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Neighborhoods

Angelino Heights

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Arleta

Arlington Heights

Arts District[1]

Atwater Village

Baldwin Hills

Baldwin Hills/Crenshaw

Baldwin Village

Baldwin Vista[citation needed]

Bank District, Old[1]

Beachwood Canyon[2]

Bel Air, Bel-Air or Bel Air Estates

Benedict Canyon[citation needed]

Beverly Crest

Beverly Glen

Beverly Grove

Beverly Hills Post Office[4]

Beverly Park[5]

Beverlywood

Boyle Heights

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Brentwood

Brentwood Circle[citation needed]

Brentwood Glen[6]

Broadway-Manchester

Brookside Park

Bunker Hill[1]

Cahuenga Pass

Canoga Park

Canterbury Knolls[7]

Carthay

Castle Heights

Central-Alameda

Central City

Century City

Chatsworth

Chesterfield Square

Cheviot Hills

Chinatown

Civic Center[8]

Core, Historic[1]

Crenshaw

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Crestwood Hills[9]

Cypress Park

Del Rey

Downtown

Eagle Rock

East Gate Bel Air[citation needed]

East Hollywood

Echo Park

Edendale[citation needed]

El Sereno

Elysian Heights[citation needed]

Elysian Park

Elysian Valley

Encino

Exposition Park

Faircrest Heights [10]

Fairfax

Fashion District[1]

Filipinotown, Historic[11]

Financial District[1]

Florence

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Flower District[12]

Franklin Hills[citation needed]

Gallery Row[1]

Garvanza

Glassell Park

Gramercy Park

Granada Hills

Green Meadows

Griffith Park

Hancock Park

Harbor City

Harbor Gateway

Harvard Heights

Harvard Park

Hermon

Highland Park

Historic Core[1]

Hollywood

Hollywood Dell[citation needed]

Hollywood Hills

Hollywood Hills West

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Holmby Hills

Hyde Park

Jefferson Park

Jewelry District[13]

Kinney Heights[citation needed]

Koreatown

Lafayette Square

Lake Balboa

Lake View Terrace

Larchmont

Laurel Canyon[14]

Leimert Park

Lincoln Heights

Little Armenia

Little Ethiopia[16]

Little Tokyo

Los Feliz

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Manchester Square

Mandeville Canyon[17]

Marina Peninsula[18]

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Mar Vista

Melrose Hill[19]

Mid-City

Mid-Wilshire

Miracle Mile

Mission Hills

Montecito Heights

Monterey Hills[20]

Mount Olympus

Mount Washington

Nichols Canyon[21]

NoHo Arts District[22]

North Hills

North Hollywood

Northridge

North University Park

Old Bank District[1]

Outpost Estates[23]

Pacific Palisades

Pacoima

Palms

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Panorama City

Park La Brea

Picfair Village[24]

Pico-Union

Platinum Triangle[citation needed]

Playa del Rey

Playa Vista

Porter Ranch

Rancho Park

Reseda

Reynier Village[25]

Rose Hills

Rustic Canyon[26]

San Pedro

Sawtelle

Shadow Hills

Sherman Oaks

Silver Lake

Skid Row[27]

Solano Canyon[citation needed]

South Central, Historic

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South Park

South Robertson

Spaulding Square[28]

Studio City

Sunland

Sunset Junction

Sun Valley

Sylmar

Tarzana

Terminal Island

Thai Town

Toluca Lake

Toy District[1]

Tujunga

University Hills[29]

University Park

University Park, North

Valley Glen

Valley Village

Van Nuys

Venice

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Vermont Knolls

Vermont-Slauson

Vermont Square

Vermont Vista

Victor Heights[30]

Victoria Park[31]

Village Green[32]

Warehouse District[33]

Warner Center

Watts

West Adams

Westchester

Westdale[34]

Western Heights[35]

West Hills

Westlake

West Los Angeles

Westside Village[36]

Westwood

Westwood Village[37]

Whitley Heights

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Wholesale District[1]

Wilmington

Wilshire Center

Wilshire Park[38]

Windsor Square

Winnetka

Woodland Hills

Yucca Corridor[39]

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Historic Preservation Overlay Zones


1. Angelino Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Angelino Heights, Echo Park.
2. Balboa Highlands Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Granada Hills, northern San
Fernando Valley
3. Banning Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Wilmington
4. Carthay Circle Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Carthay Circle
5. Country Club Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Country Club Park
6. Gregory Ain Mar Vista Tract Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Mar Vista
7. Hancock Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Hancock Park
8. Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Harvard Heights
9. Highland Park-Garvanza Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Highland ParkGarvanza
10.Hollywood Grove Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Central Los Angeles
11.Jefferson Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, South Los Angeles

12.Lafayette Square Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Lafayette Square


13.Lincoln Heights East Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Lincoln Heights
14.Melrose Hill Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Melrose Hill
15.Miracle Mile North Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Miracle Mile North
16.Pico-Union Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Pico-Union
17.South Carthay Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, South Carthay
18.Spaulding Square Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Spaulding Square
19.Stonehurst Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Sun Valley, northeastern San
Fernando Valley
20.University Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, University Park
21.Van Nuys Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Van Nuys
22.Vinegar Hill Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, San Pedro, California
23.West Adams Terrace Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, West Adams
24.Western Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Western Heights
25.Whitley Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Whitley Heights, Hollywood
26.Wilshire Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Wilshire Park
27.Windsor Square Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Windsor Square
28.Windsor Village Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, Windsor Village

Archives
Los Angeles Star: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15799coll68
Automobile Club of Southern California:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/search/collection/p15799coll59

Charlotta Bass Collection:


http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15799coll102
California Historical Society Collection:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15799coll65
-Includes: Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce Collection (1890 1960) and
thousands of photographs from the C.C. Pierce Photography Collection (1860 1960)
California Social Welfare Archives (late 20th/21st oral histories)
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15799coll34
Historical California Topographical Maps:
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/search/collection/p15799coll97
China Society of Southern California Collection (1935 2015)
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15799coll32
Chinese Historical Society of Southern California Collection (1880 1933)
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/collections
El Clamor Publico Collection, 1855 1859
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15799coll70
Dunbar Economic Development Corporation Collection, 1880 1986
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15799coll83
The Dunbar Economic Development Corporation (Dunbar EDC) collection contains photographs
and artifacts which document the Vernon-Central neighborhood of Los Angeles which is the
historic core of the California African American community. The Dunbar EDC was founded by
local community members to implement a holistic approach to addressing the lack of
employment opportunity and prosperity existing in the Vernon-Central area.
The collection contains 32 photographs, 2 newspaper articles, and one document.

