guadalupe County, resulting in a
non-DWI offer; and JOANNE  MUSICK secured separate dismissals
in a drug case and an assault, after announcing ready for tri al.
+
AMANDA  DOWNING  persevered until she gained a dismissal on an
assault case in CCCL #3.
+
JIM  LEITNER  and CLINT  GREENWOOD  battled to an acquittal
for a Precinct 4 captain accused of felony tampering with
evidence. Multi-talented JIM  also reversed an aggravated
kidnapping conviction out of the 179th District Co urt in
Hudnall v. State, 2008 WL 2985435 (Tex.App. - Houston
[1st Dist.] No., 01-07-00858-CR, delivered July 31, 2008)
[unpu blished]. Reversible error occurred when the State
was permitted to call before the jury a previously convicted
co-defendant who everyone knew was going to invoke
the 5th, then question him in a manner that inculpated
the defendant. This error was compounded by the trial
court ' s failure to instruct the jury that it could not infer the
defendant's guilt from the witness's invocation of his ri ght
not to testif)l. This is an important issue that raises a question
over the Court's decision not to publi sh the opinion.
+
Another grateful client can thank TOM  STICKLER  for being
found Not Guilty of burglar y of a building, enhanced , in
the 212th District Court of Galveston County.
+
Thirteen minutes was all it took for the jury to acquit
STEVE  HALPERT'S  client of an alleged family violence assault
in CCCL #1. The judge was reportedly convinced of the
verdict after STEVE'S cross-examination of the complainant,
but the prosecution rolled the dice, anyway.
+
CASIE  GOTRO  and HEATHER  MORROW  too k another trophy in
Washington County by garnering a Not Guilty ofaggravated
assault with a deadly weapon for their habitualized client
after onl y 45 minutes of jury deliberation . The State then
threatened to prosecute him for felon in possession of a
firearm, except it had failed to recover the alleged firearm,
so had to dismiss tha t case as wei I.
+
And last, but by no means least: VIVIAN  KING  fought
a 3-week, 3-codefendant federal trial in Austin to
6 counts of Not Guilt y involving conspiracy to violate
the Medicare anti-kickback statutes and other substantive
counts of fraud. VIVIAN'S  accounting degree and 9 years
as a banker before becoming a lawyer allowed her to
chew up the many government witnesses who testifi ed
about her client's bank records . This victory was even
sweet er due to the many underh anded tactics [such as
declaring one of VIVIAN'S  witnesses an un indicted co-
conspirator, prompting her to plead the 5th and making
her suddenly unavailable] and Brady violations engaged in
by the AUSA - justice , in the guise of VIVIAN  KING  on thi s
occasion, prevailed!
CONGRATULATIONS  TO  ALL  THESE  WINNING  WARRIORS 
future

warrIors 
AMBER  and MATTHEW  SKillERN  produced an absolutely
gorgeous baby girl on July 17,2008, when GWENDOLYN  MARIE 
weighed in at 6 lbs., 10 oz., measuring 20.5 inches long.
Welcome to the world! 
THE  DEFENDER  * 4

TOR 
Fro 
E
By Shawna L. Reagin
According to the offIcial website of the State Commission
on Judicial Conduct [SCJc] , the mission of the SCJC is
"to protect the public, promote public confidence in the
integrity, independence, competence and impartiality
of the judiciary, and encourage judges to maintain
high standards of conduct both on and off the bench."
The Commission allegedly accomplishes this mission
through investigations of judicial misconduct or incapacity,
and in cases where a judge is found to have engaged in
misconduct or to be permanently incapacitated, the Texas
Constitution authorizes the SCJC to take "appropriate
disciplinary action, including issuing sanctions, censures,
suspensions or recommendations for removal from office."
Lofty goals, to be sure. Would that these words had the
slightest meaning when it comes to judicial abuses of the
criminally accused. In the past few years, HCCLA has filed
complaints against two judges for illegally jailing defendants
who either have not hired a lawyer to suit the judge'S
timeline, or have committed the mortal sin of being unable
to hire a lawyer after making bond . One of tbe judges,
Woody Densen, in addition to jailing an African-American
woman who had not been able to hire a new lawyer over
the weekend as commanded by Judge Campbell, also
publicly berated an injured young war veteran for being
indigent and then later the same week took a plea from
an unrepresented, mentally fragile man. The other judge,
whose identity remains undisclosed due to an agreement
with the then-president of thi s organization, quickly
proved herself to be a recidivist offender once the original
complaint was summarily dismissed, notwithstanding her
tearful promises .
What we have learned through the tIling of these
complaints is that the extent of an SCJC "investigation"
appears to be perhaps obtaining some sort of denial from
the accused judge, then dismissing the complaint without
comment. Interestingly, although the judge is provided
copies of all documents in the complaint against him or
her, the complainant is never allowed to see any part of
the response. This is akin to sending the prosecution out
of the courtroom while the defense presents its case, then
expecting it to come in and effectively argue for a conviction.
Although this might still result in numerous Harris County
convictions, the fact remains that this procedure is grossly
unfair to the citizens who have suffered at the hands of
judges who don't know the law, refuse to follow the law and
distort the law to accomplish their own unconstitutional
ends. Citizens should have tbe right to rebut claims or
affidavits that are demonstrably false.
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
Citizens SHOULD  HAVE  THE  RIGHT  TO  REBUT  CLAIMS 
THE  DEFENDER  0(( 5
How DOES THIS PROMOTE PUBLIC CONFIDENCE IN THE JUDICIARY?
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
AIl three claims against Densen were dismissed without
a single affiant or witness being contacted by the SCJe.
Even when the decision was appealed, an essentially
meaningless process in itself, no one on the Commission
bothered to make a phone call in attempt to verify the events.
This happened despite the fact that Judge Densen has a
history with the SCJC, having once been sanctioned for
soliciting political contributions on the courthouse grounds .
Rest assured, however, that the SCJC does not sit
completely idle. Indeed, it would be less dangerous ifit did
not instead strike at random, issuing sanctions that seem
to be totally disproportionate to the alleged misconduct .
