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47 Sat. & Sun., Sept. 2 & 3, 10am-5pm Four Bands • Door Prizes Delicious Food
47
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47 Sat. & Sun., Sept. 2 & 3, 10am-5pm Four Bands • Door Prizes Delicious Food
47 Sat. & Sun., Sept. 2 & 3, 10am-5pm Four Bands • Door Prizes Delicious Food
47 Sat. & Sun., Sept. 2 & 3, 10am-5pm Four Bands • Door Prizes Delicious Food
47 Sat. & Sun., Sept. 2 & 3, 10am-5pm Four Bands • Door Prizes Delicious Food

CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Vol. 46, No. 16

403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916

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August 23, 2017

Embracing Stress & Living Longer by Katie Moritz page 3
Embracing
Stress &
Living
Longer
by Katie Moritz
page 3
47 Sat. & Sun., Sept. 2 & 3, 10am-5pm Four Bands • Door Prizes Delicious Food

SCHOOL BUS SAFETY TIPS

pages 5

47 Sat. & Sun., Sept. 2 & 3, 10am-5pm Four Bands • Door Prizes Delicious Food

2017 Montpelier Walk And Run For Children page 13

Check the Chip Day page 20
Check the
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THE 25TH ANNUAL Celtic and French-Canadian Music & Dance Noon–Midnight at Chandler «» Main Street, Randolph,
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Planet Fitness to Open at Berlin Mall

The owner of Berlin Mall is excited to announce a lease signing for 15,000 square- feet of space immediately beyond the Mall’s main entrance, with Planet Fitness, one of the largest and fastest growing franchisors and operators of fitness centers in the United States. “We’ve been searching for years to find the right tenant for this high-profile space, and in addition to providing Central Vermont resi- dents with a meaningful service at great value, Planet Fitness provides good jobs for the area’s workforce,” said Ken Simon, VP of Heidenberg Properties Group, owners of Berlin Mall, LLC. The Hampton, NH-based Company has

revolutionized the fitness industry with

extremely low prices and offers a variety of benefits, including cardio and strength equip- ment, fully-equipped locker rooms, flat screen televisions, unlimited small group fitness instruction by a certified trainer and much more. There are three Planet Fitness franchis- es in Vermont (Essex Junction, South

Burlington and St. Albans), and the Berlin Mall location will be the first in Vermont to be owned by Planet Fitness Corporate. “We are thrilled to be bringing our non- intimidating, high-quality, and affordable fit- ness experience to the Central Vermont com- munity,” said Jim Esposito, Planet Fitness’ Senior Vice President of Corporate Club Operations. The location is expected to open in December 2017 or early 2018. “The addition of Planet Fitness, and community events like Walk the Long Trail at Berlin Mall, further our goals of revitalizing the mall property, creating good local jobs, and providing resi- dents and visitors to the area with a positive

shopping experience,” said Mall Manger,

Gerry Hanifin. “Our vision is to create a vibrant town center where people of all ages live, work and play in a way that embraces community and celebrates life in Central Vermont,” added Land Strategies’ Michael Rushman, the Mall’s Director of Marketing and Strategic Planning.

• • •

August 12, 2017, The American Legion Post #3 along with Cub Scout Pack #742, and their leaders of E. Montpelier, held a burning of unserviceable flags at the E. Montpelier Fire Dept. lot. A light BBQ was held shortly after.

• • •

Northfield Rotarian Gloria Drown models the 2017 Harley Davison being raffled off this Labor Day weekend to raise funds for its service projects. The Northfield Rotary is cele- brating the 90th anniversary in service to the community.

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Embracing Stress & Living Longer

By Katie Moritz

It’s a familiar feeling, and not exact- ly a good one: you’re about to start a new school year, or maybe a new job, and your heart is racing. Your hands, heck, your whole body, seems to be shaking. And even once you’re in the middle of your new class, the new job, or that public speaking presentation, you still feel it. Stress. It’s easy and understandable to dis- like stress. Not only does it feel quite uncomfortable in the moment, it has been linked to an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, hypertension, dia- betes, gastrointestinal issues (diarrhea, constipation, stomach ulcers, acid reflux, for example), headaches, mus- cle tension, and a range of other unpleasantries. This list might seem like it only adds to stress. Suddenly you’re stressing about stress while you’re… stressed. But what if there was a way to combat these adverse health effects while also acknowledging, and not denying, how you feel? There just might be. Kelly McGonigal, a psychologist from Standford, believes that it may not be stress itself that causes a plethora of health problems, but the way in which we think and study stress. She uses animal testing as an example: when health is examined in animals put under stressful conditions, they exhibit a range of problems. But McGonigal wants to look at the context of these experiments as well, not just their cause-and-effect. These animals are often deprived of social connection. They have no choice or control. They ultimately exhibit what McGonigal calls a “defeat response.” She believes that these conditions may be what play a large role in their decline of health. In 2011, a study published in the American Psychological Association’s journal “Health Psychology,” showed that living with high levels of stress increased mortality only when com-

Embracing Stress & Living Longer By Katie Moritz It’s a familiar feeling, and not exact- ly

bined with the belief that stress was unhealthy. The study, titled “Does the Perception that Stress Affects Health Matter?” found some surprisingly results:

33.7% of nearly 186 million adults in the US perceived that stress affected their health a lot or to some extent. However, those who reported that they experienced a lot of stress and that that stress impacted their health had a 43% risk of premature death. When Brigid Schulte from the Washington Post interviewed Kelly McGonigal in 2015, she asked how people might then shift the way they viewed their stress and make it work for them. McGonigal’s response was to think of stress, to think of those sweaty palms and nervous stutters and increased heart rate, as “a signal of meaning, not that you’re inadequate to the challenges of life.” She also recommends taking time to reflect

on why this particularly stressful experi-

ence is meaningful, and to recognize that others have felt this way before as well. That may seem like a lot to tackle. But there are some smaller ways to start the journey. Joshua Singer, an acupunc- turist in Montpelier, Vermont, says that “stress and its hor- monal impacts on the body are normal and positive for guid- ing us effectively at times of temporary danger… Stress makes us alert and present in the moment.” So, when the immediate feelings of stress hit, instead of taking it to mean “you can’t do this,” look at it as your body’s way of getting you ready to improve your abilities. And that anxiety you feel? That’s an increase in energy that’s going to power your thinking and performance forward. It’s almost like your body is saying “I’m ready, you got this.” Therefore, when life becomes stressful, it is important to remember that how you feel is normal. Stress ultimately tells you that you’re tackling something meaningful, that you’re going to gain more experience, and that you, whether you know it or not, believe in yourself.

Volunteers Needed For Chandler’s 25th Annual New World Festival

Chandler’s New World Festival continues its tradition of presenting vibrant Celtic and French Canadian music and dance on Sunday September 3rd. The New World Festival has earned the distinction of being a Time- Honored Top Ten Event as designated by the Vermont Chamber of Commerce. Central to the Festival’s success is its core of more than 100 enthusiastic volunteers whose only payment is the gratitude of the community and the joy brought to patrons and performers. Their cheerful assistance to visitors at all performance venues, in the food tent, at the admissions gate, and in the festival store are notable and one of many reasons long-time fans of the festival keep returning. Volunteers are still needed for this year’s festival. Three to four hours of work – depending on the job – earn vol- unteers an all-day pass to the festival. Interested persons, age 12 or older, are asked to contact the festival’s volun- teer coordinator, Yasi Zeichner, at nwfvolunteer@chan- dler-arts.org, or call 802-485-9242. The daylong event begins at noon on Labor Day Sunday and celebrates the region’s Celtic and French American musical heritage brought to northern New England by English, Scottish, Irish and French-Canadian immigrants. With Main Street closed to traffic, the festival site is an intimate pedestrian village. Nearly 75 of the best regional and international musicians play concerts, offer workshops, play in dance bands, and share tunes and tradi- tions. This year’s stellar line-up includes Irish fiddler Liz Carroll, Ten Strings And A Goat Skin, De Temps Antan, Còig, Connla, Les Poules à Colin, and Pete’s Posse. Discounted advance tickets are available through August 25th online or by calling the Chandler Box Office at 802-728-6464 between noon and 4 pm on weekdays. For more information, regarding admission and featured performers, please visit the festival’s website at www. NewWorldFestival.com. All performance sites are wheel- chair accessible.

Vermont Moose Hunt Auction Nets $30,761 for Wildlife Education

Vermont’s annual auction of five moose hunting per- mits closed on August 10, with $30,761.50 taken in from the five winning bids. The auction helps fund Fish & Wildlife Department edu- cational programs, such as the Green Mountain Conservation Camps for youths. Bids do not include the cost of a hunting license ($26 for residents and $100 for nonresidents) and a moose hunting permit fee ($100 for residents and $350 for non- residents). Winning bidders can choose to hunt in any one of Vermont’s Wildlife Management Units open for moose hunting. The Fish & Wildlife Department held a lottery July 29, when 80 moose hunt- ing permit winners were drawn from the more than 4,900 people who applied. Hunters are expected to take close to 34 moose during Vermont’s moose hunting seasons. Archery moose sea- son is October 1-7. Regular moose season is October 21-26. Wildlife biologists estimate Vermont has 2,000 moose statewide.

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Sixty Years at The Gallery at Central Vermont Medical Center

Ray Brown grew up playing hockey – not a surprise since his Uncle Walter was President of the Boston Bruins (and the Boston Garden – and inventor of the Celtics). He intended to go to college to continue hockey but realized he’d never play professionally, so it would be wise to have an alternative plan. The Massachusetts College of Art was that plan. Brown received his BFA in printmaking and painting in 1963. He

continued to play hockey – on a semi-pro team since art

school did not have one – and almost made the 1960 Olympic Team. He was the last guy cut after the Eastern playoffs. (The team went on to beat the Russians!) Then Plan B kicked in. Ray became a printmaker and etcher with George Lockwood, “Impressions Printing” in

Boston, taught studio art and art history in Massachusetts high schools (Quincy and Hopkinton) and later printmaking at Worcester Museum of Art in Worcester MA and the Brockton Museum of Art in Brockton MA. Brown went on to get his

MFA in painting at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan in

1973 and further honed his skills at the Haystack Mountain School in Maine, Boston University and MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Ray and his wife, Jody Wilson

Brown, moved to Vermont in 1982 to become the owners of The Drawing Board in Montpelier. Ray was the Brown of Stubbs & Brown Carvers and Guilders of Fish in East Montpelier for 10 years. In 2003-2004, he was visiting lec- turer at Norwich University School of Architecture.

“My work, my design, is based on the golden mean –a way to find balance in anything. It’s about ratio and balance. In art school I learned to paint like deKooning and Rothko but I was thinking I would learn to paint like Corot or Sargent. I thought the professors had no idea what they were doing. It never occurred to me that they would try to teach me to paint like

Diebenkorn or Sculley. Over time my work changed and

evolved and changed again and again. When I arrived in

Vermont 30 years ago, I painted the landscape in the style of

Corot. Sargent also influenced me. But eventually I became

bored with painting. It was no longer fun. Then, when I was 66, I had a stroke. After that I had to learn to live and paint

without the right side of my body. After a year in a wheel chair

I learned to function again and returned to my studio and started painting with new skills. I started to paint with my left hand. Now I see that my handicap forced me to make changes

in my painting that I really like. Things come full circle – now

I see Sculley in my paintings. I am inspired by the landscape

but I consider myself an abstractionist. ” Brown’s paintings are his “reaction to places in the real world.” For many years he beautifully captured “in the style of Corot” the iconic Vermont landscape – its barns and rolling

hills – with much acclaim. His palette was – is – flawless.

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Flotsam #1, 2013 Sienna, 2011
Flotsam #1, 2013
Sienna, 2011

More recent paintings portray Tuscan hill towns (Monterchi, 2009; Sienna, 2011) in their unmistakable cadmium red and yellow and pthalo blue. The architecture is more abstracted, the palette more bold. Brown’s paintings of flotsam covered beaches (Flotsam 1, 2 and 3, 2013) take the viewer right to the sand. The color and atmosphere are perfect. His paintings of the Barre granite yards (Swenson’s Granite 1, 2 and 3; 2013) perfectly evoke the pervasive cold and starkness of the snow covered blocks. And then Brown abandons the landscape entirely (and momentarily) to celebrate the Red Sox (McCarthy, 2015). Brown has yet to abandon the barn however. The trio of paintings – Last Barn #1, #2, #3; 2008 – have lost their ranking several times – as have earlier versions (Last Barn,

2006).

The work exhibited here represents the long painting career of a fine artist – an accomplished artist, a brave and bold artist who at 77, to quote him, “continues to learn and grow.” The earliest work exhibited dates not long after Brown finished art school (Leaves, 1965; Collage with Golf Leaf, 1985). The most recent paintings are from 2017. Brown paints his loves – any landscape, the Red Sox and travel (especially Italy). The exhibit is arranged chronologically although a few walls dis- play similar subjects painted at different times in Ray’s career to note the similarity in palette or perhaps a radically different interpretation of a familiar subject. There are also gaps here because Ray’s work did not stay in his studio long. His paint- ings grace the walls of many homes - within Vermont borders and beyond. “As to where my work is going I have a no clear idea. My paintings are a stop on a journey – they build on each other and are not ends or beginnings but part of the flow of my life. I have been painting since 1963. I am 77 and I am stilling learning and still loving it.” THROUGH SEPTEMBER 29. For information on THE GALLERY please contact Maureen O’Connor Burgess at 802-279-6403 or moetown52@comcast.net

Northfield Labor Day Button Design Winners

This Labor Day weekend, the button tradition continues

in Northfield. For years, school students have annual- ly been invited to submit but- ton designs. Last year there

were two winners, not just one. Likewise this year, as

organizers chose from many

imaginative designs depict-

Madison Zimmerman with Board members of Northfield Observances
Madison
Zimmerman
with
Board
members
of
Northfield
Observances

ing the parade theme, Super Heroes. 5th grader Nathan Elwell is one of this year’s winners. What gave Nathan the idea for the drawing ? He chose emergency services. Why? “Because they are all super heroes.” His mom said it was the first thing he thought of. And how does he feel about winning? “Happy.” He plans to save the $35 prize

money. The other prize this year has been presented to 16 year old Madison Zimmerman, who will enter 11th grade. And the idea for her draw- ing? “I like superheroes, but I thought, I can incorporate something about America’s heroes, like the military. My dad is at Norwich, so I really appreciate it.”

Dad Jason Zimmerman says, “I’m always

proud of Madison. She’s one of the most motivated kids I’ve ever seen. Self-driven. She looks things up and makes plans for the future… things I didn’t think about when I was 16 years old.” Her Mom says, “We’re very excited about

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Nathan Elwel with Board members of Northfield Observances

her winning. She had a great idea. She came (to me) for pointers, but she put it together.” The family moved diagonally across from the southwest last year and Jason Zimmerman says they were overwhelmed by Northfield’s Labor Day weekend celebration. They have two more years in Northfield before he resumes his career as a commercial airline pilot. This year, however, it’s Madison and Nathan who are flying high. You can buy their Labor Day button artwork at this year’s cele- bration.