Ideas
Must cover:
Basic political history
Basic development history
Basic cultural history
Basic environmental history
Basic social history
Basic transnational history
Key events

Must introduce, either explicitly or implicitly:


Method
Basic: Evidence/Argumentation, Sourcing, Contextualization, Corroboration
Advanced: Against the grain, perspective, interest/bias/prejudice, innovation
(creating new arguments), problematizing oneself as interpreter, causation theories,
understanding of the stakes of causation theory
Historical Skills
Basic: recognizing and recalling factual data, periodization, argument
construction and use of evidence,
Advanced: evaluation of significance, narrative construction
Student/Life skills
Basic: purposeful listening, note taking, respectful and constructive disagreement,
perceiving the point of a specific class, making connections between classes, drawing
out the bigger themes and arguments of the course, applying concepts to new situations,
creating and defending arguments using evidence, demonstrating interest in content or
if not interested in contentdemonstrating willingness to come up with something of
more interest and propose it respectfully to the teacher, demonstrating an approach to
class that is not competitive but is instead about collectively working towards deeper
understanding,
Ways to organize:
Chronologically
Thematically
Methodologically
Conceptually
Randomly (whatever seems interesting)
Skills-based
Presentist starting with problems in the present
By assignment / Project
You got 9 months to work with, 12,000 years of history but really focusing on the post1850 history. So lets say 8 months and 150 years, which is about 20 years per month.
Early Tongva settlements, or rancherias
"The names of the rancherias associated with San Gabriel Mission
were: Acuragna, Alyeupkigna, Awigna,Azucsagna, Cahuenga, Chokishgna, Chowigna, Cuco
mogna, Hahaulogna, Harasgna, Houtgna, Hutucgna,Isanthcogna, Maugna, Nacaugna,
Pascegna, Pasinogna, Pimocagna, Pubugna, Sibagna, Sisitcanogna,Sonagna, Suangna,
Tibahagna, Toviscanga, Toybipet, Yangna.1

Helpful Websites
https://www.laconservancy.org
LGBTQ: https://www.laconservancy.org/lgbtq
1https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mission_San_Gabriel_Arc%C3%A1ngel#History

EastsideJapanese, Jewish, Latino: https://www.laconservancy.org/eastside


Key figures
Jose Figueroa
Stephen F. Fremont
Pio de Jesus Pico (Governor of Alta California, 1832, 1845 1846. Los Angeles
Common Councilman, 1853)
John D. Sloat (1781 1867): Naval officer, claimed CA for the U.S, 1st Military
Governor of California (July 9 16, 1846)
John G. Downey (1827 1894) Governor of California, founder of Farmers &
Merchants Bank with Isaias W. Hellman (future president of Wells Fargo), secured land
for USC.
Ozro Childs (Vermont born, pioneer, tinsmith, irrigator of lands outside of the Pueblo of
LA which is now Downtown Los Angeles, paid in land at that areaturned F&M Bank
and USC founder with the Hellmans)
Early Boosters:
Robert M. Widney judge, Chamber of Commerce founder, founded first rail transit
company (a horse car line from the Plaza to 6th and Pearl) Herman W. Hellman
(Entrepreneur, banker, booster, Chamber of Commerce, etcGerman Jew)
Isaias W. Hellman (Entrepreneur, banker, booster, Chamber of Commerce, etcGerman
Jew)
Maj. Edward W. Jones, William W. Workman, Col. Harrison G. Otis, Samuel B. Lewis,
J.I. Redick and Thomas A. Lewis
Phineas Banning
Biddy Mason (af-am)
Robert Owens (af-am)
Thaddeus Amat y Brusi first bishop of Los Angeles
James George Bell (Presbyterian clergyman, Occidental founder)
Lyman Stewart (Presbyterian clergyman, Occidental founder)
Thomas Bard (Presbyterian clergyman, Occidental founder)
Charles E. Toberman (1880 1981): according to Wikipedia, he was a real estate
developer who was known as Mr. Hollywood and the Father of Hollywood for his role
in developing Hollywood and many of its landmarks, including the Hollywood Bowl,
Graumans Chinese Theater, El Capital Theatre, the Roosevelt Hotel, The Graumans
Egyptian Theatre and the Hollywood Masonic Temple. Originally from Seymour, Texas.
Indigenous groups:
Tongva
Chumash

