Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 1

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 2
Contents
SECTION I: INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................... 1
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE CITY AND ITS PLANNING PROCESS............................. 1
1.1 Background ........................................................................................................................1
1.2 City Development Planning Process ..................................................................................2
1.3 Previous City Planning Process in Surat ............................................................................2
1.3.1 City Development Strategies........................................................................................... 2
1.3.2 Surat Vision 2020............................................................................................................ 4
CHAPTER 2: CITY PROFILE, VALUES AND STRENGTH................................................................... 5
2.1 City Profile .........................................................................................................................5
2.1.1 History & Growth............................................................................................................ 5
2.2 Demographic Characteristics .............................................................................................7
2.3 Urban Economy..................................................................................................................9
2.4 Population Forecasts ........................................................................................................12
SECTION II: EXISTING SITUATION ANALYSIS................................................................................. 15
CHAPTER 3: URBAN PLANNING & GROWTH MANAGEMENT..................................................... 16
3.1 Urban Sprawl over the years ............................................................................................16
3.2 Planning Process ..............................................................................................................17
3.2.1 Development Plans........................................................................................................ 17
3.2.2 Town Planning Schemes ............................................................................................... 20
3.3 Emerging Issues ...............................................................................................................23
CHAPTER 4: BASIC SERVICES & URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE ..................................................... 24
4.1 Water Supply....................................................................................................................24
4.1.1 Sources of Water ........................................................................................................... 24
4.1.3 Treatment Facility ......................................................................................................... 27
4.1.4 Storage, Transmission and Distribution ........................................................................ 27
4.1.5 Consumer Connections ................................................................................................. 28
4.1.6 EmerginG Issues ........................................................................................................... 28
4.1.7 Future Planning ............................................................................................................. 29
4.2 Sewerage Systems ............................................................................................................31
4.2.1 Sewerage Network ........................................................................................................ 31
4.2.2 Sewerage Pumping Stations .......................................................................................... 32
4.2.3 Treatment Facilities....................................................................................................... 32
4.2.4 Sewerage Systems (Zone wise)..................................................................................... 34
4.2.5 Emerging Issues ............................................................................................................ 41
4.3 Storm Water Drainage ..........................................................................................................43
4.3.1 Existing Situation................................................................................................................ 43
4.3.2 Flood Protection Scheme of River Tapi ........................................................................ 43
4.3.3 EmerginG Issues ........................................................................................................... 45
4.4 Solid Waste Management.................................................................................................47
4.4.1 Waste Generation & Collection .................................................................................... 47
4.4.2 Waste Transportation and Disposal............................................................................... 48
4.4.3 Emerging Issues ............................................................................................................ 48
CHAPTER 5: ROADS AND TRANSPORTATION.................................................................................. 50
5.1 Roads................................................................................................................................50
5.1.1 Existing situation........................................................................................................... 50
5.1.2 Bridges and Fly-overs ................................................................................................... 52
5.1.3 Emerging Issues ............................................................................................................ 53
5.2 Traffic Management .........................................................................................................55
5.2.1 Traffic Characteristics ................................................................................................... 55
5.2.2 Road-Rail Crossings...................................................................................................... 55
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY……………………………………………………………………………….1 to 7
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 3
5.2.3 Junctions........................................................................................................................ 56
5.2.2 Public Transport ............................................................................................................ 56
5.2.5 Street Lighting............................................................................................................... 57
5.2.6 Emerging Issues ............................................................................................................ 57
CHAPTER 6: HOUSING AND URBAN POOR........................................................................................ 58
6.1 Housing ............................................................................................................................58
6.1.1 Occupancy Rate and Household Size............................................................................ 58
6.2 Housing for Urban Poor ...................................................................................................59
6.2.1 Urban Poverty and Socio-economic Profile.................................................................. 60
6.2.2 Housing for Urban Poor -.............................................................................................. 63
6. 3 Emerging Issues ..............................................................................................................66
CHAPTER 7: URBAN ENVIRONMENT .................................................................................................. 67
7.1 Water ................................................................................................................................67
7.2 Air.....................................................................................................................................67
7.3 Pollution Control Mechanisms.........................................................................................68
7.3.1 Institutional Framework................................................................................................ 68
7.3.2 Regulatory Framework.................................................................................................. 68
7.4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT IN SUDA AREA................................................69
7.5 Emerging Issues ...............................................................................................................69
CHAPTER 8: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT................................................................................................. 70
8.1 Education..........................................................................................................................70