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WEBSITE:
RAFFLE
www.nwjinsurance.com
Noyle W. Johnson Insurance
Sawyer and Ritchie Agency
119 River St., Montpelier, VT
198 Route 2 W., Danville, VT
802.223.7735
802.684.3411
Our friendly and concerned neighborhood service providers and merchants have joined together to bring you these
Our friendly and concerned
neighborhood service providers and
merchants have joined together to
bring you these important safety tips.
Have a happy, healthy
and safe school year.
IF you miss the bus, call a parent
or guardian to drive you to school.
Never ask a stranger!
REMEMBER to look to the right before you
step off the bus. Careless drivers in a hurry
may sometimes try to pass on the right.
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
Interior Creations
Rubber Bubbles
Kitchen-Bath Showcase
92 S. Main St., Barre
BALLOON & PARTY SUPPLY
Barre-Montpelier Road • Berlin
479-7909
1-800-498-7909
476-6011
ALWAYS use the sidewalk when
walking to and from school. If there
is no sidewalk, walk facing traffic.
JAYWALKING is dangerous.
Cross the street at crosswalks.
STAY on the sidewalk, at least 10 feet from the
road while waiting for the bus.
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
Jail Branch Greenhouse
Sewing Basket
Montpelier Agway
Route 302 between Barre & East Barre
"A Professional Sewing Service"
190 E. Montpelier Rd, Montpelier
479-1445 • Open Everyday
325 No. Main Street, Barre
229-9187
Jackie Abts, Owner
802-476-8389
BE aware of the street traffic
around you. Avoid wearing
headphones while walking.
KEEP a safe distance between
you and the bus while waiting for
it to stop.
TALK quietly on the bus, so you don’t distract
or annoy the driver.
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
Twin City Family Fun Center
Montpelier KIWANIS Barre
Bragg Farm Sugarhouse & Gift Shop
Barre-Montpelier Road, Barre
1 mile North of E.Montpelier Village on Rt. 14
Always Serving Central Vermont
JOIN TODAY!
802-476-6181
223-5757
CROSS in front of the bus, and make sure
the driver sees you pass.
LOOSE drawstrings and objects should be
secured, so they don’t get caught on
the handrail or door of the bus.
A
USE emergency exits only in emergencies,
and make sure not to block them.
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
Cody Chevrolet/Cadillac
Leahy Press
Sponsored by
The Right Way, The Right Car.
Utton's Automotive
I
"The Professional Touch In Printing"
Barre-Montpelier Road, Montpelier
79 River Street, Montpelier
170 River St., Montpelier
802-223-6337
223-2100
TOLL FREE 1-800-278-CODY
DON’T play in the street while waiting for the
bus. Stay on the sidewalk.
MAKE sure to keep your hands to yourself at
all times while riding on the bus.
B
VACANT lots and buildings should
be avoided on your walk to
the bus stop.
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
Midstate
Sponsored by
Dunkin Donuts
J
Chrysler • Jeep • Dodge • Ram • Hyundai
Vermont Mutual Insurance Group
Barre 479-0629
B-M Road-Berlin 622-0250
Montpelier 223-0928
"We Make It Easy"
800-340-0101 • midstatedodge.com
89 State St. • Montpelier
800-451-5000 • VermontMutual.com
Open 7 Days A Week
R
ENTER and exit the bus in a single-file
line, letting younger students go first.
C
WAIT for a signal from the bus driver before
you cross the street.
Sponsored by
NEVER throw things on the bus or out the bus
window, and always
keep your hands and arms inside.
Eternity
Sponsored by
K
Sponsored by
14 No. Main St., Barre, VT
Richard J. Wobby Jewelers
Next Chapter Bookstore
802-865-2000
124 North Main Street, Barre
www.eternitymarketing.com
115 No. Main St., Barre 802-476-3114
www.nextchapterbooksvt.com
802-476-4031
S
D
FACE forward and remain seated throughout
the entire bus ride.
OBEY your bus driver’s rules and regulations,
so he or she can get you
to school quickly and safely.
X MARKS railroad tracks. Be silent when
a bus comes to a railroad crossing, so the
driver can hear if a train is coming.
L
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
Farm-Way
Ormsby’s Computer Store
X-Treme Fun Laser Tag!
286 Waits River Road
Bradford, VT
T
E
1755 US Route 302-Suite 4
Berlin, Vermont
Twin City Family Fun Center
Barre-Montpelier Road
1-800-222-9316
476-6181
1-802-262-1200
GET to your bus stop five minutes
before the bus is scheduled to arrive.
PRACTICE good behavior on and off
the bus. Don’t get talked into
M
YOUNG children should be walked
to the bus stop by their parents
or an older sibling.
breaking the rules!
Sponsored by
The Gym For Women
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
100 North Main Street, Barre
Posh Salon
U
Yankee Clipper at The Master’s Edge
479-5300
F
14 NO. MAIN ST., SUITE 1003, BARRE
100 State Street • Montpelier
www.thegymforwomen.com
229-0366
223-7361
HOLD onto the handrail when
you are entering and exiting the bus.
QUICKLY go to your seat when
you enter the bus, and keep your feet
and belongings out of the aisle.
N
Z-Z-Z-Z. Get a good night of sleep,
so you can start each school day
feeling refreshed.
Sponsored by
Hutchins Roofing
Sponsored by
Sponsored by
V
& SHEET METAL CO.
Quality Market
Mattress Land
17 West Second Street, Barre
G
155 Washington Street, Barre
97 US Rt. 302, Barre-Montpelier Rd.
476-5591
802-476-3401
www.quallitymkt.com
479-0671
www.hutchinsroofing.com
O
W
H
P
X
Q
Y
Z ZZZ
Z
call 1-800-439-5996 or visit
call 1-800-439-5996 or visit
call 1-800-439-5996 or visit
call 1-800-439-5996 or visit

PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20

CRYPTO QUIP

EVEN

PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20 CRYPTO QUIP EVEN STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES KAKURO SUDOKU EXCHANGE GO FIGURE

STICKLERS

PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20 CRYPTO QUIP EVEN STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES KAKURO SUDOKU EXCHANGE GO FIGURE

SNOWFLAKES

PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20 CRYPTO QUIP EVEN STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES KAKURO SUDOKU EXCHANGE GO FIGURE
KAKURO SUDOKU
KAKURO
SUDOKU

EXCHANGE

PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20 CRYPTO QUIP EVEN STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES KAKURO SUDOKU EXCHANGE GO FIGURE

GO FIGURE

PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20 CRYPTO QUIP EVEN STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES KAKURO SUDOKU EXCHANGE GO FIGURE

MAGIC MAZE

PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20 CRYPTO QUIP EVEN STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES KAKURO SUDOKU EXCHANGE GO FIGURE

FEAR KNOT

PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20 CRYPTO QUIP EVEN STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES KAKURO SUDOKU EXCHANGE GO FIGURE
PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20 CRYPTO QUIP EVEN STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES KAKURO SUDOKU EXCHANGE GO FIGURE

SUPER CROSSWORD

PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20 CRYPTO QUIP EVEN STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES KAKURO SUDOKU EXCHANGE GO FIGURE

Aldrich Library

call 1-800-439-5996 or visit PUZZLES ON PAGE 18 & 20 CRYPTO QUIP EVEN STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES KAKURO

Porch Concert: Folk Singer and Guitarist Nancy Smith

THU. 8/31 AT 6:30PM. YORK BRANCH LIBRARY. Paula Gills recently released a solo album of eclectic original folk music and can be heard several times a week singing the national anthem at home games for Norwich University, where she is also the Director of Learning Support Services. This free open air concert is BYOC (Bring Your Own Chair) and happens rain or shine, though we’ll head inside the library in case of inclement weather.

Senior Day: The Carpenters Cover Concert

WED. 9/6 AT 1:30PM. MILNE ROOM. Sally Olson performs her famous Karen Carpenter tribute. Fans around the country say she is the closest thing to seeing The Carpenters live again. Sally uses authentic vintage cos- tumes to bring the audience back in time and offers commen- tary on the history and lives of the Carpenters and their music. Light refreshments follow the program.

Story Hour

MONDAYS AT 10:30AM. CHILDREN’S ROOM.

Stories, songs, and finger plays, followed by a craft. Check Facebook to preview the theme each week! Tuesday story hours resume after

Labor Day (9/5)

Labor Day Pie Raffle Legendary Barre baker Marilyn Blake is auctioning off pies to two lucky winners this Labor Day weekend. Tickets are $1 for 1 or $5 for 6. Get your’s now!

Art Show: Peter Rousseau, National Parks Photographer

8/27-9/14. MILNE ROOM. Come see lovely photographs of America’s most stunning landscapes from photographer Peter Rousseau.

20th Annual Barre Community Writing Contest Kickoff Event: Writing From The Heart

WED. 9/13 AT 6:30PM. MILNE ROOM. Leda Schubert, author of Listen: How Pete Seeger Got America Singing, will open our 20th annual Writing Contest. Our theme this year, “Writing From the Heart”, is inspired by this year’s Barre Reads book Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson. Come pick up a copy of the book and get your inspiration from Leda for writing the winning entry in this year’s contest! Light refreshments served. Note: The library will be closed Saturday, September 2 and Monday, September 4 for Labor Day.

Ainsworth Public Library Williamstown

Ainsworth Public Library

Williamstown

Library Hours:

2:00 to 6:00pm Monday and Thursday 9:00 to 6:00pm Wednesday 2:00 to 7:00 pm Tuesday and Friday 9:00 to 1:00pm Saturday Look for us on Facebook: Ainsworth Public Library

802-433-5887

library@williamstownvt.org

www.ainsworthpubliclibrary.org

Storytime Changes in the Summer:

For the summer months, Storytime will be at 10 am. Join us weekly for stories, songs, a craft and a great place to meet friends. All ages are welcome. You do not need to be a resi- dent to attend.

Exordium: Mr. K. Performance

Join us for the performer Exordium. Mr. K will bring nature to the library with hands on experiments and information. Friday, Aug 25th at 3:30pm. Free. Open to all ages.

Last Day to Earn Tickets for Youth:

Friday, August 25th at 7pm is the last time Youth can hand in

Kellogg-Hubbard Library News Montpelier

Kellogg-Hubbard Library News

Montpelier

Wednesday, August 30, 2017 at 7pm: The Importance of the Jubilee Year. The Consul General Yehuda Yaakov from the Israel Consulate in Boston will discuss the importance of the “Jubilee Year” milestones, especially as they pertain to Israel’s integration into the Middle East, expansion of coop- eration with the Arab world, the city of Jerusalem and its reunification in 1967. The Consul General will also discuss the rise of social justice in Israel at it relates domestically & on the world stage, such as aid for Syrian casualties. Co-sponsored by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library and Sara Frank Chapter of Hadassah.

Our Fall Booksale is coming on Saturday, September 2 at 10 a.m. Be sure to put this on your calendar. We will begin our Saturday Fall hours that day and will be open until 5:30pm. We have thousands of books for this sale and you’re bound to find plenty of books that will tickle your fancy.

Two of our September programs require pre-registration. On Saturday, September 9, 1:00 to 3:00pm we will be cele- brating Vermont Archeology Month with a Native

raffle tickets. They can hand in for reading or for the weekly challenges. Remember, it only takes one ticket to be a win- ner.

Summer Reading Party for Youth:

Saturday, August 26th at 11am. There has been a tremendous

response to our youth summer reading program and we want to celebrate the readers. We will have activities, cake and draw for the winners for our fabulous prizes. Every child will choose a book to take home. NO RSVP needed. Come and celebrate.

Last Day to Earn Tickets for Adults:

Monday, August 28th at 6pm is the last chance for adults to hand in their tickets for summer reading or for the weekly challenges.

Adult Party to Celebrate Summer Reading:

Tuesday, August 29th at 5pm we will celebrate all of the adult summer reading. We will talk about our summer reads, cele- brate our achievements and pull the raffle winners for our 3 great prizes.

Fiber Arts Circle:

Our Fiber Arts Circle (Formally known as Project Circle) will be starting up again in September. Save the date! Saturday, September 16th at 10am. Bring your project to work on, get help with, or to ask questions to Helen Johnson the leader. Helen welcomes all ages.

American Pottery Workshop. Dive into ancient history with archaeologist and potter Charlie Paquin. Get your hands muddy as Charlie guides you through Native American pot- tery construction techniques while making your very own

pinch pots and coil bowls.

The second program that requires registration is Mindfulness & Writing Workshop with James Crews on Saturday, September 23, 2:00 to 4:00pm. This workshop will examine the connections between the practice of meditation/ mindfulness and the act of writing fearlessly from the heart. Beginners and all levels are welcome. Space is limited, please register for either program by calling the library at 223-3338.

We’ve changed things around in the library. We have a sit- ting area in front of the fireplace. Grab a book or magazine and get lost in a good story. The public computers are now in the non-fiction room. The big periodical shelves in the Reading Room have been moved and another large table has been put in its place. What a difference that makes! Come see all of these changes, we think you’ll like them. Buy a ticket to win the Fall Gardening Raffle. This package includes a wheel barrow, rake, hand tools, Green Cone, com- poster, gloves, NY Times 1000 Gardening Questions and Answers and more! Tickets are $2 apiece, 6 for $5 and 15 for

$20.

We’d love to see you at the library!

Friends of the Brown Public Library Hold First Meeting Under New Leadership

93 S Main St, Northfield, VT 05663 (802) 485-4621 Library Hours

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 10 am to 6 pm Tuesday 12 noon to 8 pm Friday 10 am to 5 pm Saturday 10 am to 2 pm

Preschool Story Hours

Monday and Thursday mornings at 10:00 A.M. After the success of last year’s Wine and Cheese Reception, which allowed Friend members early access to the Labor Day Book Sale before it was opened officially to the public, Friends’ of the Brown Public Library President, Judie Desrocher, decided to resign from her post as president. Since then, Treasurer, Margaret England, took on the role as Acting President along with continuing on as Treasurer. On August 3 the Friends held their first meeting under the new leadership. Among the items discussed was what event to hold for this Labor Day. Sherri Brickey, Director of the Brown Public Library, sug- gested a Breakfast & Books event to be held an hour before the book sale opened to the public, and all agreed it was a great idea. Instead of serving wine and cheese, coffee and baked goods would be offered. It was discussed how to get donations for the event [Last year Tops and Shaw’s in Berlin donated wine and cheese] and how to promote the event. That segued into a discussion on how long a Friend membership

lasts.

Generally, the practice has been no matter what time of the year you join the Friends the membership would be up when the Friends’ Newsletter was sent out in the spring. This was confusing to some Friend members who’d joined the Friends last August or later when they were being asked to renew their membership for 2017 already when the newsletter was sent out this past spring. It was decided that when members renew their friendship for 2017 it’ll now be for a year from the month they paid their membership. The membership forms have been updated to include the date you’re paying your membership. Unfortunately, if you paid your membership in 2016 but haven’t renewed it, yet, you’ll need to renew it to be able to attend the Breakfast and Books event being held on Saturday, September 2 from 8-9 am in the Community Room at the Brown Public Library. An email was sent out to members who hadn’t renewed yet to inform them about the event and to let them know if they’d like to attend they would need to renew their membership. Like last year, you can renew or join the Friends at the door of the event. If anyone would like to donate any baked goods to the event or anyone interested in becoming a member of the Friends’ board you can contact the Friends secretary at szelag. kathryn@gmail.com or phone her at: 485-9038. Any leftover baked goods will be offered for sale when the book sale opens officially to the public, and like all the sales from the books, all funds will be donated to the library.