September
Herbert Luthin, Surviving through the Days: A California Indian Reader (UC Press,
2002)
Linda C. Noel, I am an American: Anglos, Mexicans, Nativos, and the National
Debate over Arizona and New Mexico Statehood, Pacific Historical Review (August
2011)
Alfred Kroeber
-Indian Myths of South Central California, University of California Publications in
American Archaeology and Ethnology, 4: 167 -250 Berkeley.
-The Religion of the Indians of California, University of California
Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 4:319-356
Anna H. Gaytonher papers are at UC Berkeley
Edward S. Curtis 30 volume The North American Indian:
http://curtis.library.northwestern.edu/index.html
Indigenous history and colonial history
Chumash
Colonial Spain
1771: Mission San Gabriel founded
1781: El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora de Los Angeles de Porciuncula founded
1818: Avila Adobe built
1821: Mexico wins Independence from Spain
1826: Proclamation of Emancipation issued by Jose Maria de Echeandia, the first
Mexican-born elected governor of Alta California, on July 25. It said that all Indians
within the military districts of San Diego, Santa Barbara, and Monterey who were found
qualified were freed from missionary rule and made eligible to become Mexican citizens.
1827: December 20: Mexican government passes legislation that mandates the expulsion
of all Spaniards younger than sixty years from Mexican territories.
1833: The Mexican Congress, under the new Governor Jos Figueroa, passes An Act for
the Secularization of the Missions of California on August 17.2
1833: Figueora replaces Spanish-born Franciscan padres at all settlements north of
Mission San Antonio de Padua with Mexican-born Franciscan priests from the College of
Guadalupe de Zacatecas
1834: Governor Figueroa issues Decree of Confiscation, which issued rules for
apportioning mission lands to private parties.3
1835: Los Angeles becomes capital of Mexican California
1839: Mexican governor Juan Bautista Alvarado grants the 13,045 acre Rancho
Cucamonga to soldier, smuggler, and politician Tiburcio Tapia
1846: Siege of Los Angeles by U.S. forces. U.S Declares war against Mexico.
1846: June 15: the Bear Flag Revolt
1847: January 10, Los Angeles taken by U.S. forces
1847: January 13: Treaty of Cahuenga ends armed conflict.
1848: February 2: Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ends war and turns CA into U.S.
territory. The treaty gave residents one year to choose whether they wanted American or
2 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_secularization_act_of_1833
3 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_secularization_act_of_1833

Mexican citizenship; over 90% chose American citizenship, which included full US
voting rights. The other 10% returned to Mexico or New Mexico, where they could retain
Mexican citizenship. 4
1848: Los Angeles becomes part of U.S. territory
October
1850 1870
1850: April 4, Los Angeles incorporated
1850: September 9, Los Angeles becomes part of the new U.S. state of California
1850: Population: 1,610 city, 3,530 county
1850: Los Angeles County Established
1851: future judge Benjamin Ignatius Hayes arrives in Los Angeles, moving from
Missouri. Hayes was Catholic, white,
1851: Mormon Church leader Brigham Young sends group of Mormons to Southern
California, including the family of Robert Smith, who owned the slave Biddy Mason,
who would later become a major civic leader.
1851: Los Angeles Star, citys first newspaper, begins publication digital archives
found here: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15799coll68
1854: Round House / Garden of Eden built
1855: First City public school building built
1860: Los Angeles Soap Company formed
1862: The state gives a charter to a group of Los Angeles Jews to form the Congregation
Bnai Brith (later Wilshire Boulevard Temple)
1865: St. Vincents College (LMU and Loyola high school) opens
1866: Town Square established
1868: Street Lighting installed
1869: Los Angeles & San Pedro Railroad begins operatingit was the brainchild of
Phineas Banning and would go on to be purchased by the Southern Pacific Railroad in
1873.
November
1870 1890
1871: Anti-Chinese unrest
1871: John G. Downey and Isaias Hellman found Famers and Merchants Bank.. Merged
with Security First National Bank in 1956, later acquired by Bank of America.
1871: Evening Express newspaper beings publication
1871: San Pedro Harbor development begins
1871: Isaias Hellman and syndicate buy 13,000 acre Rancho Cucamonga
1872: First African Methodist Episcopal Church of Los Angeles established under the
sponsorship of Biddy Mason. Biddy Mason gained her freedom in 1851 after petitioning
for it in court and winning. She worked as a nurse and midwife, saved money, and
became one of the first Af-Am property owners. She founded an elementary school for
black children. The first meetings for the FAME took place at her home on Spring Street,
which is now Biddy Mason Park.
4 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_secularization_act_of_1833

1872: A Jewish temple is built on Fort Street. Isaias Hellman is the first president.
1873: The Congregation Bnai Brith erect a temple on corner of Temple and Broadway
1873: Los Angeles Daily Herald Newspaper begins publication
1875: Los Angeles and Independence Railroad begins operating in Santa Monica.
December
1876: The Southern Pacific completes the Tehachapi Loop, allowing trains to pass from
San Francisco to LA
1876: Southern Pacific Railroad begins operating Los Angeles first link to
transcontinental railroad
1876: Cathedral of Saint Vibiana built
1876: The River Station opens in what is modern-day Chinatown. It was owned by
Southern Pacific
1877: First Oranges shipped to eastern markets5
1880: USC opens
1881: Los Angeles Daily Times begins publication (founded by Nathan Cole Jr. and
Thomas Gardiner)
1881: State Normal School founded (future UCLA)
1882: Harrison Gray Otis assumes editorship of Los Angeles Daily Times
1883: City Railroad Company established
1884: Childs Grand Opera House opens
1886: Kansas-City-Los Angeles railway begins
1886: City Fire Department and Elysian Park established
1886: Pasadena and Santa Monica incorporated in Los Angeles County
1886: Railroad rate wars incentivize many to come to Los Angeles
1887: Los Angeles Athletic Club incorporated
1886: the first refrigerator cars on the Southern Pacific begin operation, which allows
cars to be loaded with oranges destined for the east coast.
1887: The Southern Pacific opens the second River Station in Chinatown, replacing the
first.
1887: The first Electric Trolleys appear
1887: Occidental College founded by clergy of the Presbyterian Church, among the
James George Bell, Lyman Steward, and Thomas Bard. Occidental Colleges first
building was in Boyle Heights, and was co-ed. In 1896 the building was destroyed by fire
and a new campus was built in Highland Park in 1898. William Howard Taft visited in
1909, and Theodore Roosevelt in 1911. In 1912, the college severed ties with the
Presbyterian Church and became a non-sectarian, non-denominational institution. In
1912, searching for more space, the school moved to Eagle Rock. Also in 1912 the
president of the school announced the trustees decision to convert Occidental College
into an all-mens institution, but the idea was abandoned after student and faculty protest.
In 1914, Booker T. Washington came to visit Occidental.
1887: Pomona College founded (Congregationalist)
1887: Pomona incorporated in Los Angeles County
5
https://archive.org/stream/losangelesaguide00writmiss#page/406/mod
e/2up

