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MATHEMATICIAN DATE BAND

UNIT 1: TOPIC LIST FOR CONJECTURING, WORDS, DEFINITIONS, AND QUADRILATERALS


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1. Can you use a given definition to identify all objects that will belong to this set?
Can you determine why a particular object would not fit a given definition? Can
you find a counterattack for a given definition (e.g. A triangle is a three sided
figure)?
2. Can you identify the properties of quadrilaterals (involving angles, sides, and
parallel-ness of sides) – sepcifically parallelograms, rectangles, squares, rhombi,
kites, darts, trapezoids, isosceles trapezoids, concave, and convex quadrilaterals)?
3. Given a few geometric figures or drawings, can you make (and clearly articulate) a
conjecture that you believe will always be true? Can you come up with a
conjecture that is interesting and or unexpected? (For example, noticing the angle
formed by connect the two endpoints of a diameter to any point on a semi-cirlce
is always 90° is surprsing!)
4. Can you prove our paper-folding conjecture? (When you fold the bottom of a
piece of paper to form two adjacent triangles, the fold lines will form a right
angle!)
5. Do you know the definition of a polygon? Do you know the definition of a circle?
Do you know the definition of a triangle?
6. Do you understand that we can use words to describe an object, but that the
object might not exist (for example, “a triangle with two parallel sides”)? Can you
determine if a given definition describes objects that exist or not?
7. Are you able to articulate that some objects are a smaller category of another
object? (For example, a square is a type of rhombus.) Do you understand that
some sets of objects can be defined using larger sets? (For example, a square can
be defined as a quadrilateral with four equal sides and four equal angles AND as a
rhombus with four right angles.)

Geogebra

You should feel comfortable doing all the tasks given to you on the first Art & Geometry task – without any
notes or references.
MATHEMATICIAN DATE BAND

UNIT 2: TOPIC LIST FOR LOGICAL THINKING AND DEFINITIONS AND PROPERTIES OF QUADRILATERALS
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1. Can you state our class definition and properties (involving angles, sides, and
parallel-ness of sides) for each of the quadrilaterals– sepcifically parallelograms,
rectangles, squares, rhombi, kites, darts, trapezoids, isosceles trapezoids,
concave, and convex quadrilaterals)?
2. Can you use a given definition to identify all objects that will belong to this set?
Can you determine why a particular object would not fit a given definition? Can
you find a counterattack for a given definition (e.g. A triangle is a three sided
figure)?
3. Do you know the difference between inductive and deductive reasoning? Can you
articulate when you are using inductive and deductive reasoning – and be able to
explain why? Do you know when you were using inductive logic and deductive
logic during the paper-folding exploration? During the Google doc activity when
you were looking for properties of quadrilaterals?
4. Are you able to answer questions such as the always/sometimes/never problems
in the Introduction to Classification Part III packet? Are you able to articulate
when some objects are a smaller category of another object? (For example, a
square always a rhombus but a rhombus is sometimes a square.) Do you
understand that some sets of objects can be defined using larger sets?
5. Do you know how to solve and do you understand the reasoning behind all of the
probems from Algebrainiac Attack 01?

Geogebra

There will NOT be a Geogebra question on this assessment.


NAME DATE BAND

UNIT 3: TOPIC LIST FOR EQUATIONS OF LINES AND QUADRILATERALS ON THE COORDINATE PLANE
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1. Do you understand what a solution to an equation is? Do you understand that a


