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SESSION 1: ONLINE TEST ADMINISTRATION

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Structured Adult ADHD Self-Test

Structured Adult ADHD Self-Test is a 22-question self-test differentiates between two distinct
components of ADHD diagnosis namely, inattention together with hyperactivity-impulsivity and
is also sensitive to factors which typically preclude a diagnosis of ADHD.

Psychometric Properties

The statistical analyses for the reliability and validity of the SAAST were performed using SPSS
for Windows (Version 17.0; SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). The internal consistency was estimated by
using Cronbachs coefcient. Alpha coefcients of 0.7 or higher were considered acceptable. For
the test-retest reliability, forty-one participants received the SAAST again after a two-week
interval.

Reliability

The mean scores of items, the standard deviation, and the corrected item-total correlation, i.e., the
correlation of each item with the sum of the remaining items and the assessment of the internal
consistency of the SAAST yielded an overall Cronbachs of .885 for the entire scale. Two week
test-retest reliability of the SAAST was 0.878 (p<0.001).

Scoring

Table 1.1 Scoring

No, not at all 0 point


Yes, somewhat or a little 1 point
Yes, moderately to quite a lot 2 points
Yes, very much 3 points
This test yields a total maximum score of 54. Question 21 is scored on the same scale but is used
to adjudicate on whether a diagnosis of ADHD should be excluded; it is not included in the final
total. Questions 19, 20 and 22 are each scored as a binary choice and are again used to adjudicate
on whether a diagnosis of ADHD should be excluded.

Item Interpretation

Factor 1 consisted of 16 items I find that I make careless mistakes in work, in school, or in other
activities; or I have trouble paying attention to details. I tend to fidget with my hands or feet, or
I squirm in my seat. I often miss what is being said to me in conversations. I prefer to run
about or climb on things, even when I know it doesnt fit the situation. I find it difficult to
organize my tasks and activities. I find it hard to engage in play or liesure activities that are quiet.
I dont like having to make a sustained mental effort. and accounted for 31.58% of the total
variance. This factor was labeled inattention/hyperactivity.

Factor 2 included 4 items I tend to talk excessively. I am easily distracted. I have trouble
waiting my turn. I often interrupt others. and accounted for 5.24% of the total variance. This
factor is labelled impulsivity.

Over All Interpretation

Numerical Value Descriptive Value Interpretation


0-23 Low Level of Experiences Associated It indicate comparatively low
With ADHD levels of experiences typically
associated with ADHD
24-54 Significant Level of Experiences It indicate levels of experiences
Associated With ADHD, No which are consistent with
Mitigating Factors ADHD, including those
associated with both inattentive
and hyperactivity-impulsivity
symptoms. This is not a
diagnosis, and this does not
necessarily mean that you have
ADHD.
24-54 Significant Level of Experiences It indicate levels of experiences
Associated With ADHD, But which are consistent with
ADHD, including those
Mitigating Factors
associated with both inattentive
and hyperactivity-impulsivity
symptoms. However, you also
reported one or more of the
following mitigating factors
which ordinarily preclude a
diagnosis of ADHD:

*You reported that none of


these experiences were
significant before the age of 7,
and/or

*You indicated that any


problems with these experiences
are limited to just one context,
and/or

*You indicated that the


experiences youve reported
have not caused more than a
little problem in your social life,
academic work, or job, and/or
You indicated that you have or
are concerned about a diagnosis
of another mental disorder
which may better account for
experiences which could
otherwise be associated with
ADHD.
Table 1.2 Overall Interpretation
Specific Objective

To administer a test that will differentiate between two distinct components of ADHD diagnosis
(namely, inattention together with hyperactivity-impulsivity), and to identify the proper treatment
to be used for these students

Activity Assigned

1. Administration of Conducting a Structured Adult ADHD Self-Test to twenty-five


participants

Prognosis

An estimated one-third of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) progress
satisfactorily into their adult years, while another one-third continue to experience some problems,
and the final one-third continue to experience and often develop significant problems. Many of
these negative outcomes are linked to the continued, severe, and persistent ADHD symptoms.
Studies are demonstrating that adults with ADHD report similar symptoms as described in children
with ADHD, but the daily impact of these symptoms is clearly different. Treatment with
appropriate medication can significantly improve the outcome for ADHD. For example,
effectively managing symptoms with medication can be a key factor in the prevention of another
psychiatric disorder or of academic failure.