1888: Land boom collapses


1888: Southern Pacifics Arcade Depot opens (closed and demolished in 1914 when
replaced by Los Angeles Central Station)
1888: Chamber of Commerce founded
1888: California Club incorporated
1888: Long Beach incorporated in L.A. County
1889: City Parks Department and Los Angeles Oil Exchange founded
1889: Orange County established
1890 1910
1891: Whittier College founded (Quaker)
1891: Immaculate Heart college founded (Catholic)
1891: Courthouse built
1892: Redondo Beach incorporated in Los Angeles County
1892: Oil discovered within Los Angeles City limits
1893: Bradbury Building constructed
1893: Mount Lowe Railway opens north of Pasadena
1893: Frank Wiggins, in an attempt to boost Los Angeles popularity among Midwestern
farmers, designs the walnut elepha877nt for the 1893 Chicago Worlds Fair. According to
Wikipedia: 850 pounds of unusually large California walnuts covered a wire framework
to create the animal.
1893: the Merchants Association (a.k.a. Merchants and Manufacturers or M&M, alater
the Employers Group) is founded in LA. Its goal was to promote commerce and defend
employers.
1894: Fiesta De Los Angeles begins
1895: Highland Park becomes part of the city of LA
1895: Los Angeles Consolidated Electric Railway taken over by bondholder and renamed
the Los Angeles Railway (privately-held (?) transit lines, maybe held by Huntington)
1895: The Pasadena & Pacific Railway was created from a merger of the Pasadena and
Los Angeles Railway and the Los Angeles Pacific Railway
1896: The Merchants and Manufacturers Association, or M&M, forms in 1896 in LA. It
was a new version of the Merchants Association of 1893. It changed when Harrison Gray
Otis joined the body. Its goal was to secure open shop in all workplaces in LA and SF.
1896: Congress approves $2,900,000 for deep-water harbor at San Pedro
1897: Los Angeles Country Club founded (originally in what is now Alvarado Terrace
Historic District at Pico and Alvarado, then moved to Pico Heights, at Hobart and 16th,
then moved to 10101 Wilshire, where it currently stands)
1898: Henry E. Huntington and Isaias W. Hellman syndicate purchase Los Angeles
Railway and expand it
1898: Griffith Park given to Los Angeles by Col. Griffith J. Griffith
1899: Garvanza and University district become part of the city of Los Angeles
1899: Construction begins on Los Angeles Harbor, San Pedro
1901: Angels Flight begins operating

1901: Childrens Hospital founded


1901: Los Angeles Shirt Waist and Laundry Workers Strike, under the organization of
Local 526
1901: Huntington incorporates the Pacific Electric Railway of California
1901: Isaias Hellman and others found the Pacific Electric Railway
1902: The City ends its lease with the private water company known as the LA City
Water Company, which had provided water to the city for decades. The city council
creates the Water Department with William Mulholland as superintendent. It was
renamed the Bureau of Water Works and Supply in 1911.
1902: Thomas Lincoln Tally opens the first movie theater in Los AngelesTallys
Electric Theater. Went on to found First National pictures with James Dixon Williams,

6https://urbandiachrony.wordpress.com/;https://urbandiachrony.wordpress.com/2014/12/31/excelsior
laundrybuildingnortheastcorneroflosangelesandwinstonstreets19332014/
The three-story corner building was completed for the Excelsior steam laundry company in 1893,
as the citys industrial district began to push south of First Street. As typical of 19th-century
Romanesque Revival commercial buildings, its well-balanced design is defined by tall arched
windows grouped in bays of two and three. The varied brickwork on its faade is punctuated by
smoother stone elements with horizontal emphasis, as in its prominent sills and belt courses. In
addition to the laundrys offices, washing, drying, and sorting facilities, the building initially
housed a small womens hat factory at the rear of its third floor. An adjacent building (far left,
unpainted in top picture), designed in a similar style with a matching roofline, was completed in
1895 as a boarding house.
As one of Los Angeles largest laundries at the turn of the century, Excelsior played a pivotal role
in the precipitation of a laundry workers strike in 1901. In the spring of that year, several
hundred workers among the citys seven major laundry companies organized to form Local 52 of
the Shirt Waist and Laundry Workers International Union, spurred by overlong hours and poor
working conditions. In May, they submitted a schedule of demands to the citys Steam Laundry
Proprietors Association, including calls for a closed shop agreement, enforcement of a ten-hour
work week with paid overtime, and equal wages for men and women workers. The Proprietors
Association, headed by Excelsior owner J. Bonfilio, resolutely refused any recognition of the
union, balking in particular at the closed shop provision. On June 29, Bonfilio ordered his
workers to either renounce their union membership or not return to work, prompting the union
to call an immediate strike.
On July 1, 335 of the citys roughly 500 steam laundry workers walked out of their jobs, including
75 of the 90 workers employed by Excelsior. Led by the fiercely anti-union Bonfilio, the affected
laundries offered no concessions to the union. In the weeks that followed, it quickly became clear
that the laundry union had underestimated the laundries ability to replace their striking workers
with non-union labor; By early August, each of the affected laundries had successfully restaffed
their facilities. No settlement was ever reached, and the strike fizzled out in the following months.
Despite the laundry unions defeat, the strike set several precedents for the general labor unrest
that would last through the decade, and solidified anti-union cooperation within the citys
business class.