Our own infamous example is tbe actual impeachment of
Judge Jim Barr for making a few off-color remarks to female
prosecutors and incorrectly issuing a writ of attachment for
a sheriff's deputy. In re Barr, 13 S.W.3d 525 (Tex.Rev.Trib.
1998). The lesson inherent in the Barr case seems to be that if
judges wish to misbehave, they should do so with defendants
and criminal defense lawyers, not prosecutors and police.
In re Barr is instructive also in that it decided the
three circumstances under which legal error by a judge may
constitute grounds for a finding of judicial misconduct:
(l) commission of egregious legal error; (2) commission
of a continuing pattern of legal error; or (3) commission
of legal error which is founded on bad faith. Id. at 544.
The examples cited in the opinion fall far short of illegally
jailing a regular citizen or taking a plea without a lawyer
present. Indeed, Judge Barr was faulted by the tribunal
for admitting that "prior to taking the step of depriving
a citizen of his individual freedom, he had not researched
the law regarding writs of attachment or witness bonds."
Id. at 546. Although we do not know what defense Densen
may have raised, if any, Barr clearly precludes a sustainable
claim that he acted as he did out of ignorance.
More recently, we have seen the SCJC publicly avenge
the granting of Chris tmas leniency in eviction cases and the
off-hours, out-of-court, consensual derriere-patting by a
male judge on a female lawyer who was not herself in any
way offended and who did not file the complaint. There
was also a public spanking for a civil court judge who made
some awkward comments concerning slavery to an African-
American lav.ryer appearing before him. This is amazing
when you consider the rudeness and condescension to
which criminal defense lawyers and the criminally accused
are subjected in some courts on a daily basis. The message
is, it is okay to jail an African-American woman with all
the due process accorded a slave, but for God's sake, don't
mention slavery to an Mrican-American male lawyer in a
money case. How does this promote public confidence in
the judiciary?
The Commission does occasionally find it within itself
to step in once a judge has actually been indicted for or
convicted of a crime . Given its usual performance, though,
one has to wonder how many complaints were probably
swept under the rug for years until the misconduct rose
to the level of a criminal offense. HCCLA has a pending
complaint against former Montgomery County District
Court Judge James Kee shan, sitting by assignment, who
illegally, and deliberately so, jailed one of our members.
A grand jury has already declined to indict this learned
jurist for offlcial oppression, but the fate of the grievance
has yet to be revealed.
Key to the SCJC's willingness to act against a judge
is the amount of publicity attendant to the fding of the
complaint. Therefore, there is nothing to be gained by
entering into future secrecy agreements with the targets of
valid complaints. Our desire to always give the benefit of
the doubt sometimes leads us to a dangerous na·lvete.
We are not advocating draconi an attacks on the
judiciary for every perceived slight or good faith mistake.
Rather, we seek reliable consistency and transparency in
the dealings of the Commission. One hopes that judges
would also welcome such a change. It must be exceedingly
uncomfortable to constantly wonder what peccadillo may
lead to public sanction or even impeachment, while knowing
that one's colleague can safely act like a raging maniac. Are
the decisions purely political? Does the SCJC exi st merely
to protect the visitation rights of former judges? Why hide
the response to a complaint unless it fails to exonerate the
accused judge or contains easily disprovable claims?
It is time for the sCJe to put some legs on its mission
statement and start protecting the citizens of this state
from serious abuses of judicial power. The Code ofJudicial
Conduct is not particularly onerous in its behavioral
requirements. If the SCJC cannot manage to enforce it,
perhaps we need a sunset review and a new beginning.
Correction: Due to an editing error, photo credit
to Cynthia Henley for the social pictures from the
HCCLA banquet was inadvertently omitted.
* The Editor's opinion is purel y personal , and in no way reflects the viewpoJnr
or position ofrhe Harri s County Criminal Lawyers' Association.
THE DEFENDER 1:< 6
THEDEFENDER] FALL  08 
Motions
FOR  NEW  TRIAL: 
The  author is  a  past  President  of the  Harris 
County  Criminal  Lawyers  Association, 
an  adjunct  professor  at  Texas  Sout hern 
University,  and  practices  locall y  here  in 
Houston  and  Fort  Bend  county, 
CHANCE  AT  SENTENCING 
By  Patrick F.  McCann 
1\(I.' l'1l1  L'h.lIlg;(s  10  Tn.1S  1\1Ik  of App(l\.ltl'  I'nKl'dur(  21,  L\'(I'\'llll(  of  LIS  h.1s  SOl11(  horror  slol'\'  of  hoI\'  .1 (Ii(lll 
"Ili(h cmlTS  :-"\oliolls  tilr          Tri.11,  h.1\,(  lll.1dL'  il  possihle  tilr  rl'(L'i\ 'nl,  till'  .1    millor  d1.1t'!!.(,  ,\,11.11  s(nllL'lf  .1 
Ihl'  tri.11  (Ollrt  III  g.r.lIll  rdirt' Oil  S(IlI(lleill!!.  iSSlI(S  0111\-.  This  is  disI1t'oportiOIl.11l:  1(1'111  of illlprisoll1l1l'llt,  \'k Il(l'd  10  h(!!.ill  10 
.1 Si!!.l1itil'.1I11  (il.lIlg.(,  .1l1d  lll1(  "hid1  111.1\'  lWlldil  \'our  dil'1l1.  look  .11  !tuk  21  1I'.1Y  10  tilrcL'  rC -C\.lI11ill.lIillll  lIt'  th.lI , 
1 .1111  !!.oill!!.  10 SlIg.g,l'sl  our h.1r  h(!!.ill  10 look.lI  Ihis eh.1I1!!.(  "h(thct'  ti'Ol11  .1  PSI,  .1  jut'1'  SClltCIlCl',  or  C\ 'L'Il,  ill  SOI11l'  1.'.lSI.''> 
.ls.1  "'.1\'  10  rl'  L' \.lllliIlC  or (orrcLI  .111  ulljust  SL'lltl'IlL' l',  "hnl' I hL'  illl'Cstig..1I iOIl  dOIl(  ,, '.lS  slHldl.h',  Oil  .1 plu, 
THE  DEFENDER  -(( 1 
\\'c ll , fir'>t, \\hcthl'l' onc i'> ,Ippointcd ()n ,If)peli, or
" c()ntinulng t() rcprocnt ,I (Iicnt ,Iftcr tri,11 ()r
'>c lltcn(ing, onc nccds to I:\\TSTIl; ,\TF, ,\sk I'm
,Ind file ,I Ill()ti()n illllllcdi,ltch' ,Iftcr '>cntcn(ing ti))'
,111 il1\'otig,ltor if it ,Ippell's th,lt thc ,>clltcn(e nccds ,I
'>cc()nd I()ok, If \'()u d()n ' t gct ()nc , ohjcct , then find
,11.1\\ studcnt or cnlist ,I \\illing Llinih' Illcillher ()f thc
(Iicnt \\ho ( ,In gct ,I((OS to f.lInih- IllcdicII, s(hool ,
,Ind ()thl'l' rc(ords th,lt n1.I\' help \'OU , Ohtain ;1 (Op\'
()f thL' PSI if one \\ ',IS donc frol11 the pri()r ,ltt())'nL'\',
f()rlll \'()ur dicnt , ())' pctition thc Coun t() h;1\ 'c it
nl.ldc ,1\ ,Ii 1.1 hie if it \\';IS n()t fikd in thc post tri,Ii tile
())' thL' nl.lin file ,It  the District ( ' krk 's ()ffi(e, Thcsc
.lrL' .Ii\\,I\"> ,I g()od '>Llning p()int.
