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Record: 1
Title:
A case study of parentchild interaction therapy for the treatment of autism
spectrum disorder.
Authors:
Agazzi, Heather. College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa,
FL, US, hcurtiss@health.usf.edu
Tan, Robin. University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, US
Tan, Sim Yin. University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, US
Address:
Agazzi, Heather, Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida, 13101
N. Bruce B. Downs Blvd., CMS 1057, Tampa, FL, US, 33612,
hcurtiss@health.usf.edu
Source:
Clinical Case Studies, Vol 12(6), Dec, 2013. pp. 428-442.
Page Count:
15
Publisher:
US : Sage Publications
ISSN:
1534-6501 (Print)
1552-3802 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
parent child interaction therapy, autism spectrum disorder, comorbid
disruptive behavior
Abstract:
Comorbid disruptive behavior disorders occur in up to 80% of children with
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Children with ASD often present as
inattentive, noncompliant, and aggressive, making it difficult for them to
engage in learning and social activities across settings. Parents and school staff
report spending excessive time managing disruptive behaviors at the expense
of engaging these children in meaningful skill development. Identifying
effective interventions to decrease disruptive behaviors and increase positive
skill development is of critical importance to improving outcomes for children
with ASD. This case study presents the effectiveness of ParentChild
Interaction Therapy, an evidence-based intervention for young children with
disruptive behavior, for addressing behavioral problems in a 7-year-old boy
with ASD. Results suggested improvements in child compliance and decrease
in disruptive behaviors. Further, parents increased their use of positive
parenting strategies, including giving effective commands all of which serve
to improve the parentchild relationship. Treatment implications for working
with young children with ASD are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c)
2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Autism Spectrum Disorders; *Behavior Problems; *Comorbidity; *Family
Therapy; *Parent Child Relations
PsycINFO Classification:
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
School Age (6-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Sutter-Eyberg School Behavior Inventory
Dyadic ParentChild Interaction Coding System
Adaptive Behavior Assessment SystemSecond Edition
Sleep Disorders Inventory for StudentsChildren
Childhood Autism Rating ScaleSecond Edition
DSM-Oriented Scales for Boys 6-11 years
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist
Teacher Report Form
Methodology:
Clinical Case Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Release Date:
20140120
Correction Date:
20151207
Copyright:
The Author(s). 2013
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534650113500067
Accession Number:
2013-37890-003
Number of Citations in Source:
41
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 2
Title:
A case study of parentchild interaction therapy: Flexible client-centered
adaptation of an EST.
Authors:
Gordon, Haley M.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,
Blacksburg, VA, US, hgordon2@vt.edu
Cooper, Lee D.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,
Blacksburg, VA, US
Address:
Gordon, Haley M., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 109
Williams Hall, Blacksburg, VA, US, 24061, hgordon2@vt.edu
Source:
Clinical Case Studies, Vol 15(2), Apr, 2016. pp. 126-142.
Page Count:
17
Publisher:
US : Sage Publications
ISSN:
1534-6501 (Print)
1552-3802 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
parentchild interaction therapy, adaptations, clinical flexibility, in-home
therapy
Abstract:
The authors present a case study of 'Katie,' a 4-year-old girl diagnosed with
oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Treatment was conducted with Katie and
her family using ParentChild Interaction Therapy (PCIT). However, client-
centered adaptations were made to improve the feasibility of the treatment and
its ecological validity in a community setting. Katie demonstrated marked
reduction in ODD symptoms during treatment and no longer met criteria for
ODD at discharge and throughout follow-up periods. A hybrid model was
utilized whereby PCIT components were delivered in both clinic and in-home
settings. Client-centered adaptations and the benefits of treatment in the in-
home setting are discussed. The authors contend that use of appropriate client-
centered clinical flexibility, when implementing a manualized, empirically
supported, and evidence-based treatment, can assist in bridging the 'science
practice gap' allowing for appropriate flexibility and individualization, while
also promoting the use of empirically supported and validated treatment
approaches. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Family Therapy; *Oppositional Defiant Disorder; *Parent Child
Communication; *Psychotherapy
PsycINFO Classification:
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Female
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
Tests & Measures:
Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist-Preschool Version
Youth Outcome Questionnaire
Anxiety Disorders Interview ScheduleParent Version
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale DOI: 10.1037/t12048-000
Methodology:
Clinical Case Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Release Date:
20160704
Copyright:
The Author(s). 2015
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534650115603819
Accession Number:
2016-10446-003
Number of Citations in Source:
43
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 3
Title:
A motivational interviewing intervention to target at-risk parents for non-
adherence to Parent-Child Interaction Therapy.
Authors:
Pleickhardt, Heather. Hofstra U., US
Source:
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering,
Vol 76(1-B)(E), 2015.
Publisher:
US : ProQuest Information & Learning
Other Journal Titles:
Dissertation Abstracts International
ISSN:
0419-4217 (Print)
ISBN:
978-1-321-13974-7
Language:
English
Keywords:
homework completion, comparison participants, treatment adherence, parent-
child interaction therapy
Abstract:
Despite the breadth of available evidence-based psychotherapies, a common
threat to patient goal attainment is often a lack of treatment adherence and
retention (Levensky & O'Donohue, 2006). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy
(PCIT) is an evidence-based treatment for children ages 2-7 with Disruptive
Behavior Disorders that is highly dependent on parent commitment to
following all aspects of the treatment plan, including daily PCIT homework
assignments, punctual attendance, and participation in treatment sessions
where parents are being guided by in vivo coaching. PCIT researchers have
reported the need for research that applies an intervention to target and resolve
parent non-adherence and attrition issues for this particular therapy (Lanier et
al., 2011; McNeil & Kigin, 2010; Fernandez & Eyberg, 2009). The current
study was designed to increase parent adherence to PCIT as defined by
therapy homework completion, arriving to session punctually, and achieving
Child Directed Interaction and Parent Directed Interaction skills mastery. Two
Motivational Interviewing sessions were conducted with the parent(s) between
regularly scheduled PCIT sessions without compromising treatment fidelity,
and built on current PCIT solutions to treatment non-adherence. The
implementation of Motivational Interviewing techniques have been found to
increase parent treatment adherence and retention and facilitate successful
treatment outcomes in a variety of child treatments including PCIT for child
welfare clients (Nock & Kazkin, 2005; Sterrett et al., 2010; Chaffin et al.,
2009). Six parents who participated in the current study received PCIT with
Motivational Interviewing. Five parents were comparison participants in the
current study and received PCIT as usual. Based on results of the current
study, there was minimal support for the effectiveness of Motivational
Interviewing on decreasing participant lateness to session. There was moderate
support that Motivational Interviewing was effective in increasing PCIT
homework completion, but the immediate increase in homework completion
was not sustained across phases. Lastly, participants who received
Motivational Interviewing did not reach mastery of Child Directed Interaction
or Parent Directed Interaction skills in fewer sessions than the comparison
participants. Interpretations of the results, strengths, limitations, and
implications for future research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c)
2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Dissertation
Dissertation Details:
UMI Order Number: AAI3633843
OpenURL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-
2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_da
t=xri:pqdiss:3633843
Subjects:
*Intervention; *Motivational Interviewing; *Psychotherapy; *Treatment
Compliance; *Treatment Outcomes; Coaching
PsycINFO Classification:
General Psychology (2100)
Developmental Psychology (2800)
Population:
Human
Age Group:
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Interview; Qualitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Dissertation Abstract
Release Date:
20150727
Accession Number:
2015-99140-299
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 4
Title:
Adapting parent-child interaction therapy to treat anxiety disorders in young
children.
Authors:
Puliafico, Anthony C.. Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New
York, US, PuliafiA@nyspi.columbia.edu
Comer, Jonathan S.. Department of Psychology, Boston University, Center for
Anxiety and Related Disorders, Boston, MA, US
Pincus, Donna B.. Department of Psychology, Boston University, Center for
Anxiety and Related Disorders, Boston, MA, US
Address:
Puliafico, Anthony C., Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, 1051
Riverside Drive Unit 74, New York, NY, US, 10032,
PuliafiA@nyspi.columbia.edu
Source:
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Vol 21(3), Jul,
2012. pp. 607-619.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am
Page Count:
13
Publisher:
Netherlands : Elsevier Science
ISSN:
1056-4993 (Print)
Language:
English
Keywords:
anxiety disorders, parent child interaction therapy, developmental skills,
cognitive behavior treatment
Abstract:
Anxiety disorders are prevalent in children 7 years and younger; however,
these children generally do not possess developmental skills required in
cognitive behavior treatment. Recent efforts have adapted parent-child
interaction therapy (PCIT), originally developed for disruptive and
noncompliant behavior, for young children with anxiety. This article reviews
the principles underlying PCIT and the rationale for adapting it to target
anxiety symptoms. The authors describe two related treatment approaches that
have modified PCIT to treat anxiety: (1) Pincus and colleagues treatment for
separation anxiety, and (2) Puliafico, Comer, and Albanos CALM Program
for the range of early child anxiety disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c)
2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Anxiety Disorders; *Cognitive Behavior Therapy; *Family Therapy; *Parent
Child Communication; *Parent Child Relations; Developmental
Stages; Parents
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):
Anxiety Disorders; Anxiety, Separation; Child; Child, Preschool; Early
Intervention (Education); Family Therapy; Fear; Humans; Parent-Child
Relations; Parenting; Parents
PsycINFO Classification:
Neuroses & Anxiety Disorders (3215)
Psychotherapy & Psychotherapeutic Counseling (3310)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Child Version
Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Parent Version
Grant Sponsorship:
Sponsor: Mental Health Initiative (MINT)
Other Details: Foundation grant
Recipients: Comer, Jonathan S.

Sponsor: National Institutes of Health


Grant Number: T32 MH016434
Other Details: T-32 Award
Recipients: Comer, Jonathan S.

Sponsor: National Institutes of Health, US


Grant Number: K23 MH090247
Other Details: K23 award
Recipients: Comer, Jonathan S.

Sponsor: National Institute of Mental Health, US


Grant Number: K-23- MH64717
Other Details: K-23 award
Recipients: Pincus, Donna B.
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Followup Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Release Date:
20120827
Copyright:
All rights reserved.. Elsevier Inc.. 2012
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chc.2012.05.005
PMID:
22800997
Accession Number:
2012-18948-013
Number of Citations in Source:
46
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 5
Title:
Adapting parentchild interaction therapy to treat severe conduct problems
with callous-unemotional traits: A case study.
Authors:
Kimonis, Eva R.. Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute,
Department of Mental Health Law and Policy, University of South Florida,
Tampa, FL, US, ekimonis@usf.edu
Armstrong, Kathleen. University of South Florida, Health's Department of
Pediatrics, Tampa, FL, US
Address:
Kimonis, Eva R., Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, Mental
Health Law and Policy, University of South Florida, 13301 Bruce B. Downs
Blvd. MHC 2639, Tampa, FL, US, 33612, ekimonis@usf.edu
Source:
Clinical Case Studies, Vol 11(3), Jun, 2012. pp. 234-252.
Page Count:
19
Publisher:
US : Sage Publications
ISSN:
1534-6501 (Print)
1552-3802 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
callous-unemotional traits, conduct problems, parent training, ParentChild
Interaction Therapy, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
Abstract:
Children with conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits (i.e., lack of
empathy, guilt, and lack of caring behaviors)(CP + CU) show poor response to
empirically supported interventions for treating disruptive behaviors. Children
with CP + CU are specifically less responsive to discipline components of
parent training, although they respond well to reward-based behavioral
strategies. This case study presents the treatment of a 5-year-old boy with
severe disruptive behavior (CP, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder) and
pronounced CU traits using ParentChild Interaction Therapy, followed by the
delivery of an adjunctive token economy system. Interventions that treat
children with CP + CU are critically needed and have the potential for
significant societal impact given the stability of their traits and severe
behavioral outcomes. Findings from this case report (a) document an
improvement in CP that was maintained to follow-up and (b) provide
preliminary support for adapting parent-training interventions to modify
severe CP in young children with CU traits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c)
2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Behavior Problems; *Conduct Disorder; *Family
Therapy; *Intervention; *Parent Training; Parent Child Relations
PsycINFO Classification:
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
US
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Behavioral Assessment System for ChildrenSecond Edition
Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning
Eyberg Child Behavior InventoryIntensity Scale
Eyberg Child Behavior InventoryProblem Scale
Dyadic ParentChild Interaction Coding System-II
Stanford-Binet Intelligence ScaleFifth EditionFluid Reasoning Subscale
Stanford-Binet Intelligence ScalesFifth EditionKnowledge Subscale
Stanford-Binet Intelligence ScalesFifth EditionQuantitative Reasoning
Subscale
Stanford-Binet Intelligence ScalesFifth EditionVisual-Spatial Processing
Subscale
Stanford-Binet Intelligence ScalesFifth EditionWorking Memory Subscale
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Antisocial Process Screening Device DOI: 10.1037/t00032-000
Methodology:
Clinical Case Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Release Date:
20120820
Correction Date:
20130909
Copyright:
The Author(s). 2012
Accession Number:
2012-16925-005
Number of Citations in Source:
98
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 6
Title:
An evaluation of ParentChild Interaction Therapy with and without
motivational enhancement to reduce attrition.
Authors:
Webb, Haley J.. School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University,
Southport, QLD, Australia, haley.webb@griffithuni.edu.au
Thomas, Rae, ORCID 0000-0002-2165-5917. Centre for Research in
Evidence-Based Practice, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond
University, QLD, Australia
McGregor, Leanne. School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University,
Southport, QLD, Australia
Avdagic, Elbina. School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University,
Southport, QLD, Australia
Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.. School of Applied Psychology, Griffith
University, Southport, QLD, Australia
Address:
Webb, Haley J., School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Parklands
Drive, Southport, QLD, Australia, 4222, haley.webb@griffithuni.edu.au
Source:
Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Vol 46(4), Jul, 2017. pp.
537-550.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol
Page Count:
14
Publisher:
United Kingdom : Taylor & Francis
Other Journal Titles:
Journal of Clinical Child Psychology
Other Publishers:
US : Lawrence Erlbaum
ISSN:
1537-4416 (Print)
1537-4424 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
parent child interaction therapy, motivational enhancement, attrition,
evidence-based intervention, caregivers
Abstract:
Although many interventions for child externalizing behavior report promising
outcomes for families, high attrition prior to program completion remains a
problem. Many programs report dropout rates of 50% or higher. In this trial
we sought to reduce attrition and improve outcomes by augmenting a well-
known evidence-based intervention, ParentChild Interaction Therapy (PCIT),
with a 3-session individual motivational enhancement component. Participants
were 192 Australian caregivers (91.7% female; Mage = 34.4 years) and their
children (33.3% female; Mage = 4.4 years). Families (51% referred from child
welfare or health services for risk of maltreatment) were assigned to PCIT or a
supported waitlist, with families assigned to PCIT receiving either standard
PCIT (S/PCIT) or motivation-enhanced PCIT (M/PCIT), depending on their
time of entry to the study. Waitlist families received phone calls every week
for 12 weeks. Parents in M/PCIT reported more readiness to change their
behavior from preassessment to after the motivation sessions. Also, parents
who reported high, rather than low, motivation at preassessment did have a
lower attrition rate, and there was some evidence that enhancing motivation
was protective of premature attrition to the extent that caregivers achieved a
high degree of change in motivation. Yet comparison of attrition rates and
survival analyses revealed no difference between M/PCIT and S/PCIT in
retention rate. Finally, there were greater reductions in externalizing and
internalizing child behavior problems and parental stress among families in
S/PCIT and M/PCIT compared with waitlist, and there was generally no
significant difference between the two treatment conditions. (PsycINFO
Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Family Therapy; *Parent Child Communication; *Student
Attrition; *Treatment Effectiveness Evaluation; Evidence Based
Practice; Motivational Interviewing
PsycINFO Classification:
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
Australia
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
School Age (6-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist-Parent Report Version
Parenting Stress Inventory, Third Edition
Readiness for Parenting Change Scale
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Grant Sponsorship:
Sponsor: Queensland Department of Communities, Child Safety and
Disability Services, Australia
Other Details: Future Directions Prevention and Early Intervention Trials,
Family Interaction Program
Recipients: No recipient indicated
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Interview; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Release Date:
20170724
Copyright:
Society of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology.
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2016.1247357
PMID:
27929661
Accession Number:
2017-29236-005
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 7
Title:
Assessing the effectiveness of parentchild interaction therapy with language
delayed children: A clinical investigation.
Authors:
Falkus, Gila; Tilley, Ciara; Thomas, Catherine; Hockey, Hannah; Kennedy,
Anna; Arnold, Tina; Thorburn, Blair; Jones, Katie; Patel, Bhavika; Pimenta,
Claire; Shah, Rena; Tweedie, Fiona; OBrien, Felicity; Leahy, Ruth; Pring,
Tim
Affiliation:
Central London Community Health Care Trust, UK
Central London Community Health Care Trust, UK; City University London,
UK
City University London, UK
Source:
Child Language Teaching & Therapy (CHILD LANG TEACH THER),
Feb2016; 32(1): 7-17. (11p)
Publication Type:
Article
Language:
English
Major Subjects:
Parent-Child Relations
Speech Therapy -- In Infancy and Childhood
Language Development
Language Therapy -- In Infancy and Childhood
Treatment Outcomes -- Evaluation
Language Disorders -- Therapy -- In Infancy and Childhood
Minor Subjects:
Clinical Research; Human; Adult; Child; United Kingdom; Speech-Language
Pathologists; Parental Attitudes -- Evaluation; Child, Preschool; Convenience
Sample; Male; Female; Scales; Videorecording; Communication Skills --
Evaluation; Parametric Statistics; Pretest-Posttest Design
Abstract:
Parentchild interaction therapy (PCIT) is widely used by speech and
language therapists to improve the interactions between children with delayed
language development and their parents/carers. Despite favourable reports of
the therapy from clinicians, little evidence of its effectiveness is available. We
investigated the effects of PCIT as practised by clinicians within a clinical
setting. Eighteen consecutive children referred for speech and language
therapy because of their delayed language were entered in the study. A within-
participants design was used, and the procedure was similar to that used
clinically. Blind assessments were conducted twice before therapy to monitor
change without therapy and once after completing PCIT. Significant changes
in a parent rating scale, the childrens mean length of utterance and the ratio of
time of child to parent speech were found after the therapy. No changes were
detected prior to therapy. The similarity of the design to clinical practice and
the use of several clinicians suggest that the findings can be generalized to
other settings and clinicians. These findings are a first step in evaluating PCIT;
we now need to show that parents can maintain their newly acquired skills in
interaction, and that this benefits their childrens communication.
Journal Subset:
Allied Health; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed;
Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland
Special Interest:
Pediatric Care
Instrumentation:
Pre School Language Scale (PLS4)(Zimmerman et al)
ISSN:
0265-6590
MEDLINE Info:
NLM UID: 9883700
Entry Date:
20160210
Revision Date:
20160615
DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0265659015574918
Accession Number:
112748106
Database:
CINAHL Complete