was the first to show a color movie in LA in 1912, first to sign Charlie Chaplin and Mary
Pickford to a movie contract.
1902: Los Angeles takes over the water system
1903: Los Angeles Examiner begins publication. It closed on 1989. It was a part of the
Hearst syndicate.
1903:
1905: The temple of finance Classical Revival building for the Farmers and Merchants
Bank is built on Fourth and Main. It was designed by the firm Morgan and Walls.7
1905: Alhambra incorporated in L.A. County
1905: Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad begins operating
1905: Design of the seal of Los Angeles created
1905: Vernon incorporated in LA country
1906: Alexandria Hotel opens for business
1906: Shoestring strip, that connects Wilmington to LA, annexed to LA
1906: Glendale, Huntington Park, and Watts incorporated in LA County
1907: Port of Los Angeles established
1907: City Club of Los Angeles established
1907: Silver Lake Reservoir built
1907: The first Bullocks Department Store (high-end consumption) opens, downtown.
Another would open in Koreatown in 1929.
1907: Los Angeles Ostrich Farm and Los Angeles Alligator Farm open
1908: Mount Wilson Observatory begins operating in LA county
1908: Construction begins on the Owens River Aqueduct
1909: Selig Polyscope Company relocates to Los Angeles
1909: City Market Wholesale Produce Terminal built
1909: San Pedro and Wilmingon become part of the city of Los Angeles
January
1910 1930
1910: Los Angeles Times Bombing
1910: East Hollywood and Hollywood become part of the city of LA
1910: the Cameo theater opens downtown, at 528 S. Broadway. It closed in 1991.
1910: The Arcade Theater opens at 534 S. Broadway. It has been closed since 1992.
1911: Nestor Studios begin operating
1911: Paramount Studios opens (as Famous Players Film Company)
1911: Pacific Electric Railway Company created from merger of 8 streetcar companies
1911: LA College created
1911: Palace Theatre opens at 630 S. Broadway. It was an Orpheum Vaudeville theater
from 1911 1926. It might still be in use.
1911: Burbank incorporated in LA county
1911: San Fernando incorporated in LA county
7 https://www.laconservancy.org/locations/farmers-and-merchants-bank-and-annexes

1912: County of Los Angeles Public Library established


1912: Universal Studios founded, as Universal Film Manufacturing Company
1913: LA Aqueduct completed, bringing water from Owens Valley to LA.
1913: La Brea Tar Pits excavation begins
1913: the Globe Theater opens at 744 South Broadway, originally called the Morosco
Theater. It was originally used from live theater, then converted into a movie theater
during the 1930s. It was converted into a swap meet in 1987, but now has been
reconverted back into event space.
1914: Southern Pacifics Central Station and Southwest Museum open.
1914: First ship via the Panama Canal arrives
1914: Beverly Hills incorporated in Los Angeles County
1915: Universal Studios begins operating
1915: San Fernando Valley becomes part of city of Los Angeles
1915: Breed Street synagogue active (Boyle Heights). It was the largest Orthodox
synagogue west of Chicago from 1915 to 1951 and is listed in the National Register of
Historic Places8
1915: Japan-Los Angeles steamship begins operating
1916: Westgate becomes part of the city of LA
1916: Lincoln Motion Picture Company begins operating
1917: Culver City incorporated in LA county
1917: The Rialto Theater (movies) opened at 812 S. Broadway, originally called Quinns
Rialto. It was purchased by Sid Grauman in 1919. Toda
1918: Warner Bros. Studios begin operating
1918: LA Philharmonic founded
1918: The Million Dollar Theatre opens at 307 S. Broadway in downtown LA. It was the
first movie house built by Sid Grauman. Joseph Mora (amazing bio!) did the exterior
Spanish Colonial Revival ornamentation
1918: Otis College of Art and Design founded
1918: Aimee Semple McPherson, already a religious celebrity, arrives in Los Angeles for
the first time.
1919: The Streetcar Strike of Los Angeles
1919: Southern Branch of University of California founded (UCLA)
1920: Warner Bros. Downtown Theater opens at 401 7th Street, originally called the
Pantages theater, but renamed in 1930 after the Hollwyood Pantages opened.
1920: The polemical, anti-corruption, anti-vice, xenophobic, anti-Catholic, creationist,
racist preacher Robert Pierce Fighting Bob Shuler (1880 1965), born in Tennessee,
arrives in Los Angeles to become pastor at Trinity Methodist Church in Los Angeles, at
1201 South Flower Street in Downtown LA. He would be past until 1953. From 1926 to
1932, Shuler operated radio station KGEF (Keep God Forever First). In 1931 the Federal
Radio Commission revoked Shulers broadcast license.
8 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breed_Street_Shul

1921: Douglas Aircraft Company begins operating in Santa Monica. Founded by Donald
Wills Douglas and later merged with McDonnell Aircraft in 1967 to form McDonnell
Douglas. McDonnell Douglas merged with Boeing in 1997.
1921: Loews State Theater opens at 703 South Broadway. It is currently owned by the
Broadway Theater Group which leases it to the Cathedral of Faith for use as a church.
1921: Hollywood Masonic Temple (now El Capitan Entertainment Centre) built.
Designed by John C. Austin, the architect who did the Griffith Observatory. The Masons
sold it in 1982, after years of declining membership. The masons could/should be
framed as elitist club, similar to the country clubs of the day.
1921: Hollyhock House built
1921: Watts Towers construction begins
1921: Chouinard Art Institute founded at 743 Grand View Street by Nelbert Murphy
Chouinard. In 1961, Roy and Walt Disney helped it merge with the Los Angeles
Conservatory to create the California Institute of the Arts. There is a documentary called
Curly (2013) which is about the institute, and includes interviews with Larry Bell, Laddie
John Dill, Llyn Foulkes, Joe Goode, Ed Ruscha, and Peter Shire. Ruscha, Purifoy, Ernest
de Soto, Mary Corse,
1921: Ambassador Hotel opens at 3400 Wilshire. RFK assassinated there in 1968.
Demolished in 2005. Designed by Myron Hunt (of the firm Hunt and [Elmer] Gray).
Hunt designed Occidental, the Rose Bowl, and and parts of Pomona
1922: Radio stations begin to appear: KFI, KHJ, and KNX
February
1922: Graumans Egyptian Theatre opens on October 18, debuting Robin Hood starring
Douglas Fairbanks. Sidney Grauman and Charles Toberman developed it. Grauman was a
Jewish-American born in Indianapolis, whose father brought him to Dawson City, Yukon,
for the gold rush. They got into the theater business instead and had ups and downs across
the country, until Sidney and David found success in Los Angeles.
1923: Hollywoodland sign erected
1923: LA Memorial Coliseum opens
1923: Biltmore Hotel opens at 5th and Grand (at its opening, it was the largest hotel west
of Chicago)
1923: The Highland Park Hebrew School Association formsbuilds the Temple Beth
Israel of Highland Park and Eagle Rock (5711 Monte Vista)
1923: Angeles Temple and Life Pacific College opens in Echo Park on January 1 under
Aimee Semple McPherson (1890 1944). It was the central house of worship for the
International Church of the Foursquare Gospel, the denomination of evangelical
Pentecostal Christianity founded by McPherson. According to Wikipedia, the
foursquare refers to the four-fold ministry of Jesus Christ as Savior, Baptizer with the
Holy Spirit, Healer, and Soon-coming King. LIFE College (Lighthouse of International
Foursquare Evangelism) was relocated in 1990 to San Dimas.
1923: The Los Angeles Daily News founded by Cornelius Vanderbilt IV, then sold to
Manchester Boddy. It would run from 1923 to 1954, before being bought by the Chandler
family, who merged it with the Los Angeles Mirror.
1924: Harding High School (now known as University High School) established. The
school contains the Serra Springs, a sacred site of the Tongva-Gabrieleno people. The
name was changed in 1929 after Hardings reputation was tarnished in the Teapot Dome