8.2 Health ...............................................................................................................................70
8.2.1 Health Facilities............................................................................................................. 71
8.2.2 Birth & Death Rates ...................................................................................................... 71
8.2.3 Mortality Pattern ........................................................................................................... 72
8.2.4 Disease Pattern.............................................................................................................. 72
8.2.5 Organisational Structure................................................................................................ 73
8.3 Recreation/ Open Spaces..................................................................................................74
8.4 Emerging Issues, ...................................................................................................................76
CHAPTER 9: URBAN GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT............................................................ 77
9.1 74
TH
Constituional Amendment .......................................................................................77
9.2 Governing Structure of SMC ...........................................................................................78
9.2.1 Elected Wing................................................................................................................. 78
9.2.2 Administrative Wing..................................................................................................... 79
9.3 Recent Management Reforms ..........................................................................................83
9.4 Capacity Building Measures ............................................................................................90
9.5 Emerging Issues ...............................................................................................................90
CHAPTER 10: URBAN FINANCE AND MANAGEMENT.................................................................... 91
10.1 74
th
Constitution Amendment Act....................................................................................91
10.1.1 State Finance Commission............................................................................................ 91
10.2 Structure of Municipal Finances ......................................................................................92
10.3 Finances of SMC..............................................................................................................93
10.3.1 Revenue Account .......................................................................................................... 94
10.3.2 Capital Account........................................................................................................... 100
10.3.3 Accounting of Depreciation ........................................................................................ 102
10.4 Financial Performance....................................................................................................102
10.4.1 Status of Municipal Finances ...................................................................................... 103
10.5 FINANCES OF SUDA.....................................................................................................104
10.5.1 REVENUE ACCOUNT.................................................................................................. 104
10.5.2 CAPITAL ACCOUNT ................................................................................................... 104
SECTION III: VISION, GOALS STRATEGIES AND PROJECTS..................................................... 105
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 4
CHAPTER 11: VISION 2020: STRATEGIES AND PROJECT IDENTIFICATION......................... 106
11.1 Strategic Focus ...............................................................................................................106
11.1.1 Strategic Focus 1: Promoting Growth......................................................................... 107
11.1.2 Strategic Focus 2: Good Governance.......................................................................... 108
11.1.3 Strategic Focus 3: Improved Service Delivery............................................................ 109
11.1.4 Overarching Objectives............................................................................................... 110
11.1.5 Toward Implementation .............................................................................................. 110
11.2 Urban Planning and Growth Management - Strategies & Action Plan..........................111
11.2.1 Identification of Projects ............................................................................................. 112
11.3 Basic Services and Urban Infrastructure – Strategies and Action Plan .........................113
11.3.1 Reforms in Water Supply............................................................................................ 114
11.3.2 Identification of Projects ............................................................................................. 116
11.3.3 Sewerage System......................................................................................................... 119
11.3.4 Identification of Projects ............................................................................................. 120
11.3.5 Storm Water Drainage................................................................................................. 124
11.3.6 Identification of Projects ............................................................................................. 125
11.3.5 Solid Waste Management............................................................................................ 127
11.3.6 Identification of Projects ............................................................................................. 128
11.4 Roads and Traffic Management- Strategies and Action Plan ........................................129
11.4.1 Roads, Flyover/ Bridges.............................................................................................. 129
11.4.2 Traffic Management .................................................................................................... 130
11.4.3 Identification of projects ............................................................................................. 131
11.4.4 Identification of Projects................................................................................................ 132
11.5 Housing - Strategies & Action Plan...............................................................................135
11.5.4 Identification of Projects................................................................................................. 136
11.6 Environment - Strategies & Action Plan........................................................................139
11.6.1 Identification of Projects ............................................................................................. 140
11.7 Health and Education - Strategies & Action Plan.........................................................146
11.8 Urban Governance – Strategic Action & Plan..................................................................151
11.9 IDentification of Projects ............................................................................................ 151
11.9 Urban Finance- Strategies and Action Plan ...................................................................152
11.10 Identification of Special Projects ...................................................................................153
11.11 Sectoral Summary of Projects Identified .......................................................................156
CHAPTER 12: CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMME.............................................................. 158
12.1 Introduction to CIP.........................................................................................................158
12.2 Institutionalising the CIP Process ..................................................................................159
12.3 Capital Facilities & Investment Needs...........................................................................159
12.3.1 Capital Investments..................................................................................................... 159
12.4 Multi-Year Investment Programme ...............................................................................160
12.4.1 FOP Assumptions........................................................................................................ 161
12.5 Financial Operating Plan (FOP)- Results.......................................................................164
12.5.1 SUDA – FOP Assumptions......................................................................................... 165
12.5.2 FOP – SUDA – Results............................................................................................... 167
ANNEXURES ........................................................................................................................................ 168