The Green Horse Continues to Gallop toward Halloween

Production staff for the movie The Green Horse meet at Barre’s Positive Pie restaurant to celebrate the completion of filming and anticipation of the editing phase. The movie, a short, adult psychological drama concerning the unraveling of a ten-year-old Halloween tragedy, is a not-for-profit commu- nity effort filmed entirely in Barre. It is slated for premiere at the Aldrige Library on Monday, October 30th, and for view- ing on public access cable television. Pictured above from left to right are local musician Jim Miller, who serves as the movie’s public relations, photo- graphic and sound coordinator, Positive Pie catering sponsor’s HR Manager Abigail Gaffron, who emphasizes that her com- pany’s mission statement includes partnering with the com- munity for fun and positivity, Central Vermont Television’s Director Tony Campos, equipment provider and technical adviser for the movie, Erica Fucello, general manager for the Barre restaurant, and Charles Henry Coburn, the film’s writer, director, and producer. The Green Horse stars locals Shaun Murphy, Robert Kershaw, Ken Folta, and Brenda Lewellen who will be fea- tured in further releases. As if having his latest book, Curtain Going Up! - Fifteen Short Plays for Competition, distributed all over the world by Amazon isn’t enough, Barre Native Charles Coburn is in the process of producing his first movie, The Green Horse, which has a Halloween setting. Well known musician Jim Miller, who has assisted Charles on two earlier projects, introduced him to Tony Campos, who runs the Video Vision television studio and Central Vermont Television located in Barre. Charles says, “I was immediately impressed with Tony’s

The Green Horse Continues to Gallop toward Halloween Production staff for the movie The Green Horse

friendliness and enthusiasm, and that he is 100 percent behind the one-camera concept which will be used in the film. Tony is like a rock, and he has assured us he will be there every step along the way as a consultant and to offer the best photo- graphic equipment available.” So far, the actors that have volunteered their time include Shaun Murphy, Bob Kershaw, Brenda Lewellen, Kenneth Folta. Miller states that he is really excited about being behind the camera, following Coburn’s directions, and he cannot wait to produce the sound track with his own original music and spe- cial effects. Local businesses have also been cooperative, supplying various properties and advice. Charles adds, “The entire film will be shot in Barre, with a release time of Halloween week this year.

2017 Events at the Brookfield Old Town Hall

Extempo story telling returns to the Brookfield Old Town Hall! This Wednesday, August 23rd, at 8 PM, come hear the best of stories from the extempo storytellers of 2012. One of our most popular events of the summer, extempo features original and true stories, told in the first person, without any notes or aids. There is no admission for this event; instead, attendees may use their donation dollars to vote for their favorite stories. This event is sponsored by a Small and Inspiring Grant from the Vermont Community Foundation. Listen to some of last year’s stories at: http://www.orcame-

dia.net/show/brookfield-hall-august-24-2016

Early Risers, come down to the Old Town Hall in Brookfield on Monday August 28th for our last summer “Boot Camp”. The one-hour class begins at 7:30 am. Emma Manion will lead us through energizing “stations” of exercises, easily adapted to all levels of fitness. Bring a few friends and kick off your week with some energy! The AM Boot Camp exer- cise series has been generously sponsored by The Clark Group, LLC, and there is no cost for the classes, but donations are gladly accepted. Our final yoga class of the season is Tuesday, August 29th from 6:30 – 7:30 pm. Join Deonna Myrick for all-levels yoga. Yoga is $5/adult; kids under 18 are free. The yoga series is co-sponsored by Nina Gaby and Craig Smith. Looking ahead, make your reservation for Small Batch Sauerkraut Making Wednesday, August 30th at 6pm. Through much trial and error, Clotilde Hryshko has finally learned a

system of making small batches of sauerkraut throughout the year. No more large crocks taking up space or temperatures that are not conducive to fermentation. This method allows the sauerkraut to be stored for optimal probiotics (no can- ning!) and made when you want. Cabbage varieties and their characteristics that affect fermentation will also be dis- cussed. Participants will take home a quart of ‘future’ sauerkraut to ferment at home. All materials will be provided, maximum of twelve participants. Reservations are required and can be made at clotilde@gmail.com. There will be a $10 fee to cover the cost of supplies. Mark your calendar for our next Indie Film Fest August 31st: The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2113681/ Allan Karlsson is a centenarian who decides for better or worse to step out the window of his nursing-home room and start a new life, and what happens then is fantastic. Through a sequence of chance encounters and flashbacks to a long and remarkable life, we get to know the main character and the people he collects on his run from the nursing home. Part Forest Gump, part Chauncey Gardiner, the message comes loud and clear that we underestimate the power, perspective and humor in the stories and histories of the elderly. As always, we thank The Frankenburg Agency of Randolph for serving as our lead sponsor for the entire 2017 series of events at the Brookfield Old Town Hall. See you soon!

Randolph Senior Center

 

The Randolph Senior a drawing and someone will win $20. All numbers are

The Randolph Senior

a drawing and someone will win $20. All numbers are

Center

at

6

Hale Street,

replayed and are eligible to be a winner each week. Since we

Randolph, VT is open for the

plan to begin Sept. 7, we will need to sign up the 100 people

public from 9

am

to

2

pm.

as soon as possible. Call 728-9324, or drop by, to select your

Lunch is served at the

 

numbers today! [No money due until Sept 7.]

Center’s

“Fork

and

Spoon

“Fork and Spoon Café” Menu for the next two weeks is as

Café” Monday – Thursday at

follows:

noon.

A

list

of

on-going

Thursday, 8/24 Pork Noodle Casserole, Green Beans, Fruit

activities can be found on the

Salad, Biscuits, Butterscotch pudding

Calendar of Events section of this paper.

 

Monday, 8/28 Beef Stroganoff on buttered noodles, Carrots,

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

Cornbread, Chocolate Pudding w/ topping

2nd ANNUAL Giant Yard Sale -- Saturday, September 9th -- located at 69 No. Main Street, Randolph, VT (between Kimball Library and Chandler Music Hall) -- to benefit our Meals on Wheels and congregate lunch programs. We will be celebrating Grandparents Day, Sunday, September 10th, with lunch on Thursday, September 7th. Try to drop by and join the party for our Nonagenarian friends and family on Thursday, September 14th at 11 am. It’s a spe- cial birthday celebration for people who have reached their 90’s! We have our list of all who are 90, and who will turn 90 this year, and will be calling to invite each to the party. If you want to be sure you’re on the list, please call and let us know-

 

Tuesday, 8/29 Chicken Divan, Mixed Veggies, Corn Muffins, Strawberry Shortcake Wednesday, 8/30 Salisbury Steaks, Roasted Potatoes, Cranberry Carrots, Whole Wheat Bread, Mayonnaise Cake Thursday, 8/31 Baked Fish, Brown Rice, Stewed Tomatoes, Broccoli, Whole Wheat Bread, Fruit Monday, 9/4 Center closed – Labor Day Hoilday Tuesday, 9/5 BIRTHDAY TUESDAY Open Faced Turkey Sandwiches on WW Bread, Brussel Sprouts, Pumpkin C\cake w/ ice cream Wednesday, 9/6 Liver n Onions or Chicken, Parsley Potatoes, Spinach, Fruit Salad, Zucchini Bread, Brownies

-728-9324.

Thursday, 9/7Ranch Chicken, Sweet Potatoes, Tossed Salad,

20/20 Club

Biscuits, Chocolate Pudding

Sept 7, 2017 – Jan 18, 2018 -- We are signing people up for another 20/20 Club drawing, to start Sept. 7 and run through Jan. 18, 2018. As you may recall, the beauty of the 20/20 club is you are paying $1 per week for 20 weeks (or you may pay $20 to cover the full 20-week period), and each week there is

 

Donations are welcome from those 60 and older. For those under 60, the cost is $5. All donations are voluntary and anonymous. Coffee, tea, water and low-fat milk are served with each meal. Call 728-9324 to confirm activities or for additional information.

 

The Montpelier Senior Activity Center

The Green Horse Continues to Gallop toward Halloween Production staff for the movie The Green Horse

The Montpelier Senior Activity Center is your home for healthy aging and lifelong learning. We are an active community, and there’s always some- thing to do, no matter your interest. If you’re 50 or older, we’d love to wel- come you as a member of the Montpelier

Senior Activity Center! If you’d like to

learn more, call us at 223-2518 or stop by at 58 Barre Street in Montpelier.

A More Affordable Center

We want to make our programs as accessible as possible. If you are interested in participating at the Montpelier Senior Activity Center, we want to find a way to make it possible. Financial aid is available to all members, regardless of town or program. Financial aid is now also available to help you pay for membership dues. Applications are confidential and we don’t ask for any income information. We have also

recently reduced the suggested donation for our FEAST com- munity meals to $5. Join us on Tuesdays and Fridays for a great affordable and nutritious meal!

Join Us On a Trip

We have lots of great day trips coming up. Join us to visit

the Basketball Hall of Fame, see Heartbreak Hotel at the Ongunquit Playhouse, enjoy the world-famous Foster’s

Clambake or walk the Jeffersonville Rail Trail. Learn more

about these trips and more by calling 223-2 518 or stopping by the center at 58 Barre Street.

Lunch with City Leaders: Geoff Beyer

Join Parks Director and Tree Warden Geoff Beyer over lunch at the Montpelier Senior Activity Center to discuss his work, the City services he manages, recent successes, and emerging challenges in our capitol city. On August 29, join Geoff Beyer, Parks Director and Tree Warden. Bring any questions you have about city government, facilities, goals,

continued on page 9

The Green Horse Continues to Gallop toward Halloween Production staff for the movie The Green Horse
The Green Horse Continues to Gallop toward Halloween Production staff for the movie The Green Horse
The Green Horse Continues to Gallop toward Halloween Production staff for the movie The Green Horse
The Green Horse Continues to Gallop toward Halloween Production staff for the movie The Green Horse
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Montpelier Transportation Projects Construction Update Project Location: State Street, Main Street, and VT 12 – Elm

Montpelier Transportation Projects

Construction Update

Project Location: State Street, Main Street, and VT 12 – Elm Street - Work to include milling, paving, manhole and drainage structure adjust- ments and extensive sidewalk improvements. VT 12-Northfi eld Street - new water, sewer, storm water improvements, sidewalks and a stabilized road base.

Northfi eld Street Detour – Possible Road Closures from Prospect Street to just below #52 Northfi eld Street.

During service connections Wednesday (8/23) thru Friday (8/25), Dubois Construction will have the option to close Northfi eld Street to traffi c from Prospect Street and just below #52 Northfi eld Street between the hours of 8:30 am to 3:30 pm. Closures will only occur if necessary.

Traffi c is strongly encouraged to use Derby Drive-National Life Drive- Memorial Drive as an alternate route. The alternate route for truck traffi c is Dog River Road-Memorial Drive. Both routes are marked with signs.

Week of August 21, 2017

Day Work – (7:00 am to 9:00 pm, M-F) VT 12/Elm Street – EXPECT DELAYS!

• Milling operations will continue from the Montpelier Pool working north to the end of the project at the Montpelier/Middlesex town line.

• If crews complete milling the travel lanes and shoulders before the end of the week, they will start milling the side street entrances working from the

Middlesex/Montpelier line south towards Spring Street. Street parking will be blocked off on each side of the side street entrance for the equipment

to access the work area. Once the work is completed, parking spots will be re-opened.

Traffi c - Travel will be reduced to one lane with alternating one-way traffi c maintained by fl aggers. Motorists can expect traffi c delays all week.

Northfi eld Street Update

Sewer Installation – Installation of the new sewer main pipe will continue from the Econo Lodge progressing towards Derby Drive.

Water Installation –

Mainline installation may continue as well this week from the Econo Lodge towards Derby Drive.

Service connections between Memorial Drive and Prospect Street are

planned for early this week.

Upon completion of water testing, service con-

nections between Prospect Street and the Econo Lodge could also occur

Advance notifi cation will be provided for service interruptions.

this week.

Traffi c – Alternating one-way traffi c is anticipated all week. Motorists are strongly encouraged to seek alternative routes using Derby

Drive or Dog River Road during construction. Traffi c delays of up to 10

minutes can be expected on Northfi eld Street.

It is illegal in VT to use any handheld portable electronic devices while driving. The law carries fi nes of up to $200 with points as- sessed if the violation occurs in a work zone.

Contact Francine Perkins, Project Outreach Coordinator, FRP Enterprises, LLC with any questions or concerns with regards to the project at 802-

479-6994. Construction updates will be posted on www.roadworkupdates.

com , The City of Montpelier’s Front Porch Forum and Facebook Pages, Montpelier Alive’s Facebook Page and Makeover Montpelier’s Facebook Page.

Stanley K. Morse Stanley K. Morse, 87, of Calais, VT succumbed to a long battle with

Stanley K. Morse

Stanley K. Morse Stanley K. Morse, 87, of Calais, VT succumbed to a long battle with

Stanley K. Morse, 87, of Calais, VT succumbed to a long battle with prostate cancer on Saturday, August 12th at his home. He leaves one son, Darryl Morse of Calais, three grand- children; Angela Morse of Plattsburgh, NY, Erica Morse and her companion, Jesse Couillard of Milton VT and Jack Morse of

Wellesley, MA; one great grand- daughter; Scarlet Couillard of Milton VT. He also leaves two brothers; David Morse and his wife Catherine and Kent Morse and his wife Marcy of Calais, VT. He is predeceased by wife of 62 years, Janice Chandler Morse and a son, Brent Morse. He is also predeceased by his brothers; Irving Morse and Robert Morse; and a sister, Rachael Roy. Stanley was a lifetime 7th genera- tion dairy farmer who enjoyed flying his private Cessna. A celebration of life will be held privately at a later date. Arrangements are in the care of Guare & Sons Funeral Home.

Roland C. Paton

Stanley K. Morse Stanley K. Morse, 87, of Calais, VT succumbed to a long battle with
  • Roland C. Paton, age 87,

  • of Davis Lane in Lyndonville, VT passed away at Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital on Friday, August 11, 2017. Roland was born in Washington, VT on February 17, 1930, son to Walter Earl and Laura (Lazer) Paton. He was raised on a farm in Washington,

VT and worked with his father in the woods growing up. He joined the U.S. Air Force serv- ing active duty in Korea. Roland spent his working years as a stone cutter and polisher-finisher for S & L Garrand in Barre. He later moved to Charleston, VT and then Lyndonville where he has lived for over 10 years. Roland liked riding his Harley in his younger years but traded it in for a boat so he could take the family with him. He did a lot of boating and camping, greatly enjoying time with his family and friends. He was an avid hiker. He liked bowling, fishing and hunt- ing, especially bird hunting. As he grew older he got away from hunting but still enjoyed watching wildlife. Roland is survived by his three children: Ken Paton and wife, Jo-Anne, of East Orange, VT, Randy Paton of Chelsea, VT, and Debbie Paton of Barre, VT; a brother:

Oland Paton and wife, Ramona, of East Barre, VT; a sister: Sylvia Mercier of Bangor, ME; six grandchil- dren: Shannon, Caleb, Scott, Damien, and Nicholas Paton and Heather Paruse; and five great-grandchil- dren. He was predeceased by a son: Jake Brian Paton in 2002; as well as nine of his twelve siblings: a child, Clint Thomas, Walter Paton, Deloros Russell, Marion Laventure, Henrietta ‘Pat’ Gordon, Laura Emerick, Larry Paton, baby Evelyn, and Raymond Paton. A Celebration of Life will be held on Saturday, August 19, 2017 at 1PM at the Chelsea Town Hall in Chelsea, VT. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family online at www.saylesfh.com.

LORRAINE Y. BLOW, 84, of Montpelier, passed away July 28, 2017, with her beloved husband, chil- dren and grandchildren by her side. She was born in Winooski, Vermont, on Sept. 19, 1932, the daughter of Emile J. Limoges and Yvonne (Morisseau) Limoges. Lorraine attended schools in Winooski and graduated from Winooski High School in 1951. Lorraine met Raymond G. Blow on a blind date while she was still in high school in 1950 and on July 7, 1951, they were married. RAYMOND G. “JACKIE” BLOW, 86, of Upper Main Street, passed away of a broken heart on Aug. 4, 2017, with his grandson, Cody Cacicio, by his side, after losing the love of his life one week before. He was born in Burlington, VT, on Feb. 14, 1931, the son of Raymond G. Blow and Ethel (Gardner) Blow. Ray attended a one-room schoolhouse in Pittsford, VT, until the eighth grade and then graduated from Burlington High School in 1949. Lorraine became a secretary for the Tree Farm in Essex Junction when she was first married. Most of her life was spent as a home- maker and caring for her family. She enjoyed sewing, knitting, making chokecherry and dandelion wine, and

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inherited the talent of drawing and painting. During

high school, Ray worked at Victory Auto in Burlington.