You)' L' liclll, likc 111,111\ ' of thc souls \\110 \\,lIldl'l' hcti»)'c
thc hcnL' II , in 1ll.1I1\' L',ISO \\ill h,1\'c ,I di,lgn()s,lhk IllClll ,11
illnc,>,>, 1  In ,I rCL' cnt (,ISC \\C \\ 'erc ,Ihk t() ohtain tcsting
Ii))' rCLlI'd,lli()n, \\hi(h, ,lltllOugh Ul1suL'(essful , did in LI((
c,>uhlish ,I \cJ'\' I()\\ 10 t()r ,I (liL'lll tl1,ll \\,l'>  put hcli)rc thc
c'()urt I,  I',-"l inl.llcs LlIlgC hct\\'cc n ten ,Ind t\\cnt\' pcr(cnt
()f thc fi)II,,> \\h() (()I11C hcti»)'c thc (J'illlin,11 justice sYstelll
11 ,1\c ,>()nlC dis()rder, ,Ind I i.lITi,> ( ' ()lInt\ ' 1,lil st.ltisti(s hel),
tlli'> Ilut, ()nL' (,111 ()ht.lin j,liI rL'(()rd,>, in(luding l11L'lli L'.I I
rccorel'>, \\ith rL' k ,I'>CS fr()1ll \'our (Iicnt, ()r \'i,1 SUhp()L'll.l
if \(HI ,lrL' gctting ,) hClring, T,llk t() \'()ur client ,1I1d ,I,k
thcln If tlIC\' h,l\'c hccn LIking ,U1\' IllcdiL'.lti()ns ()r hccn
Ilmpiulilcd, Y()U III ,1\ ' \\ 'cll hc suq))'isL'li that \'()ur c1icnt
tcl" \'Oll thn' .I rl' t,lking I ,ithiulll ,1Ild this nc\'L'I' ;If)pc,lrs
,ul\\\IILTl' on thc rcc()rd n()r d()cs thc prn'i()us ,ltt()rtll'\' kn()\\
tll,ll thi, \\,l'> thl' C,l'>C hCC.lll'>C n() (1IlL' nL'l' I11Cllti()llL'li it. ThL'
LlInil\ ,>h() uld ,Ib() hc (()n'>ltitL'li, ,1Ild thn \\ill ()licn P)'()\C .1
I"Icll '>Ollr(L' of infi, rtn.ltiOII ,lh()lIt orl,'..lnl( hr.lin injlln', P,lst
,lhlN', drul,'. prohlellls, or 1e,ll"Ilinl,'. dis,lhilit ic' s, ()nc ,llso 1lL'L'lt...
til h,IH' ,I Ill()ti()n ()Il file t() ohuin ,1Il opcn if this sh()uld
pr( )H' nc(css;u'\'.
THE DEFENDER :( 8
One can also try to disprove the errors in the PSI, if they are
present , Sometimes criminal history is misstated or overstated,
so providing affidavits as to the accuracy of the history and
obtaining some out of county or out of state records may
be needed, Mfidavits from family members are key to both
the medical/psychological portion of this MNT presentation
AND to the factual issues the trial court considered, If one
has new facts to present, then the trial court will hopefully be
willing to listen, Again, here the services of an investigator who
can locate and obtain records and affidavits is invaluable,
As the attorney, one is trying to change the factual face
of the client before the court , Even if one does not obtain a
complete re-sentencing, remember that, if eligible, one may
• 
help the client's case for "SHOCK PROBATION" or for bail if a
persuasive story can be told , The facts you present in court
may also be persuasive to other claims brought in, such as
a failure to investigate claim on punishment, or perhaps a
competency claim , There are also times when the court may
with to exercise mercy, such as on multiple enhancements on
cases of prostitution or petty theft, where the complete story
of the client, their difficult family situation, drug addiction,
or mental illness \-vas never truly brought out, What you are
preparing is essentially a supplemental or amended sentencing
memorandum for presentation to the trial court, asking for
sllch relief as you think appropriate,
A word of caution here; as the Hippocratic Oath says,
"FIRST, DO NO HARM," If the client received a light sentence or
a "SWEET DEAL" , please do not think of this as an advocation
for reopening that door, Nor am I suggesting that a judge is
always going to change his or her mind, nor reverse a jury
decision , What I am suggesting is that the new changes provide
a second chance for those clients who need it, It is a tall order
to get on a case, get an investigator, obtain releases for records,
get the records via requests, Open Record, or subpoenas, and
do the family interviews and client interviews necessary to
obtain affidavits in the short time one has to file a Motion
for New TriaL I am suggesting that if one makes an initial
review and concludes the sentence may have been too harsh
or inappropriate, then having a plan to treat the punishment
portion of the MNT as a way to educate the court and provide a
reason to give a more just sentence may benefit one's client. Eke
much of our efforts, and like chicken soup, it couldn't hurt,
BURNS BAIL BONDS 
,
Shaun, Shelby, Shannon and John 
* Family owned and operated since  1971 
* Bilingual staff with over 100 years  of experience 
* We advocate a paid in  full  attorney is  a defendant's best defense 
* Non-Arrest Bonds - we accompany your client to the jailor from  the 
courtroom 
609 Houston Avenue  Tel:  713.224.0305 
Houston, Texas 77007  burnsbailbonds@yahoo.com 
EZ  INTERLOCK 
An Automobile I  .tion Interlock Provider 
John Bums  Laura O'Brien 
* Your clients  will work with the owners 
* Summary reports emailed to you upon request 
* Convenient scheduling for installations and recalibrations - our 
technicians work around your client's schedule 
* Accurate and reliable machines - Fuel cell prevents false readings 
609 Houston A venue  Tel:  713.223.4424 
Houston, Texas 77007  ezinterlock@yahoo.com 

otlon
OF THE Moment
By Shawna L. Reagin
CAUSE NO. ___
STATE OF TEXAS IN THE DISTRICT COURT
VS. HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS
EMMABOVARY 178
TH
JUDICIAL DISTRICT
MOTION IN LIMINE
Prohibit Prosecutor From Advising Venire The State Has Equal Right To A"Fair Trial"
TO THE HONORABLE JUDGE OF SAID COURT:
COMES NOW EMMA BOVARY, Defendant in the above-styled and numbered cause, and files this Motion to Prohibit the
Prosecutor from Advising Venire the State has an Equal Right to a " Fair Trial ," and in support thereof she would show the
following:
I.
