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Architects Guide

To
San Juan Timberframes

261 Three Meadows Lane


Friday Harbor, WA 98250
360-378-6186 sanjuantimberframes.com
360-499-6062

Architects Guide to San Juan Timberframes

1) Introduction........................................................................................................................... 5
2) The San Juan Timberframes Advantage............................................................................ 6
3) The San Juan Timberframes Package................................................................................ 7
The Timberframe................................................................................................................... 7
Structural Insulated Panels (SIP)........................................................................................... 8
4) Working with San Juan Timberframes ............................................................................... 9
Getting Started........................................................................................................................ 9
Timing your project................................................................................................................ 10
Engineering options............................................................................................................... 10
The timberframe and SIP raising........................................................................................... 10
Financing............................................................................................................................... 10
5) Timberframe Design Considerations................................................................................ 12
Full Timberframe vs. Timberframe Hybrid............................................................................. 12
Floor plan and post layout..................................................................................................... 12
Floor Systems....................................................................................................................... 12
Drywall and Paneling............................................................................................................. 13
Plumbing............................................................................................................................... 14
Electrical................................................................................................................................ 14
Heating.................................................................................................................................. 15
Roof Pitch and Timberframe Trusses.................................................................................... 15
Exterior Details...................................................................................................................... 16
Foundations........................................................................................................................... 16
6) Typical Timberframe Joinery Details................................................................................ 18
7) Typical Timberframe/SIP Construction Details................................................................ 29
8) Typical Foundation Details................................................................................................ 37
9) Resources........................................................................................................................... 43

2004 by San Juan Timberframes Inc.


All rights reserved.

1) Introduction
San Juan Timberframes makes it easy to add a cost effective timberframe to your designs. We
specialize in working with architects and designers. You do not need a working knowledge of
timberframe joinery to create stunning timberframe showpieces. You provide the basic design
and vision and we provide the timberframe. We have the production capability to quickly
handle all of your projects from large lodges, churches and executive homes down to small
guest cabins.

Example of a free 3D quotation drawing based on the


floor plans received.

Benefits for the Architect

Design Flexibility. Our timberframe system is adaptable to almost any style: Park
lodge, Craftsman, Farmhouse, Modern or
Makes Ordinary Homes Extraordinary. Satisfied clients mean better referrals.
Design Collaboration. You design the home and we design the timberframe.
Fast to Design. From initial contact to raised frame in as little as 12 weeks.
Full Support. From full engineered structural drawings to experienced onsite
timberframe raising crews. We strive to make every aspect of your timber project as
seamless and smooth as possible.
No Conflict of Interest. San Juan Timberframes does not provide stock home plans or
provide home design services to end clients. We feel a local architect better serves the
clients needs.

Benefits for the Client

Surprisingly Affordable. Often built for the same or even less cost than conventional
custom building in resort areas.
Highest Quality Canadian materials and European workmanship, built to last.
Super Energy Efficient. Saves up to 50% on heating and cooling costs for the life of
the building.
High Indoor Air Quality. SIP walls lock out moisture and eliminate air pockets in the
walls to help prevent toxic molds and mildews.
Fast to Build. Close in the home in weeks instead of months.
Pride in Ownership. With your help we create timeless one of a kind homes that will
be treasured for generations to come.
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Roof detail from the Kreissig residence in Steamboat


Springs, CO.

2) The San Juan Timberframes Advantage


San Juan Timberframes is bringing a centuries old way of building into the future. With CAD
and CNC technology we create higher quality timber joinery for a fraction of the cost. Our price
can be less than half the cost of other timberframe companies and can be comparable to
conventional custom building in resort areas. The way we charge for our timberframes is by
the board foot. It makes little difference to our Hunddeger K2 CNC milling machine if your
design is complicated or simple. The difference in price can be minimal compared to the
added value of the complex timber joinery we can provide.
Below are a number of important points that differentiate San Juan Timberframes from other
timberframe suppliers.

