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School-assessed Coursework report: VCE Health and Human Development 2014 – 2017 This report is provided forVCAA 2015 " id="pdf-obj-0-2" src="pdf-obj-0-2.jpg">

School-assessed Coursework report:

VCE Health and Human Development

20142017

This report is provided for the first year of implementation of this study and is based on the coursework audit and VCAA statistical data.

Unit 3

General comments

This is the first School-assessed Coursework audit undertaken with the reaccredited Health and Human Development Study Design 2014-2017. It is important to note that clarifications and further changes to the study design have been communicated to schools in the VCAA Bulletin throughout 2014. For Unit 3 a clarification was provided in relation to Outcome 2 and the role of VicHealth and the Australian Dietary Guidelines.

The first stage of the audit requires schools to complete a preliminary survey that provides information on the types of tasks set, assessment planning and timelines and the administration of assessment. Results of the survey identified that the schools audited were designing and using tasks that met the requirements of the new study design and almost all schools were providing students with an assessment timetable to assist them in planning for their assessments. For each School-assessed Coursework task, students should be given a clear and accurate statement of:

the outcome being assessed

the task type

the requirements and conditions of the task

contribution of the task to the final outcome score.

With a few exceptions, tasks provided students with an opportunity to be challenged, to extend their understanding of the key knowledge and skills, and to demonstrate high levels of performance. In some instances however, assessment tasks lacked the rigour necessary to extend high-end students, and determine a defined rank order that differentiates the ability level of students.

As in previous years, a high proportion of schools indicated they used commercially developed tasks, which came from a range of sources. Teachers indicated they reviewed these against the key knowledge and skills from the study design to ensure their relevance to the new study. There were some examples of teacher-designed tasks, most of which met the requirements of the outcomes. Very few schools indicated they reused assessment tasks from previous years. When this did occur, a few schools indicated they made modifications or kept studentsSACs. Teachers need to consider that it is important for students to have access to their SACs as these provide important feedback for their end-of-year examination revision.

In the samples reviewed for the coursework audit, most teachers set out clearly for students the marking scheme used to assess the tasks and these were largely consistent with the VCAA

© VCAA 2015

School-assessed Coursework report: VCE Health and Human Development 20142017

performance descriptors. Many teachers adapted the VCAA performance descriptors to provide mark allocations for specific questions. In some instances, teachers developed their own individualised marking scheme that was generally appropriate to the task. All schools audited indicated the SACs were completed under supervision, making authentication less problematic.

Schools that were audited indicated that they used a range of resources to develop tasks for the unit. These resources included the Assessment Handbook, Advice for Teachers, textbooks, networks and relevant subject associations.

Schools with more than one teacher involved in the teaching of Health and Human Development indicated that consistency in marking was achieved through the use of a prepared answer sheet, discussion and cross-marking. These practices are important in ensuring an accurate rank order is achieved.

Schools should note that all required materials should be submitted for the audit. These are listed in the VCE and VCAL Administrative Handbook with a checklist for the audit published each year on the VCAA website. If all material is not submitted, a judgment cannot be made, which results in an unsatisfactory audit result.

Specific information

Unit 3 coursework

Outcome 1

Compare the health status of Australia’s population with that of other developed countries, compare and explain the variations in health status of population groups within Australia and discuss the role of the National Health Priority Areas (NHPAs) in improving Australia’s health status.

This outcome is assessed using two tasks, each with a mark allocation of 30 marks, and will contribute 60 marks out of 100 marks allocated to School-assessed Coursework for Unit 3.

Task type options Task 1:

The first task requires a response on the relative health status of Australians in one or more of the following forms:

a case study analysis

a data analysis

a visual presentation, such as a concept/mind map, poster or presentation file

a multimedia presentation using more than two data types (for example, text, still or moving

images, sound or numeric) and involving some form of interaction such as hyperlinks an oral presentation, such as a debate or podcast (audio or visual)

a blog

a test (multiple-choice, short-answer and/or extended response)

a written response.