Harris County prosecutors frequently advise felony venires that they want to be sure that the State gets a "fair trial," just like the
Defendant deserves. However, the State is not entitled to due process of law; the rights created by the Fourteenth Amendment are, by
its very terms, guaranteed to the individual. The rights established are personal rights. COLLIER V. POE, 732 S.W.2d 332, 342 (Tex.Crim.
App. 1987), citing SHELLEY V. KRAEMER, 334 U.S. 1, 68 S.Ct. 836, 846,92 L.Ed. 1161 (1948). Likewise, the word "person" in the context
of the due process clause of the 5
th
Amendment cannot, by any reasonable mode of interpretation, be expanded to encompass the States of the
Union. COLLIER, ante, citing SOUTH CAROLINA V. KATZENBACH, 383 U.S. 30 I, 86 S.Ct. 803, 816, 15 L.Ed.2d 769 (1966). Neither the State nor any
agency of the State is entitled to due process oflaw. COLLIER at 342 [cites omitted). Due process and due course of law are guarantees to citizens
and not governments or their agents. Id.
II.
Defendant submits that the right to a "fair trial" stems from both the 5
th
and 14th Amendments ofthe U.S. Constitution and their counterparts
in Art. I, Sees. 13 and 19 of the Texas Constitution, and thus is not a right that inures to the State of Texas or its agencies. She requests therefore
that the prosecutors acting on behalf of the State of Texas be prohibited from advising the venire that the jurors who serve in this trial will be
required to give the State the same right to a "fair trial" as they accord Defendant.
WHEREFORE, PREMISES CONSIDERED, Defendant prays this Motion be GRANTED and that the Court issue its order accordingly.
Respectfully submitted,
Shawna L. Reagin TBN 16634900
1305 Prairie, Suite 300 1Houston, Texas 770021713.224.1641
Atto rney For Defendant
THE DEFENDER "* lD
CERTIFICATE  OF  SERVICE 
I  hereby  certif)'  that a  true  and correct copy of the  foregoing  Motion  was  hand-delivered  to  an  Assistant  District Attorney 
assigned  to this case  on this  the  19
th 
day  of August, 2008. 
Shawna  L.  Reagin 
STATE  OF  TEXAS  IN  THE DI STRICT  COURT 
VS.  HARRI SCO UNTY, TEXAS 
EMMA  BOVARY  178
TH 
JUDICIAL DISTRICT 
ORDER 
On this  the  day of _______, 2008, came on to be  heard  Defendant's  Motion  in  Limine  to Prohibit the 
Prosecutor from  Advising  the State  Has an  Equal  Right  to  a "Fair Trial,"  and  having duly considered  same,  this  Court is  of the 
opinion said  Motion should  be: 
__Granted  I __ Denied 
Signed and entered  this  __day  of ______, 2008. 
Judge Presiding 
:_  BIONAL AND RELIABLE SERVICE
Print and Graphic Design Services
•  Business  Cards  &  Letterhead 
•  Manuals  &  Booklets 
•  Proposals  • Annual  Reports 
•  Large  Color  Displays  &  Banners 
• Trial  Exhibits •  Brochures 
Commercial Accounts Available 
Pickup &  Delivery 
www.copydotcom.com 
713.528. 1201  1201-F Westheimer,  Houston TX  77006 
£   ~ ~ I ~ + ~ ~ 4 :k:&A4
Introduces 
CHAR BAR 
':'Shoe Shine 
':'Custom Suits 
·:·Two Full  Service  Bars 
.:. Repairs  &  Alterations 
'Hull Service Tailor since 1937
713.227.5867 
PLUS 
305 Travis@ Congress 
713.222.8177 
PROCESS SERVICE 
ALR Subpoena:  Preparation and Service 
DPS  Notification/Witness Fee  Paid 
Harris and Surrounding Counties 
24  hr Cell:  281.414.3683 
Fax:  713-739-0013 
Fast  Dependable Service 
raynusher@yahoo.com 
THE  DEFENDER  * 11 
By Hon. Roger Bridgwater
THEDEFENDER] FALL 08
ALTERNATIVES


One Judge's Perspective
The Honorable Roger Bridgwater
is Judge of the 178
th
District
Court .