line is composed of infinitely many points, each a solution to a single equation?
2. Do you know how to write the equation of a line in slope-intercept form (y = mx +
b) and in point-slope form (y – y1 = m(x – x1))? Do you know how to graph a line
given its equation or given a point and slope? Can you use the equation of a line
to find exact coordinates of points on the line (e.g. can you find the value of y at a
particular x-value)?
3. Do you know how to calculate the slope of a line between two points?
4. Do you know the relationship between the slopes of parallel lines and
perpendicular lines?
5. Do you know the Pythagorean Theorem (both the hypothesis and the
conclusion)? Can you apply the Pythagorean Theorem and/or the distance
formula to calculate distances between points on the coordindate plane?
6. Given some of the vertices of a triangle or quadrilateral, can you determine the
coordinates of the missing vertex or vertices? For example, given two points can
you find the other two vertices that would form a square? Can you find another
pair that would make a different-sized square? Given three vertices, can you find
three different points that could be the fourth vertices of a parallelogram?
7. Can you calculate distances to determine if a triangle is scalene, isosceles, or
equilateral? Or if a quadrilateral is a rhombus?
8. Using distance and slope calculations, can you prove that four given points are
indeed the vertices of a rectangle? A rhombus? A square? A parallelogram?
9. Can you prove the following statement: If you have two lines with opposite
reciprocal slopes, then the two lines intersect at a 90 degree angle.
10. Do you know how to solve and do you understand the reasoning behind all of
the probems from Algebrainiac Attack 03?

Geogebra

This assessment will not have geogebra on it.


MATHEMATICIAN DATE BAND

UNIT 4: TOPIC LIST FOR BASIC CONGRUENCE


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1. Given two points, can you calculate the midpoint using the midpoint formula?
2. Given two points, can you find the vector moving one point to the other?
3. Given the endpoints of a segment, can you find the points that divide the segment
into n equal pieces? Can you find a point 71% of the way from one endpoint to
the other? Can you clearly express not only the process to get those points, but
why that process works?
4. Given a system of linear equations, can you immediately determine whether
there is no solution, one solution, or infinitely many solutions (without solving the
system)? Can you explain in words why there is no solution, one solution, or
infinitely many solutions?
5. Can you solve a system of linear equations using substitution? Elimination? By
doing an interpretive dance?
6. From Two Formal Writeups: Given a segment and its perpendicular bisector, can
you prove that any point on the perpendicular bisector is equidistant from the
endpoints of the segment? (You should be able to prove this without a “fill in the
blank” format… Suggestion: Write down a list of steps that you need to show, and
then write down the reasons each of those steps are true.)
7. Given a set of data from the bouncing ball activity, can you determine where Mr.
Shah needs to aim the ball in order to have it reach Mr. Kinnell (who is at any
given position)?

Geogebra Skills
 Can you create a vector?
 Can you create a regular polygon?
 Can you translate objects using a specific vector?
 Can you graph a perpendicular bisector?
 Can you write/use square roots in equations?
 Can you create a circle with a specified radius?
NAME DATE BAND

UNIT 5: TOPIC LIST FOR ROTATIONS


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1. Given two points, can you find all centers of rotation that will “swap” the location
of the two points? Can you articulate the reason why all these points are centers
of rotation?
2. Given two congruent line segments, can you find the two centers of rotation that
will “swap” the location of the two line segments? Can you articulate the reason
why those two points are centers of rotation? (As a part of this, can you find the
equation of the perpendicular bisector of a segment? Can you quickly and
efficiently solve a system of equations?)
3. Given a figure with rotational symmetry, can you find all rotations that will return
that figure to it’s original orientation? Given a figure with half turn symmetry, can
you find the center of rotation?
4. Given a figure and a center of rotation, can you draw a new figure that has
undergone a 90o rotation? What about a 180o rotation?

5. Given a complex figure and a rotation of this complex figure, can you use a ruler
and protractor (and compass, if desired) to find the center of rotation? Can you
determine the angle of rotation?
6. Given three non-collinear points, can you find the center of a circle that goes
through all three points? Can you articulate the reason why any three non-
collinear points can have a unique (meaning: only one) circle drawn through
them?