In most cases we offer one free preliminary timberframe design and quote. This is not
just a rough estimate or guess, but a firm quote based on actual timber volume. With
our system your client has a firm idea of costs upfront before needing to commit to an
initial design deposit.
Our timberframes are bid on a board foot basis. The cost is relative to the amount and
size of timber used, not how complex the joinery is. Adding complicated architectural
details and rooflines to your project will not exponentially increase the cost as it would
with most hand crafted timberframes. The timberframes are designed and built by
computer eliminating weeks or even months of expensive shop time.
We use a state of the art German Hundegger K2 milling machine to produce our
timberframes. Large and detailed projects with hundreds of timbers are not a problem.
They are quickly and efficiently produced with extremely precise fully housed dovetail
and oak pegged mortise and tenon joinery. Fully housed joinery is important as it is
much stronger and tighter and conceals timber shrinkage over time.
Our design staff is one of the finest in North America. Combined they have had over 30
years of experience working with and designing for the Hundegger K2 milling machines
in Germany, France, Switzerland and Canada. Our design staff is the heart of the
operation and they are excellent at what they do.
We have our own sawmill and can control the quality and supply of our timbers. All of
our timber is slow growing; very dense, tight grain Douglas fir. Almost 100% of our

timber qualifies as grade #1. A years worth of log inventory is carefully drying in the log
yard. Price fluctuations and lack of quality timber supply do not affect us as they do
other companies.
Microwave kiln drying and historic recycled timber are also available options.
We are fast. Planning and building a timberframe project does not have to take years. It
can be done in weeks. Give us a reasonable lead-time and we can have your
timberframe designed, manufactured and ready when you are.
Our timberframe packages cut weeks or even months off traditional construction
timelines. The exterior shell can be assembled on site and weather tight in as little as
two weeks. Raising your frame in the late fall could still have you weather tight before
winter sets in.

Johnson/Gerlock Residence on San Juan Island, WA.

3) The San Juan Timberframes Package


San Juan Timberframes provides not only the timberframe but also all the building materials
needed to quickly enclose the house to the point where it is weather tight and lockable. The
Canadian materials used are all of the highest quality and offer exceptional value for our US
dollar. The timberframe, windows, doors, and Structural Insulated Panels are also available
separately or bundled as a home package and are always duty free. Below is the list of the
components and items that can be included in the standard San Juan Timberframes home
package.
The Timberframe
The timberframe is the heart of the home package. The home is created and joined like
a fine piece of furniture. Large Douglas fir posts and beams are connected with precise
dovetail and oak pegged mortise and tenon joints. Cathedral ceilings and exposed
beam work in every room create an interior atmosphere that cant be rivaled by
traditional housing.
Our timberframes are completely state of the art. Much of the time consuming and
expensive labor has been removed. We take your plan and create a frame design for it
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in CADwork, a highly specialized Swiss CAD program specifically for timberframing.


After your approval of the design a licensed engineer reviews and stamps the
timberframe plans. The timbers are custom cut from high-grade tight grain Douglas fir
logs. Next the finalized CAD file is transferred into the Hunddeger K2 CNC milling
machine the timberframe joinery is created. Your timberframe home is then ready for
final quality inspection, sanding, sealing and shipping. The frame is ready for delivery
and erection in a fraction of the time and expense needed for a comparable hand
crafted timberframe. Since the frames are designed and built using a computer,
complex joinery and intricate trusses are not a problem and can be added with very little
additional cost. Once on your clients site the frame is erected with the help of our
timberframe advisor, a crane and the local contractors crew in a matter of 1 to 5 days.
Structural Insulated Panels (SIP)
Custom manufactured and fully fabricated structural insulated panels (SIPs) are
provided to enclose, insulate and make weather tight your timberframe. These panels
are made up of expanded polystyrene (like Styrofoam) sandwiched between two sheets
of 7/16 oriented strand board (OSB). Insulspan the supplier we use takes your
timberframes 3D CAD drawings and with computer controlled machinery pre cuts the
panels to exactly fit your timber frame. All window and door openings, roof hips, valleys,
wiring and plumbing chases are precut. No cutting or sizing of the panels is normally
needed on the jobsite. Panels come in sizes of up to 8ft by 24ft to minimize handling
and joints. Installation of the SIPs with a crane takes from 2 to 5 days on an average
size home depending on the complexity.
SIPs provide much more than a quickly completed shell. Think of how warm your coffee
stays in a 1/8 thick Styrofoam cup. Now imagine what a solid sheet 8 to 12 thick on
the roof and 6 thick on the walls will do to lower heating and cooling bills. There are
very few studs or framing members in the walls or ceilings to wick the heat through. An
Oak Ridge National Laboratory report proved that a SIP home can save up to 50% on
your energy costs for life of the building compared to a standard home built to the
current energy code.