Record: 8
Title:
Assessing the effectiveness of parentchild interaction therapy with language
delayed children: A clinical investigation.
Authors:
Falkus, Gila1
Tilley, Ciara1
Thomas, Catherine1
Hockey, Hannah2
Kennedy, Anna1
Arnold, Tina1
Thorburn, Blair1
Jones, Katie1
Patel, Bhavika1
Pimenta, Claire1
Shah, Rena1
Tweedie, Fiona1
OBrien, Felicity1
Leahy, Ruth1
Pring, Tim3 t.r.pring@city.ac.uk
Source:
Child Language Teaching & Therapy. Feb2016, Vol. 32 Issue 1, p7-17. 11p. 4
Charts.
Document Type:
Article
Subject Terms:
*Communicative competence
*Language acquisition
*Speech therapists
*Speech therapy
*Video recording
Children
Adults
Treatment of language disorders
Clinical medicine research
Mathematical statistics
Parent & child
Sampling (Statistics)
Parameters (Statistics)
Treatment effectiveness
Pre-tests & post-tests
Parent attitudes
Evaluation
Geographic Terms:
Great Britain
Author-Supplied Keywords:
children
interaction
intervention
language delay
parents
NAICS/Industry Codes:
541910 Marketing Research and Public Opinion Polling
621340 Offices of Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapists, and
Audiologists
Abstract:
Parentchild interaction therapy (PCIT) is widely used by speech and
language therapists to improve the interactions between children with delayed
language development and their parents/carers. Despite favourable reports of
the therapy from clinicians, little evidence of its effectiveness is available. We
investigated the effects of PCIT as practised by clinicians within a clinical
setting. Eighteen consecutive children referred for speech and language
therapy because of their delayed language were entered in the study. A within-
participants design was used, and the procedure was similar to that used
clinically. Blind assessments were conducted twice before therapy to monitor
change without therapy and once after completing PCIT. Significant changes
in a parent rating scale, the childrens mean length of utterance and the ratio of
time of child to parent speech were found after the therapy. No changes were
detected prior to therapy. The similarity of the design to clinical practice and
the use of several clinicians suggest that the findings can be generalized to
other settings and clinicians. These findings are a first step in evaluating PCIT;
we now need to show that parents can maintain their newly acquired skills in
interaction, and that this benefits their childrens communication.
[ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Copyright of Child Language Teaching & Therapy is the property of Sage
Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple
sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written
permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for
individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the
accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of
the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
Author Affiliations:
1
Central London Community Health Care Trust, UK
2
Central London Community Health Care Trust, UK; City University London,
UK
3
City University London, UK
Full Text Word Count:
5870
ISSN:
0265-6590
DOI:
10.1177/0265659015574918
Accession Number:
112748106
Database:
Communication & Mass Media Complete

Record: 9
Title:
Change Trajectories for Parent-Child Interaction Sequences during Parent-
Child Interaction Therapy for Child Physical Abuse
Author(s):
Hakman, Melissa; Chaffin, Mark; Funderburk, Beverly; Silovsky, Jane F.
Source:
Child Abuse & Neglect: The International Journal, v33 n7 p461-470 Jul 2009.
10 pp.
Peer Reviewed:
Yes
ISSN:
0145-2134
Descriptors:
Feedback (Response), Child Abuse, Child Welfare, Child Rearing, Child
Behavior, Parent Child Relationship, Therapy, Interaction, Counseling
Techniques, Outcomes of Treatment, Counseling Effectiveness, Parenting
Styles, Behavior Modification
Identifiers:
Dyadic Parent Child Interaction Coding System
Abstract:
Objective: Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) has been found to reduce
future child abuse reports among physically abusive parents. Reductions in
observed negative parenting behaviors mediated this benefit. The current study
examined session-by-session interaction sequences in order to identify when
during treatment these changes occur and how much the trajectory varies from
case-to-case. Method: Session-by-session parent-child interaction sequences,
using the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System-II (DPICS-II)
categories, were coded for 22 child welfare involved parent-child dyads
undergoing PCIT for child physical abuse. A total 5,436 interactions across
PCIT were coded and analyzed using growth curve analysis. Results: At pre-
treatment baseline, negative and positive parental responses were about
equally likely to follow a child positive behavior. This pattern changed rapidly
during PCIT, with rapid increases in positive parental responses and decreases
in negative parental responses to appropriate child behavior. A quadratic
growth pattern accounted for 70% of observed variance and virtually all
change occurred during the first three sessions. Conclusion: Changes in
observed abusive parent-abused child interaction patterns can occur early in
PCIT, a parenting intervention that involves direct coaching and practice of
skills. These benefits sustained throughout treatment. Practice implication:
Prior to receiving behavioral parent training (PCIT), parents who have
physically abused their children failed to match their parental response to their
children's behavior. This pattern of interaction improved rapidly and
substantially during the first three sessions of PCIT. The changes in the
patterns of interaction also remained relatively stable for the remainder of
treatment while parents continued to practice positive parental responses as
well as began practicing effective discipline techniques. This suggests that use
of immediate parent feedback through coaching, explicit directions to parents
in how to respond to child behavior, and customization of the application of
skills to the problems that arise in session are important components to
effective parenting programs with physically abusive parents. Targeting these
behaviors with PCIT has been found to reduce rates of recidivism, further
supporting clinical application of PCIT in these cases. (Contains 2 tables and 3
figures.)
Abstractor:
As Provided
Number of Pages:
10
Publication Type:
Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Availability:
Elsevier. 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887-4800. Tel: 877-839-
7126; Tel: 407-345-4020; Fax: 407-363-1354; e-mail: usjcs@elsevier.com;
Web site: http://www.elsevier.com
URL:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2008.08.003
Journal Code:
JAN2017
Entry Date:
2009
Accession Number:
EJ849401
Database:
ERIC

Record: 10
Title:
Differential Attention as a Mechanism of Change in Parent-Child Interaction
Therapy: Support from Time-Series Analysis.
Authors:
Pemberton, Joy; Borrego, Joaquin; Sherman, Simone
Affiliation:
Health Services Research and Development, Central Arkansas Veterans
Healthcare System, 4300 W. 7th St., 152/NLR Little Rock 72205 USA
Department of Psychology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock 79409 USA
Source:
Journal of Psychopathology & Behavioral Assessment (J PSYCHOPATHOL
BEHAV ASSESS), Mar2013; 35(1): 35-44. (10p)
Publication Type:
Journal Article - research, tables/charts
Language:
English
Major Subjects:
Attention
Parent-Child Relations
Child Behavior Disorders -- Therapy
Behavior Therapy -- In Infancy and Childhood
Minor Subjects:
Human; Time Series; Case Studies; Male; Child, Preschool; Child; Skill
Acquisition; Descriptive Statistics; T-Tests; Psychological Tests
Journal Subset:
Biomedical; USA
Special Interest:
Pediatric Care; Psychiatry/Psychology
Instrumentation:
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI)
Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System, 3rd Edition (DPICS) (Eyberg
et al)
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) [abbreviated]
ISSN:
0882-2689
MEDLINE Info:
NLM UID: 8608482
Entry Date:
20130219
Revision Date:
20150711
DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10862-012-9312-7
Accession Number:
104313484
Database:
CINAHL Complete

Record: 11
Title:
Does Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Reduce Future Physical Abuse? A
Meta-Analysis
Author(s):
Kennedy, Stephanie C.; Kim, Johnny S.; Tripodi, Stephen J.; Brown,
Samantha M.; Gowdy, Grace
Source:
Research on Social Work Practice, v26 n2 p147-156 Mar 2016. 10 pp.
Peer Reviewed:
Yes
ISSN:
1049-7315
Descriptors:
Meta Analysis, Parent Child Relationship, Child Abuse, Stress Variables,
Family Violence, Therapy, Outcomes of Treatment, Social Work, Counseling
Techniques, Effect Size, Child Welfare, Intervention, Classification, Literature
Reviews, Statistical Analysis
Identifiers:
Parenting Stress Index, Child Abuse Potential Inventory
Abstract:
Objective: To use meta-analytic techniques to evaluating the effectiveness of
parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) at reducing future physical abuse
among physically abusive families. Methods: A systematic search identified
six eligible studies. Outcomes of interest were physical abuse recurrence, child
abuse potential, and parenting stress. Results: Parents receiving PCIT had
significantly fewer physical abuse recurrences and significantly greater
reductions on the Parenting Stress Index than parents in comparison groups.
Reductions in child abuse potential were nonsignificant, although 95%
confidence intervals suggest clinically meaningful treatment effects. The
studies examining physical abuse recurrence had a medium treatment effect (g
= 0.52), while results from pooled effect size estimates for child abuse
potential (g = 0.31) and parenting stress (g = 0.35) were small. Conclusions:
PCIT appears to be effective at reducing physical abuse recurrence and
parenting stress for physically abusive families, with the largest treatment
effects seen on long-term physical abuse recurrence. Applications to social
work practice are discussed.
Abstractor:
As Provided
Number of References:
47
Number of Pages:
10
Publication Type:
Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Availability:
SAGE Publications. 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320. Tel: 800-
818-7243; Tel: 805-499-9774; Fax: 800-583-2665; e-mail:
journals@sagepub.com; Web site: http://sagepub.com
URL:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049731514543024
Journal Code:
JAN2017
Entry Date:
2016
Accession Number:
EJ1089995
Database:
ERIC