scandal (supposedly), but also because UCLA moved its campus from East Hollywood to
Westwood. According to Wikipedia, one-third of its class of 1942 did not graduate
because of Japanese Internment.
1925: The Grand Olympic Auditorium opens at 1801 South Grand. In 2005 it would be
bought by a Korean-American church called the Glory Church of Christ.
1926: The downtown Central Library is built
1926: Construction on the Chinese Theatre begins. It would open in 1927. Graumans
partners were Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, and Howard Schenck.
1926: Yoga arrives, in the form of Yogananda Self-Realization Fellowship, founded by
the Bengali guru Paramahansa Yogananda
1926: The Orpheum Theatre opens downtown on Feb. 15. It was a sister theater to the
Los Angeles Orpheum that opened in 1894, for the vaudeville circuit. It is still in
operation.
1926: Venice and Watts become part of LA city.
1926: Shrine Auditorium rebuilt, replacing one destroyed in fire.
1926: La Opinin Spanish-language newspaper begins publication
1927: The Olympic Theater opens at 313 W. 8th street, originally known as Bards 8th
Street Theater. Its now used for commerce.
1927: The Mayan theater (vaudeville and movies) opens at 1014 South Hill Street Now
used as a nightclub.
1927: Graumans Chinese Theater opens
1927: Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel opens
1927: Barnsdall Art Park established
1927: the Tower Theater opens at 802 S. Broadway. It was the first movie theater
downtown equipped for talking pictures. Now owned by Broadway Theater group.
1927: United Artists Theater (now the Theater at the Ace Hotel) opens at 933. S.
Broadway. It was the showcase for the UA group created in 1919 by Charlie Chaplin,
Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, and DW Griffith.
1927: May 27: Owens Valley protesters dynamite a large section of the LA Aqueduct.
Another incident took place a few days later.
1927: August: The Inyo County Bank, which was the bank for many of the Owens Valley
anti-LA Aqueduct protestors, collapses under the exposure of embezzlement and cash
shortage. This caused protestors to focus on survival more than protest. The city of LA
sponsored a series of repair and maintenance programs for aqueduct facilities that
stimulated local employment.
1928: L.A. City Hall built
1928: Huntington Library opens
1928: The St. Francis Dam collapses on March 12. At least 431 people were killed. The
dam was built by the LA Department of Water and Power, under the leadership of
William Mulholland. This collapse ended his career. It was built to create a reservoir for
LA.
1929: L.A. Board of Trade Building opens
1929: Bullocks Wilshire opens at 3050 Wilshire (Koreatown). In 1994 the Southwestern
Law School, its neighbor, acquired it and restored it.
1929: The Nuart Theater opens in Santa Monica, 11272 Santa Monica Boulevard. It was
bought by Landmark in 1974.

1929: The Wilshire Boulevard Temple, known from 1862 1933 as Congregation Bnai
Brith, opens its building.
1930 1950
1930: Olvera Street restored under the efforts of Christine Sterling, who believed that
Mexicanness was part of Californias authentic heritage. Good teaching moment
preservation, authenticity, nostalgia, etc. According to Wikipedia: Los Angeles

Police Chief James Davis provided a crew of prison inmates to do hard labor on the project.

1930: William R. Billy Wilkerson founds The Hollywood Reporter (still exists). He
would soon use it to accuse entertainment people of communism, especially those
involved with the Screen Writers Guild. Billys List was a major source of the
Hollywood blacklist. Wilkerson died in 1947.
1930: Griffith Parks Greek Theater is completed, as per the 1890s request of Griffith J.
Griffith
1930: The Pantages theater (Hollywood and Vine) is built, the last in Alexander Pantages
vaudeville circuit. Alexander was from Andros, Greece, born in 1867 and died in 1936.
He was accused on raping a 17 year old in 1929, which led to the downfall of his
reputation and 84-theater empire. He claims he was set up and then he was acquitted in
an appeal in 1931. He also initially refused to admit African Americans, until being
successfully sued by an Af-Am in Spokane, Washington.
1930: The Highland Park Hebrew School Association, formed in 1923, completes the
Temple Beth Israel of Highland Park and Eagle Rock (5711 Monte Vista). Its the citys
second oldest synagogue still in its original location, after the Wilshire Boulevard
Temple.
1930: Burbank Airport (United Airport) opens, owned by Boeing. Its now owned by
the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority (bureaucracy), which is controlled by
the governments on those cities. The Airport Authority contracts with TBI Airport
Management to operate.
1931: The Chateau Marmont Hotel is dedicated. The building was originally built in 1929
as a luxury apartment building, but the depression caused the owner to sell in 1931 to the
hotel owners.
1931: The Los Angeles Theater opens at 615 S. Broadway, for the premier of Charlie
Chaplins City Lights. It was built in an extremely lavish way. It continues to be used as a
performance space.
1932: The Roxie Theater opens at 518 South Broadway, downtown. It was the last of the
movie palaces built downtown.
1932: Summer Olympics come to town.
1932: In 1929, farm income in California totaled $762,479,000. By 1932, it had dropped
to $371,965,000, a 51.2% decline (Pichardo 1995).
1933: In 1933 there were 37 agricultural strikes in California and 180 strikes from 1933
through 1939 (McWilliams, 1942). From Nelson A. Pichardo, The Power Elite and
Elite-Driven Countermovements: The Associated Farmers of California During the
1930s (1995)
1933: Long Beach earthquake