4) Working with San Juan Timberframes


Getting Started
The first step to adding an awe-inspiring timberframe to your commercial and residential
projects is simple. Email or send us your current plan, design or sketches and we can
transform it into timberframe. It is that easy. We collaborate with you, you control the overall
design, and we provide the technical timberframe elements. Our system of timberframeing is
adaptable to almost every building shape and style. National Park and Mountain Lodge styles
are our specialties.
Our first preliminary CAD timberframe design based on your plans is free. With this preliminary
design we are able to give you a firm quote for the cost of the timberframe and SIP panel
enclosure. For the initial design all we need are basic floor plans and elevations. A cross
section and roof plan is helpful if the design is complex. We can work off paper plans for the
original estimate but will require having them converted into CAD to start the project.
For fastest service please submit your plans as Auto CAD compatible .dwg .dwf or .dxf files. It
is helpful to have all of the drawings saved in one large file instead of separate files for each
page. Please email your zipped files to grant@sanjuantimberframes.com. For files that are
over 2MB please call and we can arrange to receive them by ftp. A slower alternative is to mail
paper plans or a CD to our office at:
San Juan Timberframes
261 Three Meadows Ln
Friday Harbor WA 98250

Timing your project


We strive to provide timely and quick turnaround on all of our timberframe and SIP packages.
However, a majority of our work is in ski resort areas. Snow and mountain weather create a
narrow building window for contractors. Everyone wants a mid summer to early fall delivery.
Due to the high demand during these seasons, production space, designers and engineers
time can be limited. A production slot is reserved for your project when a 5% design deposit is
received. Space is allocated on a first in, first choice of dates basis. By late March most of the
summer and fall building season will be full. Winter and early spring production dates are
more easily available but can still fill to 100% of our capacity. The key is to start planning as
early as possible. (See the next page for a timeline flowchart).
Engineering options
We provide licensed timberframe engineering for all Western states. Our engineers are
capable of reviewing and stamping your entire project including foundation. Having only one
engineer of record is generally the easiest, quickest and least expensive way of providing
engineering. We can also provide full stamped structural drawings as needed. If a local
engineer is required on the job we can limit our involvement solely to the timberframe and/or
panels.
The timberframe and SIP raising
There are three options when it comes to raising the timber frame.
1) One, we can refer your local contractor to a fully equipped traveling timberframe crew.
There are a number of subcontractors who travel the west exclusively raising timberframe and
panel homes. These full service companies provide everything, often including the crane.
2) The second option is more fun for your local contractor and often works out better
financially. We work with a number of timberframe/SIP raising advisors who can come to your
site and provide guidance for the local contractors crew. The contractor provides three or four
local carpenters and arranges for the crane rental. The advisor in essence becomes the
crews foreman for the duration of the timberframe and panel raising.
3) If the project is small and straightforward it is possible for an owner builder or local
contractor to raise the frame and panels without assistance. Complete and very detailed
raising drawings are included. If they are skilled, enjoy big projects and can assemble Ikea
furniture they should have no trouble raising one of our timberframes. For larger projects
having an advisor at least at the start is generally cost effective and shortens the learning
curve.
Financing
Indy Mac bank, the nations largest construction lender is actively pursuing loans for
timberframe and SIP homes. They have a wide range of loan products that should meet the
needs of most clients including owner builders. Indy Mac loans are generally available through
local loan brokers and select banks throughout the country. For more information on financing
see indymacbank.com or call us for other options.
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The Timberframe Building Process


Client and Architect
create conceptual
design and preliminary
plans.