Annexure 1: F.O.P. Assumptions
Annexure 2: F.O.P. of SMC
Annexure 3: F.O.P. of SUDA



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 5
LIST OF MAPS

Map 1: Important Places ..................................................................................................................... 6
Map 2: Industries in Surat ................................................................................................................. 12
Map 3: Revised Development Plan 2004.......................................................................................... 18
Map 4: SUDA area – Phased wise development............................................................................... 19
Map 5: Town Planning Schemes (SMC)........................................................................................... 21
Map 6: Town Planning Schemes(SUDA) ......................................................................................... 22
Map 7 : Water Supply ....................................................................................................................... 26
Map 8 : Sewerage Systems................................................................................................................ 33
Map 9 : Flood Prone Areas (1998).................................................................................................... 44
Map 10 : Transportation Network..................................................................................................... 51
Map 11: Slums in Surat ..................................................................................................................... 62
Map 12: Administrative zoning of SMC........................................................................................... 80




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 1

Executive 8ummary Executive 8ummary Executive 8ummary Executive 8ummary
Background
The city of Surat in Gujarat is known for
its textile trade, diamond cutting and
polishing industries and, since 1994, for
the Plague, is today known for its
strength to convert adversity into
advantage. The outbreak of pneumonic
plague in Surat during September 1994
created worldwide panic and severely
affected the city as well as the entire
nation’s economy. About 60% of the
population fled the city and the industry
suffered an estimated loss of Rs. 12
Billion. Though the disease was
controlled within a week, it raised many
serious issues of public heath and the
capacity of the local government to
manage the city.
Subsequent to the Plague of 1994, the city authorities undertook one of the most massive clean-up
operations in recent times and revamped the entire administration of the city. Within two years, Surat had
been transformed from the one of the filthiest cities to the second cleanest city in the country. A systematic
process to upgrade infrastructure, both quantitatively and qualitatively, has been made by the local
government. The city governance has come to be recognized as an example of a good governance system.
The experience of Surat has demonstrated that urban local governments in developing countries have the
capacity to face the challenges of rapid urbanization and improve the quality of life of all residents.
While the city has successfully filled the large infrastructure gap accumulated over the decades within a
short span of a decade, consistently high rate of growth in population has posed new demands. The City has
been proactive in strategising its future. The first set of city consultations were done in 1998. Subsequently
in 1999, 2000 and 2001, the city concluded its City Corporate Plan (CCP). In 2004 the City revisited its CCP
and went ahead to draw the vision for Surat ‘Global City – Global Standards’. This ‘FUTURE CITY’ met
again in 2005 to take stock of the progress made in implementation of the strategy and draw up the plan for
further development. This plan, anchored on JNNURM, aims to upgrade the infrastructure standards
qualitatively and qualitatively to a desired level, extend coverage to rapidly expanding fringe/outgrowth area
and thus contributes towards transforming Surat to become a ‘Global City with Global Standards and
Values’. The declaration of the year 2005 as the Urban Development Year (Shaheri Vikas Varsh 2005) by
the State has enabled the city to initiate all-round developmental efforts.
GREATER SURAT IN REGIONAL CONTEXT
NAVSARI