1933: Los Angeles Garment Workers StrikeStarts Oct. 12, ends Nov. 6. Workers, which
included a lot of Latinas, earned a minimum wage and the right to organize, the latter had
also been made federally mandatory FDRs NIRA. Organized by the ILGWU.
1933: Frank L. Shaw becomes mayor. In 1938, he became the first mayor of a major city
to be recalled, due to corruption. But this is a kind of skewed fact, because previous
mayors Arthur C. Harper and Porter had faced recalls; according to Wikipedia, Harper
resigned before the date of the scheduled election, and Porter was sustained in office.
Interesting bio: Shaw, the son of John D. Shaw and Katherine Roche, was born February
1, 1877, in or near Warwick, Ontario. He had a brother, Joseph. The family moved
to Detroit, Michigan, then Colorado in the late 1880s and Kansas, before settling in
Missouri. He went to public schools in Denver and in Joplin, Missouri. He studied
business and then began clerking in a country store in Joplin and soon became a salesman
with the Campbell-Redell Wholesale Grocery Company. He remained in the grocery
business for thirty years, except when he was briefly with the Ozark Coal and Railroad
Company at Fort Smith, Arkansas. As a representative of the Cudahy Packing Company,
Shaw moved to Los Angeles in 1909. In 1919 he joined the Haas-Baruch Company in
Los Angeles and left it when he was elected to the City Council.[6][7][8]. This apparently
led to the election of reform mayor Fletcher Brown.
1933: The Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal is built over much of old Chinatown.
1933: New Yorks Variety opens a Los Angeles version, Daily Variety (celebrity)
1934: The Associated Farmers organization [pro-capital] emerges (Pichardo 1995).
-The AF was responsible for engineering vigilante attacks upon striking farmworkers. It
also sough to pass antipicketing ordinances, withhold relief payments to farmworkers,
and prosecute union leaders under the Criminal Syndicalism Act. The reign of the AF
would only come to an end when the LaFollette Committee turned its scrutiny toward its
activities. The committees attention short-circuited the AFs attempt to expand across the
United States.
-Local citizenryoften organized in groups such as the American Legion, the
Elks, the Knights of Columbus, the Native Sons of the Golden West, the Veterans of
Foreign Wars, the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Cavaliers, the Crusaders,
and the Disabeled American Veterans etc.
could tie in to rule-of-law vs. vigilantism, subversive activity and who
decides, esp. given this quotation later in the article from Governor Olson during the LaFollette Hearings: He referred to the mass deputization of citizens as a thing guise of
legality [that] cannot cover the reality. Vigilantism remains vigilantism, and to pin
deputy-sheriff badges on the members of a mob does not convert a mob into a posse. He
went on to question the constitutionality of the antipicketing ordinances in certain rural
counties, and to denounce the work of the Associated Farmers.
-The cooperation and mobilization of civilian groups was endorsed by the Peace
Officers Association of the State of California as a means of combating subversive
activity. Each law enforcement agency [should] establish liaison with citizens
organizations, including those that can be classified as veteran, patriotic, fraternal, civic,
religions, labor and industrial (Peace Officers Association of the State of California,
1935: 12).

1935: Griffith Park Planetarium dedicated


1936: the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles built (LAs Cathedral of Our Lady
of the Angels is the diocesan church). See the sex abuse scandal. In 2007 it reached a
$660 Million settlement with 508 victims.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexual_abuse_scandal_in_the_Catholic_archdiocese_of_Lo
s_Angeles
1936: The Crossroads of the World shopping mall is founded. Its now private offices.
1937: The Southern Californians, Inc. forms. It was sponsored by the LA Times and was
another pro-employer group. According to Wikipedia which cites a 1995 article from
Sociological Forum, in testimony before the United States congressits leaders
admitted that its sole goal was the preservation of the open shop. I downloaded the
Forum article. It says who the founders were, places them in a reactionary position
relative to the farmer organizations going back to the Grange and later the California
Farm Bureau Federation. The author emphasizes the link between members of the
Chamber of Commerce and the AF. Of the 67 members of the Agricultural Labor
Subcommittee of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce between 1933 and 1939, fully
25 also held positions in the AF and 17 contributed funds either individually or through
their business connections.
1938: L.A. flood of 1938. Dams built in the aftermath: Sepulveda, Hansen, Prado,
Whittier Narrows.
1938: China City, conceptualized by Christine Sterling (of Olvera Street fame), is
founded. It was decayed and gone by the 1950s, after a couple of fires.
1938: International modernist building CBS Columbia Square (6121 Sunset, in
Hollywood) is opened. It was built on the site of the Nestor Film Company, with the
Christie Film Company taking over in between. In 2012 the developer Kilroy Realty
Group acquired the propertywhen completed, the new plans promise a 20 story
residential tower with 200 apartments, retail, underground parking, three renovated
historic structures, two office buildings.
1938: Reformer Fletcher Bowron becomes mayor, remained mayor until 1953. Under
him, the Los Angeles Urban Reform Revival begins. He replaced the corrupt police chief
William H. Parker. He was a major advocate for Japanese internment and circulated a
good amount of propaganda.