In 1948, he joined the Marine Reserve and went on

active duty in 1950 during the Korean War. Raymond enjoyed gardening, taking care of his home, traveling,

hunting, being outdoors and riding all the roads in VT.

They both loved spending time with their children and grandchildren. They are survived by two daughters, Darcy A. Cacicio and her husband, Dario “Chuck” Cacicio, of East Montpelier, VT, and Linda B. DuCharme and David Marcone, of Waterbury, VT; three sons, Michael J. Blow, of Windsor Locks, CT, Raymond P. Blow and his wife, Wanda, of Monroe, NH, and Brian A. Blow and Jennifer Ricker, of Westford, VT; & 11 grandchildren. Lorraine is survived by her siblings, two

sisters, Dorothy Hudson, of Methuen, MA, and Claire Macey, of Morrisonville, NY; and a brother, Emile Limoges, of Burlington, VT. Raymond is survived by his sister, Norma Jean Harton, of Essex Junction, VT, and many great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cous- ins and special friends.

Other passings ....

  • JAMES ANGELO BROGGINI of Barre passed

  • away at Gifford Medical Center in Randolph on Aug. 11, 2017, surrounded by his loving family. James “Jim,” the son of Margherita (Moretti) and Cirillo Broggini, was born on Feb. 8, 1929, in the Barre City Hospital. He attended

school at Ward Five and North Barre and graduated from

Spaulding High School in the class of 1947 where he attended drafting classes. In 1952, Jim enlisted and served in the U.S. Army traveling to Germany, France and Italy. Following ser- vice to his country, he came home to Barre and operated a drafting service with his childhood friend, Charles Gianonni. On Sept. 10, 1955, Jim married Maria Carcoba at St. Monica’s Church and raised four children, Maria Broggini Beede, Martin James “Tino” Broggini, Juanita Broggini Plante, all of Barre, and Margarita Broggini Carroll, of Andover,

Massachusetts. Jim and Maria loved to travel. With family

being of utmost importance in his life, he spent many hours attending events and celebrations for his children and grand- children.

ELVA JUNE CHOUINARD, 93 years old, passed away Aug. 5, 2017, at Ocala Oaks Rehabilitation Center in Ocala, Florida, where she spent the last five years. She was born in Barre, Vermont, and was the daughter of Leo and Elsie Papazoni. She was predeceased by her

  • parents, her son, Carl Tucker, her daughter, Marsha Maurais, her son-in-law, Darell Maurais, her brother, Aldo Papazoni, her first husband, Max Tucker, and her second husband, Paul Chouinard. Survivors include her daughter, Rosann Ward and husband, Richard, of Ocala, Florida; two granddaughters, Christine Ortiz and Vicki Maurais; her great- grandchildren, Tyler Ortiz and Shaylene Abraham. She is also survived by six stepchildren, Mark Chouinard and wife Mary, Karen Askew and husband Donald, David Chouinard and wife Giselle, Linda Pomer and husband Bob, Douglas Chouinard and Lisa Chouinard, nine step-grandchildren and four step-great-grandchildren. She worked several years as a proofreader at The Times Argus. Elva was a wonderful mother to all of her children and in her eyes, they were all perfect. Little did she know, she taught great strength and love to all! ANDY DOE, Andrew Edwin Doe was born June 11, 1928, in Montpelier, VT. He graduated from Montpelier High School in 1946, and joined the Navy. He received his bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Vermont in 1952. While working for Boeing

  • Aircraft in Seattle, his life “took a big change.” He started doing props at the Penthouse Theatre and eventu- ally got his M.A. degree. He married Dorothy Kosobud in 1955. He continued his lifelong exploration of various theater scenes with visits to Europe and Canada, as well as frequent visits to New York. Later in life, he satisfied his wanderlust during the winter months by traveling with friends and family. Andrew Doe died of lung cancer at home on July 12, 2017. An extraordinary community of Vermonters helped him through his last days. His final “road trip” exemplified his modesty and practicality: a scenic drive up Route 2 took him to the Anatomical Gift Program at UVM in a pine box made by his friend, Alan Paschell, in a truck driven by his friend, Brian Swift, accompanied by his three children and flowers from his friends, Morgan Irons and Anne Sarcka. Andrew is survived by his children, Christopher (Eugene, Oregon), Kelly (New York City) and Nicholas Doe (Wellesely, Massachusetts); his grandchildren, Casey, Alex, Cooper and Bailey Doe; and his nephews, Greg and Scott Martin.

ERIC N. FRENCH, 83, died Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017, at Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. He was born Feb. 14, 1934, in Northfield, the son of Noble and Clover (Strong)

French. He attended Northfield High School. Mr. French mar-

ried Arlette (Ingalls) Drought in Northfield in 1968. She died June 8, 2016. He was a carpenter in earlier years, later worked at National Life until his retirement and then was employed part-time at Northfield Savings Bank. He was a member of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Northfield. Mr. French enjoyed taking automobile rides with his wife. Survivors include two sons, William French, of Barre, Paul French, of Missouri; stepson David Drought, of North Carolina; many grandchil- dren; a few nieces and nephews.

ROY J. GIROUARD, 73, of Weir Road, passed away suddenly on Aug. 6, 2017, at his home. Born in Burlington, VT, on March 1, 1944, he was the son of the late Laurence and Ruth (Prim) Girouard. Roy attended schools in Burlington. He worked with hundreds of young

  • men, teaching them survival skills. He was loved by many and was happy to have outlived many of his critics. He died happy and in peace and free as a bird. He loved his little dog, “Cupcake.” Survivors include one sister, Joan Globe, of Pennsylvania; three brothers, James Girouard and his wife, Suzanne, of Essex Junction, Stanley Girouard and his wife, Melanie, of Monticello, Minnesota, Robert Girouard and his wife, Wendy, of Essex Junction; and a spe- cial friend, Larry Ellison, of Williamstown, whom he loved very much. ARTHALEE “PETE” MARTIN, 76, of Waterbury, VT, passed away on Aug. 9, 2017. Born Sept. 22, 1940, in Montpelier, VT, she was the daughter of the late Bernard Stewart and Ruth E. (Woodward) Stewart. She graduated from Waterbury High School with the class of

  • 1958. Arthalee managed the snack bar at Mount Mansfield Union High School for many years, where interact- ing with the students brought her great joy. She later became

employed at IBM where she worked in manufacturing. Some

of her favorite hobbies included crafting, quilting and sewing, and playing bingo. She took pride in cooking, and her maca- roni and cheese was a favorite amongst family and friends. She loved being with her granddaughters. Arthalee is loved and mourned by her son, Ronald Martin, of VT; six siblings, Judy Ather and husband Bradley, of Michigan, Sharon MacMahan, of VT, Susan Chalmers, of VT, Ruth “Tunie” Sugg, of VT, Diane “Dinnie” Stewart, of VT, and Bernard “BG” Stewart, of VT; her granddaughters, Rachel Martin and fiancé Graham McFadden, of VT, and Amanda Farrelly and husband Stephen, of Ireland; special cousins, Lynn and Larry Austin; and countless family members and dear friends.

Stanley K. Morse Stanley K. Morse, 87, of Calais, VT succumbed to a long battle with
  • STEPHEN JOHN HORTON

  • PICKERING, 73, of Winooski, passed away at his home on Aug. 13, 2017. Born Aug. 25, 1943, in Dallas, Texas, he was one of two children born to John and Bertha (Chase) Pickering. He attended Barre City public schools

and graduated from Spaulding High School in

1961. He served his country honorably with the U.S. Army from 1962-1965. On July 22, 1967, Stephen married Jeannette A. Robert. They spent all of their life together in Winooski. Stephen worked for IBM for 36 years. He enjoyed hunting, gambling and sports, especially the Boston Red Sox. Stephen is survived by his wife of 50 years; his son, John Pickering

and wife Joann, of Vergennes; his daughter, Lisa (Pickering) Alden and husband Furman, of Highgate; eight grandchildren,

Ashlee, Mitchell and Daniel Pickering, Alexis and Colby Cota, Amanda Dear, Desiree Garrison, Peggy Perrin and Jacob Alden; along with several great-grandchildren. Also surviving is his brother, Timothy Pickering and wife Pamela, of Jonesville; his aunt, Lillian Clark, of Barre; and several nieces and nephews.

  • RONALD J. POULIN. A Mass of Christian

  • Burial and celebration of life for Ronald J. Poulin, 81, of Barre Town and Zephyrhills, Florida, was held on Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, at 11 a.m. in St. Monica Catholic Church in Barre. He passed away on July 28, 2017, in Florida. The Rev. Leopold J. Bilodeau, a family friend and former pas- tor of the church, was the celebrant. Crucifer Fred Letourneau was altar server and led the Prayer of the Faithful. Flowers

were presented by his grandchildren. Assisting as Eucharistic minister was Patricia Robinson, a family friend. Words of remembrance were shared by his son, Michael Poulin. Father Bilodeau led a prayer service with the family prior to the Mass. In attendance was a group of Catholic Daughters of the Americas, Court St. Monica, #1180; also a delegation of the

Boy Scouts of Green Mountain Council; and a group from the

Washington County Sheriff’s Department, who also led the procession to the Vermont Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Randolph Center. Burial followed the Mass, in the Vermont Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Randolph Center, where Father Bilodeau read the committal prayer. Full military hon- ors were accorded the deceased by the Vermont National Guard.

The largely attended life celebration and graveside service for DOUGLAS N. ROBBINS, a longtime resident of Prospect Street, was held Monday, Aug. 7, 2017, at 11 a.m. in the Wilson Cemetery. He passed away on July 31, 2017, at the Barre Gardens (formerly Rowan Court) in Barre. The Rev. Renny Azotea, pastor of the Hedding United Methodist Church, led the ceremony and gave the committal prayers. The hymns “Amazing Grace” and “The Old Rugged Cross” were played and sung by the congregation. Fellowship, a shar- ing time and luncheon followed at the Barre Elks Lodge #1535 on Jefferson Street in Barre.

DORIS L. WIMBLE – 95, passed away at the Barre Gardens Health and Rehabilitation Center on August 14, 2017. Born in Milton on June 18, 1922, she was the daughter of the late Homer and Grace (Wagner) Rankin. On January 18, 1941 she married Owen A. Wimble, Sr. in

  • Waitsfield. Owen passed away on June 9, 2003. Doris was a 1940 graduate of Waitsfield High School and then following her marriage, was happy and busy as a homemaker, raising her family and in addition worked part-time as a housekeeper at the Mad River Barn and was the bookkeeper for her husband’s trucking business. With her children grown, Doris was employed for 20 years by the Vermont Department of Fish and Game as a bookkeeper, retiring in 1982. In her leisure time she enjoyed knitting, a variety of crafts, quilting and working on her family’s genealogy. Doris is survived by her children, Sandra Thurston of Essex Junction, Owen Wimble, Jr. of Waitsfield; 11 grandchildren, 15 great-grand- children and several great-great grandchildren.

Special Committees & Their Potential Impact on Local Businesses

Special Committees & Their Potential Impact on Local Businesses By William Moore It is the mid-point

By William Moore

It is the mid-point in August and you know what that means: legislative Committees are busy at work trying to complete the tasks that they were assigned in the last session of the General Assembly. There have been several special

Committees created studying a variety

of topics. While the Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce has an interest in all of the activities and their potential impact on the business community, there are a few that we have a definite interest in following. Act 47 (H.424) created the Commission on Act 250: The Next 50 Years. The Chamber has a very definite interest in the direction that this Commission may be headed. Development is vital for the future of the state. That does not mean that we need to allow the rampant spread of smokestack industries. What it does mean is that reasonable development, consistent with Vermont’s economic profile, should not be forced to clear unreasonable hurdles. Act 250 has a place in Vermont, but that place should not be in the form of a stranglehold on reasonable development. Act 73 (H.516) established the Clean Water Working Group. The Chamber is mindful of the need to study and make recommendations related to Clean Water. Our concern is that no single segment of the economy be unduly burdened with the costs related to remediation and protecting the envi- ronment for the future. Act 69 (S.135) formed the Minimum Wage and Benefits Cliff Study. The Chamber is very interested in the direction that this may be headed. We are very mindful of the effects of the “Benefits Cliff” and recognize that it presents significant challenges to lower wage workers. We are wary of increases in the minimum wage beyond those that were adopted by the General Assembly in 2014. We believe that market forces should determine the minimum wage, not artificial increase imposed by the legislature. Under existing law, the minimum wage increased in 2016 to $9.60 per hour. This year, the minimum wage increased to $10.00 per hour. On January 1, 2018, the minimum wage increases to $10.50 per hour. Beginning January 1, 2019 and

on January 1st each year thereafter, the minimum wage rate will increase by five percent or the percentage increase of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) as calculated by the U.S. Department of Labor whichever is smaller. By indexing the minimum wage, business owners can plan for the future and adjust their workforce needs accordingly. We are concerned about efforts to immediately increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour and the impact that such an

increase will have on the economy and the Benefits Cliff.

Already, a significant study that has been conducted looking at all sectors of Seattle’s economy (where the minimum wage is $15 per hour) is showing a significantly negative impact on low wage workers due to their working significantly fewer hours as a result of the increased minimum wage. Another study that we are very concerned about is Governor Scott’s Blue Ribbon Commission to study marijuana. We are opposed to the legalization of marijuana and are concerned that this commission may result in major steps toward legal- ization. The commission should be tasked with, as a major part of its agenda, considering the efficacy of not legalizing marijuana. Legalization of marijuana is a threat to public health and safety. Vermont Chiefs of Police are unanimous in their oppo- sition to legalization, particularly because there is no reliable method in which to conduct field tests of drivers suspected to be impaired by marijuana. Users who may be under the influence of marijuana while at work pose a direct threat to themselves and their co-work- ers. This is particularly true in professions such as construc- tion, heavy equipment operation, logging, manufacturing, health care, jobs requiring driving on state roads and high- ways and other safety-sensitive professions that require atten- tion to detail and clarity of mind. Marijuana is known to be a gateway drug. At a time when the state is facing the worst opioid crisis in the nation, legal- ization is counter-intuitive and disingenuous at best. Studies conducted in states where marijuana has been legalized have revealed unanticipated consequences that are negatively impacting those states. The Chamber will be following the activities of these study groups with an open mind and a keen eye on detail What do you think?

Vermont Clean Water Week to Focus on “All In” for Water Quality

Vermont Clean Water Week is scheduled for August 20-26,

2017.

Vermont Clean Water Week will celebrate Vermont’s

waters, and the efforts of businesses, organizations, communi- ties and individuals to protect and restore clean water state- wide. Vermont Governor Phil Scott will hold a press event about Vermont Clean Water Week on Thursday, August 24, 2017, 11am-12:00PM at 12 Reid Street, Barre. The Governor will be joined by the Mayor of Barre City and local partners. Over 80 organizations, businesses, institutions and munici- palities are Clean Water Week Sponsors. Media members and the public can attend Clean Water Week Events at numerous

locations and businesses across Vermont. For more informa-

tion, visit: http://dec.vermont.gov/watershed/cwi/clean-water- week. Vermonters love their local stream, lake and pond and value clean water. Clean Water helps the economy, provides abundant recreational opportunities, supports public health benefits and sustains critical wildlife habitat. Businesses, organizations, and communities throughout the state are com- mitted to clean water and efforts to restore and protect our lakes, ponds, rivers, and wetlands. This “All-In” approach is about relying on Vermont’s collaborative spirit to assure a legacy of clean water for today’s and future generations.