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 2
Population Growth: Surat city
has seen an unprecedented
growth in last four decades
recording one of the highest
growth rates in the country and a
10-fold population rise. The
City now ranks the 9th largest
city in the country. Coupled with
this the spillover of population
into periphery has also been
observed. From time to time
jurisdictional limits of SMC
have also been extended to
include the outgrowth. At
present SMC area is about 112
Sq. Kms. There are about 6.50 Lakh people (2001) reside in the immediate periphery of the city.
Surat Urban Area – Population Growth
Economic Base
The economic base of Surat consists of textile manufacturing, trade, diamond cutting and polishing
industries, intricate Zari works, chemical industries and the petrochemical and natural gas based industries at
Hazira established by leading industry houses such as ONGC, Reliance, ESSAR, and Shell. The City
accounts for:
42 % of the world’s total rough diamond cutting and polishing,
70 % of the nation’s total rough diamond cutting and polishing,
40 % of the nation’s total diamond exports,
40 % of the nation’s total man made fabric production,
28 % of the nation’s total man made fibre production
18 % of the nation’s total man made fibre export, and
12 % of the nation’s total fabric production.
As estimated (1997-98) the industrial sector in the city contributed a gross amount of Rs.14667 million to
SMC as taxes, Rs.27512 million as Excise Duty, Rs.6050 million as Income Tax and Rs.6976 million as
Sales Tax.
The region is one of the leading city-regions in the country that has attracted massive investments of which
substantial proportion is under implementation. According to CMIE 2002, the Surat City region has a
proposed investment of about Rs. 11,817 Crores. In addition projects worth Rs. 2,022 Crores are under
implementation. Hazira and SEZ are major focal points for growth. Given these, the prospects of rapid
growth continuing is bright.
8urat Urban Agg|omerat|on 19ê1 19Z1 1981 1991 2001
Popu|at|on 28802ê 193001 91380ê 1518950 28111ê1
Crowth Rate - ê3.Z5 85.3ê êê.22 85.09
7 Popu|at|on |n the per|phery | agg|omerated Area 0.0 1.3 15.0 1.3 13.1

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 3
Infrastructure Status
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Income Distribution
The city is experiencing rapid growth in economy, which is dominated by labor-intensive activities. This
character reflects distinct demographic characteristics. Being dominated by migrant labor from eastern India,
in Gujarat and parts of Maharashtra, the demography exhibits a low sex ratio, growth of informal settlements
characterized by high density and associated public health risks. The reflection of this is also visible on cities
income distribution.
The distribution of incomes in Surat relates to the
quality of its work force Vis-a-Vis comparable
cities. Around 60 % earn less than Rs 25000 a year
or about Rs. 70 per day. While the incomes are
higher than the standard poverty levels, it needs
mention that the cost of living in Surat if not equal
to Mumbai is at least close to it. This is one of the
reasons for the growth in informal settlements.
This also means additional responsibility on the
part of the City Government to provide for
services at affordable cost.
CITY ASSESSMENT
City Strengths and Opportunities: The resourceful and inclusive city of Surat with a dynamic local authority
thrives for excellence to become a dominant player in the national and global scenario. Its distinct social and
economic character is its major strength. Its strength lies in its diverse economic base, conducive
environment for industrial growth provided by responsive local administration, entrepreneurial skill of
people, peoples’ willingness to accept other people belonging to different culture and sustained growth over
four decades. While Surat is seen as an alternative to Mumbai as a place of residence, at the same time it is
also a weakness that it is located in between two metro cities namely Mumbai and Ahmedabad. The major
weakness of the city is lack of educational institutions to respond to local institutional demand. Large
proportion of the population lives in slums in Surat as cost of living is quite high. Additional support from
ULB towards urban poor is a necessity. At the same time, the opportunity provided by the local
administration to enhance quality of life of the residents makes the city enterprising by creating conditions
for a safe living and business friendly environment. The recent development and growth of petrochemicals
and gas-based industries in the city region should be considered as an opportunity for further growth.
Potential for demand in terms of trade and transit services should be tapped for sustainable urban growth .
CITY SERVICES
The turnaround of the city of Surat happened after
the plague in 1994. This event reflected the ability of
local governance to turnaround and the support of
the citizens in transforming their city. This
transformation is an outcome of: ingenious
entrepreneurship skills of people of Surat and
commitments of the Central and the State
Governments. In the centre of all this transformation
process is the Surat Municipal Corporation (SMC).
The quality of infrastructure in Surat reflects its high
quality governance. The levels of services post 1994
have enhanced the levels by improved operation and
maintenance and informed investments. The infrastructure growth in this city has kept pace with the growth
of population. Surat is an exemplary case study of post-plague resurgence, a result of improved and dynamic
urban governance and citizen support for reforms. Improved governance and financial management have
resulted in enhanced municipal financial capacity to invest in services and improved O&M. However, the
population, which has spilled over in the periphery is devoid of urban services even at basic level.