For this task the most common option selected was the data analysis and a test (usually short answer, including a combination of data analysis and case study questions). These tasks were completed under test conditions with all students completing the same task rather than being provided with a choice of tasks. Many schools used commercially developed tasks.

School-assessed Coursework report: VCE Health and Human Development 20142017

The requirements of this task were similar to the previous study design. Teachers appeared to have little difficulty in selecting tasks that met the study design. The physical environment as a determinant of health status was the only addition to the new study design, and schools appeared to have no difficulty incorporating this into the assessment tasks. The majority of the tasks

assessed students’ ability in relation to the key skills associated with defining key health terms, use

and analysis of data to compare the health status of Australia’s population with that of other

developed countries, comparing the health status of one or more population groups in Australia and using the determinants of health to explain the differences in health status. All population groups listed in the study design males and females, higher and lower socio-economic status groups, rural and remote populations and indigenous populations were assessed.

Timing and assessment

The majority of schools indicated they scheduled Task 1 for Weeks 6-7 in the semester, with a few falling earlier, in Week 5, and a few later, in Weeks 8 or 9. The time allocated for the completion of the task was either less than one hour or from one to two hours.

Most schools indicated they used the VCAA descriptors or modified the descriptors to allocate marks to the task. The weightings that were applied were appropriate in reflecting the depth, complexity and detail required.

Task 2

The second task requires a response to the National Health Priority Areas in one or more of the following forms:

a case study analysis

a data analysis

a visual presentation such as a concept/mind map, poster or presentation file

a multimedia presentation, using more than two data types (for example, text, still or moving

images, sound or numeric) and involving some form of interaction, such as hyperlinks an oral presentation, such as a debate or podcast (audio or visual)

a blog

a test (multiple-choice, short-answer and/or extended response)

a written response.

For this task the most common option selected was a test (usually a combination of data analysis, case studies and general short answer questions). As with task one, these tasks were completed under test conditions with all students completing the same task with no choice provided. Again many schools made use of commercially developed tasks. When teachers designed their own tasks they were generally well constructed and provided rigour in assessment although this was not always the case. It is important that tasks include questions that extend students with higher end ability and allow for a clearly defined rank order that differentiates the ability levels of students.

The key knowledge and skills being assessed in this task underwent some changes in the new study design, in particular the role of nutrition in addressing the NHPAs of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, colorectal cancer, obesity and osteoporosis, taking into account, where relevant, the function (as a determinant of health) and major food sources of protein, carbohydrate (including fibre), fats (mono, poly, saturated and trans), water, calcium, phosphorus, sodium and vitamin D.

While most schools selected tasks that reflected the changes in the assessment of the new key knowledge, some schools required students to examine food groups, nutritional requirements across the lifespan and reasons for variations. This expectation is outside the requirements of this key knowledge and skill and may result in valuable teaching and learning time being spent on unnecessary course content.

School-assessed Coursework report: VCE Health and Human Development 20142017

When assessing the key knowledge and skills associated with this outcome, a range of approaches were used. In some instances, students were given the choice of demonstrating their knowledge in detail of one NHPA, along with its determinants, the reasons for its selection as an NHPA, associated costs and a health promotion campaign relevant. Some schools chose to focus on all key knowledge and skills in the outcome, particularly when a test was undertaken while others chose to focus on one or two NHPAs where nutrition played a key role and use these NHPAs to explore the relevant key knowledge.

Timing and assessment

The majority of schools indicated they scheduled task two for Weeks 11-12 in the semester with the time allocated for the completion of the task being either less than one hour or between one and two hours.

As with the first task in this outcome, most schools indicated they used the VCAA descriptors or modified them to be used to allocate marks for examination type questions. The weightings that were applied were appropriate in reflecting the depth, complexity and detail required.

Outcome 2

Discuss and analyse approaches to health and health promotion, and describe Australia’s health

system and the different roles of government and non-government organisations in promoting health.