March
1950 1970

1960: The Tamarind Lithography Workshop founded by June Wayne on Tamarind Avenue
in LA. It would later turn into the Tamarind Institute, affiliated with the University of
New Mexico in Albuquerque, in 1970.
1965: the Immigration and Nationality Act (Hart-Cellar Act) leads to many Chinese
immigrating to LA.
April
1970 1990
May
1990 2010
1992: the First annual Life Before Columbus Day event is held by the Gabrielino/Tongva
Springs foundation.
1997: The LAUSD decides to eliminate all American Indian mascots, a decision upheld
in federal court. A sidenote: the California Racial Mascots Act, which proposed
eliminating Indian mascots statewide, was vetoed twice by Gov. Schwarzeneggar.
Or, through themes
Conflict, Cooperation, self-interest, selflessness, purity, (too much overlap already)
Purity, Hybridity, Progress, Conservation, Inequality, Equality, Opportunity, Restriction,
Centers, Margins, Unity, Fragmentation, Incorporation
September
Purity
October
Hybridity
November
Progress
December
Conservation
January
Inequality
February
Equality
March
Opportunity
April

Opportunity Restriction
May
Fantasies and Futures
Nice as this is, I dont think its the right callthe students need the mental discipline of
moving chronologically and thinking about causation. But the conceptual approach does
offer some advantages in terms of categorization, but it also might prioritize concepts too
much and lead to broad generalizations in thinking, when what needs to be emphasized is
attentiveness to particularities and specifics.
So chronology it is I suppose, but then lets think creatively about how to make the
chronological narrative something more than just a march through random events.
Obviously the events have to be united through narrative choices and themes.
Risk, Reward, and Resistance (capital and labor and their respective positions)
-The backers of the AF [Associated Farmers] were drawn from prominent agricultural
quarters. Industrial concerns, such as finance, ginning, packing, transportation, and power
companies, supported the AF because they were economically linked to the fortunes of
the agricultural growers. They were also linked by their ideological outlook and
opposition to labor and the New Deal (Pichardo, 28).
LA Bibliography:
Kellie Jones, South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and
1970s (2017)
Jon Wilkman, Floodpath: The Deadliest Man-Made Disaster of 20th Century America
and the Making of Modern Los Angeles (2017)
Michael Fallon, Creating the Future: Art & Los Angeles in the 1970s (2017)
John Mack Faragher, Eternity Street: Violence and Frontier Justice in Los Angeles (1850
1900) Law and order (2017)
Stephen Shapiro and Philip Barnard, Pentecostal Modernism: H.P. Lovecraft, Los
Angeles, and World-Systems Culture (2017)
Kenneth A. Breisch and Kevin Starr, The Los Angeles Central Library: Building an
Architectural Icon (2016)
Marne L. Campbell, Making Black Los Angeles: Class, Gender, and Community, 18501917 (2016)
William Deverell and Tom Sitton, Water and Los Angeles: A Tale of Three Rivers, 1900
1941 (October 2016)

Daniel M. Sojoyner, First Strike: Educational Enclosures in Black Los Angeles (October
2016) education and incarceration
Lloyd Ziff, Los Angeles: Photographs: 1967 2014 (August, 2016)
Melanie U. Pooch, DiverCity: Global Cities as a Literary Phenoomenon: Toronto, New
York and Los Angeles in a Globalizing Age (August 2016)
Cid Martinez, The Neighborhood Has Its Own Rules: Latinos and African Americans in
South Los Angeles (NYU, 2016) bought; rule of law / self-governance
Michael Fallon, Dodgerland: Decadent Los Angeles and the 1997 78 Dodgers (2016)
Lynn Mie Itagaki, Civil Racism: the 1992 Los Angeles Rebellion and the Crisis of Racial
Burnout (2016)
Les Standiford, Water to the Angels: William Mulholland, his Monumental Aqueduct, and
the Rise of Los Angeles (2015)
John H.M. Laslett, Shameful Victory: The Los Angeles Dodgers, the Red Scare and the
Hidden History of Chavez Ravine (1999/2015)
Chip Jacobs and William J. Kelly, Smogtown: The Lung-Burning History of Pollution in
Los Angeles (2015)
Peter Vacher, Swingin on Central Avenue: African American Jazz in Los Angeles (2015)
Mel Scott, Cities are for People: the Los Angeles Region Plans for Living (1942)
1941: Writers Program of the WPA, Los Angeles; a guide to the city and its environs,
compiled by workers of the Writers program of the Work projects administration in
Southern California
1920s: Cook Book of a Missionary Society
1919: U.S. Congressional Hearing, Water Supply of Los Angeles, California
1913: Charter of the City of Los Angeles (1889 1913)
1911: Alexander Irvine, Revolution in Los Angeles Christian socialist tirade against
big business in Los Angeles
1907: James Miller Guinn, A History of California and an Extended History of Its
Southern Coast Counties, also containing biographies of well-known citizens of the past
and present (with an emphasis on Los Angeles)
1900: Antony E. Anderson, As we see em, a Volume of Cartoons and Caricatures of
Los Angeles Citizens
You have a month per period:
Pre-1850
Basic subjects: ecology, Indians, missions, colonization

1850 1870
Basic subjects: gold + westward expansion, mex-american war and civil war, law and
constitution, frontier life/land use/demographics
1870 1890
Technology and railroads, privatization/incorporation/ownership, Anti-chinese,
agriculture and risk/resources/boosterism
1890 1910
Elite social clubs, emergence of government and its abuses (maybe better under
modernization and centralizationwater politics too), open shop vs. organization
(buildup to LA Times bombing), Jim Crow culture/migration/immigration/
1910 1930
Integration: Internationalization, Nationalization, and their consequences: Mexican
revolution, WWI, beginnings of Great Depression; Prosperity, leisure, and mixing; fear of
subversive activities and the policing of purity; opportunity and restriction
1930 1950
Great Depression and its effects; Associated Farmers and pro-worker organizations;
WWII; Second Great Migration and militarism
1950 1970
1970 1990
1990 2010
So every week is one of these topics. We have four groups that work together throughout
the semester. Each group gets a week.
Or: each group gets a day, presents a text. Thats a lot of reading for 14 year olds though.
So one big text per week that a group presents on the first meeting of the week. Then I
will have other suggested textsif any group or individual wants to present on one of
those, they will have the ability to get credit. If not, I will be the one teaching that
content.
Nightly homework via Versaly.
Quiz on each text/subtopic at the end of the week.
Test/paper on each 20 year period at the end of each month.