Household Income Distribution in Select Cities
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Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 4
CITY VISION
Surat city is gearing up for becoming a city with global presence in a well-planned and systematic way.
There is an awareness that the City needs to strategically decide its future growth direction. The people of
Surat articulate their aspirations in terms of their vision ‘Global City – Global Standards’ and the ‘FUTURE
CITY’ with Global Standards and Values’.
The city’s population with its continuing high rate of growth, is likely to double from the present 2.8 million
to 5.5 to 6.0 million by the year 2020. The forecasts are in the order of 3.5 and 4.1 Million by 2011 and
2016. The city’s economic base has to remain attractive and continuously upgrade quality of life of its
residents. In this light the strategic focus of the city has been structured around three elements:
Promoting Growth
Good Governance
Improved Service Delivery
The overarching objective of this strategy is to promote safety, security, and environmental quality.
The vision and strategies towards fulfilling these are summarised below.
1. Promoting
Growth
1A Enabling Economic Development
It is important to create an enabling environment for trade, industry and
business to flourish by adopting a judicious mix of policies, incentives,
tariff structure, assured power supply, access to the serviced land,
creation of markets and high quality affordable infrastructure,
recognizing the existing large scale informal trade and cheap labour
availability.
1B Improve Connectivity
Improve connectivity through a combination of high-speed, strategic
links via air, expressways and waterways and advanced information
technology / communications networks for global positioning.
2. Good
Governance
2A Managing Urban Growth
To make the city enterprising and inviting by creating a business friendly
environment
2B Strengthening Urban Governance
Strengthening governance to promote growth and effective service
delivery
2C Inter Agency Coordination
Inter-departmental Coordination within SMC and coordination with other
agencies and state government policies and incentives
3. Improved
Service Delivery
3A Access to Basic Services
Improve access to basic services for the poor and set up a demand
responsive service delivery mechanism to foster growth
3B Mass Rapid Transit
Improved, fast and affordable public transport
3C Road Network Improvements
Improved transportation system and networks for better intra-city
commuting
Overarching
Objectives
A Safe and
Sustainable City
An enterprising and
inviting city by
creating a safe living
and business friendly
environment
Improve Improve
Environmental Environmental
Quality Quality
Pollution-free, clean
and green
environment by
managing pollution. A
cleaner river and
sustained efforts
towards natural
resource
management and
energy efficiency in
internal systems
SURAT VISION 2020
“A Global City with Global Standards -
A city that is competitive and offers a better quality of life”
Strategic Focus
1. Promoting
Growth
1A Enabling Economic Development
It is important to create an enabling environment for trade, industry and
business to flourish by adopting a judicious mix of policies, incentives,
tariff structure, assured power supply, access to the serviced land,
creation of markets and high quality affordable infrastructure,
recognizing the existing large scale informal trade and cheap labour
availability.
1B Improve Connectivity
Improve connectivity through a combination of high-speed, strategic
links via air, expressways and waterways and advanced information
technology / communications networks for global positioning.
2. Good
Governance
2A Managing Urban Growth
To make the city enterprising and inviting by creating a business friendly
environment
2B Strengthening Urban Governance
Strengthening governance to promote growth and effective service
delivery
2C Inter Agency Coordination
Inter-departmental Coordination within SMC and coordination with other
agencies and state government policies and incentives
3. Improved
Service Delivery
3A Access to Basic Services
Improve access to basic services for the poor and set up a demand
responsive service delivery mechanism to foster growth
3B Mass Rapid Transit
Improved, fast and affordable public transport
3C Road Network Improvements
Improved transportation system and networks for better intra-city
commuting
Overarching
Objectives
A Safe and
Sustainable City
An enterprising and
inviting city by
creating a safe living
and business friendly
environment
Improve Improve
Environmental Environmental
Quality Quality
Pollution-free, clean
and green
environment by
managing pollution. A
cleaner river and
sustained efforts
towards natural
resource
management and
energy efficiency in
internal systems
SURAT VISION 2020
“A Global City with Global Standards -
A city that is competitive and offers a better quality of life”
Strategic Focus