Geogebra Skills
 Can you rotate a figure through a particular angle (in degrees!)?
 Can you graph a perpendicular bisector?
 Can you measure an angle?
NAME DATE BAND

UNIT 6: TOPIC LIST FOR CIRCLES


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1. Do you know the derivation for the equation of a circle (given a center and a
radius)? Imagine you were asked to teach someone, from scratch, where this
equation came from – could you do this? [Note: this is when we used a right
triangle and the Pythagorean theorem.]
2. Given the graph of a circle, can you write its equation? Given an equation of a
circle, can you graph it?
3. Given a circle and an x-coordinate of a point on the circle, do you know who to
algebraically find the two (exact) points that are on the circle with that x-
coordinate ? [Similarly, given a y-coordinate, can you do the same?]
4. Given the equation of a circle or a graph of a circle, can you find several exact
cooridnates of points that you know will be on this circle?
5. Given the endpoints of a diameter of a circle, can you write the equation for this
circle? [Note: the diameter might not be horizontal or vertical.]
6. Given the center and one point on the circle, cand you write the equation of the
circle?
7. Can you determine whether a given point lies on a circle or not?
8. Can you explain why the coordinates for the center of a circle do not satisfy the
equation for a circle. [Note: Be sure to use the definition of a circle in your
answer.]
9. Given three non-collinear points, can you find the center of a circle that goes
through all three points? Can you articulate the reason why any three non-
collinear points can have a unique (meaning: only one) circle drawn through
them?
10. Do you know the content from Algebrainiac Attack 04?

Geogebra Skills

You will not have a geogebra part to this assessment.


NAME DATE BAND

UNIT 7: TOPIC LIST FOR BASIC CONGRUENCE AND POLYGONAL ANGLES


ADV GEOMETRY | PACKER COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE

1. Can you prove that the “midpoint quadrialeral” will always be a parallelogram?
2. Do you know all the content from Algebrainiac Attack 05?
3. Given a diagram with labeled sides and angle congruences, can you identify all the
possible figures the diagram could represent? Can you accurately mark a given
quadrilateral with congruent sides and/or angles to fit a particular definition? Can
you identify if a diagram has markings that would make the figure impossible to
draw?
4. Given the name of a polygon, do you know how to draw the polygon and label it
appropriately? Given a polygon with labeled vertices, do you know the different
ways it can be named?
5. Do you how to accurately draw an angle bisector by using a proctractor? By using
patty paper?
6. Given two labeled congruent figures, can you write the statement of congruence?
For example ABCD @ EFGH. Given a statement of congruence, can you identify all
pairs of congruent angles and segments?
7. Do you understand how that regular polygons can be generated by rotating
isosceles triangles repeatedly about a vertex? Do you understand what figure
might result after repeatedly rotating other polygons about a vertex?
8. Can you use algebra to find missing side lengths of a figure if the sides lengths are
given as variable expressions? (For example, see #6 in Congruence Part III.)
9. Can you explain graphically why the sum of the interior angles of an n-gon can be
computed as (n  2)180o ? What about a graphical explanation for why the sum
can also be computed as 180o n  360o ?
10. If you have a regular n-gon, can you calculate each individual interior angle
measure?
11. Given a diagram with some given angles marked, can you fill in the missing
angles using what you have learned about the angles of polygons?
12. Given a dissection of a polygon into triangles, can you write and explain an
expression for the sum of the interior angles of the polygon based solely on the
dissected triangles (“polygonal crystals”)?
13. Certain polygons fit nicely together around one vertex with no gaps or overlap
(for example, three regular hexagons). Given a number of regular polygons, can
you determine if they will fit nicely in this manner? Do you have a method for
finding which type of regular polygon would fit snugly in a gap – or can you show
that no regular polygon would fit snugly in this gap?