Record: 12
Title:
Effect of the child directed interaction phase of parent-child interaction
therapy on behavioral impulsivity in young children.
Authors:
Pekarsky, Ranita. Hofstra U., US
Source:
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering,
Vol 74(1-B)(E), 2013.
Publisher:
US : ProQuest Information & Learning
Other Journal Titles:
Dissertation Abstracts International
ISSN:
0419-4217 (Print)
ISBN:
978-1-267-60794-2
Language:
English
Keywords:
childhood development, parent child interaction, therapy, behavioral
impulsivity, patent training
Abstract:
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an evidence-based behavioral
parent training program that involves working with parents and their young
children, ages 3 to 6, who display a range of externalizing behaviors (McNeil
& Hembree-Kigin, 2010). One behavior in particular, impulsivity, is
recognized early in childhood and is a determining characteristic of such
behavioral disorders as Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and
Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Impulsivity is especially evident in those
children whose parents who incorporate the use of negative control. The
present study sought to decrease rates of impulsivity in young children by
intervening with an evidence-based treatment, Parent-Child Interaction
Therapy (PCIT; Eyberg, 1988). Three children were selected based on having
met criteria for being impulsive, as determined by their behavioral
demonstration of impulsivity on two delay tasks and their cut-off scores on
selected subscales of the Early Childhood Attention Deficit Disorders
Evaluation Scale (ECADDES) and the Brown ADD Scales for Children.
During the pre-treatment assessment, child behavior indicative of impulsivity
was coded in a pre-intervention play interaction and two additional tasks
(delay of gratification and choice delay task) were given. Each child, along
with his mother, received six weeks of the Child Directed Interaction phase of
PCIT after which the child was evaluated once again during a post-treatment
assessment, identical to the pre-intervention session. During the CDI phase,
mothers were coached to apply positive parenting techniques (i.e., labeled
praises, behavioral descriptions, and reflective statements) to attempt to
modify their child's behavioral impulsivity. The children were coded for
specific behaviors indicative of impulsivity to detect weekly changes. It was
hypothesized that, upon completion of the CDI Phase of PCIT, children would
display fewer impulsive behaviors during the pre- and post-intervention
activities as well as improvement on a weekly basis. Hypotheses 2a and 2b
were supported by Participants 1 and 2. Both participants indicated observable
decreases in their frequency count of impulsive behaviors throughout the
treatment sessions as well as decreases on the parent report measure of
inappropriate child behaviors specific to the home which include but are not
limited to impulsive behaviors on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory,
specifically the Intensity Scale. In addition, Participant 2 also demonstrated
overall decreases on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory Problem Scale,
although he was not initially rated as at-risk on this scale. The results suggest
that teaching parents positive parenting strategies can impact impulsivity
during structured play sessions, although changes did not generalize to
parental report of child's impulsive behavior at home. (PsycINFO Database
Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Dissertation
Dissertation Details:
UMI Order Number: AAI3526764
OpenURL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-
2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_da
t=xri:pqdiss:3526764
Subjects:
*Impulsiveness; *Parent Child Relations; *Parent
Training; Intervention; Parents
PsycINFO Classification:
Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention (3300)
Population:
Human
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
School Age (6-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Dissertation Abstract
Release Date:
20130902
Accession Number:
2013-99140-591
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 13
Title:
Effectiveness of group format parent-child interaction therapy compared to
treatment as usual in a community outreach organization.
Authors:
Foley, Kimberly. Department of Family Medicine, West Virginia University,
Morgantown, WV, US, foleyki@wvuhealthcare.com
McNeil, Cheryl B.. Department of Psychology, West Virginia University,
Morgantown, WV, US
Norman, Meredith. Department of Psychology, West Virginia University,
Morgantown, WV, US
Wallace, Nancy M.. Department of Psychology, West Virginia University,
Morgantown, WV, US
Address:
Foley, Kimberly, Department of Family Medicine, 6040 University Town
Centre, Second Floor, Morgantown, WV, US, 26501-2421,
foleyki@wvuhealthcare.com
Source:
Child & Family Behavior Therapy, Vol 38(4), Oct, 2016. pp. 279-298.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
Child Fam Behav Ther
Page Count:
20
Publisher:
United Kingdom : Taylor & Francis
Other Publishers:
US : Haworth Press
ISSN:
0731-7107 (Print)
1545-228X (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
Child behavior problems, effectiveness research, evidence-based treatment,
parent training, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)
Abstract:
Forty-four participants recruited from a community outreach organization
were assigned to receive either group format Parent-Child Interaction Therapy
(PCIT) or group format treatment as usual (TAU). The expected interaction
between time and condition was such that participants in the PCIT group
experienced a significantly greater decrease in internalizing and externalizing
behavior problems compared to participants in the TAU group. This
interaction was not significant regarding parenting stress or child abuse
potential between the PCIT and TAU conditions. There was a significant
increase in positive caregiver skills from pretreatment to posttreatment for the
PCIT group; however, there was not a significant decrease in caregiver
negative talk. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Behavior Disorders; *Child Attitudes; *Evidence Based Practice; *Outreach
Programs; *Parent Training; Behavior Therapy; Family Therapy
PsycINFO Classification:
Interpersonal & Client Centered & Humanistic Therapy (3314)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
US
Age Group:
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs)
Thirties (30-39 yrs)
Middle Age (40-64 yrs)
Tests & Measures:
Parenting Stress IndexShort Form
Child Abuse Potential Inventory-IV
Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System-III
Therapy Attitude Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t16794-000
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study; Treatment Outcome
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
Accepted: Sep 4, 2015; Revised: Aug 20, 2015; First Submitted: Aug 14, 2014
Release Date:
20161226
Copyright:
Taylor & Francis. 2016
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07317107.2016.1238688
Accession Number:
2016-60187-002
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 14
Title:
Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in the Treatment of
Young Children's Behavior Problems. A Randomized Controlled Study.
Authors:
Bjrseth ; Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trndelag Hospital Trust, Levanger,
Nord-Trndelag, Norway.; Department of Psychology, Norwegian University
of Science and Technology, Sr-Trndelag, Trondheim, Norway.
Wichstrm L; Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science
and Technology, Sr-Trndelag, Trondheim, Norway.
Source:
Plos One [PLoS One] 2016 Sep 13; Vol. 11 (9), pp. e0159845. Date of
Electronic Publication: 20160913 (Print Publication: 2016).
Publication Type:
Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
Language:
English
Journal Info:
Publisher: Public Library of Science Country of Publication: United States
NLM ID: 101285081 Publication Model: eCollection Cited Medium: Internet
ISSN: 1932-6203 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 19326203 NLM ISO
Abbreviation: PLoS ONE Subsets: MEDLINE
Imprint Name(s):
Original Publication: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
MeSH Terms:
Parent-Child Relations*
Behavior Therapy/*methods
Child Behavior Disorders/*therapy
Adult ; Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders/therapy ; Child
; Child, Preschool ; Conduct Disorder/therapy ; Female ; Humans ; Male
; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales ; Treatment Outcome
Abstract:
Objective: The aim of the present investigation was to compare the
effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) with treatment as
usual (TAU) in young children who were referred to regular child and
adolescent mental health clinics for behavior problems.
Method: Eighty-one Norwegian families with two- to seven-year-old children
(52 boys) who had scored 120 on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory
(ECBI) were randomly assigned to receive either PCIT or TAU. The families
were assessed 6 and 18 months after beginning treatment. Parenting skills
were measured using the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System
(DPICS), and child behavior problems were measured using the ECBI and the
Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).
Results: Linear growth curve analyses revealed that the behavior problems of
children receiving PCIT improved more compared with children receiving
TAU according to mother reports (ECBI d = .64, CBCL d = .61, both p < .05)
but not according to father report. Parents also improved with regard to Do
and Don't skills (d = 2.58, d = 1.46, respectively, both p .001). At the 6-
month assessment, which often occurred before treatment was finished,
children who had received PCIT had lower father-rated ECBI and mother-
rated CBCL-scores (p = .06) compared with those who had received TAU. At
the 18-month follow-up, the children who had received PCIT showed fewer
behavior problems compared with TAU according to mother (d = .37) and
father (d = .56) reports on the ECBI and mother reports on the CBCL
regarding externalizing problems (d = .39). Parents receiving PCIT developed
more favorable Do Skills (6-month d = 1.81; 18-month d = 1.91) and Don't
Skills (6-month d = 1.46; 18-month d = 1.42) according to observer ratings on
the DPICS compared with those receiving TAU.
Conclusion: Children receiving PCIT in regular clinical practice exhibited a
greater reduction in behavior problems compared with children receiving
TAU, and their parents' parenting skills improved to a greater degree
compared with those receiving TAU.
Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NTC01085305.
Comments:
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Entry Date(s):
Date Created: 20160914 Date Completed: 20170804 Latest Revision:
20170804
Update Code:
20170805
PubMed Central ID:
PMC5021353
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0159845
PMID:
27622458
Database:
MEDLINE with Full Text

Record: 15
Title:
Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Delivered to At-Risk
Families in the Home Setting
Author(s):
Galanter, Rachel; Self-Brown, Shannon; Valente, Jessica R.; Dorsey,
Shannon; Whitaker, Daniel J.; Bertuglia-Haley, Michelle; Prieto, Metta
Source:
Child & Family Behavior Therapy, v34 n3 p177-196 2012. 20 pp.
Peer Reviewed:
Yes
ISSN:
0731-7107
Descriptors:
Child Abuse, Therapy, Parent Child Relationship, Outcomes of Treatment,
Parent Attitudes, Fidelity, Family Environment, Risk, Barriers, At Risk
Persons, Counseling Techniques
Abstract:
An evaluation was conducted for 83 parent-child dyads who participated in
parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) delivered in-home by community
agency therapists. Data included self-report measures and therapist
observations at baseline and posttreatment. Results indicated significant
positive changes in child/parent behavior and parent attitudes for dyad
completers. Overall, parents who completed in-home PCIT reported
significantly more positive child outcomes than noncompleters and had a
significantly lower risk of child abuse. Implications for implementing PCIT
into community practice are discussed, including reducing barriers, in-home
modifications, and model fidelity in practice with high-risk communities.
(Contains 2 tables.)
Abstractor:
As Provided
Number of References:
40
Number of Pages:
20
Publication Type:
Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Availability:
Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite
800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web
site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
URL:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07317107.2012.707079
Journal Code:
JAN2017
Entry Date:
2012
Accession Number:
EJ978801
Database:
ERIC

Record: 16
Title:
Effects of mindfulness training on parents' positive parenting skills and
distress tolerance in parent-child interaction therapy.
Authors:
Ufford, Amber N.. Hofstra University, Clinical Psychology, NY, US
Source:
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering,
Vol 77(2-B)(E), 2016.
Publisher:
US : ProQuest Information & Learning
Other Journal Titles:
Dissertation Abstracts International
ISSN:
0419-4217 (Print)
ISBN:
978-1339083551
Language:
English
Keywords:
mindfulness training, positive psychology, parenting skills, parent-child
interaction therapy, distress
Abstract:
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), a two-phase treatment, has been
shown to be an effective intervention for children with disruptive behaviors
and attentional problems. However, the increased stress and related avoidance
of experiencing negative emotions (experiential avoidance) that many parents
encounter during the second phase of PCIT may lead to poor treatment
outcomes and decreased treatment gains. Specifically, the first phase of PCIT,
called Child Directed Interaction (CDI), teaches parents positive parenting
skills. The second phase of PCIT, called Parent Directed Interaction (PDI),
teaches parents to manage their child's challenging behaviors using effective
commands and time-out, while still maintaining a high level of positive
parenting. The parents in the current study were recruited because they failed
to maintain the requisite number of positive parenting skills once in PDI,
which is typical when parents are experiencing distress due to the increased
demands of behavior management and the increased oppositionality of their
child. This study utilized a brief intervention, mindfulness, to enable parents to
continue using high levels of positive parenting by reducing stress during play
sessions. Mindfulness has been shown to be an effective intervention to
decrease parenting stress, decrease experiential avoidance, and improve the
use of positive parenting practices. While several studies have successfully
incorporated mindfulness into behavioral parent training programs, few
studies have utilized the coding of live behavior in conjunction with the
implementation of a mindfulness technique, nor have these studies utilized in-
vivo coaching of mindful-parenting skills. To date no controlled studies
utilizing mindfulness training to improve parents use of positive parenting
skills during PCIT have been conducted. The goal of the current study was to
examine the effectiveness of enhancing the second phase of PCIT with a brief
mindfulness training component for parents to improve their continued use of
positive parenting skills previously learned in the first phase of PCIT. The
current study utilized a single-subject, repeated measures A-B design, in
which each parent's baseline of verbal behavior and parenting stress served as
her own control. Participants included four mothers of parent-child dyads who
scored in the clinically significant range on the Parenting Stress Index -- Short
Form and who did not maintain mastery of positive parenting skills during
baseline. Following baseline, parents were led in a brief mindfulness induction
exercise at the beginning of each therapy session, coached in-vivo by
therapists to practice mindfulness skills during the session, and given
mindfulness homework practice in between sessions. The positive parenting
skills taught in CDI were measured in-vivo by therapists throughout the PDI
phase of treatment by coding 5-minute play periods at the beginning of each
session following the mindfulness induction exercise, and by trained coders
using video-taped sessions. Parent verbalizations and skill use were coded
using the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS-IV; Eyberg,
Nelson, Ginn, Bhuiyan, & Boggs, 2013). The ratio of parents' use of positive
skill verbalizations and neutral/negative verbalizations per each 5-minute
coding period were also examined. In addition, parent-reported levels of
parenting stress and parental experiential avoidance were measured throughout
treatment, using self-report measures and the Subjective Units of Distress
Scale (SUDS). It was hypothesized that compared to baseline, parents would
demonstrate increased use of positive parenting skills, increased ratio of
positive parenting skill verbalizations vs. neutral/negative verbalizations, and
decreased parenting stress, and that changes would be maintained at follow-
up. In addition, research (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all
rights reserved)
Document Type:
Dissertation
Dissertation Details:
UMI Order Number: AAI3724731
OpenURL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-
2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_da
t=xri:pqdiss:3724731
Advisor(s): Phyllis S. Ohr
Degree: Ph.D., 2015
Institution: Hofstra University
Department: Clinical Psychology
Subjects:
*Parent Child Relations; *Parenting Skills; *Positive
Psychology; *Mindfulness; Distress
PsycINFO Classification:
Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention (3300)
Developmental Psychology (2800)
Population:
Human
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Dissertation Abstract
Release Date:
20160929
Accession Number:
2016-31155-061
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 17
Title:
Effects of values development on parents' experiential avoidance in parent-
child interaction therapy.
Authors:
Allen, Jennifer R.. Hofstra University, Clinical Psychology, US
Source:
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering,
Vol 77(10-B)(E), 2017.
Publisher:
US : ProQuest Information & Learning
Other Journal Titles:
Dissertation Abstracts International
ISSN:
0419-4217 (Print)
ISBN:
978-1339740324
Language:
English
Keywords:
values development, parents' experiential avoidance, parent-child interaction
therapy, mindfulness, parenting
Abstract:
Parents of children diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders often
experience distress due to their child's misbehavior. They frequently attend to
misbehavior and rescind requests placed on the child. These interactions tend
to be motivated by attempts to rid both the parent and their child of negative
emotions, unintentionally negatively reinforcing both child and parent
maladaptive behavior. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) aims to
improve the parent-child relationship while teaching parents behavior
management skills. PCIT is efficacious; however, it fails to include a focus on
parents' thoughts and emotions. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)
is a mindfulness-based treatment positing that attempts made to get rid of
emotional suffering paradoxically create more of it; this is known as
experiential avoidance. Utilizing ACT within the framework of PCIT is
relevant in the first phase of PCIT, Child Directed Interaction (CDI).
Differential attention is taught during CDI and can be conceptualized as the
antithesis of experiential avoidance. In order to ignore child misbehavior,
parents must be willing to experience uncomfortable thoughts and feelings
without attempting to alleviate them. The purpose of the present study (n = 6)
was to evaluate the efficacy of adding two ACT processes (i.e., contacting the
present moment and clarifying values) to CDI. It was hypothesized that
experiential avoidance would decrease as a result of ACT-based practices, and
that parents' use of effective parenting skills (including differential attention)
and values-consistent behavior would increase throughout treatment. A single
subject design was used. Treatment began with four baseline sessions. Two
subjects received PCIT-as-usual. Two subjects were introduced to ACT
processes within the same week as learning CDI skills. The remaining two
subjects were introduced to ACT processes three weeks after learning CDI
skills. ACT processes were introduced in a session called Values Teach and
following sessions retained this focus. Parents completed weekly ACT-based
and standard CDI homework. Experiential avoidance was measured with the
Parental Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and values consistent behavior
was assessed using an individualized self-report measure based on the Valued
Living Questionnaire. Parents' commitment to practicing ACT-related
processes and parenting skills was measured by a homework ratio. It was
hypothesized that this ratio would increase throughout treatment. Parents' use
of effective parenting skills was measured using the Dyadic Parent-Child
Coding System-III. Parents' use of differential attention, specifically, was
determined by the ratio of opportunities parents had to selectively ignore
compared to how many times they utilized this skill in session. Visual
inspection and ipsative z scores were used to analyze data. Data analyses
revealed that all subjects who received ACT-based strategies maintained
mastery level PRIDE skills at follow-up. Neither subject who received PCIT-
as-usual showed these results. This suggests that subjects who received ACT-
based strategies more readily retained skills than those who did not. While it
was hypothesized that ACT principles would aid in skill acquisition, the data
suggest that these skills may have instead contributed to skill retention.
Additionally, the majority of subjects receiving ACT-based strategies showed
a decrease in experiential avoidance. This loosely suggests that clarifying
values and learning to contact the present moment aided parents in increasing
their ability to engage in the management of their child's emotions as well as
tolerate emotional experiences in themselves or in their children. Findings
were discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications. Strengths
and limitations of the study as well as recommendations for future research are
presented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Dissertation
Dissertation Details:
UMI Order Number: AAI10110787
OpenURL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-
2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_da
t=xri:pqdiss:10110787
Advisor(s): Joseph R. Scardapane
Degree: Ph.D., 2016
Institution: Hofstra University
Department: Clinical Psychology
Subjects:
*Parent Child Relations; *Mindfulness; *Authoritarian Parenting
PsycINFO Classification:
Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention (3300)
Developmental Psychology (2800)
Population:
Human
Age Group:
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Dissertation Abstract
Release Date:
20170406
Accession Number:
2016-53065-205
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 18
Title:
Efficacy of ParentChild Interaction Therapy With Chinese ADHD Children.
Authors:
Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Ng, Gene S. H.; Choi, S. Y.
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic
University, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Department of Social Work and Social Administration, The University of
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Tung Wah Group of Hospitals, Hong Kong
Source:
Research on Social Work Practice (RES SOC WORK PRACT), Jan2017;
27(1): 36-47. (12p)
Publication Type:
Article
Language:
English
Abstract:
Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction
Therapy (PCIT) in Chinese children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity
disorder (ADHD) or ADHD features. Methods: This study adopted a
randomized controlled trial design without blinding. Participants were
randomized into either the intervention group (n = 32) and offered PCIT by
trained PCIT practitioners or the waitlist control group (n = 32) and offered
PCIT after the intervention group had completed treatment. Parent participants
were requested to complete questionnaires on their childrens behavior and
their parental stress. PCIT practitioners observed parentchild interactions
according to a coding system. Results: Analysis was by intention to treat. The
results indicated a significant decrease in child behavior and attention
problems, parental stress, and negative parenting practices and an increase in
positive parenting practices in the intervention group at postintervention (p
.002 in all cases). Conclusion: This study provided promising evidence on the
effectiveness of PCIT in Chinese children with ADHD or ADHD features.
Journal Subset:
Allied Health; Peer Reviewed; USA
ISSN:
1049-7315
MEDLINE Info:
NLM UID: 9425959
Entry Date:
In Process
Revision Date:
20161229
DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049731516643837
Accession Number:
120304329
Database:
CINAHL Complete