Vermont Granted Federal Disaster Declaration

Governor Phil Scott today announced the major disaster declaration he requested for Addison, Bennington, Caledonia, Orange, Rutland, Washington, and Windsor Counties has been signed by the President. These seven counties suffered

substantial damage by flooding between June 29 and July 1,

2017.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Public Assistance disaster declaration allows communities and public utilities in those counties to receive 75 percent federal reimbursement for storm response and recovery, including costs for debris removal and repairs to public roads, bridges, and other infrastructure with damage resulting from the storm. “This declaration will provide much-needed financial relief for the communities that that were affected and continue to have significant cleanup and repairs to complete after this storm,” said Scott. “I commend the local and state officials and work crews for their recovery efforts, and thank our fed- eral partners, including FEMA and the White House staff for their responsiveness.” Town leaders will be able to start the reimbursement pro- cess at applicant briefings, which will be announced in the coming days by Vermont Emergency Management. The brief- ings will outline the requirements for receiving federal awards

and maximizing eligibility of repairs. Vermont Emergency Management, Agency of Transportation district personnel, and FEMA will guide town officials through the application process. A Preliminary Damage Assessment (PDA) by FEMA,

which started on July 12, identified $4.7 million in public infrastructure damage, far exceeding the $1 million minimum Vermont must show to be considered for a disaster declara- tion. Addison, Bennington, Caledonia, Orange, Rutland, Washington, and Windsor Counties each exceeded the $3.61 per capita threshold needed to qualify cities and towns in those counties for assistance. The damages identified in the PDA are only a partial accounting of the total damages suf- fered from the storm and the final tally will likely be higher. The declaration also includes funds from the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) for towns, state agencies, and approved nonprofit organizations statewide. This pro- gram provides funding for a variety of mitigation activities, including home buyouts, structural elevations, flood proofing and public infrastructure upgrades for roads, bridges and cul- verts in vulnerable locations. For town leaders seeking more information on the process, please visit http://vem.vermont.gov/funding/pa.

Free Registration Open for Senator Leahy’s 21st Annual Women’s Economic Opportunity Conference

Workshops are filling up fast for Vermont’s 21st Annual Women’s Economic Opportunity Conference (WEOC), pre- sented by U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy. This year’s conference will be held Saturday, Sept. 16, at Vermont Technical College in Randolph and will feature keynote speaker Mary Alice McKenzie of the Boys & Girls Club of Burlington. Deadline for registration is Sept. 8. In the interest of making the confer- ence accessible to all, there is no charge for registration, lunch, or pre-arranged child care. This conference draws hundreds of women from around Vermont for a day of personal and professional growth. The

range of workshops supports women of all skill levels as they explore new careers, forge professional contacts, discover financial resources and master social media. This year’s part- nership with Change The Story VT will offer new workshops and presenters, and feature an afternoon session of unique storytelling. Please visit Senator Leahy’s website at leahy.senate.gov to learn more about the conference and to register, or visit the 21st Annual Womens Economic Opportunity Facebook page. Call Senator Leahy’s Montpelier office at 802-229-0569 with questions.

The Montpelier Senior Activity Center continued from page 7

and more. All are welcome for the delicious lunch and conversation. Reservations for lunch are appreciated at 262-

6288.

Lunch is $7 for anyone under age 60, and a $5 sug-

gested donation for anyone 60 or older. Jazzyoke: Singing to Live Music for All! Friday, August 25, 6:30-9:30 pm Come to listen, enjoy free refreshments, and optionally,

take a turn at the mic, singing jazz standards backed by a live six-piece band. Vermonters have already enjoyed Jazzyoke at Espresso Bueno and other venues, and we are delighted to bring it to MSAC free of charge (tips for the band gratefully accepted). Be prepared for a great time, and bring your friends!

 

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PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT As of September 5, 2017 The Montpelier Sewing Basket is moving and will consolidate
PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT As of September 5, 2017 The Montpelier Sewing Basket is moving and will consolidate

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What Does Killing a “Nuisance” Animal Accomplish?

Editor,

Most people care about wildlife and assume that the Vermont Fish & Wildlife (VFW) Department is working to protect all wildlife on behalf of all Vermonters. Some biolo- gists are doing important work, but other folks at VFW are only working on behalf of hunters, trappers, and anglers. VFW should be working to protect wildlife for their own sake – especially during spring and summer months when wild

animals have young and should not be killed. Sadly, a lot of

so-called “nuisance” animals are killed outside of hunting and trapping seasons. Killing them may also result in the deaths of more wild animals, as young animals can be orphaned.

Furthermore, the “nuisance” behavior – seeking food or a den site or building a dam to create a pond - may simply be an animal’s attempt to care for her young. Killing a “nuisance” animal won’t prevent another animal from engaging in the same behavior, either. To make matters worse, VFW does not regulate “nuisance” trapping, so they don’t know how many animals are killed, where, why, whether the problem was solved, or any biological information about those animals. For an agency that should base its decisions on science, that’s pretty unscientific. Fortunately, there is a group of people working to protect wildlife in Vermont. Protect Our Wildlife (POW) is a non- profit organization that has secured grant funding for a new “Living With Wildlife” campaign to help municipalities and the public humanely address wildlife conflicts; you can learn more online at www.protectourwildlifevt.org/conflicts.

Sincerely,

Linda Huebner

A Republican Look Back on the 2017 Legislative Session

Pat McDonald and Ben Kinsley are co-

hosts of the show “Vote for Vermont.” With

this show, Ben and Pat fi nished up their series of talking to House leadership from

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT As of September 5, 2017 The Montpelier Sewing Basket is moving and will consolidate

party line. A bold and much appreciated change

of style.

We talked about the teacher’s health care savings proposal the Governor mentioned in early January. Many members were a little tak- en aback when the issue came up again through the recommendation of a $26M savings oppor- tunity which included the use of health savings

accounts (HSA’s), an 80/20 split in cost, etc. The Governor vetoed the budget, which set in motion discussions and a compromise. At the

end of the session some savings were realized.

There were no HSAs or across the board 80/20 split agreement included but all health care contracts were re- scheduled to open back up in 2019, which means teacher’s health care discussion could return. Brian also mentioned that in the special session called by Legislative leaders, the Republicans and several others from the Legislature voted not to suspend rules so that the Mari-

juana Bill could be taken up for discussion. It will be back in January. Brian also talked about Independent Contractors. Appar- ently nothing was done and the issue remains in limbo for yet

another year.

Lastly we talked about the $54M identifi ed for water clean- up. Brian reviewed the breakdown of the total amount of fund- ing but was discouraged that while we know the amount going to various areas like Lake Champlain, there is no plan on how and where to use the money effectively. Asked what’s next, Brian said we will all have to wait to

see what the Federal Government is going to do if there will

be a reduction in the amount of federal funds coming our way. There is another special session tentatively scheduled in Octo- ber to deal with any adjustments that will need to be made to the budget. We will need to wait and see. Note: The comments refl ected in this article are opinions stated by our guests. Any rebuttals are welcome and can be expressed on the websites and Facebook pages of VFV and CFV. If you would like to see the show please go to vote802. com for a complete listing of Vote for Vermont shows or our YouTube channel.

the Democrat, Progressive, and now the

Republican Party. They interviewed Brian Savage, Assistant House Minority Leader (a/k/a WHIP). Back in January, Brian was on

the show and stated that the priorities of the

Republican Party were: Property Taxes, an Affordable Vermont, School Choice, Vibrant Economy, Good Paying Jobs, and an Afford- able Health Care System. Ben’s fi rst question was about whether Brian felt the House

Republicans achieved their goals or at least set the stage for

moving their ideas forward. Brian noted they had limited suc-

cess but their actions did set the stage for next year’s session.

He felt the budget was a huge achievement by coming in level

funded, with no new taxes and no cuts in services and by be-

ing passed by the House with an overwhelming majority vote. Brian was especially pleased about the $35M in housing ini- tiatives, particularly as housing impacts economic growth. Pat commented that all legislatives guests on the show agreed they all heard the message from constituents about property tax, jobs, health care, etc. but thought that somehow the message seemed lost based on the bills from this past session. There were only two economic bills passed out of the Leg- islature. Brian said his personal view of the on Vermont’s economy was to streamline the permitting process. Everyone agreed that you can fi x permitting while still continuing to protect the environment. It is not an either/or approach. Brian talked about the appeal process and how that needed to be re- viewed and streamlined as well. Pat mentioned that in her ex- periences and through guests on the show all business people want is predictability in time and cost. Everyone agreed. Brian was asked about the change in leadership in the Leg- islature and all the new members. Brian noted that it was un- derstandable that things were a little confusing with so many changes and the loss of some institutional memory. He was impressed however that the Speaker of the House brought with her a new style of managing where Legislative members were

encouraged to vote their conscience rather than vote straight

Reiss Pieces By Judy Reiss I always try and watch some of the spectacular horse races

Reiss Pieces

By Judy Reiss

  • I always try and watch some of the spectacular horse races which are al- ways shown on T.V. in the spring of

the year. And I must admit that I don’t

really care who wins. What I really find

most interesting is the gigantic group of

people who group into the stands and

are dressed to the nines! Never in my life have I ever seen

woman were are dressed in outfits that cost as much as my

house! And as you might know, every single woman wear hats that are not only amazing but cost as much as a year’s salary. Now in case you think that I am just joking let me tell you how I know. When my daughter was married I decided that I wanted a big beautiful hat myself. So I used the computer and looked up “Fancy hats” and sure enough up came the per- son who makes those hats and believe it or not, the woman who makes them lived about 5 miles from my cottage at the Cape. So, over we went and I met the milliner and decided the hat that I wanted. And although the hat was very expensive for me, it was actually very inexpensive!! And I paid ONLY $350.00 dollars! Can you imagine such an outrageous price? Now if I paid that much can you image how much the rich and famous pay? My guess is thousands of dollars and that doesn’t count their suits and dresses!

None of that makes much difference, what I found most interesting was this. Quite a ways from the rich course, there was a small dirt course with a few places on it was a place set aside for the workers and those who couldn’t pay the shock- ingly expensive price to go and sit in the stands to watch the

race. Nope, the dirt stands were set aside for those who do the

actual work who prepared the horses to race. Needless to say these workers were not allowed to sit in the stands with the rich and elite. And do you have any idea how much the horses who win make? Well, I don’t actually know either but I do know it is in the millions of dollars. And then the horse usually is retired to be put out for stud where they earn more in an hour then most of us make in a year! What do you think about the very rich and their ability to share their wealth with the less fortunate? And my question that always is in my mind. How much is enough? The ath- lete who makes more than a few millions? And if you make 5, 10, 15 million, is that enough? Our country has more than enough don’t you think that giving some of it away to the less fortunate wouldn’t hurt anyone! Let’s try and help spread the wealth rather than try and hoard as much as we can for our own family. A little something for our family is a good thing but think about it how much is enough for you and yours.

Detroit HHH

T he 1967 Detroit Riot was hideously destructive. More

than 1000 people were injured. 43 died. More than two

thousand buildings were destroyed. After five days of

arson and looting, the combined forces of police, National

Guard, and army troops were finally able to enforce the 9pm

curfew and reestablish order. Thank goodness for those armed men in uniform. They maintain order and save us all from the destructive forces of anarchy. Without the cops and troops, just imagine what would have happened to Detroit. At best, the riot would have

reduced the city to ashes. At worst, there could have been an armed war between the city-dwellers and suburbanites, with 10 Mile Rd as the Front Line. If you think that is far-fetched, that is because you have lived your whole life in a well-policed country. As soon as legitimate order breaks down, chaos ensues. Look at the situation in Libya and Venezuela and South Sudan. Anarchy isn’t just a theoretical fear; it is the natural state of man. If you think that many cops are on a power trip, you’re right. If you think that many cops use excessive force, you’re obviously right. If you think that many cops are racist, you couldn’t be more right. If you think we would be better off without the police, you’re preposterously wrong. And you know it. That’s why you aren’t moving to South Sudan. “Detroit” is a well-made, entertaining, gripping, outra-

geously biased film about one ugly incident that happened

during the 1967 Detroit Riot.

It began innocently enough, with a black guy firing a loud starter pistol in the direction of some cops. The officers did

not know that it was just a starter pistol and they hideously overreacted.

Detroit HHH T he 1967 Detroit Riot was hideously destructive. More than 1000 people were injured.

A handful of rogue cops busted into the building from

which the shots were fired, lined everyone up against the

wall at gun point, and proceeded to terrorize them until they got a confession. Oscar-winning director Kathryn Bigalow (“The Hurt Locker”) is a master of violent suspense. As entertainment,

“Detroit” is first rate. As a horror movie, “Detroit” works on

every level. As a political statement, “Detroit” is a dubious achievement at best.

Making a film about the Detroit Riot and making it all

about police brutality is an odd spin indeed. It’s kind of like

making a film called “Nazi Germany” and telling the heart-

warming story of Hitler’s relationship with his loyal German Shepard Blondi. On one hand, the movie would be 100% true. At the same time, it would be laughably biased and expose the filmmak- er’s ugly political agenda. “Detroit” is the right movie set in the wrong place at the wrong time. Riots are the times where we need cops the most. Our country has a lot of problems. But none of them are as bad as anarchy.

What unusual item do you carry in your car?

W hat unusual item do you carry in your car? Karen T. - So. Walden Bottle

Karen T. - So. Walden

Bottle of Windex

W hat unusual item do you carry in your car? Karen T. - So. Walden Bottle

Carol M. - Barre

Wig

W hat unusual item do you carry in your car? Karen T. - So. Walden Bottle

Darren S. - Rutland

Lots of Sand

W hat unusual item do you carry in your car? Karen T. - So. Walden Bottle

Ed M. - Barre

Trash Bags

Wendy E. - Barre

Swiffer Duster

Ricci-Sue R. - Barre

Bat or Field Hockey Stick

Ferron P. - E. Montpelier

My Whole Wardrobe

Mary S. - Swanton

Handcuffs

Reiss Pieces By Judy Reiss I always try and watch some of the spectacular horse races

WARNING SPECIAL MEETING CENTRAL VERMONT UNIFIED UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT

August 31, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.

The legal voters of the Central Vermont Unifi ed Union School District (the “District”), comprising the voters of the Towns of Northfi eld and Williamstown, are hereby notifi ed and warned to meet at the Brown Public Library in Northfi eld, VT, on Thursday, August 31st, 2017, in the Community Room, at 6:00 p.m. to conduct the following business:

Article 1: To elect a temporary presiding offi cer and clerk from among the qualifi ed voters. Article 2: To adopt Robert’s Rules of Order or other rules of order to govern the parliamentary procedures of

this and subsequent meetings of the District. Article 3: To elect the following offi cers to serve from their election and qualifi cation for one year or until the election and qualifi cation of their successors:

• Moderator

• Clerk

• Treasurer

Article 4: To determine and approve compensation, if any, to be paid District offi cers.

Article 5: To establish a date of the annual meeting.

Article 6: To establish provisions for the payment of any

expense incurred by the District.

Article 7: To authorize the District to borrow money pending

receipt of payments from the State Education

Fund by the issuance of its notes or orders

payable not later than one year from date:

provided, however, that the newly formed District

is authorized by Vermont Statutes to borrow

suffi cient funds to meet pending obligations.

Article 8: To determine and approve compensation, if any, to be paid to School Board Directors. Article 9: To determine whether to authorize the Board of School Directors, pursuant to the provisions of 16 V.S.A. §563(10) & (11)(C), to provide mailed notice to residents of the availability of the Annual Report and proposed school budget in lieu of distributing the Annual Report and proposed budget. Article 10: To transact any other school business thought proper when met. Dated this 27th day of July, 2017.