GEOGEBRA
We may have a geogebra component to this assessment. However, you have not learned any new Geogebra
skills. It will only require the skills you’ve already been working with.
NAME DATE BAND

UNIT 8: TOPIC LIST FOR PARALLEL LINES AND FLOWCHART PROOFS


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1. Given a completed flowchart proof, can you identify ways that it needs to be
improved – so that the explanation is clear, the flow of the argument (arrows)
make sense, and all important steps are included?
2. Given an incorrect flowchart proof, can you identify errors? [You have not been
given any of these; you should be able to read a flowchart proof and decide
whether each step of the argument is valid]
3. Using given information and a statement to be proved, create a flowchart proof.
This may be a proof you’ve seen before, or it may be different. You should
definitely feel comfortable reproducing the arguments for the proofs we’ve done
together.
4. Once you are able to prove a statement with a set of given information, can you
articulate in words what you’ve proven? (Example: “The sum of all exterior angles
of a triangle is always 360 degrees”)
5. Given a diagram with many lines, can you identify pairs of corresponding,
alternate interior, alternate exterior, and same-side interior angles (and the
associated pair of lines and transversal)? (For examples, see the “Angle
Relationships” handout and the problems you did from Section 3-1 and 3-2.)
6. Can you articulate the difference between the postulate “If two parallel lines are
cut by a transversal, then corresponding angles are congruent” and the postulate
“If two lines cut by a transversal form congruent corresponding angles, then the
two lines are parallel”?
7. Can you apply angle relationships of parallel lines to find the measures of other
angles in a diagram that includes parallel lines?
8. Given a diagram and angle relationships, can you identify which lines must be
parallel? (Note how this topic is the “opposite” of #6.)
9. Do you know different ways to deduce that two lines are parallel?

(For examples for #7 and #8, see the “Is it a parallelogram?” handout and
problems from Section 3-3.)

10. Can you deductively prove that the sum of the angles in a triangle is 180°?
11. Can you deductively prove that the opposite angles in a parallelogram are
congruent (starting with the definition of a parallelogram as a quadrilateral with
two pairs of opposite sides which are parallel)?
12. Given a diagram with some given angles marked, can you fill in the missing
angles using what you have learned about the angles of polygons?

There will not be any Geogebra problems on this assessment.


NAME DATE BAND

UNIT 9: TOPIC LIST FOR BASIC SIMILARITY


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1. [Holdover from last unit] Can you use your understanding of parallel lines to
deduce whether a figure is a parallelogram or not? (This is based on the “Is it a
parallelogram?” worksheet.)
2. Do you know the definition of similiarity of figures? Do you know two-part
definintion of similarity of polygons (congruence of all corresponding angles and
all corresponding sides in proportion)? Can you draw examples of two polygons
where only one of the two conditions for similarity is satisfied?
3. Can you apply the definition of similarity in order to determine if two polygons are
similar, given two diagrams? Can you determine whether certain polygon types
(e.g. rhombi) will always, sometimes, or never be similar to each other?
4. Given two similar figures, can you find the scale factor? Can you identify
congruent angles and write proportions for corresponding sides? Can you use
these proportions/the scale factor to find the lengths of unknown side lengths?
5. Do you know what is necessary to prove two triangles similar to each other?
Given two triangles with certain markings, can you determine if they are similar to
each other, not similar to each other, or if no conclusion can be stated?
6. Can you set up and solve proportions involving similar triangles/polygons?

7. In class we saw there were many different approaches to the “two pole
problem,” including one involving coordinate geometry. However, one elegant
solution involved using two pairs of similar triangles. Can you identify three pairs
of similar triangles and explain why they are similar? Do you understand how this
problem can solved strictly using similar triangles? Could you solve the problem
with different pole heights?
NAME DATE BAND