Record: 19
Title:
Efficacy of ParentChild Interaction Therapy With Chinese ADHD Children.
Authors:
Leung, Cynthia1 ssleung@polyu.edu.hk
Tsang, Sandra2
Ng, Gene S. H.3
Choi, S. Y.3
Source:
Research on Social Work Practice. Jan2017, Vol. 27 Issue 1, p36-47. 12p.
Document Type:
Article
Author-Supplied Keywords:
ADHD
intervention
parent training
Abstract:
Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction
Therapy (PCIT) in Chinese children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity
disorder (ADHD) or ADHD features. Methods: This study adopted a
randomized controlled trial design without blinding. Participants were
randomized into either the intervention group (n = 32) and offered PCIT by
trained PCIT practitioners or the waitlist control group (n = 32) and offered
PCIT after the intervention group had completed treatment. Parent participants
were requested to complete questionnaires on their childrens behavior and
their parental stress. PCIT practitioners observed parentchild interactions
according to a coding system. Results: Analysis was by intention to treat. The
results indicated a significant decrease in child behavior and attention
problems, parental stress, and negative parenting practices and an increase in
positive parenting practices in the intervention group at postintervention (p
.002 in all cases). Conclusion: This study provided promising evidence on the
effectiveness of PCIT in Chinese children with ADHD or ADHD features.
[ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Copyright of Research on Social Work Practice is the property of Sage
Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple
sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written
permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for
individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the
accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of
the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
Author Affiliations:
1
Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic
University, Kowloon, Hong Kong
2
Department of Social Work and Social Administration, The University of
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
3
Tung Wah Group of Hospitals, Hong Kong
Full Text Word Count:
8611
ISSN:
1049-7315
DOI:
10.1177/1049731516643837
Accession Number:
120304329
Database:
SocINDEX with Full Text

Record: 20
Title:
Efficacy of ParentChild Interaction Therapy with Chinese ADHD children:
Randomized controlled trial.
Authors:
Leung, Cynthia. Department of Applied Social Sciences, Hong Kong
Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong, ssleung@polyu.edu.hk
Tsang, Sandra. Department of Social Work and Social Administration,
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Ng, Gene S. H.. Tung Wah Group of Hospitals, Hong Kong
Choi, S. Y.. Tung Wah Group of Hospitals, Hong Kong
Address:
Leung, Cynthia, Department of Applied Social Sciences, Hong Kong
Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong, ssleung@polyu.edu.hk
Source:
Research on Social Work Practice, Vol 27(1), Jan, 2017. pp. 36-47.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
Res Soc Work Pract
Page Count:
12
Publisher:
US : Sage Publications
ISSN:
1049-7315 (Print)
1552-7581 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
ADHD, intervention, parent training
Abstract:
Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction
Therapy (PCIT) in Chinese children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity
disorder (ADHD) or ADHD features. Methods: This study adopted a
randomized controlled trial design without blinding. Participants were
randomized into either the intervention group (n = 32) and offered PCIT by
trained PCIT practitioners or the waitlist control group (n = 32) and offered
PCIT after the intervention group had completed treatment. Parent participants
were requested to complete questionnaires on their childrens behavior and
their parental stress. PCIT practitioners observed parentchild interactions
according to a coding system. Results: Analysis was by intention to treat. The
results indicated a significant decrease in child behavior and attention
problems, parental stress, and negative parenting practices and an increase in
positive parenting practices in the intervention group at postintervention (p
.002 in all cases). Conclusion: This study provided promising evidence on the
effectiveness of PCIT in Chinese children with ADHD or ADHD features.
(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity; *Intervention; *Training
PsycINFO Classification:
Developmental Disorders & Autism (3250)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
Hong Kong
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Tests & Measures:
Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding SystemThird Edition
Grant Sponsorship:
Sponsor: Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, Hong Kong
Recipients: No recipient indicated
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Release Date:
20170330
Copyright:
The Author(s). 2016
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049731516643837
Accession Number:
2016-61030-004
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 21
Title:
Efficacy of Parent-Child interaction therapy with parents with intellectual
disability.
Authors:
Chengappa, Karishma. West Virginia U., US
Source:
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering,
Vol 75(3-B)(E), 2014.
Publisher:
US : ProQuest Information & Learning
Other Journal Titles:
Dissertation Abstracts International
ISSN:
0419-4217 (Print)
ISBN:
978-1-303-56022-4
Language:
English
Keywords:
intellectual disability, parenting ability, parent-child interaction therapy,
disruptive behavior disorders
Abstract:
Parents with intellectual disability are faced with the challenges of parenting
as well as with having to deal with cognitive difficulties and limited financial
and social supports. Deficits in parenting ability often are associated with poor
child outcomes such as developmental delays, mental health concerns, neglect,
and disruptive behavior disorders. Parents with intellectual disabilities
frequently come under the scrutiny of child protective services for neglect and
inadequate parenting and are often overrepresented in child maltreatment
proceedings. When given systematic skills training using applied behavior
analysis, these parents have been shown to improve a narrow range of basic
child care skills. However, outcomes are inconsistent with no prior research on
packaged empirically supported treatments that focus on broader parenting
styles surrounding nurturance and limit setting. Parent-Child Interaction
Therapy (PCIT) is an example of an empirically supported treatment that
incorporates performance-based training to enhance parenting ability. The
current study evaluated the utility of PCIT with parents who have an
intellectual disability using a multiple baseline design across behaviors.
Results were promising in terms of improved use of positive parenting
behaviors and consistent discipline. However, limitations related to poor
maintenance and generalization along with other contextual factors warrant
the need for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all
rights reserved)
Document Type:
Dissertation
Dissertation Details:
UMI Order Number: AAI3576285
OpenURL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-
2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_da
t=xri:pqdiss:3576285
Subjects:
*Disabilities; *Parent Child Relations; Mothers; Parenting Style
PsycINFO Classification:
Social Processes & Social Issues (2900)
Population:
Human
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Dissertation Abstract
Release Date:
20141027
Accession Number:
2014-99180-038
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 22
Title:
Efficacy of parent-child interaction therapy with the use of in-room coaching.
Authors:
Reeve, Cassie Shacklett. Western Michigan U., US
Source:
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering,
Vol 76(7-B)(E), 2016.
Publisher:
US : ProQuest Information & Learning
Other Journal Titles:
Dissertation Abstracts International
ISSN:
0419-4217 (Print)
ISBN:
978-1-321-58972-6
Language:
English
Keywords:
in-room coaching, parent-child interaction therapy, disruptive behavior,
discipline strategies, supported treatment
Abstract:
One significant consequence of oppositional and defiant behavior is an
increase in negative interactions between caregivers and the child exhibiting
those behaviors (Greene & Doyle, 1999). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy
(PCIT) is an empirically supported treatment that targets the development of a
nurturing parent-child relationship along with teaching effective discipline
strategies to decrease child noncompliance (Bodiford-McNeil & Hembree-
Kigin, 2010). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of
PCIT when modified by utilizing strictly in-room coaching. This type of
research would allow for expanded use of this empirically supported treatment
into community agencies and clinics which do not currently have the resources
to conduct traditional PCIT using a one-way mirror and bug-in-the-ear
technology. Supporting previous research, results of the current study revealed
a significant decrease in child oppositional behavior and parent stress
(McNeil, Capage, Bahl, & Blanc, 1999; Eyberg, Boggs, & Algina, 1995;
Schuhmann et al., 1998). Improvements were also seen in differing
dimensions of the parenting relationship, an area not frequently assessed in
PCIT research. The current study provides initial empirical support for the use
of inroom coaching with PCIT. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA,
all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Dissertation
Dissertation Details:
UMI Order Number: AAI3690424
OpenURL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-
2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_da
t=xri:pqdiss:3690424
Subjects:
*Infant Development; *Parent Child Relations; Behavior
Problems; Caregivers; Parents; Coaching
PsycINFO Classification:
General Psychology (2100)
Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention (3300)
Population:
Human
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Dissertation Abstract
Release Date:
20160411
Correction Date:
20160620
Accession Number:
2016-99020-208
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 23
Title:
Enhancing foster parent training with parent-child interaction therapy:
Evidence from a randomized field experiment.
Authors:
Mersky, Joshua P.. Jane Addams College of Social Work, University of
Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, US, mersky@uic.edu
Topitzes, James. Helen Bader School of Social Welfare, University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, US
Janczewski, Colleen E.. Jane Addams College of Social Work, University of
Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, US
McNeil, Cheryl B.. Department of Psychology, West Virginia University,
Morgantown, WV, US
Address:
Mersky, Joshua P., Jane Addams College of Social Work, University of
Illinois at Chicago, 1040 W. Harrison Street, Chicago, IL, US, 60607,
mersky@uic.edu
Source:
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research, Vol 6(4), Dec, 2015. pp.
591-616.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
J Soc Social Work Res
Page Count:
26
Publisher:
US : Univ of Chicago Press
Other Publishers:
US : Society for Social Work and Research
ISSN:
2334-2315 (Print)
1948-822X (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
foster care, parent training, intervention, parent-child interaction therapy,
stress, parenting
Abstract:
Objective: Research indicates that foster parents often do not receive sufficient
training and support to help them meet the demands of caring for foster
children with emotional and behavioral disturbances. Parent-Child Interaction
Therapy (PCIT) is a clinically efficacious intervention for child externalizing
problems, and it also has been shown to mitigate parenting stress and enhance
parenting attitudes and behaviors. However, PCIT is seldom available to foster
families, and it rarely has been tested under intervention conditions that are
generalizable to community-based child welfare service contexts. To address
this gap, PCIT was adapted and implemented in a field experiment using 2
novel approachesgroup-based training and telephone consultationboth of
which have the potential to be integrated into usual care. Method: This study
analyzes 129 foster-parent-child dyads who were randomly assigned to 1 of 3
conditions: (a) waitlist control, (b) brief PCIT, and (c) extended PCIT. Self-
report and observational data were gathered at multiple time points up to 14
weeks post baseline. Results: Findings from mixed-model, repeated measures
analyses indicated that the brief and extended PCIT interventions were
associated with a significant decrease in self-reported parenting stress. Results
from mixed-effects generalized linear models showed that the interventions
also led to significant improvements in observed indicators of positive and
negative parenting. The brief course of PCIT was as efficacious as the
extended PCIT intervention. Conclusions: The findings suggest that usual
training and support services can be improved upon by introducing foster
parents to experiential, interactive PCIT training. (PsycINFO Database Record
(c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Foster Care; *Intervention; *Parent Child Relations; *Parent Training
PsycINFO Classification:
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
US
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
School Age (6-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs)
Thirties (30-39 yrs)
Middle Age (40-64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Parenting Stress Index-Short Form
Dyadic ParentChild Interaction Coding System-II
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Grant Sponsorship:
Sponsor: National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child Health and
Human Development, US
Grant Number: 1R15HD067829-01A1
Recipients: No recipient indicated
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Field Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
First Posted: Oct 12, 2015; Accepted: Feb 15, 2015; First Submitted: Oct 31,
2014
Release Date:
20160630
Copyright:
All rights reserved.. Society for Social Work and Research. 2015
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/684123
PMID:
26977251
Accession Number:
2016-17719-007
Number of Citations in Source:
57
Database:
PsycINFO
Record: 24
Title:
Examination of group format parent-child interaction therapy adapted for
anxiety disorders.
Authors:
Gold, Dylann C.. Hofstra University, Clinical Psychology, US
Source:
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering,
Vol 78(2-B)(E), 2017.
Publisher:
US : ProQuest Information & Learning
Other Journal Titles:
Dissertation Abstracts International
ISSN:
0419-4217 (Print)
ISBN:
978-1369015188
Language:
English
Keywords:
parent-child interaction therapy, anxiety disorders
Abstract:
It is estimated that over nine percent of children between the ages of two and
five meet criteria for an anxiety disorder (Egger & Angold, 2006). Without
intervention, most childhood anxiety disorders do not remit over time, leading
to more serious impairment later in life (Pine, Cohen, Gurley, Brook, & Ma,
1998). Although the empirical literature on anxiety treatment for young
children is limited, there is growing evidence that parents can become
powerful agents of change. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an
evidence-based intervention, originally designed for young children with
disruptive behaviors (Zisser & Eyberg, 2010). Modified individual PCIT has
shown preliminary feasibility and efficacy in treating a wide range of anxiety
disorders of early childhood (Comer et al., 2012; Pincus, Eyberg, & Choate,
2005). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of applying
modified group-format PCIT for the treatment of young children with anxiety
disorders, specifically social phobia. Four children and their parents received a
14-session modification of group PCIT to target clinically impairing social
anxiety. Parents were trained to use specific behavioral techniques to
encourage child approach behavior. Each dyad received live skills coaching
during in vivo exposure exercises in the clinic, as well as practiced
independently between sessions. Parent skills and child behaviors were
observed and coded before, during, and after treatment; self-report measures
were administered at pre-, mid-, and post-treatment. Visual inspection of data
indicated positive changes in parent-reported child anxiety and avoidance
behavior; parent-rated accommodation of anxious avoidance; child inhibited
behavior; as well as several areas of parent behavior. The results of this study
provide preliminary support that the PCIT model can be applied to a group
setting and adapted for the treatment of young children with anxiety disorders.
(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Dissertation
Dissertation Details:
UMI Order Number: AAI10146089
OpenURL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-
2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_da
t=xri:pqdiss:10146089
Advisor(s): Phyllis S. Ohr
Degree: Ph.D., 2016
Institution: Hofstra University
Department: Clinical Psychology
Subjects:
*Anxiety Disorders; *Parent Child Relations; *Treatment; Parent Child
Communication
PsycINFO Classification:
Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention (3300)
General Psychology (2100)
Population:
Human
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Dissertation Abstract
Release Date:
20170626
Accession Number:
2017-01060-201
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 25
Title:
Examining the efficacy of parentchild interaction therapy with children on
the autism spectrum.
Authors:
Masse, Joshua J.. University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dartmouth, MA,
US, JMasse2@umassd.edu
McNeil, Cheryl B.. West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, US
Wagner, Stephanie. New York University Child Study Center, New York,
NY, US
Quetsch, Lauren B.. West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, US
Address:
Masse, Joshua J., University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport
Road, Dartmouth, MA, US, 02747-2300, JMasse2@umassd.edu
Source:
Journal of Child and Family Studies, Vol 25(8), Aug, 2016. pp. 2508-2525.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
J Child Fam Stud
Page Count:
18
Publisher:
Germany : Springer
ISSN:
1062-1024 (Print)
1573-2843 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
parentchild interaction therapy, autism spectrum disorders, externalizing
behaviors, evidence-based treatments, community-based practice
Abstract:
Externalizing behaviors are a common component of the clinical presentation
of autism spectrum disorders. Although traditionally used with typically-
developing children, parentchild interaction therapy (PCIT) is one
behaviorally-based parent training program that has demonstrated success in
increasing child compliance, reducing problem behavior, and improving
parentchild communication. The study examined the efficacy of PCIT as a
treatment for children with autism spectrum disorders by employing a single
subject, non-concurrent multiple baseline design across three subjects. Primary
findings revealed increases in child compliance, reductions in child disruptive
behavior, and improved parenting skills across participants. In addition, each
caregiver reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention. Results
suggested that PCIT may be a treatment option for children on the autism
spectrum with co-occurring behavioral difficulties. Although the non-
concurrent nature of the multiple baseline design is a limitation, this study
replicates and extends previous research investigating the efficacy of PCIT
with children with autism and their parents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c)
2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Autism Spectrum Disorders; *Communication; *Evidence Based
Practice; *Family Therapy; *Parent Child Relations
PsycINFO Classification:
Developmental Disorders & Autism (3250)
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
US
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
School Age (6-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs)
Thirties (30-39 yrs)
Tests & Measures:
Compliance Probability Questionnaire-Academic Version
Dyadic ParentChild Interaction Coding System-III
Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence--Third Edition DOI:
10.1037/t15177-000
Therapy Attitude Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t16794-000
Childhood Autism Rating Scale DOI: 10.1037/t49458-000
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Autism Behavior Checklist DOI: 10.1037/t03991-000
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
First Posted: Apr 30, 2016
Release Date:
20160505
Correction Date:
20161117
Copyright:
Springer Science+Business Media New York. 2016
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10826-016-0424-7
Accession Number:
2016-22244-001
Number of Citations in Source:
73
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 26
Title:
Examining the Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Children on
the Autism Spectrum.
Authors:
Masse, Joshua
McNeil, Cheryl
Wagner, Stephanie
Quetsch, Lauren
Source:
Journal of Child & Family Studies. Aug2016, Vol. 25 Issue 8, p2508-2525.
18p. 2 Charts, 5 Graphs.
Document Type:
Article
Subjects:
AUTISM -- Psychological aspects
TREATMENT of behavior disorders in children
BEHAVIOR therapy
FAMILY psychotherapy
OUTCOME assessment (Medical care)
PARENT & child
RESEARCH -- Evaluation
DESCRIPTIVE statistics
Geographic Terms:
UNITED States
Abstract:
Externalizing behaviors are a common component of the clinical presentation
of autism spectrum disorders. Although traditionally used with typically-
developing children, parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) is one
behaviorally-based parent training program that has demonstrated success in
increasing child compliance, reducing problem behavior, and improving
parent-child communication. The study examined the efficacy of PCIT as a
treatment for children with autism spectrum disorders by employing a single
subject, non-concurrent multiple baseline design across three subjects. Primary
findings revealed increases in child compliance, reductions in child disruptive
behavior, and improved parenting skills across participants. In addition, each
caregiver reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention. Results
suggested that PCIT may be a treatment option for children on the autism
spectrum with co-occurring behavioral difficulties. Although the non-
concurrent nature of the multiple baseline design is a limitation, this study
replicates and extends previous research investigating the efficacy of PCIT
with children with autism and their parents. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Copyright of Journal of Child & Family Studies is the property of Springer
Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed
to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express
written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for
individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the
accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of
the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
ISSN:
1062-1024
DOI:
10.1007/s10826-016-0424-7
Accession Number:
116622701
Database:
MasterFILE Premier