This outcome is assessed using one task with a mark allocation of 40 marks, and will contribute 40 marks out of 100 marks allocated to School-assessed Coursework for Unit 3.

Task type options

The task requires a response in one or more of the following forms:

a case study analysis

a data analysis

a visual presentation, such as a concept/mind map, poster or presentation file

a multimedia presentation using more than two data types (for example, text, still or moving

images, sound or numeric) and involving some form of interaction such as hyperlinks an oral presentation, such as a debate or podcast (audio or visual)

a blog

a test (multiple-choice, short-answer and/or extended response)

a written response.

For this task the most common option selected was a test with short-answer type questions based on data analysis, case study questions and general questions. As with previous tasks they were completed under test conditions with all students completing the same task rather than being provided with a choice. Again, many schools used commercially developed tasks.

In Outcome 2, the key knowledge and skills focused on understanding the health system and the role of governments and non-government organisations in promoting health and healthy eating. The requirements of this task in many ways were similar to the previous study design although clarification was provided in relation to the key knowledge and skills associated with VicHealth and the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Most schools appeared to have little difficulty in selecting and developing tasks relevant to the new study design and the clarifications that were distributed to schools in the February 2014 VCAA Bulletin VCE, VCAL and VET. Most assessment tasks used by schools also challenged students to demonstrate their understanding and ability to apply the key knowledge and skills, and therefore demonstrate performance at a higher cognitive level.

School-assessed Coursework report: VCE Health and Human Development 20142017

Some schools chose to focus on a selection of the key knowledge and used a case study of VicHealth to determine studentsunderstanding. Other schools chose to focus on the role of government and non-government organisations in promoting healthy eating. Schools are advised that when they choose to focus on a selection of key knowledge only for assessment, they must provide other opportunities for students to demonstrate understanding of the remaining key knowledge through classroom activities to ensure students are well prepared for the rigours of the end-of-year examination.

Timing and assessment

The majority of schools indicated they scheduled this task between Weeks 15 to 17 in the semester with the time allocated for the completion of the task being between one and two hours. Students needed additional time for the completion of this task when compared to Outcome 1 given the increased mark allocation and key knowledge and skills being assessed.

As with previous tasks, most schools indicated they used the VCAA descriptors or modified the descriptors to allocate marks to the task. Where schools used the test option, most used a marking scheme similar to the one used to allocate marks for examination questions.

The weightings that were applied were appropriate in reflecting the depth, complexity and detail required.

School-assessed Coursework report: VCE Health and Human Development 20142017

Unit 4

General comments

It is important to note that further changes to the study design were communicated to schools via the VCAA Bulletin VCE, VCAL and VET, and are available online. For Unit 4 these were specifically related to Area of Study 2: Outcome 2 and the responsibilities of the Australian Government’s aid program. AusAID is no longer referred to, and has been replaced by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). Clarification was also provided to schools in relation to DFAT’s aid priorities and the term ‘health’ and the concepts of global health and sustainable human development used extensively in Unit 4.

It was pleasing to note that the outcome of the Unit 3 audit meant that few schools progressed into the audit process for Unit 4. Following the completion of the online audit survey even fewer schools were required to provide further evidence and no issues were observed. This report is therefore based a limited number of audited schools.

Of the schools that were audited and completed the online survey, results showed that schools were designing and using tasks that met the requirements of the new study design and the changes made in relation to Unit 4 communicated in the VCE Bulletin referred to above had been incorporated.

These schools were providing students with a relevant assessment timetable and information regarding the type of task being used, the requirements and conditions of the task, and the contribution of the task to the final outcome score.

As in Unit 3, several schools indicated they used commercially developed tasks that came from a range of sources, and there were some examples of teacher-designed tasks that met the requirements of the outcomes. A few schools indicated assessment tasks from previous years were being used but with modifications.