UNIT 10: TOPIC LIST FOR INTERMEDIATE SIMILARITY AND GEOMETRIC MEAN
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1. Do you know what is necessary to prove two triangles similar to each other?
Given two triangles, can you determine if they are similar to each other or not?
2. Can you set up and solve proportions involving similar triangles?
3. Do you know what the definition of the geometric mean is? Can you calculate the
geometric mean between two numbers? Can you prove the formula for the
geometric mean between two numbers?
4. In a right triangle where the altitude is drawn to the hypotenuse, can you
articulate how there are three similar triangles created? Can you identify
corresponding sides of these similar triangles?
5. In a right triangle where the altitude is drawn to the hypotenuse, there are many
side lengths that could be found as the geometric means of other side lengths.
Can you derive these relationships from similar triangles? Can you use these
relationships to find various missing sides?
6. Can you simplify radical expressions like 180 ? Can you rewrite radicals like
3 or 7 ?
7 5
7. Do you know how to solve the problems on Algebrainiac 07?
**8. Can you prove that if a triangle has two congruent sides then the two angles
opposite those sides must be congruent?
**9. Can you prove the theorem: two inscribed angles that intercept the same arc
are congruent? Can you apply this theorem to find missing angle measurements?

**Note: These topics will be dependent upon progress we make in class. The final decision for their inclusion
will be made as the day of the assessment nears.
NAME DATE BAND
UNIT 11: TOPIC LIST FOR THE CROSSED CHORD THEOREM, AREA AND SURFACE AREA, AND BASIC
TRIGONOMETRY
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Note: We will likely not get to all the topics on this topic list. Closer to the assessment date, we can tell you
what numbers we have covered.

1. Can you prove the circle-chord theorem? Can you apply the circle chord theorem
to find missing segment lengths in a diagram?
2. Do you know how to find the circumference and area of a circle? Can you apply
those formulas to find missing information in novel problems (like the textbook
problems)?
3. For right prisms, do you know how to find the lateral area, total area and
volumes? Can you apply these understandings to find missing information in
novel problems (like the textbook problems)?
4. Can you use similarity and the Platonic Right Triangles book to find missing side
lengths? Missing angles?
5. Using the Book of Platonic Right Triangles and given an image of a right triangle
with either two sides or an angle and a side, can you find all missing side lengths
and angles? Using the Table of Right Triangle Ratios and given an image of a right
triangle with either two sides or an angle and a side, can you find all missing side
lengths and angles? Using the trigonometric functions on your calculator and
given an image of a right triangle with either two sides or an angle and a side, can
you find all missing side lengths and angles? Using the trigonometric functions on
your calculator, do you know how to give your answers both exactly and
approximately?
6. Given a horizontal distance from an object, the angle of elevation (measured by a
clinometer, for example), and the eye height of the angle measurer, can you
calculate the height of the object?
7. Can you articulate Plato’s argument that objects like triangles and circles can’t
exist in physical reality but can exisit in our minds (a.k.a. mathematical reality)?
8. Can you articulate why the ratio of any two sides of a right triangle corresponds
to only one Platonic right triangle? And do you understand that the Platonic right
triangles can be scaled to any size while preserving that ratio?
MATHEMATICIAN DATE BAND