Record: 27
Title:
Extending parent-child interaction therapy for early childhood internalizing
problems: new advances for an overlooked population.
Authors:
Carpenter AL; Department of Psychology, Center for Anxiety and Related
Disorders, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA, aedson@bu.edu.
Puliafico AC
Kurtz SM
Pincus DB
Comer JS
Source:
Clinical Child And Family Psychology Review [Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev]
2014 Dec; Vol. 17 (4), pp. 340-56.
Publication Type:
Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support,
Non-U.S. Gov't; Review
Language:
English
Journal Info:
Publisher: Springer Country of Publication: United States NLM ID: 9807947
Publication Model: Print Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1573-2827
(Electronic) Linking ISSN: 10964037 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Clin Child Fam
Psychol Rev Subsets: MEDLINE
Imprint Name(s):
Publication: New York, NY : Springer
Original Publication: New York, N.Y. : Plenum Pub. Corp., c1998-
MeSH Terms:
Parent-Child Relations*
Anxiety Disorders/*therapy
Depressive Disorder/*therapy
Psychotherapy/*methods
Child ; Humans
Abstract:
Although efficacious psychological treatments for internalizing disorders are
now well established for school-aged children, until recently there have
regrettably been limited empirical efforts to clarify indicated psychological
intervention methods for the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders
presenting in early childhood. Young children lack many of the developmental
capacities required to effectively participate in established treatments for
mood and anxiety problems presenting in older children, making simple
downward extensions of these treatments for the management of preschool
internalizing problems misguided. In recent years, a number of research
groups have successfully adapted and modified parent-child interaction
therapy (PCIT), originally developed to treat externalizing problems in young
children, to treat various early internalizing problems with a set of neighboring
protocols. As in traditional PCIT, these extensions target child symptoms by
directly reshaping parent-child interaction patterns associated with the
maintenance of symptoms. The present review outlines this emerging set of
novel PCIT adaptations and modifications for mood and anxiety problems in
young children and reviews preliminary evidence supporting their use.
Specifically, we cover (a) PCIT for early separation anxiety disorder; (b) the
PCIT-CALM (Coaching Approach behavior and Leading by Modeling)
Program for the full range of early anxiety disorders; (c) the group Turtle
Program for behavioral inhibition; and (d) the PCIT-ED (Emotional
Development) Program for preschool depression. In addition, emerging PCIT-
related protocols in need of empirical attention--such as the PCIT-SM
(selective mutism) Program for young children with SM--are also considered.
Implications of these protocols are discussed with regard to their unique
potential to address the clinical needs of young children with internalizing
problems. Obstacles to broad dissemination are addressed, and we consider
potential solutions, including modular treatment formats and innovative
applications of technology.
Comments:
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Grant Information:
K23 MH090247 United States MH NIMH NIH HHS
Contributed Indexing:
Indexing Agency: NLM Local ID #: NIHMS645877.
Entry Date(s):
Date Created: 20141107 Date Completed: 20151021 Latest Revision:
20161025
Update Code:
20161213
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4258530
DOI:
10.1007/s10567-014-0172-4
PMID:
25212716
Database:
MEDLINE with Full Text

Record: 28
Title:
Feasibility and effectiveness of parentchild interaction therapy with victims
of domestic violence: A pilot study.
Authors:
Herschell, Amy D.. West Virginia University, University of Pittsburgh School
of Medicine, Morgantown, WV, US, Amy.Herschell@mail.wvu.edu
Scudder, Ashley B.. Western Psychiatric Institute & Clinic, University of
Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, US
Schaffner, Kristen F., ORCID 0000-0003-1995-4667. Western Psychiatric
Institute & Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA,
US
Slagel, Leslie A.. Family Resources of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, PA, US
Address:
Herschell, Amy D., West Virginia University, University of Pittsburgh School
of Medicine, 1234 Life Sciences Building, 53 Campus Drive, PO Box 6040,
Morgantown, WV, US, 26506-6040, Amy.Herschell@mail.wvu.edu
Source:
Journal of Child and Family Studies, Vol 26(1), Jan, 2017. pp. 271-283.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
J Child Fam Stud
Page Count:
13
Publisher:
Germany : Springer
ISSN:
1062-1024 (Print)
1573-2843 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
Parentchild interaction therapy, Domestic violence, Interpersonal violence,
Aggression, Treatment effectiveness
Abstract:
ParentChild Interaction Therapy is an evidence-based treatment for young
children (aged 2.57 years) with externalizing behavior problems. Since its
development, ParentChild Interaction Therapy has been applied to a wide
array of childhood problems and has a significant evidence base for families
with histories of child physical abuse. The current study extended the existing
literature by testing the effectiveness and feasibility of ParentChild
Interaction Therapy in an urban domestic violence shelter with community-
based clinicians delivering the treatment. Seven clinicians implemented
ParentChild Interaction Therapy with parentchild dyads, which included 21
preschool (M = 4.57 years; SD = 1.50) children. Families completed
assessments at baseline, mid-treatment, and post-treatment. Nine families
completed ParentChild Interaction Therapy (43 %). Completion of Parent
Child Interaction Therapy was associated with improved child behavior,
parenting practices, and mental health symptoms. Considerations for treatment
delivery and future directions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c)
2017 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Community Services; *Domestic Violence; *Intervention; *Parent Child
Communication
PsycINFO Classification:
Community & Social Services (3373)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
US
Age Group:
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Thirties (30-39 yrs)
Middle Age (40-64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Competency Checklist
Life Stressors Checklist-Revised
Grant Sponsorship:
Sponsor: National Institutes of Health, US
Grant Number: UL1TR001857; UL1 RR024153; UL1TR000005
Recipients: No recipient indicated

Sponsor: National Institute of Mental Health, US


Grant Number: K23 MH074716
Other Details: Career Development Award
Recipients: Herschell, Amy D.
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
First Posted: Sep 19, 2016
Release Date:
20170223
Copyright:
Springer Science+Business Media New York. 2016
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10826-016-0546-y
Accession Number:
2017-00964-017
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 29
Title:
Feasibility and Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Victims
of Domestic Violence: A Pilot Study.
Authors:
Herschell, Amy
Scudder, Ashley
Schaffner, Kristen
Slagel, Leslie
Source:
Journal of Child & Family Studies. Jan2017, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p271-283. 13p. 4
Charts.
Document Type:
Article
Subjects:
FAMILY psychotherapy -- Evaluation
CHI-squared test
CHILDREN'S conduct of life
CONFIDENCE intervals
FAMILY psychotherapy
FAMILY violence
METROPOLITAN areas
PARENT & child
PARENTING
PARENTS
FINANCING of research
T-test (Statistics)
VICTIMS
VIDEO recording
PILOT projects
PSYCHOSOCIAL factors
TREATMENT effectiveness
PRE-tests & post-tests
DESCRIPTIVE statistics
Geographic Terms:
UNITED States
Abstract:
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy is an evidence-based treatment for young
children (aged 2.5-7 years) with externalizing behavior problems. Since its
development, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy has been applied to a wide
array of childhood problems and has a significant evidence base for families
with histories of child physical abuse. The current study extended the existing
literature by testing the effectiveness and feasibility of Parent-Child
Interaction Therapy in an urban domestic violence shelter with community-
based clinicians delivering the treatment. Seven clinicians implemented
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with parent-child dyads, which included 21
preschool ( M = 4.57 years; SD = 1.50) children. Families completed
assessments at baseline, mid-treatment, and post-treatment. Nine families
completed Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (43 %). Completion of Parent-
Child Interaction Therapy was associated with improved child behavior,
parenting practices, and mental health symptoms. Considerations for treatment
delivery and future directions are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Copyright of Journal of Child & Family Studies is the property of Springer
Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed
to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express
written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for
individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the
accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of
the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
ISSN:
1062-1024
DOI:
10.1007/s10826-016-0546-y
Accession Number:
120600290
Database:
Professional Development Collection