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 5
The City has initiated actions to update its medium term financial framework to prioritize investment and
related policy interventions. The consultations with stakeholders would continue and form the basis for
operational decisions. It is also important to note that the overarching objectives for the entire exercise are
making Surat a safe and sustainable city by improving environmental quality.
City Investment Plan: With the support of the State and the Centre, there have been initiatives to develop a
Gems and jewellery Park, an apparel park. A SEZ is being developed in Surat. Efforts to strengthen
education sector is also underway. Similarly proposals towards development of regional transportation
systems in the form of airport, high-speed highway corridor are also being pursued at different levels.
Towards delivery of urban core functions, i.e provision of basic amenities and facilities of a quality to make
city competitive, the city has envisaged a host of projects under several heads which have been summarized
below.
Some redistribution in the outlay is being considered with the period extending upto 2012. The projects
identified here are part of continuous planning and consultative process based on a certain vision for the city.
Total planned investments are of the tune of Rs. 4968 crores in the city and Rs. 2,517 crores in the periphery
(Rs. 7485.42 Crores over 7 years). The proposal, in addition to standard urban infrastructure components,
also includes projects such as Tapi Riverfront Development, Heritage Conservation, Canal Road
Development (express corridor), Gopi Talao Re-development and Alia-bet Island Development.
Out of the projects outlined below, projects listed as 1,2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 11, 16 and 21 specifically address the
needs of the poor in the city by providing basic infrastructure, housing and community development works.
The projects listed as numbers 1-11, 19, 20, 21 have potentials for developing (partially or fully) as public-
private partnership project in the planning, execution and operation of the systems. The City under the
JNNURM Framework wherein 70% of the urban infrastructure and governance related investment is funded
by way of GoI and GoG capital grants proposes these investments. The rest of the 30% and investment on
social infrastructure will need funding through own sources or user contributions and borrowings.