Rebecca Holcombe, Ed.D. Secretary of Education

WARNING SPECIAL MEETING ORANGE WASHINGTON UNIFIED UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT

August 30, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.

The legal voters of the Orange Washington Unifi ed Union School District (the “District”), comprising the voters of the Towns of Orange and Washington, are hereby notifi ed and warned to meet at the Orange Town Hall in Orange, VT on 30th day, August, 2017, at 6:00 p.m. to conduct the following business:

Article 1: To elect a temporary presiding offi cer and clerk from among the qualifi ed voters. Article 2: To adopt Robert’s Rules of Order or other rules of order to govern the parliamentary procedures of this and subsequent meetings of the District. Article 3: To elect the following offi cers to serve from their election and qualifi cation for one year or until the election and qualifi cation of their successors:

• Moderator

• Clerk

• Treasurer

Article 4: To determine and approve compensation, if any, to be paid District offi cers. Article 5: To establish a date of the annual meeting. Article 6: To establish provisions for the payment of any expense incurred by the District. Article 7: To authorize the District to borrow money pending receipt of payments from the State Education Fund by the issuance of its notes or orders payable not later than one year from date:

provided, however, that the newly formed District is authorized by Vermont Statutes to borrow suffi cient funds to meet pending obligations. Article 8: To determine and approve compensation, if any,

to be paid to School Board Directors. Article 9: To determine whether to authorize the Board of School Directors, pursuant to the provisions of 16 V.S.A. §563(10) & (11)(C), to provide mailed notice to residents of the availability of the Annual Report and proposed school budget in lieu of distributing the Annual Report and proposed budget. Article 10: To transact any other school business thought proper when met. Dated this 26th day of July, 2017.

Rebecca Holcombe, Ed.D. Secretary of Education

August 23, 2017

The WORLD

page 11

In celebration of Francis & Eunice Brooks’ th on Aug. 26th Anniversary their children would like
In celebration of
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on Aug. 26th
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their children would like to honor
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Cards of congratulations may be sent to:
27 Harrison Ave., Montpelier, VT 05602
Look Who’s 80! Happy Birthday Chet Cookson! Love, Your Family AUGUST 30, 2017
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AUGUST 30, 2017
Happy Anniversary Blossom Cottage Florist and The WORLD would like to help you wish a special
Happy Anniversary
Blossom Cottage Florist and The WORLD would like to help you wish a
special couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send their name, address & wed-
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names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to: The WORLD, c/o HAPPY
ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide
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WILLIAMSTOWN, 25 YEARS
AUGUST 24
JAMES & HEATHER VERDON, WILLIAMSTOWN, 15 YEARS
STEVE & LISA ENGLAND, BARRE, 26 YEARS
AUGUST 26
FRANCIS & EUNICE BROOKS, MONTPELIER, 50 YEARS
BLOSSOM COTTAGE FLORIST
“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”
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Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.
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In celebration of Francis & Eunice Brooks’ th on Aug. 26th Anniversary their children would like
The following birth announcements were submitted by Central Vermont Medical Center on August 16, 2017. Any
The following birth announcements were submitted by Central Vermont Medical Center
on August 16, 2017. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to CVMC.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BIRTH
Central Vermont Medical Center

A daughter, Gemma Violet Erwin, was born Aug. 1 to

Mya Potts and Josh Erwin of Barre.

A daughter, Hannah Elizabeth Tease, was born Aug. 4 to

Amy (Woodbury) and Justin Tease of Montpelier.

A daughter, Savannah May Carr, was born Aug. 11 to

Diana Rowell and Billy Carr of Hardwick.

A daughter, Amelia Rose LaFrance, was born Aug. 12 to

Amy (Trinanes) and Joshua LaFrance of Montpelier.

The following birth announcements were submitted by Gifford Medical Center ANNOUNCEMENTS BIRTH Gifford Medical Center
The following birth announcements were submitted by Gifford Medical Center
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BIRTH
Gifford Medical Center

on August 13, 2017. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to Gifford.

A son, Wesley Dylan, was born August 2, 2017

to Sarah Emmons and Ludwig Witham of Barre

A daughter, Ana Marie Blaisdell, was born August 3, 2017

to Katelyn Coleman and Nick Blaisdell of Braintree

A son, Caden Arnold Clark, was born August 4, 2017 to Miriam Abu Shuraija Clark and Tarkin Clark of South Royalton

A son, Fletcher Allen Rizzo, was born August 4, 2017 ro Megan Shayton Rizzo and Scott Rizzo of East Corinth

In celebration of Francis & Eunice Brooks’ th on Aug. 26th Anniversary their children would like

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Happy Birthday!

Happy Birthday!
 
 
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Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE

BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just

send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address & phone number for prize notification.

 

AUGUST 23

AUGUST 26

Rosalie Richardson, 80, Woodbury

 
 

AUGUST 24

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AUGUST 25

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AUGUST 27

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CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) at 479-9078 and ask for Julie Fandino (Bakery Manager) or Beverlee Hutchins (Cake Decorator) by Thursday, August 24 to arrange for cake pick-up.

 

This Week’s Cake Winner:

 

On AUGUST 27, JAMES GINGRAS of BERLIN is 80 YEARS OLD!

 
 
 

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BIRTHDATE ______________________________ NAME ___________________________________ AGE (this birthday) _________________________ ADDRESS________________________________ ________________________________________ PHONE __________________________________

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Happy 17th Birthday, Taylor August 21, 2017 Love, Family & Friends
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ARIES (March 21 to April 19) This week could of- fer more opportunities for ambitious Lambs

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) This week could of- fer more opportunities for ambitious Lambs eager to get ahead. But don’t rush into making decisions until you’ve checked for possible hidden problems.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Some light begins to shine on

professional and/or personal situations that have long eluded explanation. Best advice: Don’t rush things. All will be made clear in time.

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Although you might want to protest what seems to be an unfair situation, it’s best to keep your tongue and temper in check for now. The full story hasn’t yet come out.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Work prospects are back on track. But watch what you say. A thoughtless comment to the wrong person -- even if it’s said in jest -- could delay or even derail your progress.

LEO (July 23 to August 22) A colleague might try to goad you into saying or doing the wrong thing. It’s best to ignore the troublemaker, even if he or she riles your royal self. Your supporters stand with you.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Be careful not to let your on-the-job zealousness create resentment with co-work- ers who might feel you shut them out. Prove them wrong by including them in your project.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Although it’s not quite what you hoped for, use your good business sense to make the most of what you’re being offered at this time. Things will improve down the line.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A more positive pic-

ture of what lies ahead is beginning to take shape. But there

are still too many gaps that need to be fi lled in before you

make defi nitive plans.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Continue to

keep a tight hold on the reins so that you don’t charge willy- nilly into a situation that might appear attractive on the sur- face but lack substance.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You still need to demand those answers to your questions. Remember, your wise counseling earns you respect, but it’s your search for truth that gives you wisdom.

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) You’ll fi nd that people are happy to help you deal with some diffi cult situa-

tions. And, of course, knowing you, you’ll be happy to return those favors anytime. Won’t you?

PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Give that special some- one in your personal life a large, loving dollop of reassurance. That will go a long way toward restoring the well-being of your ailing relationship.

BORN THIS WEEK: You are a delightful paradox. You like things neat and tidy. But you’re also a wonderful host who can throw a really great party.

(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

2017 Montpelier WALK AND RUN FOR CHILDREN Prevent Child Abuse Vermont hosted the 18th WALK FOR
2017 Montpelier WALK AND RUN FOR CHILDREN Prevent Child Abuse Vermont hosted the 18th WALK FOR
2017 Montpelier WALK AND RUN FOR CHILDREN Prevent Child Abuse Vermont hosted the 18th WALK FOR

2017 Montpelier WALK AND RUN FOR CHILDREN

Prevent Child Abuse Vermont hosted the 18th WALK FOR CHILDREN and 5K RUN on Saturday, August 19, 2017 at the State House Lawn in Montpelier. Approximately 150 walkers and runners from all over Vermont came to downtown Montpelier to show their support for helping families, child care providers and schools nurture

all of Vermont’s children! PCAVT’s Board President, Steve Dale welcomed the gath- ered supporters and introduced the speakers. The Commissioner for the Department of Children and Families, Ken Schatz former UVM basketball star, Taylor Coppenrath and Mayor of Montpelier, John Hollar spoke. Executive Director, Linda Johnson said, “Today Vermonters came together to WALK & RUN, giving support to children and families throughout Vermont. Child abuse can be prevented and each of us has a role to play.” Children of all ages had their faces painted and some had their strollers and bicycles decorated, while enjoying live music by local artist, Julia Kate Davis. Also mingling with the children and families, was Skip from the Vermont Mountaineers and Prevent Child Abuse Vermont’s own Great Big Blue Kid Bear. Many thanks to the volunteers, businesses and organizations involved in making the WALK and RUN FOR CHILDREN a success! Prevent Child Abuse Vermont (PCAVT) is the Vermont Chapter of Prevent Child Abuse America and the National Circle of Parents. Our mission is to promote and support healthy relationships within families, schools and communi- ties to eliminate child abuse. Our goals are::End the genera- tional cycle of abuse; Train all who interact with children on proven methods to prevent child abuse and neglect; Empower children to be heard.

PCAVT has been serving children and families at significant risk of child abuse and neglect for nearly 41 years by creating, adopting and carrying out statewide, innovative, proven effective prevention pro- grams. PCAVT’s programs are unique in that they are strength-based and teach adults how to nurture healthy development in children, and emphasize adult responsibility for keeping children safe.

Gifford welcomes Dr. Anne Viselli Urogynecologist Dr. Viselli has joined the Gifford urology team and brings
Gifford welcomes Dr. Anne Viselli
Urogynecologist
Dr. Viselli has joined the Gifford urology team and brings expertise in the
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“It is reported that as many as two in four women have some element of
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To schedule an appointment call 728-2430 or 229-2325
NOW SEEING PATIENTS IN OUR RANDOLPH AND BERLIN CLINICS
Learn more:
www.GiffordHealthCare.org
Gifford Health Care
Caring for you
...
for life.
Professional Services For The Wedding Or Event Of Your Dreams Enjoy the months leading up to
Professional Services
For The Wedding Or Event Of Your Dreams
Enjoy the months leading up to your wedding, while we plan the day you’ve always
imagined. We offer a wide variety of wedding services, consultations and assistance.
PARTY SUPPLIES
BRIDAL SHOP
WEDDING HAIR & MAKEUP
RECEPTIONS
RubbeR
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BRIDAL BOUTIQUE
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14 N. Main St., Suite 1003, Barre
~•~
Tues.-Fri. 9:30-5:30 • Sat. 9:30-2:00
Open Mon.-Fri. 9am-7pm, Sat. 9am-2pm
•Sit-Down Dinners or Buffets
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802.223.4777
Barre-Montpelier Rd., Barre
could
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Walk-Ins Welcome • Appointments Suggested
Barre Lodge of the Elks
403 U.S. RT. 302 - BERLIN • BARRE, VT 05641-2274
476-6011
www.shalinebridal.com
479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • FAX 479-7916
802-229-0366
No. 1535
for be just
John Cutler, Manager Call Today 479-9522
RECEPTIONS
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$
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Food provided by
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We ship almost anywhere!
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802-223-5757
Country Club
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223-2740
Just 2.0 miles up
County Road
At Your Location
Or One Of Ours
1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village
on Rt. 14 (follow signs)
124 NORTH MAIN ST., BARRE, VT 05641
Contact Keith Paxman at keith@cornerstonepk.com
(802) 476-4031 • 479-0506
249-7758
"The Capital City's Beautiful Backyard"
www.richardjwobbyjewelers.com
142 Drake Road • Barre • 802-476-2121
Bob & Brenda
CENTRAL VERMONT’S BEST COUNTRY “One of the Best Regional Theaters LNT: Born 1977 in america” -
CENTRAL VERMONT’S BEST COUNTRY
CENTRAL
VERMONT’S
BEST
COUNTRY
CENTRAL VERMONT’S BEST COUNTRY “One of the Best Regional Theaters LNT: Born 1977 in america” -
CENTRAL VERMONT’S BEST COUNTRY “One of the Best Regional Theaters LNT: Born 1977 in america” -

“One of the Best Regional Theaters

LNT:

Born 1977

in america”

- NYC Drama League

KATE

photo of Janis as Kate Hepburn courtesy of Sacramento Theatre Co. hall arts center montpelier city
photo of Janis as Kate Hepburn
courtesy of Sacramento Theatre Co.
hall arts center
montpelier city
a play by 
 RICK FOSTER THE 
 UNEXAMINED LIFE
 JANIS STEVENS starring

a play by 

RICK FOSTER
THE 

UNEXAMINED LIFE

JANIS STEVENS
starring


“Janis Stevens doesn’t just play

Katharine Hepburn,

she IS the indomitable star”

- the davisenterprise

THURS-SUN

THURS-SUN

SEPT 7–17 SEPT 7–17
SEPT 7–17
SEPT 7–17

TICKETS :

July 6–23

(802) 229-0492

lostnationtheater.org

“One of the Best Regional Theaters LNT: Born 1977 in america” - NYC Drama League KATE
ndndndnnnnnndddddd 222222222222 Annual Annual Annual AAAAAA nnua nnnnnn nnnnnn uuuuuu aaaaaa lll nnua nnua FREEZING FUN
ndndndnnnnnndddddd
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Annual
Annual
Annual
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FREEZING FUN
FOR FAMILIES
Charity Golf
Tournament
Fri., Sept. 8, 2016
9:00 am Shotgun Start
Country Club
of Vermont
2800 Country Club Rd • Waterbury Center, VT
COST
$160 / Player
$600 / Team of 4
$800 / Corporate Sponsorship
(Includes team of 4 and hole sponsorship)
$250/Hole Sponsorship Only
DINNER
House-made Burgers • Italian Herb Grilled Chicken
All Beef Hot Dogs 8 Baked Beans • House-made Chips
Pasta Primavera w/ Seasonal Vegetables
Assorted Cookies and Brownies Platter
The 2nd Annual Freezing Fun for Families Charity Golf Tournament, September 8, 2017. Each fee
includes 18 holes, cart, meal, and prizes. All proceeds go to the expansion of Freezing Fun For Families.
Tournament will be limited to 20 teams. Registrations and hole sponsorships must be completed by August
25, 2017. For details or to register yourself or your team visit www.freezingfunforfamilies.com or call
Corey at 802-279-3632.
CENTRAL VERMONT’S BEST COUNTRY “One of the Best Regional Theaters LNT: Born 1977 in america” -

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.com or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S. Route 302, Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m., Thursday preceding publication. The Ongoing section is for free/low cost community events, which should be verified monthly. We are no longer able to include ongoing classes.

Ongoing Events

BARRE - Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes. Pre-GED and high school diplo- ma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46 Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.

PAWS. Support for those grieving the loss of a beloved pet. Universalist Church. 1st Thursday of month. 7 p.m. Info. beyondthedog97@ gmail.com

Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, an adult LGBTQ group, bowls at Twin City Lanes on Sunday afternoons twice a month. For dates and times: RUCVTAdmin@PrideCenterVT.org

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group. Free instruction projects for all abilities. Barre Congregational Church, Mondays 1-4 p.m.

479-9563

Rock & Soul Chorus. 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Church of the Good Shepherd on 39 Washington St. Sing songs from the Sixties and beyond. Ability to read music is not required. No audition, but singers should be able to accurately sing back what’s been sung to them. All ages are welcome. Children under 13 should come with a parent.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild. Meets on third Tuesday of the month at First Presbyterian Church on Seminary Street from 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Step ‘n’ Time Line Dancers of Central

Vermont. Thursdays at The Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St. 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Playgroup . Universalist Church, Tuesdays 9:30-11 a.m., while school is in session. Sponsored by Building Bright Futures. Info.