Architect develops full


set of plans for
building dept submittal
incorporating
timberframe and SIP
designs.

Plans submitted for


Building Dept
approval.

Windows, Doors,
Siding, roofing and t&g
paneling ordered for
delivery immediately
following TF raising.

Local Contractor
prepares foundation
and subfloor if needed.

1st design
1 to 3
weeks

SJT designs free


preliminary Timberframe
model and quote.

SJT designs joinery and


finishes timberframe
model with input from
client, architect and TF
engineer.

SIP panel enclosure


is designed using
CAD timberframe
model.

*Depends on # of
changes, size and
complexity

Engineer specializing in
timberframe and SIPs
engineers project.
Contract is finalized
after all changes are in.

Sawmill time
1 to 2
weeks*

Cut list is produced and


timbers are cut on the
sawmill and stickered to
dry or are sourced from
recycled timbers.

Timbers are planed,


mortise and tenon and
dovetail joinery are
added. UV protectant
and end seal is added.
Ready to ship.

Timberframe raising and SIP installation


is done by a local contractor with our TF
advisor (if desired) or by specialized
crew. A 2500 sq ft home can be weather
tight and lockable in less than two
weeks.

Local Contractor and


Subs finish the home in
the conventional
manner.

Design Time
1 to
6 months*

*Drying time from


0 to 6 months
optional

SIP panels are


manufactured and
prefabricated with all
door and window
ROs and roof angles
precut.

Production time
1 to 3
weeks

1 1/2 to 3* weeks
to make weather
tight and lockable
*depends on size and
complexity

Time required
depends on local
contractor and
finish choices

Client moves in

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5) Timberframe Design Considerations


Full Timberframe vs. Timberframe Hybrid.
A timberframe hybrid is made up of a conventional 2x4 or 2x6 framed house with strong
timberframe elements added to key rooms and often to the front elevation. In the past with
labor intensive hand cut frames this was a good compromise balancing cost with the desired
look. The cost of a hybrid was basically the local stick-framed price of the home in addition to
the cost of the timberframe package. It generally would take longer than conventional
construction and created headaches for engineers trying to blend two different building
systems into one. The key rooms look good but the rest of the home is out of synch and plain
in comparison.
We still create timberframe hybrid homes but have found that it is often less expensive, more
dramatic and much faster to construct the homes in full timberframe. CAD design and CNC
joinery machines have brought full timberframe/SIP prices down low enough to be comparable
to custom conventional building in some areas. The finished cost of the full timberframe/SIP
home can end up being less than the cost of a similar but less attractive timberframe hybrid. In
mountainous areas with short building seasons the speed at which a full timberframe home is
made weather tight can also a deciding factor.