Record: 30
Title:
Filling potholes on the implementation highway: Evaluating the
implementation of ParentChild Interaction Therapy in Los Angeles County.
Authors:
Timmer, Susan G., ORCID 0000-0002-1005-952X. CAARE Diagnostic &
Treatment Center, University of California, Davis, Childrens Hospital,
Sacramento, CA, US
Urquiza, Anthony J.. CAARE Diagnostic & Treatment Center, University of
California, Davis, Childrens Hospital, Sacramento, CA, US
Boys, Deanna K.. CAARE Diagnostic & Treatment Center, University of
California, Davis, Childrens Hospital, Sacramento, CA, US
Forte, Lindsay A.. CAARE Diagnostic & Treatment Center, University of
California, Davis, Childrens Hospital, Sacramento, CA, US
Quick-Abdullah, Daphne. Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health,
Los Angeles, CA, US
Chan, Sam. Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, Los Angeles,
CA, US
Gould, William. First 5 LA, Los Angeles, CA, US
Address:
Timmer, Susan G., CAARE Diagnostic & Treatment Center, 3671 Business
Dr., Sacramento, CA, US, 95820
Source:
Child Abuse & Neglect, Vol 53, Mar, 2016. pp. 40-50.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
Child Abuse Negl
Page Count:
11
Publisher:
Netherlands : Elsevier Science
ISSN:
0145-2134 (Print)
Language:
English
Keywords:
Evidence-based interventions, Implementation outcomes, Facilitators and
barriers to implementation, ParentChild Interaction Therapy
Abstract:
In October 2012, first 5 LA funded a unique collaboration between Los
Angeles County Department of Mental Health (DMH) and UC Davis PCIT
Training Center (UCD PCIT) to train county-contracted agencies to provide
ParentChild Interaction Therapy (PCIT). This $20 million dollar, 5-year
grant represented the largest implementation effort of an empirically based
treatment to date. The purpose of this paper was to describe the first 2 years of
the implementation process of this project, beginning with project start up and
pre-implementation phases, and to present agency training and client
performance outcomes from our first year of training. Results presented in this
evaluation suggest that it is possible to train LA County providers in PCIT,
and that PCIT is an effective intervention for DMH-contracted providers in
LA County. This evaluation also discusses challenges to successful
implementation. Barriers to progress included unanticipated delays building
county infrastructure, trainee attrition, and insufficient client referrals. We
discuss the results of the current implementation with respect to theory,
research, and others training models, with the aim of evaluating and
prioritizing different implementation drivers, noting the ongoing competition
between knowing what to do and the need for action. (PsycINFO Database
Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Evidence Based Practice; *Family Therapy; *Parent Child Relations; Clients
PsycINFO Classification:
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
US
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
Adolescence (13-17 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs)
Thirties (30-39 yrs)
Middle Age (40-64 yrs)
Aged (65 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Dyadic ParentChild Coding System-4
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Grant Sponsorship:
Sponsor: First 5 LA, US
Recipients: No recipient indicated
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
First Posted: Dec 15, 2015; Accepted: Nov 18, 2015; Revised: Oct 30, 2015;
First Submitted: Feb 25, 2015
Release Date:
20151221
Correction Date:
20160922
Copyright:
All rights reserved.. Elsevier Ltd.. 2015
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.11.011
PMID:
26704299
Accession Number:
2015-57436-001
Number of Citations in Source:
29
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 31
Title:
Group parentchild interaction therapy: A randomized control trial for the
treatment of conduct problems in young children.
Authors:
Niec, Larissa N.. Center for Children, Families, and Communities, Central
Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI, US, Niec1L@cmich.edu
Barnett, Miya L.. Department of Psychology, University of California, Los
Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, US
Prewett, Matthew S.. Department of Psychology, Central Michigan
University, Mount Pleasant, MI, US
Shanley Chatham, Jenelle R.. Institute of Public Health, Georgia State
University, GA, US
Address:
Niec, Larissa N., Center for Children, Families, and Communities, Central
Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI, US, 48859, Niec1L@cmich.edu
Source:
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol 84(8), Aug, 2016. pp.
682-698.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
J Consult Clin Psychol
Page Count:
17
Publisher:
US : American Psychological Association
Other Journal Titles:
Journal of Consulting Psychology
Other Publishers:
US : American Association for Applied Psychology
US : Dentan Printing Company
US : Science Press Printing Company
ISSN:
0022-006X (Print)
1939-2117 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
PCIT, parentchild interaction therapy, childhood conduct problems, group
treatment, parent management training
Abstract (English):
Objective: Although efficacious interventions exist for childhood conduct
problems, a majority of families in need of services do not receive them. To
address problems of treatment access and adherence, innovative adaptations of
current interventions are needed. This randomized control trial investigated the
relative efficacy of a novel format of parentchild interaction therapy (PCIT),
a treatment for young children with conduct problems. Method: Eighty-one
families with 3- to 6-year-old children (71.6% boys, 85.2% White) with
diagnoses of oppositional defiant or conduct disorder were randomized to
individual PCIT (n = 42) or the novel format, Group PCIT. Parents completed
standardized measures of childrens conduct problems, parenting stress, and
social support at intake, posttreatment, and 6-month follow-up. Therapist
ratings, parent attendance, and homework completion provided measures of
treatment adherence. Throughout treatment, parenting skills were assessed
using the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System. Results: Parents in
both group and individual PCIT reported significant improvements from
intake to posttreatment and follow-up in their childrens conduct problems and
adaptive functioning, as well as significant decreases in parenting stress.
Parents in both treatment conditions also showed significant improvements in
their parenting skills. There were no interactions between time and treatment
format. Contrary to expectation, parents in Group PCIT did not experience
greater social support or treatment adherence. Conclusions: Group PCIT was
not inferior to individual PCIT and may be a valuable format to reach more
families in need of services. Future work should explore the efficiency and
sustainability of Group PCIT in community settings. (PsycINFO Database
Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Impact Statement:
What is the public health significance of this article?Children and families
who completed group parentchild interaction therapy (PCIT) demonstrated
significant reductions in child conduct problems and increases in positive
parenting skills that were not inferior to the treatment gains experienced by
families in individual PCIT. Group PCIT may offer the potential to increase
treatment availability for families in need of services. (PsycINFO Database
Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Behavior Problems; *Conduct Disorder; *Family Therapy; *Management
Training; *Parent Training; Group Psychotherapy; Parent Child
Communication; Parent Child Relations
PsycINFO Classification:
Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention (3300)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
US
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
School Age (6-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children
Dyadic ParentChild Interaction Coding System-III
Behavioral Assessment System for Children2
Parent Rating Scale 25 year olds
Parent Rating Scale 511 year olds
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test--Third Edition DOI: 10.1037/t15145-000
Wonderlic Personnel Test
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Grant Sponsorship:
Sponsor: National Institute of Mental Health, US
Grant Number: MH 070483
Recipients: No recipient indicated
Methodology:
Clinical Trial; Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
First Posted: Mar 28, 2016; Accepted: Feb 8, 2016; Revised: Nov 18, 2015;
First Submitted: May 2, 2014
Release Date:
20160328
Correction Date:
20160718
Copyright:
American Psychological Association. 2016
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0040218
PMID:
27018531
Accession Number:
2016-15309-001
Number of Citations in Source:
78
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 32
Title:
Is parent--child interaction therapy effective in reducing stuttering?
Authors:
Millard SK; Nicholas A; Cook FM
Affiliation:
The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, Finsbury Health Centre,
Pine Street, London EC1R 0LP England; sharon.millard@islingtonpct.nhs.uk.
Source:
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research (JSLHR J SPEECH LANG
HEAR RES), Jun2008; 51(3): 636-650. (15p)
Publication Type:
Journal Article - research, tables/charts
Language:
English
Major Subjects:
Fluency Disorders -- Therapy -- In Infancy and Childhood
Parent-Child Relations
Speech Therapy -- Methods -- In Infancy and Childhood
Minor Subjects:
Case Studies; Child, Preschool; Experimental Studies; Female; Funding
Source; Interrater Reliability; Language Tests; Male; Pictorial Methods; Play
and Playthings; Pretest-Posttest Design; Prospective Studies; Replication
Studies; Scales; Severity of Illness; Speech Sample; Treatment Outcomes;
Videorecording; Human
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To investigate the efficacy of parent--child interaction therapy
(PCIT) with young children who stutter. METHOD: This is a longitudinal,
multiple single-subject study. The participants were 6 children aged 3;3-4;10
[years;months] who had been stuttering for longer than 12 months. Therapy
consisted of 6 sessions of clinic-based therapy and 6 weeks of home
consolidation. Speech samples were videorecorded during free play with
parents at home and analyzed to obtain stuttering data for each child before
therapy, during therapy, and up to 12 months posttherapy. RESULTS:
Stuttering frequency data obtained during therapy and posttherapy were
compared with the frequency and variability of stuttering in the baseline
phase. Four of the 6 children significantly reduced stuttering with both parents
by the end of the therapy phase. CONCLUSIONS: PCIT can reduce stuttering
in preschool children with 6 sessions of clinic-based therapy and 6 weeks of
parent-led, home-based therapy. The study highlights the individual response
to therapy. Suggestions for future research directions are made.
Journal Subset:
Allied Health; Peer Reviewed; USA
Special Interest:
Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care; Speech-Language
Pathology/Audiology
Instrumentation:
British Picture Vocabulary Scale (BPVS)
Renfrew Action Picture Test (RAPT)
ISSN:
1092-4388
MEDLINE Info:
PMID: 18506041 NLM UID: 9705610
Grant Information:
Supported by the Association for Research into Stammering in Childhood and
by Islington Primary Care Trust
Entry Date:
20080808
Revision Date:
20150818
Accession Number:
105783433
Database:
CINAHL Complete

Record: 33
Title:
Open-trial pilot of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for children with Autism
Spectrum Disorder.
Authors:
Zlomke, Kimberly R.. Department of Psychology, University of South
Alabama, Mobile, AL, US, zlomke@southalabama.edu
Jeter, Kathryn. Department of Psychology, University of South Alabama,
Mobile, AL, US
Murphy, Jillian. Department of Psychology, University of South Alabama,
Mobile, AL, US
Address:
Zlomke, Kimberly R., Department of Psychology, University of South
Alabama, 307 University Boulevard North, UCOM 1000, Mobile, AL, US,
36688, zlomke@southalabama.edu
Source:
Child & Family Behavior Therapy, Vol 39(1), Jan, 2017. pp. 1-18.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
Child Fam Behav Ther
Page Count:
18
Publisher:
United Kingdom : Taylor & Francis
Other Publishers:
US : Haworth Press
ISSN:
0731-7107 (Print)
1545-228X (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), disruptive behavior, manualized
intervention, parenting intervention, play therapy
Abstract:
In this pilot study, the effectiveness and feasibility of Parent-Child Interaction
Therapy (PCIT) for decreasing disruptive behavior was evaluated in 17 young
children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). PCIT is a behaviorally based
play therapy which targets the parent-child relationship through live coaching
of play interactions and the implementation of consistent discipline
techniques. Following an average of 19 sessions, disruptive behavior as
measured by multiple indices significantly decreased. Congruently, parents
increased positive parental following skills and decreased negative parental
leading skills across the course of treatment. In addition, parents reported
increased levels of child functional communication and prosocial behavior.
High levels of parent acceptability of the intervention were also noted. Effect
sizes were medium to large across measured dependent variables, including
parent report and behavioral observations. Implications for the clinical use of
PCIT within an ASD population and future research with controlled outcome
studies are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights
reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Autism Spectrum Disorders; *Behavior Problems; *Behavior
Therapy; *Parent Child Relations; Family Therapy; Intervention; Play
Therapy
PsycINFO Classification:
Behavior Therapy & Behavior Modification (3312)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
School Age (6-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System
Behavior Assessment System for Children
Gilliam Autism Rating Scale
Therapy Attitude Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t16794-000
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study; Treatment Outcome
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
Accepted: Jan 16, 2016; Revised: Jan 11, 2016; First Submitted: Oct 23, 2015
Release Date:
20170227
Copyright:
Taylor & Francis. 2017
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07317107.2016.1267999
Accession Number:
2017-07104-001
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 34
Title:
Open-Trial Pilot of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for Children With
Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Authors:
Zlomke, Kimberly R.1
Jeter, Kathryn1
Murphy, Jillian1
Source:
Child & Family Behavior Therapy. 2017, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p1-18. 18p.
Document Type:
Article
Subject Terms:
*Treatment of autism
*Analysis of variance
*Parent & child
*Children
Correlation (Statistics)
Health care teams
Play therapy
T-test (Statistics)
Pilot projects
Repeated measures design
Data analysis software
Descriptive statistics
Author-Supplied Keywords:
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
disruptive behavior
manualized intervention
parenting intervention
play therapy
Abstract:
In this pilot study, the effectiveness and feasibility of Parent-Child Interaction
Therapy (PCIT) for decreasing disruptive behavior was evaluated in 17 young
children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). PCIT is a behaviorally based
play therapy which targets the parent-child relationship through live coaching
of play interactions and the implementation of consistent discipline
techniques. Following an average of 19 sessions, disruptive behavior as
measured by multiple indices significantly decreased. Congruently, parents
increased positive parental following skills and decreased negative parental
leading skills across the course of treatment. In addition, parents reported
increased levels of child functional communication and prosocial behavior.
High levels of parent acceptability of the intervention were also noted. Effect
sizes were medium to large across measured dependent variables, including
parent report and behavioral observations. Implications for the clinical use of
PCIT within an ASD population and future research with controlled outcome
studies are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Copyright of Child & Family Behavior Therapy is the property of Taylor &
Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or
posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission.
However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This
abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the
copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for
the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
Author Affiliations:
1
Department of Psychology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama,
USA
ISSN:
0731-7107
DOI:
10.1080/07317107.2016.1267999
Accession Number:
121255658
Database:
SocINDEX with Full Text

Record: 35
Title:
Palin Parent Child Interaction Therapy (Palin PCI): an approach for stuttering
children and their parents.
Authors:
Iven, Claudia; Hansen, Bernd
Affiliation:
Dipl.-Sprachheilpdagoge, Akademischer Sprachtherapeut und Dozent,
Universitt Flensburg
Source:
Forum Logopadie (FORUM LOGOPADIE), mar2014; 28(2): 18-23. (6p)
Publication Type:
Journal Article
Language:
German
Abstract:
The Palin Parent-Child Interaction Approach (Palin PCI, Kelman & Nicholas
2008) is hardly known in German speaking countries. The evidence based
approach for stuttering children aged 2;6 to 7 years was developed at the
Michael Palin Centre for Stammering in London. Palin PCI represents a useful
endorsement for therapy of dysfluent speaking or stuttering preschool
children: It takes into account the fluency-enhancing conditions that are
present in the childs daily live and therefore focuses on participation and
other ICF related factors. The multidimensional perspective on stuttering leads
to a comprehensive assessment of individual aspects and the therapy planning
processes. The program helps parents to establish specific interaction styles to
enhance speech fluency.
Journal Subset:
Allied Health; Continental Europe; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert
Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed
Special Interest:
Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology
ISSN:
0932-0547
MEDLINE Info:
NLM UID: 9441433
Entry Date:
20150923
Revision Date:
20151008
DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.2443/skv-s-2014-53020140202
Accession Number:
109665176
Database:
CINAHL Complete

Record: 36
Title:
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in school-aged children with specific
language impairment.
Authors:
Allen, Jessica; Marshall, Chlo R.
Affiliation:
Department of Language and Communication Science, City University
London, London, UK
Source:
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders (INT J LANG
COMMUN DISORD), Jul2011; 46(4): 397-410. (14p)
Publication Type:
Journal Article - research, tables/charts, randomized controlled trial
Language:
English
Major Subjects:
Parent-Child Relations
Language Therapy -- Methods -- England
Language Disorders -- Therapy
Treatment Outcomes
Communication Skills -- In Infancy and Childhood
Minor Subjects:
England; Human; Professional Role; Speech-Language Pathologists; Verbal
Behavior; Nonverbal Communication; Random Assignment; Control Group;
Waiting Lists; Comparative Studies; Prospective Studies; Repeated Measures;
Videorecording; Child; Semantics; Grammar; Games; Interrater Reliability;
Mean Length of Utterance; T-Tests; Analysis of Variance; Descriptive
Statistics; Randomized Controlled Trials
Abstract:
Background: Parents play a critical role in their child's language development.
Therefore, advising parents of a child with language difficulties on how to
facilitate their child's language might benefit the child. Parent-Child
Interaction Therapy (PCIT) has been developed specifically for this purpose.
In PCIT, the speech-and-language therapist (SLT) works collaboratively with
parents, altering interaction styles to make interaction more appropriate to
their child's level of communicative needs. Aims: This study investigates the
effectiveness of PCIT in 8-10-year-old children with specific language
impairment (SLI) in the expressive domain. It aimed to identify whether PCIT
had any significant impact on the following communication parameters of the
child: verbal initiations, verbal and non-verbal responses, mean length of
utterance (MLU), and proportion of child-to-parent utterances. Methods &
Procedures: Sixteen children with SLI and their parents were randomly
assigned to two groups: treated or delayed treatment (control). The treated
group took part in PCIT over a 4-week block, and then returned to the clinic
for a final session after a 6-week consolidation period with no input from the
therapist. The treated and control group were assessed in terms of the different
communication parameters at three time points: pre-therapy, post-therapy
(after the 4-week block) and at the final session (after the consolidation
period), through video analysis. It was hypothesized that all communication
parameters would significantly increase in the treated group over time and that
no significant differences would be found in the control group. Outcomes &
Results: All the children in the treated group made language gains during
spontaneous interactions with their parents. In comparison with the control
group, PCIT had a positive effect on three of the five communication
parameters: verbal initiations, MLU and the proportion of child-to-parent
utterances. There was a marginal effect on verbal responses, and a trend
towards such an effect for non-verbal responses. Conclusions & Implications:
Despite the small group sizes, this study provides preliminary evidence that
PCIT can achieve its treatment goals with 8-10-year-olds who have expressive
language impairments. This has potentially important implications for how
mainstream speech and language services provide intervention to school-aged
children. In contrast to direct one-to-one therapy, PCIT offers a single block of
therapy where the parents' communication and interaction skills are developed
to provide the child with an appropriate language-rich environment, which in
turn could be more cost-effective for the service provider.
Journal Subset:
Allied Health; Europe; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland
Special Interest:
Pediatric Care; Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology
ISSN:
1368-2822
MEDLINE Info:
PMID: 21771216 NLM UID: 9803709
Entry Date:
20111109
Revision Date:
20150819
DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/13682822.2010.517600
Accession Number:
104703053
Database:
CINAHL Complete

Record: 37
Title:
ParentChild Interaction Therapy and autism spectrum disorder: Adaptations
with a child with severe developmental delays.
Authors:
Lesack, Roseanne. Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of
Medicine, Atlanta, GA, US
Bearss, Karen. Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of
Medicine, Atlanta, GA, US
Celano, Marianne. Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of
Medicine, Atlanta, GA, US
Sharp, William G.. Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of
Medicine, Atlanta, GA, US, wgsharp@emory.edu
Address:
Sharp, William G., Pediatric Psychology and Feeding Disorders Program,
Marcus Autism Center, 1920 Briarcliff Road, Atlanta, GA, US, 30329,
wgsharp@emory.edu
Source:
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology, Vol 2(1), Mar, 2014. pp. 68-82.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
Clin Pract Pediatr Psychol
Publisher:
US : Educational Publishing Foundation
ISSN:
2169-4826 (Print)
2169-4834 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
autism spectrum disorders, behavior problems, case study, parent training,
parentchild interaction therapy
Abstract:
Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) frequently present with co-
occurring problem behaviors (e.g., noncompliance, aggression), which
increase the risk for exclusion from educational programming, social
relationships, and community activities. Although behavioral intervention
represents a frequently cited and promising approach for addressing
challenging behaviors in ASD, there is a pressing need to expand the
availability and dissemination of short-term, evidenced-based interventions to
meet growing demand in the ASD community. Originally developed for
typically developing children, ParentChild Interaction Therapy (PCIT)
represents a well-supported, behaviorally based parent training program
shown to hold potential benefit for children with ASD. Questions, however,
remain regarding the application of PCIT among children with ASD and
pronounced developmental delays. This case study describes the use of PCIT
with a child with ASD who presents with limited receptive and expressive
communication skills, as well as a history of aggression, tantrums, and
noncompliance. Adaptations to the intervention included changes to both
phases of the intervention (CDI and PDI). Results indicate that the
intervention was associated with acquisition of parenting skills and reduced
problem behaviors, suggesting PCIT with modifications may also hold benefit
for children with ASD and severe developmental delays. (PsycINFO Database
Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Behavior Problems; *Family Therapy; *Parent Child Relations; *Parent
Training; Autism Spectrum Disorders
PsycINFO Classification:
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Male
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
Tests & Measures:
Dyadic ParentChild Interaction Coding System
Preschool Language Scale, Fourth Edition DOI: 10.1037/t15140-000
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Methodology:
Clinical Case Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
Accepted: Dec 19, 2013; Revised: Dec 16, 2013; First Submitted: Jun 21,
2013
Release Date:
20140317
Correction Date:
20151207
Copyright:
American Psychological Association. 2014
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cpp0000047
PsycARTICLES Identifier:
cpp-2-1-68
Accession Number:
2014-09057-005
Number of Citations in Source:
128
Database:
PsycARTICLES