UNIT 12: TOPIC LIST FOR INTERMEDIATE TRIGONOMETRY


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1. Can you use similarity and the Platonic Right Triangles book to find missing side lengths? Missing
angles?
2. Using the Book of Platonic Right Triangles and given an image of a right triangle with either
two sides or an angle and a side, can you find all missing side lengths and angles? Using
the Table of Right Triangle Ratios and given an image of a right triangle with either two
sides or an angle and a side, can you find all missing side lengths and angles? Using the
trigonometric functions on your calculator and given an image of a right triangle with
either two sides or an angle and a side, can you find all missing side lengths and angles?
Using the trigonometric functions (sin, cos, tan, sin-1, cos-1, tan-1) on your calculator, do
you know how to give your answers both exactly and approximately?
3. Can you articulate why the ratio of any two sides of a right triangle corresponds to only
one Platonic right triangle? And do you understand that the Platonic right triangles can
be scaled to any size while preserving that ratio?
4. For any value given in the Table of Right Triangle Ratios, can you articulate what that
numbers measures/means? Can you do this visually/geometrically?
5. Can you explain why we only need one ratio (e.g. leg opposite angle/hypotenuse) in
order to identify which Platonic right triangle we have? Furthermore, considering we only
need one ratio, can you explain why we have three different ratios in our Table of Right
Triangle Ratios?
6. Can you articulate how the Book of Platonic Right Triangles and the Table of Right
Triangle Ratios are the same? Are different? In what ways does the calculator’s use of sin,
cos, tan, sin-1, cos-1, and tan-1 improve upon the Table of Right Triangle Ratios?
7. Can you draw connections among ratios of sides in a right triangle and relationships
within the Table of Right Triangle Ratios (such as the ones described in Similar Triangles
#2 problems #7, 8, 9, 13 and in Similar Right Triangles #3 problems #6, 7, 8, 9)?
8. Can you estimate the shape of a right triangle given the value of a particular
trigonometric ratio (like we did in our activity with the Placemat of Particular Platonic
Plight Priangles)?
9. Given only one specific ratio for a right triangle with a known angle, can you explain how
to calculate the other two ratios in the same triangle without using the Table of Right
Triangle Ratios or the trigonometric functions on your calcuator?
10. Throughout this unit we’ve been talking about when we’ve been approximating and
when we’ve been exact. We’ve also drawn connections between what “exact” means
and the Platonic ideal world of mathematics. Can you identify and articulate when
something is exact versus when it is approximate? Can you explain what sin(23o ) and
-1 12
what cos ( ) mean conceptually, and how they are truly “exact”?
41
11. Can you solve the problems from Algebrainiac Attack 08?
NAME DATE BAND
UNIT 13: TOPIC LIST FOR ANGLE BISECTORS, IMPOSSIBLE TRIANGLES, SALT, & BASIC TRIANGLE
CONGRUENCE
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1. Do you know the relationships of the sides of 30-60-90 degree triangles and the
45-45-90 degree triangles? Given one of these triangles and one side length, can
you (quickly) identify the other side lengths? Given one of these triangles and all
three side lengths, can you identify the angle measures?
2. Can you explain clearly why the shortest distance between a point and a line is
the length of a line segment from the point that is perpendicular to the line?
3. Can you prove both theorem involving angle bisectors? These are: (1) Given an
angle, any point equidistant to both rays of the angle lies on the angle bisector,
(2) Given any angle and a point on the angle bisector, that point is equidistant to
both rays of the angle.
4. Can you prove why all three angle bisectors of a triangle meet at a single point?
Can you explain why that point is the center of a circle that is tangent to all three
sides of the triangle (we call that point an “incenter” and the circle the “inscribed
circle”)?
5. Can you anticipate what “lines”/”ridges” will be formed by pouring salt onto a
particular shape (for example, a triangle, rectangle, or other polygon)? Can you
explain why these lines will form where they do? Can you explain why the height
of the ridge at one place on the “salt figure” will be higher or lower than the ridge
at another place on the “salt figure”?
6. Given three side lengths of a triangle, can you identify if that triangle is possible to
draw? If it is not possible, can you clearly explain why it is impossible (using a
diagram and deductive logic to show it is true)? If it is possible, can you draw the
triangle (you can use patty paper, a ruler, and a compass)?
7. If you are given two side lengths of a triangle, can you determine all possible
lengths for the third side?
8. Given certain information about a triangle (certain angles and sides), can you
draw a triangle that fits that information? (You will have access to patty paper,
ruler, a protractor, and a compass.) If there are more triangles that can be
constructed with given information, can you draw them? If there are not more
triangles, can you explain why there is only one possible triangle?
9. Do you know which configuration of given information about a triangle forces it to
be rigid? Given information about two triangles, do you know if the two triangles
will be congruent (and by what reason)?
10. We found that when you were given certain information about triangles, there
was a minimal amount of forced information that forced rigidity (e.g. SSS was
enough for rigidity, but if you only had SS, you did not have rigidity). These
triangles were forced to be rigid and we say this by doing constructions (with a
compass, protractor, and rulter). Can you do a construction, given this minimal
information, to illustrate that the triangle must be rigid, and write words
explaining why your constructions show that this triangle is forced?