Floor plan and post layout


The Douglas fir posts we use are typically 7.5 x 7.5, they sit completely inside the house and are fully
exposed to the interior space. The number and spacing of the posts defines rooms and living areas.
If there are particular places you would like to see posts please note them on your plans. Having 2nd
floor posts line up with first floor post beneath is very helpful but not absolutely imperative.
Floor Systems
The first floor of a timberframe home is generally conventionally framed with a stem wall
foundation, tji joists and tongue and groove
plywood subfloor. Both the timberframe
and SIPs rest directly on the plywood
subfloor. The point loads of the timber
posts are carried down though the crawl
space to the footings with pressure treated
posts provided by the local contractor.
Hold-downs and Simpson straps are used
to secure the timberframe to the
foundation when required for wind or
seismic loading. Slab floors can also be
cost effective for first floors or daylight
basements.
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Timber top plates and timber joists are used to support the second floor system and become
the exposed ceilings for the rooms below. The least expensive and quickest way to create
ceiling and floors in second floors is to use 1 t & g spruce, pine, or fir car decking blind
nailed to the timberframe joists. The car decking becomes the ceiling below and is the finished
floor above (or sub floor if carpeting is planned). This can work well for smaller cabins and for
rooms that will have little or quiet use like attics and home offices.
On high-end homes the second and third floors systems are often doubled. A second floor
system of 8, 10, or 12 joists is applied over the timberframe joists and t & g ceiling. This
double floor creates a space for can lighting, wiring, and plumbing and can dramatically reduce
noise and dust migration through the floor. The space can also be used structurally to header
off posts from above that would otherwise land in unacceptable locations in the rooms below.
These hidden headers can be made of timber, gluelam or even steel I beams if necessary.
The double floor system is sometimes added after the timberframe is finished, weathertight
and enclosed with SIP panels. Four-inch wide inch shims are added to the tops of all timber
joists and plates. The TGI joists are installed over the shims with a traditional t & g plywood
subfloor above. The inch shim space leaves room to tuck in 5/8 thick t & g ceiling or
sheetrock after the other trades have finished their electrical and plumbing work. Soundboard
can also be applied between floors to isolate areas of high noise like home theaters
Drywall and Paneling
When designing a timberframe floor plan in CAD it is important to allow for the thickness of the
interior finishes. Both the timberframe and the SIP panels will be precisely manufactured by
computer-controlled machinery based on the CAD drawings. Not allowing space for finishes
can cause problems in the field,
A timberframe home is normally built in the following sequence. The foundation and first floor
deck (or slab) is finished prior to the arrival of the timberframe. Then the timberframe is then
raised with a crane in a few short days. The next step depends on the interior finish and what
sort of weather window is available.
The outer skins of the SIP panels are generally set flush with the outer edge of the concrete
stem wall. This differs from stick frame building where it is the outer stud edge is set flush with
the concrete and the sheathing extends beyond that. The standard SIP walls are exactly
6.5 thick.
When Spruce, Pine, or Cedar tongue and groove interior paneling or ceilings are to be used as
interior finishes they are applied at this stage directly to the timberframe before the SIPs are
installed. To allow for the thickness of the t & g wall paneling (typically 5/8) the exterior face
of the posts and /or rafters are set exactly 5/8 in from the inside face of the SIPs in the CAD
design. From the outside edge of concrete the inset for the timber posts would be 6.5 + 5/8 =
7 1/8
If dry wall or blue board/plaster veneer is to be the interior finish normally the entire
exterior of the frame is furred out with long 4 strips of 5/8 plywood. Then the SIPs are raised
and screwed to the timberframe through the plywood shims. After the home is weather tight (2
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to 7 days depending on complexity) dry wall can be easily slipped into the space behind the
posts and rafters created by the 5/8 shim. This creates a much cleaner look and is much
quicker than trying to custom fit each piece of drywall. For extra tight sheet rock and timber
joints use 1/8 cardboard sheetrock shims on the OSB 1 1/2 out from the posts. The shim
allows the sheetrock to slide in, then pries it tight when the sheet is screwed down. When
designing a home for sheetrock in this way set the exterior face of the posts back from the
outer edge of concrete 6.5 + 5/8 = 7 1/8 the same as above. Add an extra 1/8 for a total of 7
if 5/8 sheet rock is to be used.
A fast alternative for dry weather installations is to either pre-apply the drywall to the SIPs
before they are raised or apply the dry wall to the outside of the timberframe before installing
the Sips. There are two issues with this appealing method. One is rain and the second is
greater care must be taken to insure the joints between SIP panels have been properly
connected. These joints are hidden behind the drywall and must be nailed or screwed together
on the ground before raising the whole wall sections up with a crane. For this method, design
the frame 5/8 in from the inside face of the SIPs so you will still have the options presented
above if it looks more prudent.
Plumbing
The easiest way to plumb a timberframe home is to keep the majority of the supply, waste and vent
lines in interior partition walls. The interior partition walls of a timberframe home are typically framed
conventionally out of 2x6 or 2x4 wet walls. This allows the plumber to run his supply, waste and vent
lines in the traditional manor. If some fixtures (like a kitchen sink) must be placed on an exterior wall
there are alternatives to traditional venting that may be used if your code allows them. If there is no
alternative and traditional vent or supply lines must be placed in the exterior wall the Sip panels can
be custom ordered with precut plumbing chases in the locations where they are needed, generaly at
no additional cost.
Electrical
Like the plumbing, the electric service in the internal partition walls, floors and crawlspace is identical
to traditional built homes. Consider putting the main panel on an internal stud wall that allows easy
access to above and to the crawl space below.
The exterior SIPs walls typically come with 1.5 wire chases built in. Two horizontal chases at outlet
height and switch plate height and run completely around the building on each floor. Vertical chases
connect with the horizontal chases every 4 from the crawl space to the ceiling or at locations you
specified. Wiring chases can be custom made to specific locations for sconces, outdoor lights and
ceiling fans and are included in the cost. A qualified electrician should not have difficulty fishing wires
for these locations. For initial design purposes no special considerations are generally needed.