Schools should note that all required materials should be submitted for the audit. These are listed in the VCE and VCAL Administrative Handbook with a checklist for the audit published each year on the VCAA website. If all material is not submitted, it is difficult to make a judgment.

Specific information

Unit 4 coursework

Outcome 1

Analyse factors contributing to variations in health status between Australia and developing

countries, and evaluate progress towards the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals.

This outcome is assessed using two tasks, each with a mark allocation of 25 marks, and will contribute 50 marks out of 100 marks allocated to School-assessed Coursework for Unit 4.

School-assessed Coursework report: VCE Health and Human Development 20142017

Task type options Task 1:

The first task requires a response on the variations in health status between developing countries and Australia in one or more of the following forms:

a case study analysis

a data analysis

a visual presentation, such as a concept/mind map, poster or presentation file

a multimedia presentation using more than two data types (for example, text, still or moving

images, sound or numeric) and involving some form of interaction such as hyperlinks an oral presentation, such as a debate or podcast (audio or visual)

a blog

a test (multiple-choice, short-answer and/or extended response)

a written response.

For this task most of the schools audited indicated they used a combination of approaches such as data analysis and short-answer type questions undertaken in test conditions with all students completing the same task.

The requirements of this task were similar to the previous study design, with the inclusion of the elements of sustainability and the exclusion of the analysis of the interrelationships between health, human development and sustainability to produce sustainable human development in a global context.

Task 2

The second task requires a response on the contribution of the Millennium Development Goals to global health and sustainable human development in one or more of the following forms:

a case study analysis

a data analysis

a visual presentation such as a concept/mind map, poster or presentation file

a multimedia presentation, using more than two data types (for example, text, still or moving

images, sound or numeric) and involving some form of interaction such as hyperlinks an oral presentation, such as a debate or podcast (audio or visual)

a blog

a test (multiple-choice, short-answer and/or extended response)

a written response.

As with the previous task most of the schools audited indicated that students completed the task under test conditions and included a combination of data analysis and short-answer questions with all students completing the same task.

The key knowledge and skills being assessed in this task were quite similar to the previous study design.

Outcome 2

Describe and evaluate programs implemented by international and Australian government and non-government organisations, and analyse the interrelationships between health, human development and sustainability.

This outcome is assessed using one task, with a mark allocation of 50 marks, and will contribute 50 marks out of 100 marks allocated to School-assessed Coursework for Unit 4.

Task type options

School-assessed Coursework report: VCE Health and Human Development 20142017

The task requires a response in one or more of the following forms:

a case study analysis

a data analysis

a visual presentation, such as a concept/mind map, poster or presentation file

a multimedia presentation using more than two data types (for example, text, still or moving

images, sound or numeric) and involving some form of interaction such as hyperlinks a blog

a test (multiple-choice, short-answer and/or extended response)

a written response.

Once again the most common option selected by the audited schools was a test using a combination of short-answer type questions, data analysis and case-study questions with all students undertaking the same task.

In Outcome 2, the key knowledge and skills focused on understanding of the different types of aid provided and the role of international organisations and the Australian government through DFAT in achieving sustainable improvements in health and human development by investigating a range of strategies.

Apart from the changes communicated to schools in relation to DFAT and their aid priorities and clarification around the concepts of health, human development and sustainability in a global context, there were few changes from the previous study design.

Some schools chose to focus on a selection of the key knowledge in this outcome to determine students understanding. Where this occurs, schools are advised that they should provide other opportunities for students to demonstrate understanding of the remaining key knowledge through classroom activities to ensure students are well prepared for the rigours of the end-of-year examination.

Given the size and complexity of this task, students need additional time for the completion of this task when compared to outcome one given the increased mark allocation and key knowledge and skills being assessed. Most of the schools audited indicated the time allocated for the completion of the task ranged between one and two hours.

Useful resources

There are a range of useful resources for teachers and schools to reflect on their students’ results. All of the schools audited indicated they had accessed the previous years examination report and the majority of the schools indicated they had accessed the statistical moderation report from VASS.