Record: 38
Title:
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and High Functioning Autism: A Conceptual
Overview
Author(s):
Masse, Joshua J.; McNeil, Cheryl B.; Wagner, Stephanie M.; Chorney, Daniel
B.
Source:
Journal of Early and Intensive Behavior Intervention, v4 n4 p714-735 2007.
22 pp.
Peer Reviewed:
Yes
ISSN:
1554-4893
Descriptors:
Autism, Interaction, Therapy, Outcomes of Treatment, Preschool Children,
Aggression, Resistance (Psychology), Parent Child Relationship, Pervasive
Developmental Disorders, Behavior Problems, Family Counseling, Behavior
Modification, Positive Reinforcement, Skill Development, Parenting Skills,
Antisocial Behavior, Interpersonal Competence, Counseling Techniques,
Preschool Education
Abstract:
Externalizing behaviors are a common component of the clinical presentation
of Autism Spectrum Disorders and are typically the initial focus of treatment
for children within this population. This article examines the appropriateness
of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) as a first-line, gateway treatment
for preschoolers with High Functioning Autism who demonstrate co-occurring
difficulties with aggressive and noncompliant behavior. Although PCIT has
shown initial success in treating children with High Functioning Autism, much
of the knowledge is based on clinical case studies thus warranting further
empirical research before conclusions can be drawn.
Abstractor:
As Provided
Number of References:
61
Number of Pages:
22
Publication Type:
Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Availability:
Full Text from ERIC Available online:
http://www.eric.ed.gov/contentdelivery/servlet/ERICServlet?accno=EJ805605
Joseph Cautilli, Ph.D. & The Behavior Analyst Online Organization. 535
Queen Street, Philadelphia, PA 19147-3220. Tel: 215-462-6737; Web site:
http://www.baojournal.com/
Journal Code:
JAN2017
Entry Date:
2008
Accession Number:
EJ805605
Database:
ERIC

Record: 39
Title:
Parent-child interaction therapy and language facilitation: The role of parent-
training on language development.
Authors:
Tempel, Ashley B.. West Virginia University, Department of Psychology,
Morgantown, WV, US, Ashley.Tempel@mail.wvu.edu
Wagner, Stephanie M.. West Virginia University, Department of Psychology,
Morgantown, WV, US, Stephanie.Wagner@mail.wvu.edu
McNeil, Cheryl B.. West Virginia University, Department of Psychology,
Morgantown, WV, US, Cheryl.McNeil@mail.wvu.edu
Address:
Tempel, Ashley B., West Virginia University, Department of Psychology, 53
Campus Drive, Morgantown, WV, US, 26506, Ashley.Tempel@mail.wvu.edu
Source:
The Journal of Speech and Language Pathology Applied Behavior Analysis,
Vol 3(2-3), 2009. pp. 216-232.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
J Speech Lang Pathol Appl Behav Anal
Publisher:
US : Joseph D. Cautilli
ISSN:
1932-4731 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
language development, parent child interaction therapy, facilitative parenting
styles, language intervention
Abstract:
The high rate of comorbidity between language delays and externalizing
behavior problems has been well established. The enduring nature and
negative projections of delayed language supports the need for further
examination of language facilitation and early interventions aimed at altering
language development, which may also positively influence later behavioral
outcomes. Specifically, the role of parenting styles in altering both language
development and behavior problems has been examined. Although
independently established within each field, characteristics of facilitative
parenting styles remain similar between the language development and parent-
training literatures. In particular, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)
shares many similarities with existing language intervention approaches. The
current paper explores the potential influences that PCIT may have in
facilitating children's language development. (PsycINFO Database Record (c)
2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Behavior Problems; *Comorbidity; *Language Development; *Parent Child
Relations; *Parenting Style; Language; Language Delay; Parent Training
PsycINFO Classification:
Interpersonal & Client Centered & Humanistic Therapy (3314)
Population:
Human
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Test of Language Development
Standford-Binet IQ test
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test--Revised
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Release Date:
20141222
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0100241
PsycARTICLES Identifier:
slp-3-2-3-216
Accession Number:
2014-51870-007
Number of Citations in Source:
91
Database:
PsycARTICLES

Record: 40
Title:
Parent-child interaction therapy as a family-oriented approach to behavioral
management following pediatric traumatic brain injury: a case report.
Authors:
Cohen ML; Heaton SC; Ginn N; Eyberg SM
Affiliation:
MS, Department of Clinical & Health Psychology, College of Public Health
and Health University of Florida, PO Box 100165, Gainesville, FL, 32610-
0165, USA. mlcohen@phhp.ufl.edu.
Source:
Journal of Pediatric Psychology (J PEDIATR PSYCHOL), Apr2012; 37(3):
251-261. (11p)
Publication Type:
Journal Article - case study, research
Language:
English
Major Subjects:
Behavior Therapy -- Methods
Brain Injuries -- Therapy
Family Therapy -- Methods
Parent-Child Relations
Minor Subjects:
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder -- Complications; Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder -- Psychosocial Factors; Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder -- Therapy; Brain Injuries -- Complications; Brain
Injuries -- Psychosocial Factors; Child; Child Behavior; Human; Male; Parents
-- Psychosocial Factors; Stress, Psychological -- Therapy
Journal Subset:
Biomedical; USA
Special Interest:
Pediatric Care; Psychiatry/Psychology
ISSN:
0146-8693
MEDLINE Info:
PMID: 22004884 NLM UID: 7801773
Entry Date:
20120727
Revision Date:
20150711
Accession Number:
104536271
Database:
CINAHL Complete

Record: 41
Title:
Parent-child interaction therapy as a treatment for ADHD in early childhood:
A multiple baseline single-case design.
Authors:
Jeffries DeLoatche, Kendall. University of South Florida, Psychological and
Social Foundations, US
Source:
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social
Sciences, Vol 76(9-A)(E), 2016.
Publisher:
US : ProQuest Information & Learning
Other Journal Titles:
Dissertation Abstracts International
ISSN:
0419-4209 (Print)
ISBN:
978-1321693881
Language:
English
Keywords:
mothers' attitudes towards therapy, preschool-aged children, ADHD
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of PCIT as an
alternative to medication in managing symptoms and behavior problems of
preschool-aged children with ADHD. Using a multiple baseline single-case
design, the study measured the impact of PCIT on four preschool-aged
children's problem behaviors and ADHD symptoms, parenting practices, and
mothers' attitudes towards therapy. Outcome measures included the Child
Behavior Checklist, Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, Behavior Assessment
System for Children, ADHD Symptom Observation form, Dyadic Parent-
Child Interaction Coding System, Parenting Practices Interview, and Therapy
Attitude Inventory. Results from visual analyses, a visual permutation test, and
hierarchical linear modeling showed partial treatment effects for mothers' use
of labeled praises (b = 10.67, p < 0.0001), commands (b = -26.84, p = 0.000),
behavior management skills (b = 91.21, p < 0.0001), children's behavior
problems (b = -20.29, p = 0.000), and parent-reported ADHD symptoms ( b =
-25.76, p = 0.000). Mothers expressed high satisfaction with PCIT and
reported their relationships with their children and their children's compliance
and behavior problems had improved post-intervention. The consistency with
which other caretaking partners (e.g., fathers) practiced the same discipline
procedures as the mothers in the study played a significant role in the changes
observed in mothers' use of effective discipline practices and children's
behavior problems. Findings of this study indicate PCIT may partially be an
effective intervention in improving children's behavior problems and ADHD
symptoms. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Dissertation
Dissertation Details:
UMI Order Number: AAI3689770
OpenURL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-
2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_da
t=xri:pqdiss:3689770
Advisor(s): Kathy Bradley-Klug
Degree: Ph.D., 2015
Institution: University of South Florida
Department: Psychological and Social Foundations
Subjects:
*Attention Deficit Disorder; *Attention Deficit Disorder with
Hyperactivity; *Mothers; *Preschool Students; Preschool Education
PsycINFO Classification:
Educational Psychology (3500)
Population:
Human
Female
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Methodology:
Clinical Case Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Dissertation Abstract
Release Date:
20160811
Accession Number:
2016-26512-185
Database:
PsycINFO
Record: 42
Title:
ParentChild Interaction Therapy as an attachment-based intervention:
Theoretical rationale and pilot data with adopted children.
Authors:
Allen, Brian. Center for the Protection of Children, Penn State Hershey
Children's Hospital, Hershey, PA, US, ballen1@hmc.psu.edu
Timmer, Susan G.. UC Davis Children's Hospital, Davis, CA, US
Urquiza, Anthony J.. UC Davis Children's Hospital, Davis, CA, US
Address:
Allen, Brian, Center for the Protection of Children, Penn State Hershey
Children's Hospital, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA, US, 17033,
ballen1@hmc.psu.edu
Source:
Children and Youth Services Review, Vol 47(Part 3), Dec, 2014. pp. 334-341.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
Child Youth Serv Rev
Page Count:
8
Publisher:
Netherlands : Elsevier Science
ISSN:
0190-7409 (Print)
Language:
English
Keywords:
Attachment Evidence-based treatment, Parent Child Interaction Therapy
Adoption
Abstract:
Children with histories of child abuse and neglect, particularly children
residing in foster or adoptive homes, are commonly considered by many
professionals to need 'attachment therapy' in order to address emotional and
behavioral needs. However, evidence-based treatments rarely utilize an
attachment-based justification outside of the infancy through preschooler age
range. In actuality, many evidence-based treatments can be understood
through the lens of attachment theory. This paper reviews the tenets of an
attachment-based approach to treatment and describes how one evidence-
based treatment, ParentChild Interaction Therapy (PCIT), conforms to all
expectations and requirements prescribed by attachment theory and research.
Next, pilot data from an open trial of PCIT with a sample of adopted children
and their adoptive caregivers (n = 85) are provided. Results demonstrate
significant improvements in positive parenting techniques, reductions in
parenting stress, and reductions in externalizing and internalizing concerns
among the children. These results are discussed in the context of improving
the quality of care for children often described as in need of 'attachment
therapy.' (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Adopted Children; *Attachment Behavior; *Family Therapy; *Parent Child
Relations; *Treatment; Age Differences; Caregivers; Psychometrics; Test
Reliability; Test Validity; Theories
PsycINFO Classification:
Clinical Psychological Testing (2224)
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
US
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
School Age (6-12 yrs)
Tests & Measures:
Parenting Stress InventoryShort Form
Family Risk Factors Measure
Child Behavior Checklist
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
First Posted: Oct 23, 2014; Accepted: Oct 15, 2014; Revised: Oct 15, 2014;
First Submitted: Aug 6, 2014
Release Date:
20150112
Correction Date:
20150126
Copyright:
All rights reserved.. Elsevier Ltd.. 2014
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2014.10.009
Accession Number:
2014-55927-018
Number of Citations in Source:
73
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 43
Title:
Parent-child interaction therapy emotion development: a novel treatment for
depression in preschool children.
Authors:
Lenze SN; Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of
Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.
Pautsch J
Luby J
Source:
Depression And Anxiety [Depress Anxiety] 2011 Feb; Vol. 28 (2), pp. 153-9.
Date of Electronic Publication: 2010 Dec 13.
Publication Type:
Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Language:
English
Journal Info:
Publisher: Wiley Country of Publication: United States NLM ID: 9708816
Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 1520-6394
(Electronic) Linking ISSN: 10914269 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Depress
Anxiety Subsets: MEDLINE
Imprint Name(s):
Original Publication: New York, NY : Wiley, c1997-
MeSH Terms:
Emotions*
Parent-Child Relations*
Personality Development*
Depressive Disorder, Major/*therapy
Education/*methods
Family Therapy/*methods
Checklist ; Child, Preschool ; Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis
; Depressive Disorder, Major/psychology ; Emotional Intelligence ; Feasibility
Studies ; Female ; Humans ; Internal-External Control ; Male ; Personality
Assessment ; Pilot Projects ; Treatment Outcome
Abstract:
Background: Psychotherapies with known efficacy in adolescent depression
have been adapted for prepubertal children; however, none have been
empirically validated for use with depressed very young children. Due to the
centrality of the parent-child relationship to the emotional well being of the
young child, with caregiver support shown to mediate the risk for depression
severity, we created an Emotional Development (ED) module to address
emotion development impairments identified in preschool onset depression.
The new module was integrated with an established intervention for preschool
disruptive disorders, Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). Preliminary
findings of an open trial of this novel intervention, PCIT-ED, with depressed
preschool children are reported.
Methods: PCIT was adapted for the treatment of preschool depression by
incorporating a novel emotional development module, focused on teaching the
parent to facilitate the child's emotional development and enhance emotion
regulation. Eight parent-child dyads with depressed preschoolers participated
in 14 sessions of the treatment. Depression severity, internalizing and
externalizing symptoms, functional impairment, and emotion
recognition/discrimination were measured pre- and posttreatment.
Results: Depression severity scores significantly decreased with a large effect
size (1.28). Internalizing and externalizing symptoms as well as functional
impairment were also significantly decreased pre- to posttreatment.
Conclusions: PCIT-ED seems to be a promising treatment for preschoolers
with depression, and the large effect sizes observed in this open trial suggest
early intervention may provide a window of opportunity for more effective
treatment. A randomized controlled trial of PCIT-ED in preschool depression
is currently underway.
( 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.)
Comments:
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16429091)
Grant Information:
R34-MH80163 United States MH NIMH NIH HHS; T32DA007261 United
States DA NIDA NIH HHS; R34 MH080163-01A1 United States MH NIMH
NIH HHS; T32 DA007261 United States DA NIDA NIH HHS; R34
MH080163 United States MH NIMH NIH HHS; K23 MH090245-01A1
United States MH NIMH NIH HHS
Contributed Indexing:
Indexing Agency: NLM Local ID #: NIHMS254467.
Entry Date(s):
Date Created: 20110201 Date Completed: 20110523 Latest Revision:
20161122
Update Code:
20161213
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3302425
DOI:
10.1002/da.20770
PMID:
21284068
Database:
MEDLINE with Full Text

Record: 44
Title:
ParentChild Interaction Therapy for Child Disruptive Behaviour Disorders: A
Meta-analysis
Authors:
Ward, Michelle
Theule, Jennifer
Cheung, Kristene
Source:
Child and Youth Care Forum; October 2016, Vol. 45 Issue: Number 5 p675-
690, 16p
ISSN:
10531890; 15733319
Abstract:
Numerous studies have looked at the efficacy of ParentChild Interaction
Therapy (PCIT) for young children with externalizing behaviour problems.
The present study compiled these results through a comprehensive review to
provide greater clarity regarding the efficacy of this treatment. Using a random
effects model, a meta-analysis was conducted to determine the weighted mean
effect size. To be included in this analysis, studies were required to have
implemented PCIT with children (ages 25) with clinically significant
externalizing behaviour problems. Twelve studies comprising 254 treated and
118 control group children were included, with the majority of children being
White males. This research also assessed whether gender and type of
disruptive behaviour disorder (DBD) moderated the effectiveness of PCIT.
PCIT had a large effect on improving externalizing behaviour problems in
children with DBD based on the effect size derived from pre- and post-
treatment behavioural outcomes (d= 1.65, 95 % CI [1.41, 1.90], p< .001) and
treatment and control group data (d= 1.39, 95 % CI [1.05, 1.73], p< .001).
Neither gender nor diagnosis was found to significantly moderate the
effectiveness. PCIT was found to be an efficacious intervention for child
DBD, although the small number of eligible studies and lack of diversity in the
sample populations suggests a need for further research. This study has
important implications for both practitioners and researchers and provides an
efficient summary of the research to date.
Entry Date:
20160223
LC Classification:
20081; 10008
Accession Number:
38122268
Database:
E-Journals