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Heating
Two heating issues should be noted in the design phase of a SIP enclosed timberframe home. The first
due to the extreme energy efficiency of SIP homes the size (BTU output) of the heating system can
often be reduced. This saves some money up front and the correctly sized heating system runs more
evenly through out the day.
The second issue also stems from the super efficiency of the SIP system. SIP houses are much more
air tight than even the most carefully built conventional home. Mechanical ventilation is required.
Planning to include an air-to-air heat exchanger is a wise and necessary investment.
Roof Pitch and Timberframe Trusses
To have the greatest choice of different timberframe truss styles a minimum roof pitch of 9 in
12 is generally needed. Less steep and flat roofs can also be timberframed but generally need
to use a post and beam and rafter system. Below are a few of the standard truss systems we
can create. The standard trusses can be augmented with curved timbers, curved glue lams, or
extra details like crossed timbers that can make them look very unique while adding very little
to the cost. There are also many carved beam end treatments available if needed.

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Exterior Details
There are many cost effective ways to dress up the exterior of a timberframe building. These
details should hint at what lies inside. These details also give a home its style. Here are some
ideas.
Exposed rafter tails. Instead of cutting notches in the stress skin panel for the true
rafters to stick out, short premilled decorative 6x8 rafter ends are screwed up to the
SIP eave. Construction time is saved and the integrity of the SIP enclosure is preserved
preventing air leaks. When the home is finished no one will know the difference unless
they saw it built.
Gable End Timber Trusses. These are a similar concept to the decorative rafter tails
above. The large gable end trusses actually hang from the SIP eaves or attach with
timber brackets to the exterior face of the SIP panels. The same is true for large beamends that look as if they are protruding through the wall. Again this saves time. The
house is timberframed, and then closed in with precut Sip panels, finally the exterior
details are added only after the main house is dry and secure and available for other
trades.
Porches, Entries, Decks, Stairs and Railings can all be timberframed with hidden or
exposed mortis and tenon joinery. Small trusses mirroring the main house can have a
dramatic effect. These are all added to the exterior after the main house is completed.

Foundations
From an engineers point of view the timberframe and SIP panels work at providing different
functions. The timberframe itself provides support for the live and dead loads of the roof and all
floors of the building. The timberframe also can function as the hold down member of a shear
wall system if they are needed for seismic and wind loads. At the foundation level the post are
held down with straps embedded in concrete footings or hold-downs. Large Simpson straps
16

