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Meeting Maryland’s Energy

Needs With Offshore Wind


Power

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Wind power – the world’s fastest-
growing electricity source
•  Installed US capacity increased 45% in 2007 to
over 48 billion kWh enough for nearly 4.5
million US homes in 34 states.
•  Currently 1% of overall US electric supply
•  Worldwide over 74 GW of installed capacity,
enough for 60 million Europeans.
•  President and AWEA both say wind power can
provide up to 20% of US electricity.

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Offshore Wind Energy Works
•  Offshore wind turbines
In Europe generate
electricity 70-90% of the
time
•  Sites identified by
Bluewater will generate
electricity 85 – 89% of
the time
•  PJM grid balances
energy produced by wind
generators, depending
on locations
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Other Jurisdictions Currently
Active in OSW
•  MD – University of Maryland System RFP, Baltimore Region RFP,
PSC Case 9214, MEA request for expressions of Interest
•  DE - Power purchase agreement
•  NJ – 3 Developers negotiating with BPU
•  NY – Request for Information and Interest - NYC and Long Island,
RFP by 2010
•  RI – RFP issued, negotiations taking place
•  MA – Cape Wind
•  VA/NC - research
•  Great Lake States
•  *Canada

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Offshore Resources
Supply Aligned With Demand
28% of coastal states use 78% of the electricity in
the U.S.

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A reliable energy resource off
of Maryland’s coast
Bluewater Wind Maryland
Project
–  60 to 85 feet of Water
–  Proposed up to 600 MW: 200 – 3 Mw Turbines
–  12 to 17 miles offshore of Ocean City Inlet
–  Project anticipated completion by the end of
2014
–  25 year Power Purchase Agreement

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Offshore wind answers
Maryland’s energy needs…
•  Stable Priced
–  Avoids unknown future compliance costs associated
with CO2 limits and pollution regulations such as
RGGI and Federal Carbon legislation
•  Increases Fuel Diversity
•  Reduces Environmental Impacts
•  Enables a state to become part of the solution to Global
Climate Crisis

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Maryland’s Energy Needs, cont.
•  Maryland’s RPS will require 20% by 2022
•  EmPower MD – conservation efforts
•  Transmission line congestion/expansion
–  “We are getting concerned that we are pushing the limits on
the current transmission system to meet Maryland’s loads from
imports”. – Michael Kormos, PJM, MD Electricity Supply
Stakeholder Meeting 9.17.07
•  Deficit of 1,890 MW by 20151
1MEA estimate based on 2006 weather normalized peak of 14,300 MW grown at 1.2%/year.

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Economic development
• 500+ local union jobs to be
created during construction
• $1.6 Billion investment
• Approx. 80 union O&M jobs
• Clean, high-tech industry
• Onshore and offshore
construction
• Trades, materials managers,
vessel operators, and service
businesses
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Additional economic development
•  More energy dollars kept in the state
•  New tourism related opportunities –
fishing, sight seeing
•  Enhanced quality of life – Reduction in air
emissions = Reduced health care costs

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Environmental benefits
•  No contribution to global warming
•  No air pollution (SO2, NOx, mercury)
•  No water pollution
•  No CO2
•  No waste
•  No fuel deliveries
•  No mining or drilling
•  No intake/discharge of water for cooling
•  No land use for generation equipment
•  No noise pollution
•  Promotes recreational fishing with artificial reefs created
by foundations 13
Offshore wind energy can reduce
the need for electricity from
polluting sources
Pollution avoided per year from a
600 MW offshore wind park
CO2 (lbs) 1.8 billion
SOX (lbs) 19.2 million
NOX (lbs) 6.9 million

Source: Analysis based on data provided in ‘Assessment of Delaware Offshore Wind Power’, University of
Delaware. Dhanju, Whitaker, Burton, Tolman, and Jarvis. September 2005.

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Maryland Approval Process
Federal, State & Local Reviews
•  Federal Regulations and Reviews •  State Regulations,
–  Energy Policy Act 2005 Permits & Approvals
–  Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972
–  Rivers and Harbors Acts of 1890 and 1899 –  MDE- State Environmental Review (associated
–  Clean Water Act of 1977 with NEPA)
–  Navigation and Navigable Waters
–  DNR - Coastal Federal Consistency
–  Federal Aviation Administration
–  National Park Service Certification
–  National Environmental Policy Act –  Subaqueous lands permits and leases
–  Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act of
1974 –  Wetlands permit
–  Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act of 1958 –  Section 401 Water Certification
–  Endangered Species Act of 1973
–  Estuary Protection Act –  NPDES Storm Water Permit
–  Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act –  Air Quality Permits
–  US Coast Guard
–  Marine Mammal Protection Act
–  DNR- Fisheries Service
–  Magneson-Stevens Conservation and Management –  DNR Wildlife and Heritage
Act
–  Migratory Bird Treaty Act –  Beach Preservation Act of 1972
–  Abandoned Shipwreck Act –  Maryland PSC
–  Approval for Private Aids to Navigation
–  MD Critical Areas Commission
•  Local Authorities – Ocean City, Worcester County –  MD Historic Trust
–  To be participant in NEPA/State review
–  Municipalities with potential visible impacts –  MD Economic Development Office
–  Local communities transited by onshore cable route –  MD Energy Office
–  Building permits as required –  MD DOT

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June 2006, Confidential
Delaware Project
•  Project Size: 230 - 450 MW (up to 150 turbines)
•  Closest turbine: about 12 highway miles east of
Rehoboth
•  Transmission cable: connected to the Indian River
substation via the Bethany substation
•  Offshore Construction Start Date: Expected 2012
•  Completion Date: Expected 2012 – 2013 (depends on
project size)
•  Met Tower approved and to be constructed spring 2010
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Location of Delaware Project

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Supporters of the Bluewater
Delaware Wind Park
•  US Senator Tom Carper
•  Lt. Governor John Carney •  League of Women Voters
•  Delaware Treasurer Jack Markell
•  Natures Path of Integrated Health
•  Delaware Insurance Commissioner •  News Journal Editorial Board
Matthew Denn •  Sierra Club
•  Society of Natural History
•  Delaware Municipal Electric •  St. Andrews School
Corporation •  Unitarian Universalists of Southern
Delaware
•  Citizens for A Better Sussex
•  Citizens for Clean Power •  City of Dover
•  Coalition for Climate Change Study •  City of Lewes
and Action
•  Delaware Audubon Society
•  City of Milford
•  Delaware Building & Construction •  City of New Castle
Trades Council •  City of Newark
•  Delaware Nature Society •  City of Seaford
•  Endecon, Inc. •  Town of Clayton
•  Epworth United Methodist Church
•  Town of Middletown
•  Green Delaware 18
Offshore electrical design
35 kV Submarine Cables

Offshore Transformer Platform


e.g. 35 kV / 138 kV

Wind Turbines Array Submarine Cable to Shore

Shore Connection to
existing grid at
substation
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For more information on offshore
wind energy
•  American Wind Energy Assoc. – awea.org
•  British Wind Energy Assoc. – bwea.org
•  Windpower.dk
•  Utility Wind Integration Group – uwig.org
•  www.ocean.udel.edu/windpower/

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David Blazer, Maryland Project Director
david@bluewaterwind.com
410.726.2235
www.bluewaterwind.com

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