Along with this Borgman cartoon, appearIng 111 the (HCCSCD). This perhaps is one more indication reflecting the
November 10,2007 Chronicle were three letters to the editor change in philosophy towards more of a "corrections mindset"
about the defeat of the county jail bond issue. One wrote, and away from that of "social worker".
"Confusion abounds. The defeat of the jail bond baffles Harris Rehabilitation has always been a consideration in
County officials who have begun blaming each other for its determination of sentencing imposed by the District Court
failure. Political analysts cite late campaign efforts. Not one of Judges trying criminal cases and a lack of jail space may
the post-election articles quotes a voter." The writer then opined encourage a closer look at other options.
that with" . . . escalating imprisonment rates, it is no wonder Sentencing alternatives to incarceration have been
that the voters have spoken. Will the "deciders" understand developed in a number of areas to address violations of
that ill-timed direct mail is not their biggest problem?" probationers swiftly and appropriately using a system of
Another said, " .... Instead of expending taxpayer dollars graduated sanctions and incentives. Among the first such
for family counseling, education, job treatment and drug alternatives was the creation of the STAR (Success Through
treatment, taxpayers spend tens of thousands of dollars per Addiction Recovery) program, also known as "Drug Court".
year to house an inmate." The goal there is to assist non-violent offenders in overcoming
While I don't support the accuracy of the drawing or of serious drug addictions. The Judges serving in the Drug
all the comments, I am concerned that this may accurately Courts do so on a volunteer basis and in addition to their
reflect many of the public'S perspective as well, if not at least a regular criminal court docket. Defendants from any of the
modicum of the problem. 22 Criminal District Courts can be referred to the Drug
Certainly "locking them up IS not the only answer" Court and, those fitting the criteria are provided intensive
and the District Court Judges trying criminal cases realize substance abuse treatment with the aid of innovative court
that. The probation department is now known as the Harris supervision and community support services. The success rate
County Community Supervision and Corrections Department has been impressive .
THE DEFENDER * 12
LOCKING
THEM  UP 
IS  NOT 
THE ONL'I
ANSWER 
JAIL 
THERAP't 
PLACEMENT  IN  AN 
IN-PATIENT 
NEED-BASED  FACILlT'I, 
OR REMOVAL  FROM
THE  PROGRAM
or removal from the program ) other than revocation with
sentence to state jailor Texas Department of Corrections
Institutional Division.
While there are no hard statistics at this time to show
the direct impact of progressive sanctions to the reduction of
revocations of probation, in 2007 there was a 14% decrease
for all of HCCSCD.
There are several other alternative programs, but they
are all limited by funding and, as the legislature allots more
funds towards these programs, it is the belief that mOre
Sllccess can be seen in this area. The cost of alternative
programs is much less than the cost to incarcerate .
Realize that I do not speak for any court other than the
178th District Court; other judges are as much or more
interested and knowledgeable in alternatives then I am.
Be creative, be aware of the community supervision options
available to the court, learn the court's philosophy, your
client's needs and bring options to the Judge other than
revoca tion.
Lives are being changed and that goal must remain
among the top priorities for attorneys representing offenders,
just as it is for the court considering case dispositions.
DRUG 
COURT
Change Through Intervention (CTI) is another supervision
tool available to all Criminal Court District Judges, although
only in practice in 18 of the 22 courts. CTI is available for
use in drug cases as well as for other offenses where it is
determined to be appropriate. Being designed for high and
high-medium risk/ needs probationers there is a 1:35 officer to
probationer ratio. Currently there are 20 CTI officers and 12
Aftercare officers assigned to the 4 regional offices throughout
the county. There is even a CTI Mental Health caseload were
supervision is 1 :25 officer to client ratio.
These programs al.low supervision to be much more
intensive, with phase I of CTI requiring a minimum of three
face to face visits a month . Officers also maintain regular
contact with treatment providers to monitor treatment issues
and progress throughout the program. The Criminal
District Court Judge in which the case was filed also
meets personally with the CTI probationers every 90
days to evaluate the participants and to provide praise
and incentives where appropriate as well as addressing
non-compliance issues with sanctions ( that may include
a supervisor admonishment, Court admonishment, "jail
therapy", placement in an in-patient need-based facility,
THE  DEFENDER  * 13 
Modification of Disposition
or Violation of Probation (VOP) 
Part 2 I By JoAnne Musick
Any disposition, except a commitment to TYC, may be
modified by the juveni Ie court until the child reaches his
18th birthday or the child is earlier discharged by the court
or operation of ~ a w   Except for commitment to TYC, all
dispositions automatically terminate when the child reaches
his 18th birthday.
A hearing to modify disposition shall be held on the
petition of the child and his parent, guardian, guardian
ad litem, or attorney, or on the petition of the state, a
probation officer, or the court itself. Reasonable notice
of a hearing to modifY disposition shall be given to aJl
parties. §S4.04(d). Because any party may petition for a
modification, the court is given flexibility to reward good
behavior as well as address negative behaviors.
Typically, it is the State seeking to modifY disposition
because the juvenile is alleged to have violated the terms and
THE DEFENDER *  14
conditions of their probation; however, any party may petition
the court for a modification. And, modifications need not
always seek additional punishment; a juvenile in compliance
may seek to lessen his probation burden or otherwise change
his conditions.
If the term of probation will expire before the 18th
birthday, the probation may be extended. A motion or
petition must be filed seeking extension before the probation
term expires, otherwise, the court loses jurisdiction to modifY.
Further, if the petition to extend is timely filed, the court must
act on the petition to extend before the first anniversary of the
date on which the period of probation expires.
2
And, similar
to adult court and motions to revoke probation or proceed
to adjudication of a deferred probation, the juvenile is not
entitled to a jury determination on a modification issue
3
When  the  State  seeks  to  modi!,)' because  of an  alleged 
violation  of probation,  it  is  clear  the  juvenile  is  entitled  to 
notice  of the  alleged  violation.  Though  the  family  code  does 
not  specify  what  must  be included  in  a  petition  to  modi!,),
disposition,  the  juvenile  attorney  should  object  when  the 
State  does  not  follow  the  general  requirements  for  a  petition 
for  adjudication  or  transfer.  The  petition  to  modify  should 
articulate  the  conditions  of probation  the  child  is  aJleged  to 
have  violated  and  the  manner and  means  in  which  the  child  is 
alleged  to  have  acted  in  the  violation.