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 6
Investment Plan:
Summary of Identified Projects
Rs. |r La|rs
N0
Project deta||s Tota| 6ost
Est|mated 0ut|ay
|n 2005 -0ô
Est|mated 0ut|ay
|n 200ô -07
Est|mated 0ut|ay
|n 2007 -08
Est|mated 0ut|ay
|n 2008 -09
Est|mated 0ut|ay
|n 2009 -10
Est|mated 0ut|ay
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Est|mated
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C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v
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53o||d Wasle raradererl 800 8000 25 3Z5 1000 1Z2 1000 Z8 2000 90 2000 ê0 1000 0 1000
êErv|(orrerl |rp(overerl W|lr u(oar Fo(esl(v 21200 0 250 10010 10110 1910 810 810 0
Z8(|dde & F|vove(s Z0300 11000 225 2ê95 1500 10832 5500 15190 1000 19530 21828 0
8Roads 23319 8Z000 315ê 1500 88êZ 10000 3901 15000 31ê3 15000 39ê2 21300 0 13100 8100
9Cara| Road 0eve|oprerl 30000 0 892 119ê3 119ê3 1111 1038 0 0
10T(all|c Varadererl 11ê83 0 150 1Z98 1030 8930 11Z90 10000 1985
11Ew3 / Ll0 lous|rd |u(oar Poo() Z8125 351Z5 0 500 Z305 1300 12952 Z800 11598 10100 21399 9100 221Z1 3300 0 2ZZ5
123c|erce cerl(e. Vuseur. a(l da||e(v 5000 0 Z00 1ê00 1500 1200
13T(ade Cerl(e 2200 0 500 500 ê00 ê00
113|audrle( rouse 900 0 0 250 200 150
150l3 app||cal|ors 500 0 20 130 100 100 150
1ê8oc|a| |nfrastructure
a ) Aud|lo(|urs |r |) 3oulr Zore & ||) wesl Zore 1Z52 0 52 Z00 1000

o) 3W|rr|rd poo|s |r |) Easl Zore & ||) No(lr
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c) 0|v|rd Poo| |r wesl Zore 332 0 150 182
d) \edelao|e ra(|el Z00 0 0 200 250 250
e) La|e deve|oprerl ard da(der
|) 0op| Ta|av ê81 0 25 200 15ê
||) 0a(der 0eve|oprerl 359Z.5 3350 101.25 55ê.25 - 920 Z00 Z19.25 Z00 ê8ê.Z5 Z00 121 Z00 1ê0 550
|||) P(ese(val|or ol wale( ood|es êZ 2000 5 - 10 - 15 500 Z 500 500 500 -
l) 3po(ls corp|ex
|) wale( 3po(ls & Va(|re Accua(|ur 1191 0 10 210 510 101
d) Corrur|lv la|| 0 5000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000
r) C(eralo(|ur 0 1000 - 100 300 300 - -
18Aa||a 8el 0eve|oprerl 20200 0 0 1100 Z000 Z100 5000
19lrled(aled Road 0eve|oprerl 12500 0 1000 2300 2300 2300 2300 1300 1000
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21Tap| R|ve(l(orl 0eve|oprerl 100000 0 2350 1ê50 10000 20000 21000 21000 21000
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Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 7
INVESTMENT VIABILITY
In determining a long-term financial strategy, the city plans to raise resources through:
Accessing the grants available under the JNNURM Framework (as % of identified
investment in Urban Governance and infrastructure sectors - 50% Central Govt. Grants and 20% State
Govt. Grants)
Funds devolved by the GoG based on the recommendations of the State Finance
Commission
Revision of the Annual Rateable Value at certain levels
Revision of water and sewerage charges at specific intervals
Transfer of water and sewerage tax to the respective account heads
Maintaining the collection performance of taxes and charges at certain minimum levels for
the present and for arrears.
Underlying the major assumptions, a few basic assumptions for growth in property tax assessment, growth
in other taxes and miscellaneous income, as well as changes in the main expenditure heads have been made,
including general administration, establishment, O & M, debt servicing, etc. In the existing framework
SMC is the core agency implementing projects. SUDA is the agency overseeing developmental activities in
the periphery. The proposal is to expand jurisdictional limits of SMC to include outgrowth areas. However,
FOP have been developed separately as per the existing arrangement.
In case of SMC, investments in sectors of sewerage, sanitation and storm water drains are envisaged in the
first three years and those in the other sectors are envisaged. It has been assumed that by enhancing the
collection performance and widening the tax base, SMC would be able to sustain the entire identified
investment, of Rs. 4968.18 Crores (Rs. 5996.44 Crores at current prices). The actual investment
sustainability of SMC under the assumptions made and funding structure is 145% of the identified
investment i.e., about Rs. 7204 Crores. In the absence of JNURM grants, the sustainability of SMC falls to
95%.
In case of SUDA recommended investment is Rs. 2517.25 Crores. It may be noted that, under the
assumptions made, and the available resources for funding SUDA records 45% sustainability. That is SUDA
can sustain 45% of the identified investment of Rs. 2517 Crore amounting to Rs. 1133 Crores. Though
during the intial four years, it was observed that the operating surpluses would not be available, SUDA
would be able to tide over the situation in the next financial year at the indicated sustainability figure of 45%
while continuing to maintain overall surpluses during all the years.
SUDA will need to find additional resources to the tune of Rs. 1385 Crores in the form of grants or
own sources to fund the remaining 55% of the identified investment. At this juncture, it however
needs mention that SMC has indicated excess sustainability to the tune of Rs. 2234 Crores.
Considering the possibility of SMC area getting extended to include parts of SUDA area under its
jurisdiction in the near future, a framework of implementation between SMC and SUDA to take up
the remaining investment is suggested. It also needs mention that the FOP for SMC indicated
sustainability for Rs. 7204 Crores, which is marginally less than the combined investment
requirement of SMC and SUDA of Rs. 7485 Crores. In which case an appropriate project funding
and revenue sharing mechanism between SMC and SUDA will project a combined sustainability
much higher than the total identified investment of Rs. 7485 Crores. Such cooperation and
association between SMC and SUDA in the backdrop of JNNURM framework will assist them in
maintaining a healthy financial condition and further provide the leverage to take up additional
investments towards creation of better infrastructure for its ever growing populace.