279-0993.

Additional Recyclables Collection Center. Open for collection Mon., Wed., Friday noon – 6 p.m., 3rd Saturdays 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 540 N. Main St., Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable items.

Jabbok Christian Center Prayer Meeting. 8

Daniel Dr. 6:30-8 p.m. 1st & 3rd Thursdays.

Info: 479-0302

Medicare and You. New to Medicare? Have questions? We have answers. Central Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month. Call 479-

0531 to register.

Celebrate Recovery. Recovery for all your hurts/habits/hang-ups. Christ Community Church, 43 Berlin St. across from R&L Archery, Monday, 6-8 p.m. 476-3221.

Wheelchair Basketball. Barre Evangelical Free Church, 17 So. Main St., Every other Tuesday,

5:30-7 p.m. Info 498-3030 (David) or 249-7931

(Sandy).

Aldrich Public Library Activities. 6 Washington St., 476-7550. Story Hour , Mondays & Tuesdays starting 9/22, 10:30 a.m. Reading Circle Book Club, 3rd Wednesdays, 6:30 p.m. Living & Learning Series, 1st Sundays, 1 p.m. Senior Day, 1st Wednesdays, 1 p.m.

Central Vermont Business Builders . Community National Bank, 1st & 3rd Tuesdays, 8-9 a.m. Info. 777-5419.

Weekly Storytime. Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St., Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. Info.

476-3114.

Overeaters Anonymous . Barre Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 39 Washington

St. Saturdays 8:30-9:30 a.m. Use side entrance, go upstairs, and to the right. Info: Valerie, 279-

0385.

Greater Barre Democrats. Town & City resi- dents welcome. Aldrich Public Library, last Wednesdays, 5:15-6:15 p.m. Info 476-4185.

Play Group. St. Monica’s Church, lower level, Thursdays during school year, 9:30-11 a.m.

American Legion Auxiliary Unit 10. Meets at the post, first Thursday of each month (not July), 6:30 p.m.

Vermont Modelers Club. Building & flying model airplanes year-round, visitors welcome. Info. 485-7144.

Community Breakfast . First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer St., 3rd Sunday of month, FREE, 7:30-9 a.m. 476-3966.

Grandparents Raising Their Children’s Children. Support group. 23 Summer St., 1st & 3rd Weds., 10 a.m.-noon. 476-1480.

Friends of Aldrich Public Library. Aldrich Library, 2nd floor boardroom, 4th Tuesday of month, 6:30 p.m. Info. 476-7550.

Circle of Parents. Confidential support group for parents and caregivers. Meets Tuesday eve- nings. Info. 229-5724 or 1-800-CHILDREN.

Mothers of Preschoolers. Monthly get-togeth- ers for crafts, refreshments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.

Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings in Barre,

daily;

call 802-229-5100 for latest times &

locations; www.aavt.org.

Hedding United Methodist Activities &

Meetings. 40 Washington Street, 476-8156. Choir, Thursdays 7 p.m; Free Community Supper, Fridays 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Community Service & Food Shelf Hours: Weds & Thurs. 3-5 p.m.

Turning Point Recovery Center. 489 N. Main

St., Barre. Safe & supportive place for individu- als/families in or seeking substance abuse recov- ery. Recovery coaching and other support pro- grams; recreational facilities (pool, ping pong, games). Open Mon.-Wed. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thurs.

10 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri. 10 a.m.-11 p.m., Sat. 6-11 p.m. Making Recovery Easier, Tuesdays at 6 p.m.; Wit’s End parent support group, Wednesdays at 6 p.m.; All Recovery support continued on next page

CENTRAL VERMONT’S BEST COUNTRY “One of the Best Regional Theaters LNT: Born 1977 in america” -
group Fridays at 6 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous: “Sane & Sober” group , Saturdays at 7:30 a.m.;

group Fridays at 6 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous: “Sane & Sober” group, Saturdays at 7:30 a.m.; “Living Sober” group, Sundays at 8:30 a.m. Narcotics Anonymous: “When Enough is Enough” group, Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. & Sundays at 5:30 p.m. Al-Anon: “Courage to Change” group, Saturdays at 5 p.m. (childcare provided). For help, or Info on special programs, call

479-7373.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter. National women bikers club. 2nd Wed. of month; info grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.

BERLIN - Drop-in Meditation Sitting Group. W/Sherry Rhynard. CVMC, conf. room #2, Thursdays, 6-7 p.m. sherry@ easeofflow.com or 272-2736.

Barre Tones Women’s A Capella Chorus. Capital City Grange 6612 Rt 12. Mondays, 6:30-9 p.m. www.barretonesvt.com 223-

2039.

Survivors of Suicide Loss Support. For family and friends who lost someone to suicide. CVMC, conf. room #1, 3rd Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m. Info. 223-0924.

Bereavement/Grief Support Group. CVHHH Conference Center, 600 Granger Rd. Open to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one. No fee. Group 1: 10-11:30 a.m. every other Wednesday starting May 10. Group 2: 6-7:30 p.m. every other Monday starting May 15. Info: Diana Moore at 802-223-1878

NAMI-VT Connection Recovery Support Group. Central Vermont Medical Center Boardroom, 130 Fisher Rd. Second Thursdays, 4:00 p.m. Free, 90-minute recovery support groups for people living with mental illness.

Cancer Support Group. With potluck. Second Wednesday of each month, 6 p.m. Info. 229-5931.

Living w/ Advanced or Metastatic Cancer: Lunch provided, 2nd Tuesday of month, noon-1 p.m. Writing to Enrich Your Life: For anyone touched by cancer, 3rd Tuesday of each month, noon-1 p.m. Both held at CVMC Cancer Center resource room. Info. 225-5449.

Borrowed Time Books Visit us at GRAKLES 162 N. Main St., Barre
Borrowed Time
Books
Visit us at GRAKLES
162 N. Main St., Barre
For Classified Advertising That Works Call 479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753
For
Classified
Advertising
That Works
Call 479-2582
or
1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont Rotary Club. Visitors & potential members welcome. Steakhouse Restaurant, Mondays, 6:15 p.m. 229-

0235.

Parkinsons Support Group. Woodbridge Nursing Home, 142 Woodridge Rd, third Thursdays, 10 a.m. Info. 439-5554.

Diabetes Support Program . CVMC, conf. rooms, first Thursday of month, 7-8 p.m., free. Info. 371-4152.

Civil Air Patrol. At the airport (blue hangar), Tuesdays, 6-8:30 p.m. Info at 229-5193.

Pregnancy & Newborn Loss Support Group. CVMC confer- ence room #3, 4th Monday of month, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 371-4304 or -4376.

Partners for Prevention-Alcohol & Drug Abuse Coalition.

CVH, 2nd Weds. of month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Info 479-

4250.

BEST DRIVE-THRU ANYWHERE! We're Open in Barre! Enjoy Our Large Sit-Down Café & Drive-Thru At Jiffy
BEST
DRIVE-THRU
ANYWHERE!
We're Open in Barre!
Enjoy Our Large Sit-Down Café
& Drive-Thru
At Jiffy Mart!
LOTS OF
SEATING
350
NO.
MAIN
BARRE
OPEN EVERYDAY 5AM to 10PM
Owned & Operated By The Quadros Family
BERLIN 622-0250 • Open 5am M-S, 6am Sun.
BARRE 479-0629 • Open 5am-10pm
MONT. 223-0928 • Open 5am M-S, 6am Sun.
LOTS OF
PARKING
SALE Take an extra 20% off clothing at Lenny’s Outlet store & 10% off footwear August
SALE
Take an extra
20% off clothing
at Lenny’s Outlet store
& 10% off
footwear
August 26-27 th
Sale Hours:
Saturday 9-6pm
Sunday 10-5pm
Outlet Store
54 North Main St, Barre • 802-476-9107
Cash & credit cards only. All sales final. Prices valid while supplies last.
BARRE
BARGAIN
BLAST
WEEKEND

Savvy Speakers Toastmasters Club. BC/BS conf. room, Industrial Ln., 1st & 3rd Tuesdays, 5:30-7 p.m. Info. (802) 476- 0908 or mlferguson2002@yahoo.com.

Birthing Center Open House. For parents, sibs, grandparents, etc. CVMC, 1st Wed. of month, 5:30-7 p.m. RSVP/Info. 371-

4613.

Knee/Hip Replacement Orientation Class. CVMC, conf.

room #3, free, 1st Thurs. of each month, 2-3 p.m. Info 371-

4188.

Breastfeeding Support Group. CVMC Garden Path Birthing Center, 1st Monday of month, 5:30-7 p.m. Info. 371-4415.

Infant & Child Car Seat Inspections. Berlin Fire Station, free, first Friday of month, 12-4 p.m. Appointments required, 371-

4198.

BETHEL - YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program starts Thursday, October 6, from 11 a.m. to noon at the United Church of Bethel on Church Street. People at risk for developing type-2 diabetes can take steps to reduce their risk and prevent diabetes. This free program offers education and support for 25 sessions throughout the year. Info/register: Megan at 802-728-7714.

BRADFORD - Rockinghorse Circle of Support. For young women with or w/o kids, childcare & transportation avail- able. Wednesdays, 1-2:30 p.m., Grace Methodist Church. Info 479-1086.

New Hope II Support Group. Grace United Methodist, every Mon., 7-9 p.m. Info. at 1-800-564-2106. continued on next page

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL TOMORROW WHAT YOU CAN SELL TODAY! 479-2582 Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753 ~
DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL TOMORROW
WHAT YOU CAN SELL TODAY!
479-2582
Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753 ~ Central Vermont’s Newspaper
403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641
Visit Us During Barre Blast For The Best Buys! OPEN EVERY DAY
Visit Us During
Barre Blast
For The Best Buys!
OPEN
EVERY DAY
Visit Us During Barre Blast For The Best Buys! OPEN EVERY DAY NelsonAceHardware.com 188 No. Main

NelsonAceHardware.com

188 No. Main St., Barre • 802-476-5700

Barre’s First Annual Bargain Blast Weekend will include an INDOOR FLEA MARKET, CITY-WIDE YARD SALE and
Barre’s First Annual Bargain Blast Weekend
will include an INDOOR FLEA MARKET,
CITY-WIDE YARD SALE and
MAIN STREET SIDEWALK SALE!
Saturday, 10AM-5PM
and
Sunday, 11AM-2PM
Saturday (Sunday optional)
MAIN STREET
SIDEWALK SALE
INDOOR
FLEA MARKET
150 Main St., Barre
Rent a 10’ x 8’ Booth
for Saturday and Sunday
for $25.00
Sign up by Friday Aug. 25
Contact Steve Restelli
at 802-310-6868
Merchants and vendors will line
Main Street with loads of bargains!
If you are a comunity-based
organization interested in
promoting your cause or selling a
product for a fundraiser,
contact Pierre Couture
at 802-279-2221
COMMUNITY WIDE YARD SALE
Saturday and Sunday
Pick up a map starting Friday at Noon from the Barre Rotary Club.
They will be located at 150 North Main Street in
the old Homer Fitts building.
All Funds Raised By This Event Will Be Used To Complete
The Monument Honoring Scouting In America!
ART EXHIBITS
ART EXHIBITS

BARRE - Studio Place Arts Exhibits. Exhibit dates: July 18 – August 24, 2017. Main floor gallery: Ten. This group show includes artwork inspired by the various objects described the old counting nursery rhyme, “One, two buckle my shoe,” counting to ten. Second floor gallery: Road Trip: Life through the Windshield by Aaron Stein; Assemblages and constructions. Third floor gal- lery: Trash Mounds by Grace Amber; Installations. Reception:

Thurs., July 20, 6-8 p.m.

Paletteers’ Summer Art Show 2017. Aldrich Public Library. July 22 through August 25, 2017.

Barre Opera House Lobby Gallery: A playful, cosmic art show, through August, features “Planetary Gods and Goddesses” by Astromythologist Kelley Hunter of Calais, from her recently pub- lished coloring book. Gallery is open weekdays, 9:00-4:30. Meet- and-Greet the Artist on Friday, August 11 from 2:30-4:30 p.m.

CHELSEA - Moving Paint, Moving Bodies, by Hannah Dennison. Chelsea Public Library. Through July and August. Pairs photographs of Dennison’s long career as a dance artist with paintings made during her 10-year hiatus from making site-specif- ic projects. She is interested in how the dance informed her paint- ings, and visa versa, how we learn through various modes of expression. Dennison is director of Cradle to Grave Arts and lives in the Chelsea area.

MONTPELIER - Sculpture Exhibit. Featuring contemporary sculpture created by Vermont artists. Vermont Arts Council Sculpture Garden, ongoing.

The Vermont Supreme Court Gallery presents “Bridging Worlds” Paintings by Hunter Eddy. 111 State St. July 12- September 29, 2017. Opening reception Wednesday, July 12 from 4-7 p.m.

The Vermont Governor’s Gallery presents “A Path Well Traveled” selected works by Ed Epstein and George Kurjanowicz. On exhibit July 6 – September 29. Opening reception Wednesday, July 12 from 4-7 p.m.

“Mixing Primaries” A Member Exhibit of the Art Resource Association. T.W. Wood Gallery, 46 Barre St. August 1 to September 8, 2017. Gallery hours are Tuesday-Saturday, noon to

  • 4 p.m. and by appointment. Opening reception Thursday, August

  • 3 from 5-7 p.m.

Annual Summer Juried show, works of 23 Vermont artists. T.W. Wood Gallery, 46 Barre St. Opens Tuesday, July 11.

“Connection: the Art of Coming Together”. Vermont Arts Council Spotlight Gallery. June 5-October 6. Presents a survey of contemporary Vermont art organized by artist networks rather than aesthetics or media. Open to the public and located in the corridor and conference room of the offices at 136 State St.

MORRISVILLE- 3rd Annual River Works Group Exhibit River Arts, 74 Pleasant St. August 24 - October 20. Reception Thursday, September 14, 5-7PM. A range of mediums and styles comprise this show celebrating water’s power to inspire artists. Exhibiting Artists: Robert Brunelle - Renee Greenlee - Phil Herbison - Jen Hubbard - Jean O’Conor - John Sargent - Kent Shaw - Rett Sturman - Homer Wells.

A Stitch in Time: 18th & 19th Century Textiles. August 24 - October 20. Reception Thursday, September 14, 5-7PM. River Arts and the Noyes House Museum have partnered together to present a collection of quilts, samplers and embroidery work cre- ated by women in the 18th and 19th century. Examining these works allow us to decipher and contextualize the untold stories of women’s lives in the past.

PLAINFIELD - Goddard College presents Social Justice in

Race, Gender, Immigration, and the Environment. On exhibit in the Art Gallery on the main floor of the Pratt Center. Through October 9, 2017 with an Opening Reception on August 3 from 5-7 p.m. Open Mon-Fri, 9-4.

RANDOLPH - Chandler Gallery presents Scale: Models to

Monuments. June 24 through September 2. The show will consist of scale models or maquettes of pieces that have been made into public art by contemporary artists from Vermont and beyond.

ART EXHIBITS BARRE - Studio Place Arts Exhibits . Exhibit dates: July 18 – August 24,

BROOKFIELD - MOPS - Mothers of Preschoolers. Moms of kids birth through kindergarten welcome. Meal & childcare provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fridays, 6 p.m. 276-3022.

Health-focused Group. Learn to cope w/ life’s passages. Weds, 7-8 p.m.; Info 276-3142; Dr. Alice Kempe.

Brookfield Community Singers Rehearsals. Pond Village Church. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Four-part choral group rehearses Wednesdays for June concert. If interested in joining, e-mail Director Kathy Rotondi, at kmrr1@yahoo.com.

CABOT - Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Monday after- noons, call 279-2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fridays 3-5:30 p.m. All at Cabot Library, 563-2721.