Notice  of  the  motion  to  modify  must  be given  to  all 
parties  including  the  child  and  at  least  one  of the  adults  in 
his  or  her  life.

Where  the  State  files  the  motion,  the  child  is 
entitled  to  notice;  where  the  child  files  a  motion,  the  State  is 
entitled  to  notice. 
The code states  only that reasonable  notice shall  be  given, 
but  it  does  not specify  what  is  reasonable.

This  has  resulted 
in  a  split  among  the  courts,  ranging  from  8  days  notice  to  at 
least  10 days  notice ?  Until this  conflict  is  resolved,  the  proper 
remedy  is  to  file  a  motion  for  continuance  where  counsel 
believes  he  has  not  been  given  adequate  notice  of the  issues 
and  time  to  prepare  a  defense.  If the  record  does  not  show 
when  the  child  was  given  notice,  but  the  child's  attorney 
announced  ready,  did  not  file  a  motion  for  continuance,  and 
the  child  and  his  parents  were  present  and  fully  advised  by 
the  court  as  to  the  issues  before  the  court,  reasonable  notice 
is  presumed.

To  avoid  a  waiver  of the  notice  requirement, 
proper objections  are  required. 
Once  filed,  can  the  petition  to  modify  be  amended? 
Though  the  code  is  silent  as  to  the  circumstances  under 
which  a  petition  for  modification  can  be  amended,  the 
general  principle  is  that the  petition  can  be  amended  if that 
can  be  done  without  substantial  prejudice  to  the  juvenile 
respondent.

Interestingly,  in  modifications  other than  for  placement 
in  a  secure  facility  for  a  period  longer  than  30  days  or 
commitment  to  TYC,  the  child  and  the  child's  parent  or 
attorney  may  waive  the  hearing  in  accordance  with  Section 
51.09 . 
10
However,  to  place  the  juvenile  in  a  secure  facility, 
the  court  must  hold  a  hearing  which  cannot  be  waived. 
Once  a  petition  is  filed  and  hearing  date  is  set,  a 
modification  related  to a violation  of probation  is  a  two-step 
process:  first,  the court must  determine  whether or not the 
child  violated  a  condition of probation; second,  if the court 
found  the  violation  to  be  true,  the  court  must  determine 
what to do about the violation.  The court wiJl  be permitted 
to  review  social  history  reports  from  probation  officers, 
professional  court employees, or  professional  consultants  in 
addition  to  the  testimony  of other  witnesses  to  determine 
the  appropriate  modi fica tion. II 
Further,  where  the  modification  seeks  confinement, 
the  juvenile  is  entitled  to  an  attorney. 12  A  court  making  a 
finding  of indigence  shall  appoint  an  attorney  to  represent 
the  child  on  or  before  the  fifth  working  day  after  the 
petition  or  motion  has  been  filed. 
For the judge to modify a disposition and assess additional 
punishment,  the  court  must  find  by  a  preponderance 
of  the  evidence  that  the  child  violated  a  reasonable  and 
lawful  order  of the  court .
13 
Where  the  court  modifies  the 
disposition,  the  court  shall  specifically  state  in  the  order  its 
reasons  for  modifying  the  disposition  and  shall  furnish  a 
copy  of the  order  to  the  child,l4 
IN A SIGNIFICANT RECENT CHANGE TO
THE STATUTE, JUVENILES MAY NO LONGER BE
COMMITTED TO TYC ON A MODIFICATION, regardless 
of  their  past  referral  history,  unless  the  underlying  case 
being  modifi ed  is  equivalent  to  a  felony  offense. IS 
The legislature eliminated the possibility that a misdemeanor 
disposition  can  be  modified  to  include  commitment 
to  TYC. 
And  finally,  the  juvenile  has  the  right  to  appeal 
under Section  56.01 (c)( 1)( C) and  challenge  the  revocation 
decision .  A finding of a single probation violation supported 
by  evidence  is  sufficient  to  uphold  a  revocation. L6
I FC §5405. 
2  FC §54.05(1). 
3  FC §54.05(c). 
4  See  Te.xas  Juvenile  Law,  Roben  O.  Dawson  (6th  Ed.  2004)  and  In  the 
Matter ot R.A.B.,  525  S.W.2d  892  (Tex.Civ.App.  1975),  stating a petition  to 
modify  dispOSItion  IS  not unlike  a motion  to  revoke  probation  in  adult cases. 
5  FC §54.05(d ). 
6  FC  §54.05(d). 
7  See  In  the  Maner  of I. e., 556  S.W.2d  119  (Tex.Civ.App. - 'Vaco  1977) 
and  In  the  Matter  of M.L.S.,  590  S.W.2d  626  (Tex.Civ.App.  - San  Antonio 
1979 ). 
8  In  the  Matter ofO.E.P.,  512 S.W.2d  789  (Tex. Civ.App.  1974). 
9  Texas  Juvenile  Law, Robert O . Dawson  (6th  Ed.  2004). 
)0 FC §54.05(h). 
11  FC  §54.05(e). 
12  FC  §51.101(e). 
13  FC §54.05(f) . 
14  FC  §54.05(i). 
LS FC  §54.05. 
16  In  re  T.R.S.,  115 S.W.3d  318  (Tex.App.  2003). 
JoAnne Musick is a Houston attorney handling primarily criminal and juvenile defense matters. She is Board Certified in
Juvenile Law by the Texas Board of Legal  Specialization. JoAnne is a partner with Musick & Musick LLP and a legal analyst
for various national news programs. JoAnne chairs the HBA Criminal Law & Procedure Section and is president- lect of the 
Harris County Criminal Lawyers Association.
THE DEFENDER * 15

•• •• ••
•••••••
• • •
t   ~
uti
d
es 
. A BID

. . .-.- .. 
Team HCCLA triumphed again at the Big Brother /
Big Sister benefit at Palace Lanes on Jul y 12, 2008. HCCLA
soundly beat the numbers posted by Team HBA in both games .