are used to connect posts between floors. The straps are all nailed to the outside of the posts
hidden in the 5/8 space reserved for sheet rock.
The SIP panel is used as the shear panel in conjunction with the strapped down timberframe.
In areas of heavy seismic activity the SIPs can also have double and triple stud hold-downs
incorporated inside them. With tight nailing patterns very high shear ratings can be achieved.
SIP panels have been code approved for all seismic zones. In a timberframe curtain wall
application the SIP wall carries none of the buildings load. However is does need to be
supported. A 20 tall section of wall will weigh in at about 80 lbs per linear foot.
Stem wall foundations
There are a number of different foundations types that will work for timberframe and SIP
construction. The standard is a typical 6 or 8 stem wall and footing system. A traditional tji
joist subfloor is normally platform framed over traditional cripple walls and/or stem walls. The
SIP panels are supported on the tgi floor system with the outer skin of OSB flush with the
outside of the rim joist and concrete stem wall. The stem wall keeps the SIPs and floor system
up out of the ground and also helps put the footing below frost level. However it does not hold
up much of the buildings load. Pressure treated posts secured directly to the footings give
support up through the crawl space and tji joist floor system to the timberframe posts above.
On the perimeter of the building these pressure treated posts extend down directly along side
the stem wall to the footing. The footings are each sized to carry the buildings load. (Note: the
tji floor system can also be cantilevered out over the stem wall the thickness of the panels so
that the timberframes post loads land directly over the stem wall. In some cases 12 wide stem
walls have been used to support both the SIP walls and the timber posts.) See some sample
details at the end of Chapter 8 for foundation options.
Insulated concrete forms (ICFs) are another foundation method that works well when a
heated basement is desired. Typically 13 to 15 ICF foam blocks are use to create 8 to 10
concrete walls. A conventional tji joist floor or timberframe floor system is supported on top of
the ICF walls. The inner concrete core is then centered directly under the timberframe posts
and provides bearing to the foundation. This eliminates the need for pressure treated posts
around the basements perimeter. See the end of chapter 8 for a detail showing a ICF
foundation with cantilever support for the SIP panels.
Concrete Slabs
If your site permits it, concrete slabs can be one of the most cost effective foundation types.
Mono pours combine the footings for the timberframe, the perimeter footing and the slab pour
in one quick step. The bottoms of the timberframe posts can be factory predrilled in the centers
to accept short lengths of #4 rebar to aid positioning. After the slab has cured the post lay out
is chalked on the slab and short corresponding locator holes are drilled in with a rotohammer.
Two layers of 30# tar paper or flashing are used on the bottom of each post to isolate it from
moisture in the concrete. The concrete slab can then be covered and used as a subfloor or
can be acid stained for an inexpensive floor treatment.

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6) Typical Timberframe Joinery Details

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

7) Typical Timberframe/SIP Construction Details

These details are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all structural
components and reinforcements.

29

These details are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all structural
components and reinforcements.

30

These details are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all structural
components and reinforcements.

31

These details are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all structural
components and reinforcements.

32

These details are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all structural
components and reinforcements.

33

These details are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all structural
components and reinforcements.

34

These details are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all structural
components and reinforcements.

35

Timber/SIP Corner Detail (plan view)

These details are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all structural
components and reinforcements.

36

8) Typical Foundation Details

These details are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all structural
components and reinforcements.

37

These details and rebar specs are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all
structural components and reinforcements.

38

These details and rebar specs are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all
structural components and reinforcements.

39

These details and rebar specs are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all
structural components and reinforcements.

40

These details and rebar specs are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all
structural components and reinforcements.

41

These details and rebar specs are only for example only. An engineer needs to size all
structural components and reinforcements.

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9) Resources
The Timberframe Home
Tedd Benson
Taunton Press, 1997
This is an excellent and highly recommended book giving a good overview of all aspects of
timberframe building. The electrical chapter and SIP chapter however are already somewhat
dated and may not meet the current code. With our package we provide up to date installation
instructions and help on these issues through our SIP manufacturer.
Timberframe
Tedd Benson
Taunton Press, 1999
This is a good coffee table picture book that shows some of the styles possible with
timberframes. There is a small selection of western frames. Most however are on the east
coast.
Building with Structural Insulated Panels
Michael Morley
Taunton Press, 2000
An excellent and recommended primer on building with SIPs, up to date and includes good tips
on wiring and all phases of installation.

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