CALAIS - Men’s and Women’s Bible Study Groups. County Road, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. 485-7577 or www.thefishermenmin- istry.org.

CHELSEA - Story Time. Songs, stories & crafts for children birth to 5 years. Chelsea Public Library, Wednesdays, 1:15 p.m.

685-2188.

TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly. Nonprofit support grp. United Church of Chelsea, North Common, Wednesdays, 5:45 p.m. 685-

2271/685-4429.

Gifford’s Chronic Conditions Support Group. Join a discussion and educational group for people with chronic illnesses on Fridays 8:30-11 a.m. at the Chelsea Senior Center (in the United Church of Chelsea, 13 North Common. Free. Info/register: Megan at 802-728-7714.

Chelsea Historical Society House/Museum . Open 3rd Saturdays May-October, FREE, 10 a.m.-noon. 685-4447.

EAST BARRE - Story Hour. Aldrich Library York Branch, Tuesdays, ages 0-3 10 a.m., ages 3-5 10:30 a.m. Info. 476-5118.

EAST HARDWICK - Touch of Grace Assembly of God

Church, corner Rts. 15 &16, Pastor Matt Preston, 472-5550. Sunday a.m. worship 10:00 (incl. 11:20 children’s church); adult Sunday School 9:00 (Sep. thru June). Tue. evening Bible study

(call for info). Wed. youth group: 5:00 dinner, 6:00 activity.

EAST MONTPELIER - Crossroads Christian Church. Men’s Ministry: For Men Only group. Monday nights 7-9 p.m. Men’s Breakfast, 2nd Sat., 8 a.m. 272-7185. Sunday Service 9:30-11 a.m. Pastor Thorsten Evans 476-8536. Church Office hours Tues & Fri 9 a.m. to noon. 476-4843

C onnections oncert Always ... Patsy Cline Thu, Aug 24 - Sun, Sep 10 The Grange

Connections

oncert

Always

...

Patsy Cline

Thu, Aug 24 - Sun, Sep 10 The Grange Theatre at Artistree - Pomfret, VT

Stowe Wine & Food Classic

Sun, Aug 27, 1:00pm Topnotch Resort Mountain View Pavilion - Stowe, VT

Prydein | FREE SHOW

Sun, Aug 27, 4:00pm Dog Mountain - St. Johnsbury, VT

John Mellencamp

 

Fri, Sep 1, 7:00pm Champlain Valley Expo Coca- Cola Grand Stand - Essex Junction, VT

Madaila on Main 2.0

Sat, Sep 2, 12:00pm Nectar’s - Burlington, VT

Matuto | FREE SHOW

Sun, Sep 3, 4:00pm Dog Mountain - St. Johnsbury

The Lao Tizer Band | FREE SHOW

Sun, Sep 10, 4:00pm Dog Mountain - St. Johnsbury, VT

Godspell

 

Thu, Sep 14 - Sun, Oct 1 The Grange Theatre at Artistree - Pomfret, VT

Grace Potter’s Grand Point North

Sat, Sep 16 - Sun, Sep 17 Waterfront Park - Burlington, VT

The High and Mighty Brass Band | FREE SHOW

Sun, Sep 17, 4:00pm Dog Mountain - St. Johnsbury, VT

Gogol Bordello

Sat, Sep 23, 8:00pm Higher Ground Ballroom -

South Burlington, VT

The Head and The Heart

Sun, Sep 24, 8:00pm Shelburne Museum -

Shelburne, VT

Stephen Stills & Judy Collins

Thu, Sep 28, 7:30pm Lebanon Opera House -

Lebanon, NH

The Marvelous Wonderettes

Thu, Oct 5 - Sun, Oct 22 The Grange Theatre at

Artistree - Pomfret, VT

CHaD Hero Half Marathon

Sun, Oct 22, 12:00am Dartmouth Green - Hanover

Shout Out Louds

Sun, Nov 5, 8:00pm Higher Ground - S Burlington

Shawn Colvin

Sat, Nov 11, 4:00pm Lebanon Opera House

Carbon Leaf

Sat, Nov 11, 8:00pm Higher Ground Ballroom - South Burlington, VT

For venue phone numbers, call

The Point at 223-2396 9:00 to 5:00

Mon.-Fri., or visit our web site at pointfm.com

Twin Valley Senior Center. 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds., Fri., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sign up for Meal-on-Wheels Program or join us for an On-site meal at 12:15 p.m. Seniors/$5, under 60/$6. Nobody turned away. Free bus service for seniors & disabled in six towns served. Many classes offered from bone strengthening to art. Donations welcomed. Info: 802-223-3322 or email info. twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.net

Bone Builders Classes: Osteoporosis exercise and prevention class at Twin Valley Senior Center every Monday, Wednesday and Friday starting at 7:30 a.m. Extra 9 a.m. class on Monday and Wednesday. All ages welcome. Free of charge. Donations wel- comed.

Tai Chi Classes: Advanced Class Mondays and Fridays 1-2 p.m. Beginner Class Tuesdays and Thursdays 10-11 a.m. All ages wel- come. Free of charge.

Death Cafe. 1st Friday of the month 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. Discussions of events past, present, and future. All are welcome and discussions are confidential.

GROTON - YA Book Club: 3rd Mondays, 6:30 p.m.; Book Discussion Group: 4th Mondays, 7 p.m.; Crafts & Conversation, Wednesdays, 1-3 p.m. Round Robin Storytime, for kids age 0-5 & their caregivers: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. All at Groton Public Library, 584-3358.

HARDWICK - Caregiver Support Group. Agency on Aging, rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs of month. 229-0308

x306.

Peace and Justice Coalition. G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old fire- house), Tues., 7 p.m. Info. Robin 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs., 6-8:30 p.m. Registration/info 472-5229.

MARSHFIELD - Playgroup. Twinfield Preschool, Mondays, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (except when school not in session).

Jaquith Public Library Activities. Old Schoolhouse Common, 426-3581. Story & Play Group, Wednesdays, 10-11:30 a.m. Book Group for Adults, stop by for copy of the book, 4th Mondays, 7 p.m.

MIDDLESEX - Food Shelf. United Methodist Church, Saturdays, 9-10:30 a.m.

MONTPELIER - Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes. Intermediate Level Reading for Adults: Thurs. 9-10 a.m.; Learning English: Tues. or Weds. 9-10 a.m.; English

Conversation: Tues. 4-5 p.m. Montpelier Learning Center, 100

State St. Info/register 223-3403.

Ballroom Dance Classes. Union Elementary School, Six-week sessions, Tuesdays April 25-May 30, 6-7 p.m. Waltz and Foxtrot (three weeks of each). 7-8 p.m. Rumba and Swing (three weeks of each). Singles welcome, no experience necessary. Register: call Montpelier Rec. Dept. 225-8699

Sunday School. For children (up to 20) to study the Bible and teachings of Jesus. Christian Science Church, 145 State St., Sundays, 10:30 a.m.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup. North Branch Nature Center. Mondays 9:30-11:30 a.m. March 13-June 5. Fee: By donation. Outdoor playgroup for parents, caregivers, and children ages 0 - 5.

continued on next page

 

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

Wednesday

6

PM Barre Congregational Church

4:30 PM Rice TV Mass

Community Bulletin Board 1a

7:30 PM Lutheran

5

PM Calvary Life

9

PM Calvary Life

6

PM Washington Baptist Church

Barre City Council 9a,12p,3p Democracy Now 6p Williamstown Select 7p, 10p Thursday Community Bulletin Board 1a

10

PM Rice TV Mass

Sunday

Community Bulletin Board 1a

2

AM Barre Congregational Church

3:30 AM St. Monica’s Mass

4:30 AM Washington Baptist Church

7

8

PM Faith Community Church

PM Barre Congregational Church

9:30 PM Lutheran

Williamstown Select 6a, 9a, 12p

10

PM St. Monica’s Mass

Democracy Now 6p

11

PM Calvary Life

Barre Supervisory Union 3p,7p,10p Friday

6:30 AM Barre Congregational Church

Monday Community Bulletin Board 1a

Community Bulletin Board 1a

8

AM Calvary Life

Statehouse Programming 6a,9a,12p

Barre Supervisory Union 6a,9a,12p Democracy Now 6p Barre Town Select 3p,7p,10p Saturday

9

10

11

AM Washington Baptist Church

AM 1st Presbyterian Church

AM Barre Congregational

Church

Democracy Now 6p

Barre Act 46 3, 7, 10p

Tuesday

Community Bulletin Board 1a

12:30 PM Rice TV Mass

Barre Act 46 6a,9a,12p

Barre Town Select 6a, 9a, 12p

1

PM St. Monica’s Mass

Statehouse Programming 3-5pm

4

PM Washington Baptist Church

2

PM Barre Congregational Church

Democracy Now 6p

5

PM 1st Presbyterian Church

3:30 PM Washington Baptist

Barre City Council “Live” 7pm

 

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

 

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

 
Channel 192 “All schedules are subject to change, please call us with questions - 479-1075.” BARRE,
Channel 192
“All schedules are subject to
change, please call us
with questions - 479-1075.”
BARRE, VT
CVTV

Wednesday

 

Opening

1:00 AM

The Artful Word

4:30 PM

Holiday Fun

1:30 AM

Hendersons Herb Tinctures

5:00 PM

Ghost Chronicles

3:00 AM

Health Talk

6:00 PM

13 Most Haunted - MA

3:30 AM

New England Music Awards

6:30 PM

Understanding PTSD

5:30 AM

The Better Part

8:00 PM

Hunger Mountain Co-op

6:00 AM

The Better Part

10:30 PM Issues of Aging

6:30 AM

CVTSport.net

Saturday

8:00 AM

Poetry Outloud - live broad-

2:30 AM

Moose & Bears in NH

cast

4:00 AM

Burlington Bookfest Preview

4:00 PM

The Better Part

4:30 AM

Sustainable Living Series

4:30 PM

The Better Part

6:00 AM

Floor Hockey

5:00 PM

CVTSport.net

7:00 AM

Upper Valley Humane Society

6:32 PM

1st Wednesdays

7:30 AM

SlowLiving

8:00 PM

30 Minutes with Bill Schmick

9:00 AM

Montpelier Brown Bag Series

8:30 PM

Conversations with Kay

12:00 PM Moose & Bears in NH

9:00 PM

Vermont Historical Society

1:30 PM

Burlington Bookfest Preview

10:00 PM The Artful Word

2:00 PM

Sustainable Living Series

10:30 PM Hendersons Herb Tinctures

3:30 PM

Floor Hockey

Thursday

4:30 PM

Upper Valley Humane Society

2:00 AM

The State of Marriage

5:00 PM

SlowLiving

3:00 AM

Yestermorrow Lecture Series

6:30 PM

Montpelier Brown Bag Series

4:00 AM

Taste for Life

9:30 PM

Moose & Bears in NH

4:30 AM

On the Waterfront

11:00 PM Burlington Bookfest Preview

5:00 AM

2015 Cornish Fair

11:30 PM Sustainable Living Series

5:30 AM

Salaam/Shalom

Sunday

6:30

AM

Yoga To Go

1:30 AM

Lego Chat

7:30 AM

RagFest Concerts

2:00 AM

Community Producers

8:30 AM

Judge Ben

2:30 AM

Talking About Movies

9:30 AM

Ethan Allen Homestead

3:00 AM

Vaccine Mandates

10:30 AM It’s News to Us

3:30 AM

Ghost Chronicles

11:30 AM

The Y Connection

4:30 AM

Gory Storytime

12:00 PM

Vermont Today

5:00 AM

Green Mountain Vets for

1:30 PM

The State of Marriage

Peace

2:30 PM

Yestermorrow Lecture Series

6:00 AM

Holistically Speaking

3:30 PM

Taste for Life

6:30 AM

Mountain Man Adventures

4:00 PM

On the Waterfront

7:00 AM

Cuban Bridge

4:30 PM

2015 Cornish Fair

8:31 AM

Car Stories

5:00 PM

Salaam/Shalom

9:00 AM

Health Talk

6:00

PM

Yoga To Go

9:30 AM

Ethan Allen Homestead

7:00 PM

RagFest Concerts

10:30 AM Ragtime - All Tha Jazz

8:00 PM

Judge Ben

11:30 AM Talking About Movies

9:00 PM

Ethan Allen Homestead

12:30 PM Lifelines

10:00 PM It’s News to Us

1:00 PM

For the Animals

11:00 PM

The Y Connection

1:30 PM

Authors at the Aldrich

11:30 PM

Vermont Today

2:30 PM

CVTSport.net

Friday

4:02 PM

Truck Pull 2015

1:00 AM

Green Mountain Care Board

5:00 PM

Cuban Bridge

2:30 AM

Twin St vs Granite St Derby

6:00 PM

Conversations with Kay

4:00 AM

WRJ Vet Center Grand

6:30 PM

Vermont Historical Society

Opening

7:30 PM

It’s News to Us

5:00 AM

Holiday Fun

8:30 PM

The Y Connection

5:30 AM

Ghost Chronicles

9:00 PM

Vermont Today

6:30 AM

13 Most Haunted - MA

10:30 PM The State of Marriage

7:00 AM

Understanding PTSD

11:30 PM Yestermorrow Lecture Series

8:30 AM

Hunger Mountain Co-op

Monday

11:00 AM Issues of Aging

2:00 AM

Ethan Allen Homestead

12:30 PM Green Mountain Care Board

3:30 AM

Will the Constitution

3:00 PM

High on the Hog

4:30 AM

Lego Chat

3:30 PM

WRJ Vet Center Grand

5:00 AM

Community Producers

5:30 AM

Talking About Movies

6:00 AM

City Room with Steven

6:30 AM

Pappas Ghost Chronicles

7:30 AM

Gory Storytime

8:00 AM

Sidewalks Entertainment

8:30 AM

Energy Conservation

10:00 AM Ethan Allen Homestead

11:30 AM Will the Constitution 12:30 PM Lego Chat

1:00 PM

Community Producers

1:30 PM

Talking About Movies

2:00 PM

City Room with Steven

2:30 PM

Pappas Ghost Chronicles

3:30 PM

Gory Storytime

4:00 PM

Sidewalks Entertainment

4:30 PM

Energy Conservation

6:00 PM

Ethan Allen Homestead

7:30 PM

Will the Constitution

8:30 PM

Lego Chat

9:00 PM

Community Producers

9:30 PM

Talking About Movies

10:00 PM City Room with Steven

Pappas 10:30 PM Ghost Chronicles 11:30 PM Gory Storytime Tuesday

3:00 AM

Ethan Allen Homestead

4:00 AM

Ragtime - All Tha Jazz

5:00 AM

Talking About Movies

6:00 AM

Lifelines

6:30 AM

For the Animals

7:00 AM

Authors at the Aldrich

8:00 AM

Sidewalks Entertainment

8:30 AM

Green Mountain Vets for

9:30 AM

Peace Holistically Speaking

10:00 AM Mountain Man Adventures

10:30 AM Cuban Bridge 11:00 AM Hometown Storytellers

12:00 PM Car Stories

12:30 PM

Health Talk

1:00 PM

Ethan Allen Homestead

2:00 PM

Ragtime - All Tha Jazz

3:00 PM

Talking About Movies

4:00 PM

Lifelines

4:30 PM

For the Animals

5:00 PM

Authors at the Aldrich

6:00 PM

Sidewalks Entertainment

6:30 PM

Green Mountain Vets for

7:30 PM

Peace Holistically Speaking

8:00 PM

Mountain Man Adventures

8:30 PM

Cuban Bridge

9:00 PM

Hometown Storytellers

10:00 PM Car Stories

10:30 PM

Health Talk

11:00 PM Talking About Movies

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17

• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

ORCA Media Channel 15