Out of the 4-team rivalry of HCCLA, HBA, HYLA and the
Justice League, HCCLA bowler Jim Woodward posted the
second-highest score in the first game with a masterful 172.
Steve Halpert racked up the best score out of the HCCLA and
HBA teams in the second game with an impressive 169.
The 2008 HCCLA team included Mark Bennett, Steve
Halpert, Chuck Stanfield , Jim Woodward, Tom Zakes and
head cheerleader, Wendy Miller. Generous sponsors and fans
,, ' ere Jennifer, Veronica and Eric Bennett, Staci Biggar, Troy
cKinney, Scott Markowitz and JoAnne Musick.
With the incredible support of HCCLA fans and our
Exec utive Board, our team rai sed $885.00 for BBBS Amachi Texas
Mentor Program, which exceeded the 2007 total of $500.00.
It's not too early to start practicing to join Team HCCLA 2009!

. .
Everyone  is  welcollle. 
Without intervention,  700/0  of children of 
prisoners will follow their parent into prison themselves. 
One-t<H>ne  mentoring with children who have a parent or relative in 
prison can help break the cycle of incarceration. 
Help us break the chain.  Become a Big  Brother or  Big Sister today,  or 
recommend us to the family of a child who needs a little guidance. 
BIg 8rotMrs Big SIsters 
of Greater Houston
www.gobighouston.org 
(713)  271-5683 
THE  FOLLOWING 
HARRIS  COUNTY  CRIMINAL  DEFENSE  LAWYERS 
JOIN  HER  CAMPAIGN  STEERING  COMMITTEE 
JACK  B.  ZIMMERMANN,  GENE  JONES,  STANLEY  SCHNEIDER, 
ROBERT  SCARDINO,  CHRIS  TRITICO,  KENT  SCHAFFER,  DAN  COGDELL, 
GEORGE  McCALL  SECREST,  TROY  McKINNEY,  JAY  W.  BURNETT 
and 
FORMER  REPUBLI CAN  PRIMARY  CANDIDATE 
MICHELE  SATTERELLI  ONCKEN 
Geraldo  Acosta 
Jaime  Acosta 
Sam  Adamo 
James  Ardoin  III 
John  Armstrong 
Mack  Arnold 
Juan ita  Barner 
Karen  Barney 
Jennifer  Bennett 
Mark  Bennett 
Dean  Blumrosen 
Nancy  Botts 
Gerald  Bourque 
Lott  Brooks 
Sean  Buckley 
Dick  Burr 
Yolanda  Coray 
David  Cunningham 
M.  Fox  Curl 
Neal  Davis 
Ni cole  DeBorde 
Emily  Munoz 
Rick  DeTotO 
Chris  Downey 
Todd  Dupont 
Danny  Easterling 
Rosa  Eliades 
James  T. Fallon  III 
Ami  Feltovich 
Robert  Fickman 
David  Fleischer 
Tyler  Flood 
Phyllis  R.  Frye 
Trent  Gaither 
Greg  Gladden 
Lana  Gordon 
Tucker  Graves 
Heather  H,  Hall 
Steve  Halpert 
Robyn  Harlin 
Cynthia  Henley 
Mark  Hochglaube 
Bennie  House 
Olivia  Jordan 
Jennifer  Kahn 
John  Kahn 
Kathryn  Kelber 
David  Kiatta 
Vivian  King 
Richard  Kuniansky 
Tommy  LaFon 
Jim  Lavine 
Robert  Loper 
Blanca  Lopez 
Amy  Martin 
Melissa  Martin 
Farrah  Martinez 
Janie  Maselli 
Patrick  McCann 
Ken  McLean 
Dee  McWilliams 
Jim  Medley 
Sherra  Miller 
Wendy  Miller 
Rand  Mintzer 
Mark  L. Mitchell 
Tyrone  Moncriffe 
Morris  Moon 
Robert  Morrow 
Earl  Musick 
JoAnne  Musick 
Tad  Nelson 
Alvin  Nunnery 
Sandy  Oballe 
Kim  Ogg 
Kirk  Oncken 
Nancy  Oncken 
George  Parnham 
Dale  Pasc hal 
Richard  Patterson 
Daphne  Pattison 
Robert Pelton 
Danalynn  Recer 
Carmen  Roe 
Mary  Samaan 
Kyle  Sampson 
Katherine  Scardino 
Josh  Sc haffer 
Grant  Scheiner 
Patty  Segura 
Norm  Silverman 
Amber Skillern 
Matthew Skillern 
Aimee  Solway 
James  Spradlin 
Chuck  Stanfield 
David  Suhler 
Jim  Sullivan 
Sunshine  Swallers 
Mark  Thering 
Shandon  Tonry 
Ted  Trigg 
Amanda  Webb 
Russell  Webb 
Mandy  Welch 
Brian  Wice 
Cornel  Williams 
Enid  Anne  Williams 
Q. Tate  Williams 
Sarah  V.  Wood 
Mark  Yanis 
Terri  Zimmermann 
ALSO  ENDORSED  BY: 
HARRlS  COUNTY AFL-CIO,  GLBT  CAUCUS,  HARRlS  COUNTY  DEPUTIES'  ORGANIZATION,  HARRIS 
COUNTY WOMEN'S  POLITICAL CAUCUS  AND  THE ASSOCIATION  OF WOMEN  ATTORNEYS 
(The  only  Democrat  for  a  criminal  district  court  bench  endorsed  by  AWA) 
Pol.  Adv.  paid  for  by  the  Shawn a  L. Reagin  for  Judge  Campaign,  in  compli ance  with  the  Judicial  Campaign  Fairness  Act. 
Mark  Bennett, Treasurer,  735  Oxford  Street,  Houston, Texas  77007 
THEDEFENDER] FALL 08
~ r   c e
NOTES
By Jeremy Sierra
'
ConsUl G 
Carlos General ofM
Onz;i/ez A A exico
Danai nn recounts all of GRACE's
accon7plishments for the past year

June 26, 2008
the Gulf Regional Advocacy Center [GRACE] held its
annual fundraiser benefit dinner at Trinity Episcopal Church.