Transitional Plan

Clients should Improve Clients will be able to


Clients are inattentive, attention and focus on focus, tasks, instructions,
unfocused, off task, and assignments, tasks, and and activities.
distractible behaviors instruction Also clients will be
Reduce distractibility developing attentiveness
and responsiveness.
Table 2.1 Facilitators Results

Name Raw Score Interpretation

Amarille, Kevin S. 9 Low Level of Experiences


Associated With ADHD
Cid, Ancheska Angelie L. 16 Low Level of Experiences
Associated With ADHD
Dizon, Chiqui H. 24 Significant Level of Experiences
Associated With ADHD, No
Mitigating Factors
Espliguez, Justine 7 Low Level of Experiences
Associated With ADHD
Encabo, Caryl Jan C. 16 Low Level of Experiences
Associated With ADHD
Rabago, Sheba Victoria B. 6 Low Level of Experiences
Associated With ADHD

Table 2.2 Test Results


Name Raw Score Interpretation
Low Level of Experiences
Abad, Rose Mary B. 8
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Buenaventura, Queenie 16
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Diamante, Al Raven F.
12 Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Esic, Jarden Dear D.
14 Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Fuentes, Natasha Jane L. 15
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Goc-ong, Korina Joyce D. 5
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Guarte, Maxie Gem E. 15
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Guerra, Elenjoy P. 24
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Mejia, Al Jon Christoffer 15
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Pazo, Michael M. 13
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Ponce, Jerica April A. 8
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Primor, Abegail V. 8
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Romitman, Hyacinth R. 13
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Sas, Joana 8
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Sultan, Monica Grace R. 12
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
6
Tabanao, Mae Ann C. Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
13
Tadena, Anne Edelienne Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Tomarong, Shannaile Jan 10
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Villamor, Luz Patrizsa Hyacinth 25
Associated With ADHD
Low Level of Experiences
Yaez, Leendli Carmel A. 8
Associated With ADHD

Results per Category

Table 3.1 0-23 Low Level of Experiences Associated With ADHD

Name Raw Score


Abad, Rose Mary B. 8
Buenaventura, Queenie 16
Diamante, Al Raven F. 12
Esic, Jarden Dear D. 14
Fuentes, Natasha Jane L. 15
Goc-ong, Korina Joyce D. 5
Guarte, Maxie Gem E. 15
Mejia, Al Jon Christoffer 15
Pazo, Michael M. 13
Ponce, Jerica April A. 8
Primor, Abegail V. 8
Romitman, Hyacinth R. 13
Sas, Joana 8
Sultan, Monica Grace R. 12
Tabanao, Mae Ann C. 6
Tadena, Anne Edelienne 13
Tomarong, Shannaile Jan 10
Yaez, Leendli Carmel A. 8

Table 3.2 Significant Level of Experiences Associated With ADHD, No Mitigating Factors

Dizon, Chiqui H. 24
Guerra, Elenjoy P. 24
Villamor, Luz Patrizsa Hyacinth 25
Summary of Results

Interpretation Frequency Percentage


Low Level of Experiences 22 70%
Associated With ADHD
Significant Level of 3 30%
Experiences Associated With
ADHD, No Mitigating Factors
Significant Level of 0 0
Experiences Associated With
ADHD, But Mitigating Factors

The following students scored high on these statements:


Name of Student Statements
Statement 10: I find it difficult to keep my attention
Cid, Ancheska Angelie L. on what I am doing, whether working or playing.
Statement 16: I am easily distracted.
Statement 10: I find it difficult to keep my attention
Dizon, Chiqui H. on what I am doing, whether working or playing.
Statement 16: I am easily distracted.
Statement 2: I tend to fidget with my hands or feet,
Diamante, Al Raven F.
or I squirm in my seat.
Encabo, Caryl Jan C. Statement 16: I am easily distracted.
Statement 1: I find that I make careless mistakes in
Guarte, Maxie Gem E. work, in school, or in other activities; or I have
trouble paying attention to details.
Statement 5: I find it difficult to organize my
tasks and activities.
Statement 10: I find it difficult to keep my
Guerra, Elenjoy P.
attention on what I am doing, whether working or
playing.
Statement 15: I tend to talk excessively.
Tomarong, Shannaile Jan Statement 7: I always seem to have new friends
Villamor, Luz Patrizsa Hyacinth C. Statement 16: I am easily distracted.