Record: 45
Title:
Parentchild interaction therapy for child disruptive behaviour disorders: A
meta-analysis.
Authors:
Ward, Michelle A.. Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba,
Winnipeg, MB, Canada, umward23@myumanitoba.ca
Theule, Jennifer. Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba,
Winnipeg, MB, Canada, Jen.Theule@umanitoba.ca
Cheung, Kristene, ORCID 0000-0002-6759-4961. Department of Psychology,
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada,
Kristene.Cheung@umanitoba.ca
Address:
Theule, Jennifer, Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, P436
Duff Roblin Building, 190 Dysart Road, Winnipeg, MB, Canada, R3T 2N2,
Jen.Theule@umanitoba.ca
Source:
Child & Youth Care Forum, Vol 45(5), Oct, 2016. pp. 675-690.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
Child Youth Care Forum
Page Count:
16
Publisher:
Germany : Springer
Other Journal Titles:
Child & Youth Care Quarterly; Child Care Quarterly
ISSN:
1053-1890 (Print)
1573-3319 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
Meta-analysis, Children, Disruptive behaviour disorders, Family therapy
Abstract:
Background: Numerous studies have looked at the efficacy of ParentChild
Interaction Therapy (PCIT) for young children with externalizing behaviour
problems.Objective: The present study compiled these results through a
comprehensive review to provide greater clarity regarding the efficacy of this
treatment. Methods: Using a random effects model, a meta-analysis was
conducted to determine the weighted mean effect size. To be included in this
analysis, studies were required to have implemented PCIT with children (ages
25) with clinically significant externalizing behaviour problems. Twelve
studies comprising 254 treated and 118 control group children were included,
with the majority of children being White males. This research also assessed
whether gender and type of disruptive behaviour disorder (DBD) moderated
the effectiveness of PCIT. Results: PCIT had a large effect on improving
externalizing behaviour problems in children with DBD based on the effect
size derived from pre- and post-treatment behavioural outcomes (d = 1.65, 95
% CI [1.41, 1.90], p < .001) and treatment and control group data (d = 1.39, 95
% CI [1.05, 1.73], p < .001). Neither gender nor diagnosis was found to
significantly moderate the effectiveness. Conclusions: PCIT was found to be
an efficacious intervention for child DBD, although the small number of
eligible studies and lack of diversity in the sample populations suggests a need
for further research. This study has important implications for both
practitioners and researchers and provides an efficient summary of the
research to date. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights
reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Behavior Problems; *Externalization; *Family Therapy; *Parent Child
Relations; Self-Efficacy
PsycINFO Classification:
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Methodology:
Meta Analysis
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
First Posted: Feb 22, 2016
Release Date:
20160225
Correction Date:
20160922
Copyright:
Springer Science+Business Media New York. 2016
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10566-016-9350-5
Accession Number:
2016-09884-001
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 46
Title:
Parentchild interaction therapy for preschool children with disruptive
behaviour problems in the Netherlands.
Authors:
Abrahamse, Marille E.. De Bascule, Academic Center for Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Amsterdam, Netherlands,
m.abrahamse@debascule.com
Junger, Marianne. Department of Social Safety Studies, Institute for
Innovation and Governance Studies (IGS), School of Management &
Governance, University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands
Chavannes, E. Lidewei. De Bascule, Academic Center for Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Coelman, Frederique J. G.. De Bascule, Academic Center for Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Boer, Frits. De Bascule, Academic Center for Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Lindauer, Ramn J. L.. De Bascule, Academic Center for Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Address:
Abrahamse, Marille E., De Bascule, Academic Center for Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Amsterdam, Netherlands,
m.abrahamse@debascule.com
Source:
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, Vol 6, Jun 13, 2012.
ArtID: 24
NLM Title Abbreviation:
Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health
Publisher:
United Kingdom : BioMed Central Limited
ISSN:
1753-2000 (Electronic)
Language:
English
Keywords:
parent child interactions therapy, treatment, disruptive behavior problems,
children, oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit disorder with
hyperactivity, autism spectrum disorder
Abstract:
Background: Persistent high levels of aggressive, oppositional and impulsive
behaviours, in the early lives of children, are significant risk factors for
adolescent and adult antisocial behaviour and criminal activity. If the
disruptive behavioural problems of young children could be prevented or
significantly reduced at an early age, the trajectory of these behavioural
problems leading to adolescent delinquency and adult antisocial behaviour
could be corrected. ParentChild Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is a short-term,
evidence-based, training intervention for parents dealing with preschool
children, who exhibit behavioural problems. Recently, PCIT was implemented
in a Dutch community mental health setting. This present study aims to
examine the short-term effects of PCIT on reducing the frequency of
disruptive behaviour in young children. Methods: This study is based on the
data of 37 referred families. Whereby the results of which are derived from an
analysis of parent reports of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI),
obtained during each therapeutic session. Furthermore, demographic
information, extracted from client files, was also utilized. However, it must be
noted that eleven families (27.5%) dropped out of treatment before the
treatment protocol was completed. To investigate the development of
disruptive behaviour, a non-clinical comparison group was recruited from
primary schools (N = 59). Results: The results of this study indicate that PCIT
significantly reduces disruptive behaviour in children. Large effect sizes were
found for both fathers and mothers reported problems (d = 1.88, d = 1.99,
respectively), which is similar to American outcome studies. At post
treatment, no differences were found concerning the frequency of behavioural
problems of children who completed treatment and those who participated in
the non-clinical comparison group. Conclusion: The findings of this study
suggest that PCIT is potentially an effective intervention strategy for young
children and their parents in the Dutch population. However, further research
into the evaluation of PCIT using a randomised controlled trial is
recommendable. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights
reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Behavior Problems; *Parent Child Relations; *Parent
Training; *Treatment; Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity; Autism
Spectrum Disorders; Oppositional Defiant Disorder
PsycINFO Classification:
Interpersonal & Client Centered & Humanistic Therapy (3314)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
Netherlands
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Grant Sponsorship:
Sponsor: Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development,
Netherlands
Recipients: No recipient indicated
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Interview; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
First Posted: Jun 13, 2012; Accepted: Jun 13, 2012; First Submitted: Feb 24,
2012
Release Date:
20120924
Correction Date:
20151207
Copyright:
Abrahamse et al.. 2012
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1753-2000-6-24
PMID:
22694924
Accession Number:
2012-21838-001
Number of Citations in Source:
49
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 47
Title:
Parent-child interaction therapy for preschoolers with ADHD
Author(s):
Bussing R, Boggs S, Donnelly R, Jaccard J, Eyberg S
Contact Information:
R. Bussing, Psychiatry, Clinical and Health Psychology; Pediatrics, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States
Language of Original Document:
English
Source:
Neuropsychiatrie de l'enfance et de l'adolescence 2012 60 5 SUPPL. 1, S92
(S92) Proceeding held: CONFERENCE START: 2012 Jul 21 CONFERENCE
END: 2012 Jul 25 in 20th World Congress of the International Association for
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions, IACAPAP 2012
Paris France
MEDLINE Publication Type:
Journal: Conference Abstract
Record Status:
This record is new this issue.
Abstract:
Objectives.- This study examines effects of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy
(PCIT) for preschoolers with ADHD with and without comorbid ODD
randomized to individual or group PCIT. Methods. * Analysis included 80
children (4 to 6 years old) who completed PCIT. Pre and post-treatment
measures included: * Child Behavior Checklist: * parent and teacher ratings of
the Swanson, Nolan and Pelham, Version 4, * the Eyberg Child Behavior
Inventory, * Columbia Impairment Scale (CIS); * observations from the
Dyadic Parent Child Interaction Coding System. Results. * For both PCIT
treatment formats significant post-treatment reductions of symptoms and
functional impairment were found on most parent-reported measures,
including ADHD-specific ratings and CIS scores, and significant
improvements were noted on observational measures of parent-child
interactions. None of the teacher-reported measures showed symptom
reductions in either the individual or group PCIT format. Conclusions. *
ADHD symptom reduction is not a specific goal of children's treatment in
PCIT, yet significant improvements occurred in both hyperactive/ impulsive
and inattentive symptoms, for children with ADHD with and without
comorbidODD, based on parent report measures. These findings suggest that
PCIT may be an effective treatment for the behavioral and attentional
symptoms of ADHD in preschoolers and that it merits further study as a
promising intervention for preschoolers with ADHD.
EMBASE keywords:
*human; *child; *preschool child; *therapy; *child psychiatry; *occupation;
*parent; *attention deficit disorder; teacher; functional disease; Colombia;
child behavior; Child Behavior Checklist
EMBASE AN:
2015-10-312015 Issue 107188006810.1016/j.neurenf.2012.05.379
Cochrane Source Information:
This document should be cited as: Bussing R; Boggs S; Donnelly R; Jaccard J;
Eyberg S. Parent-child interaction therapy for preschoolers with ADHD 2012
(The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CCTR/CENTRAL)). In: The
Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2012. Oxford: Update Software. Updated
quarterly.
Accession Number:
CN-01089348
Database:
Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials

Record: 48
Title:
ParentChild Interaction Therapy for sexual concerns of maltreated children:
A preliminary investigation
Authors:
Allen, Brian1
Timmer, Susan G.2
Urquiza, Anthony J.2
Source:
Child Abuse & Neglect; June 2016, Vol. 56 Issue: Number 1 p80-88, 9p
ISSN:
01452134
Author Affiliations:
1
Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital, Hershey, PA, USA
2
UC Davis Children's Hospital, Sacramento, CA, USA
Abstract:
The current study examines whether an evidence-based treatment for
externalizing behavior problems may reduce sexual concerns among children
with maltreatment histories. An archival analysis identified 44 children
between the ages of 3 and 8 exhibiting externalizing problems and co-morbid
sexual concerns who were treated using ParentChild Interaction Therapy
(PCIT). A second group of children receiving PCIT for externalizing
behaviors without sexual concerns was included for comparison purposes
(n=143). Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks Tests indicated significant improvement
among the group with sexual concerns, with 63.6% of children no longer
displaying clinically significant sexual concerns at post-treatment. In addition,
these children showed a decline in general externalizing problems comparable
to that observed among the group of children receiving PCIT and not
displaying sexual concerns. Lastly, logistic regression analyses showed that
pre-treatment posttraumatic stress scores did not moderate improvement of
sexual concerns, suggesting that posttraumatic stress-related sexual concerns
may improve from PCIT treatment. These findings suggest that evidence-
based parent training interventions, specifically PCIT, may successfully
reduce sexual concerns among children who experienced maltreatment.
Entry Date:
20160425
LC Classification:
20081; 10008
Accession Number:
38666141
Database:
E-Journals

Record: 49
Title:
ParentChild Interaction Therapy for sexual concerns of maltreated children:
A preliminary investigation.
Authors:
Allen, Brian. Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital, Hershey, PA, US,
ballen1@hmc.psu.edu
Timmer, Susan G.. UC Davis Children's Hospital, Sacramento, CA, US
Urquiza, Anthony J.. UC Davis Children's Hospital, Sacramento, CA, US
Address:
Allen, Brian, Center for the Protection of Children, Penn State Hershey
Childrens Hospital, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA, US, 17033,
ballen1@hmc.psu.edu
Source:
Child Abuse & Neglect, Vol 56, Jun, 2016. pp. 80-88.
NLM Title Abbreviation:
Child Abuse Negl
Page Count:
9
Publisher:
Netherlands : Elsevier Science
ISSN:
0145-2134 (Print)
Language:
English
Keywords:
Sexual behavior, Sexual concerns, Externalizing problems, ParentChild
Interaction Therapy, Sexual abuse, Posttraumatic stress
Abstract:
The current study examines whether an evidence-based treatment for
externalizing behavior problems may reduce sexual concerns among children
with maltreatment histories. An archival analysis identified 44 children
between the ages of 3 and 8 exhibiting externalizing problems and co-morbid
sexual concerns who were treated using ParentChild Interaction Therapy
(PCIT). A second group of children receiving PCIT for externalizing
behaviors without sexual concerns was included for comparison purposes (n =
143). Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks Tests indicated significant improvement among
the group with sexual concerns, with 63.6% of children no longer displaying
clinically significant sexual concerns at post-treatment. In addition, these
children showed a decline in general externalizing problems comparable to
that observed among the group of children receiving PCIT and not displaying
sexual concerns. Lastly, logistic regression analyses showed that pre-treatment
posttraumatic stress scores did not moderate improvement of sexual concerns,
suggesting that posttraumatic stress-related sexual concerns may improve from
PCIT treatment. These findings suggest that evidence-based parent training
interventions, specifically PCIT, may successfully reduce sexual concerns
among children who experienced maltreatment. (PsycINFO Database Record
(c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Document Type:
Journal Article
Subjects:
*Child Abuse; *Externalization; *Parent Child Communication; *Parent
Training; *Psychosexual Behavior; Behavior Therapy; Sexual Abuse
PsycINFO Classification:
Group & Family Therapy (3313)
Population:
Human
Male
Female
Location:
US
Age Group:
Childhood (birth-12 yrs)
Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
School Age (6-12 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Tests & Measures:
Trauma Symptom Checklist for Young Children
Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory DOI: 10.1037/t01233-000
Methodology:
Empirical Study; Quantitative Study
Format Covered:
Electronic
Publication Type:
Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication History:
First Posted: May 6, 2016; Accepted: Apr 18, 2016; Revised: Mar 22, 2016;
First Submitted: Jul 7, 2015
Release Date:
20160714
Copyright:
All rights reserved.. Elsevier Ltd.. 2016
Digital Object Identifier:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2016.04.008
PMID:
27155807
Accession Number:
2016-27644-009
Number of Citations in Source:
32
Database:
PsycINFO

Record: 50
Title:
ParentChild Interaction Therapy for the Treatment of Disinhibited Social
Engagement Disorder: A Case Report
Authors:
Dickmann, Cassie R.1
Allen, Brian1
Source:
Evidence-Based Practice in Child and Adolescent Mental Health; January
2017, Vol. 2 Issue: Number 1 p19-29, 11p
ISSN:
23794925; 23794933
Author Affiliations:
1
Penn State Childrens Hospital
Abstract:
ABSTRACTDisinhibited social engagement disorder (DSED), formerly
known as reactive attachment disorderdisinhibited type, is a relatively rare
condition connected to severe deprivation early in life. DSED often persists
long after the child is placed in a more normative caregiving environment;
however, few clinical investigations have examined potential treatment
approaches. The extant research suggests that evidence-based, parent-focused
behavior management training (BMT) may be a fruitful avenue to explore.
This case study discusses the application of ParentChild Interaction Therapy
(PCIT), a well-validated BMT for externalizing problems, to a child
presenting with DSED and multiple comorbid concerns. Specific adaptations
of the PCIT protocol are discussed, including the integration of indicated
cognitive-behavioral techniques, and an assessment instrument specifically
designed to assess DSED symptoms was implemented to assess outcome.
Potential avenues through which the intervention may have prompted
therapeutic change are discussed and implications for further research in this
area are provided.
Entry Date:
20170313
Accession Number:
41510286
Database:
E-Journals
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