The evening's special guest was Mexico's Consul General,
Carlos 1. Gonzalez Magall6n, who presented Danalynn
Recer and GRACE with an award commending them for
their work through the Mexican Capital Legal Assistance
Program. Danalynn and GRACE were fresh off their victory
in the Juan Quintero case, where they succeeded against all
odds in securing a life sentence for Mr. Quintero, whose
wife was also present at the event.
The award is a plaque that reads: "TEPANTLATOANI
- In honor of the 6th anniversary of the Gulf Region
Advocacy Center the Consulate General of Mexico expresses
THE DEFENDER * 18
'V1agalJo
n
Recer leads the crowd in
Danalynn GRACE staff members
thankIng
its sincerest gratitude to Danalynn Recer and the entire staff
of GRACE for their tireless efforts in protecting the lives
of Mexican nationals." Tepantlatoani means "la'A'Yer" in
Nawatl, an indigenous language of Mexico.
GRACE also wishes to announce that it is becoming
licensed as fact investigators, due to Harris County's
singular interpretation of a statute making this a necessary
step for GRACE to continue providing its services as
mitigation specialists. [No other county in the state
has implemented such a requirement, and even in
Harris County it is not being applied to all mitigation
specialists.] GRACE expects the license to be issued by
the end of September.
-
Welcome
NEW Members
Yong J. An
Al an J. Baer
Sheila Burnett
Jacquelyn R. Carpenter
Wilvin J. Carter
Clint Davidson
Paul Doyle
Zachary B. Fertitta
Ramona
Franklin -Williams
Terrence Gais er
Marissa Garcia
J.J. Gradoni
Willard J. HaJl J r.
R.K. Hansen
Ronald B. Helson
Jacob Henderson
George Jacobs
Joaquin Jimenez
J ules Johnson
Hope Knight
-
Rand y Martin
Carl Moore
Sarah Mueller
Richard K. Oliver
J. Reid Perry II
Frank M . Pisano
Lenno n Prince
Silvia V. Pubchara
Javier M . Ramos
Gary A. Roth
Kimberly J. Samman
Matthew D . Sharp
Edward P. Sillas
Matthew A. Skillern
Monique C. Sparks
Gregor y Tsioros
Jane Scott Vara
Kurt B. Wentz
Michael F.
Westbrook II
Bob Wicoff
CENSORED
.....--.1 CENSORED ...--
CENSORED
CENSORED,aI_ _
REASONABLE DOUBT
TODD DUPONT
THEDEFENDER] FAll 08
Notes
OF Interest
advertising rates:
FUll INSIDE PAGE [NON-COVER] - $700.00 per issue I $2,520.00 per year
INSIDE FRONT COVER - $800.00 per issue I $2,880.00 per year
INSIDE BACK COVER - $750.00 per issue I $2,700.00 per year
BACK COVER - $800.00 per issue I $2,880.00 per year
213 PAGE - $600.00 per issue I $2,160.00 per year
1/2 PAGE - $500.00 per issue I $1,800.00 per year
1/3 PAGE - $400.00 per issue I $1,440.00 per year
1/4 PAGE - $250.00 per issue I $900.00 per year
BUSINESS CARD SIZE - $125.00 per issue I $450.00 per year
THE DEFENDER *: 20
IN  BECOMING  AMEMBER? 
HCClA 
-+ Promotes aproductive  exchange  of ideas and  encourages 
better communication  with  prosecutors and  the judiciary. 
-+ Provides continuing legal  education  programs  for  improving 
advocacy  skills  and  knowledge. 
-+ Promotes  ajust application of the  court-appointed  lawyer 
system  for  indigent persons  charged  with  criminal  offenses. 
-+ Files  amicus curiae  briefs in support of freedom  and 
human  rights. 
APPLICATION 
Applicant:
Mailingaddress:
Telephone:
Fax:
Email:
Website:
Firm Name:
Date admitted to bar:
Law school:
Professional organizationsin which you are amemberin good standing:
Typeofmembership:
o  Student($25 annual fee)
Expected graduation date: ____
o  Newly licensed (first year) attorney($75)
o  Regular membership ($150)
Date:
Signatureofapplicant:
Endorsement:
I,amemberin goodstandingofHCCLA, believe this appLicant
to be a person ofprotcssional competency, integrity and good
moralcharacter.Theapplicantis actively engaged in thedefense
ofcriminal cases.
Date:
Signatureofmember:
Member name:
MAIL THIS  APPLICATION  TO: 
HeCLA
P.O.Box 924523,HOllston,Texas 77292-4523
713.227.2404
TEXAS
LEGAL
PUBLICATIONS
"FEATURING THE LARGEST SELECTION OF LAW BOOKS IN TEXAS U
PROUDlY SI RVI:--:t; AI [ORNI YS [N [[ II S [All 01 TI XAS
Fegturing:
WEST . LEXIS NEXIS . TEXAS LAWYER . TEXAS DISTRICT &
COUNTY AnORNEY'S ASSOCIATION . OMNI PUBLISHERS . NHTSA
JURIS PUBLISHING . NtTA • JONES McCLURE PUBLISHING . BAKERS
PUBLICATIONS COUNCIL FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT & RESEARCH
.•• AND MANY MORE
CIAL ORDERS AVAILABLE
TEXAS CRIMI NAL
IATION
EXAS LEGAL PUBLICATIONS
3610 FANNIN STR EET
HOUSTON. TX 77004
7 1) 51(d(),)O (I )
(·?060·····;2493
REE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS . SP
OFFICIAL BOOKSTORE FOR TH
D EFEN E LAWYERS AS
7 135 2('" '}t)) (I ' )
II" , II, "
    3-DIGIT
MS. JOANNE MUS ICK
MUSICK & MUSICK
397 N SAM HOUSTON
HCI!...I::; ·rClr··1 T::-:
PRESORTED STANDARD
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
HOUSTON, TEXAS
PERMIT NO. 11500
ill, , , , II" II" , , , ), J, i " II, I, , " II, I, , , I, I, I, II, II!
770
LlP
PKWY E STE 325