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 1









8ECT¡ON 8ECT¡ON 8ECT¡ON 8ECT¡ON ¡: ¡: ¡: ¡: ¡NTRODUCT¡ON ¡NTRODUCT¡ON ¡NTRODUCT¡ON ¡NTRODUCT¡ON



CHAPTER 1: ¡NTRODUCT¡ON CHAPTER 1: ¡NTRODUCT¡ON CHAPTER 1: ¡NTRODUCT¡ON CHAPTER 1: ¡NTRODUCT¡ON
TO THE C¡TY AND ¡T8 TO THE C¡TY AND ¡T8 TO THE C¡TY AND ¡T8 TO THE C¡TY AND ¡T8
PLANN¡NG PROCE88 PLANN¡NG PROCE88 PLANN¡NG PROCE88 PLANN¡NG PROCE88
11.1 BACKGROUND
Cities play a critical role in the economic development process
of the nation. They are the engines of economic growth and
places of high productivity. They contribute more than the
proportionate share towards the regions income. For instance,
Surat district alone contributes to about Rs. 700 Crores to the
state as through sales tax, over Rs 3000 Crores and Rs. 8500
Crores through as Excise duty and Income Tax respectively 2002
and 2003. This clearly demonstrates that to sustain high rates of
economic growth, cities have to be made productive and
competitive. In a globalizing scenario, the role of the cities is
even more pronounced. With no barriers, attractiveness of a city
as an investment destination depends on the quality of
infrastructure, social safety and connectivity. Ultimately,
improved quality of life in our city would depend on our ability
to compete successful y with other city-regions and to provide
the necessary foundations for growth. Competitive businesses
and industries are going to result in employment and increased
revenues to the local government. To achieve this objective of
being the most appropriate choice of investment/ residence, there
is a need to strategically position our city strengths.
While cities generate more than proportionate share of States’
income, they also pose certain challenges. The challenges relate
to providing access to serviced land for housing the urban poor,
provision of basic amenities and facilities and a system to plan
and manage these. Hence urban investments in economic,
physical and social infrastructure at adequate levels are a
prerequisite. In recognition of these the state has initiated a series
of reforms in urban governance. A greater emphasis was laid
when the state declared the year 2005 as Urban Development
Year. At the State level several
initiatives have been made in line with
URIF framework. The State Urban
Slum Policy, State Hawkers Policy and
State Urban Transport Policy are under
various stages of finalizeation. As part

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 2
of this, cities have prepared City Development Strategies/Plan
which outlined vision, strateties to achieve the vision and time
bound action plans. The City Development Strategy/Plans were
prepared through consultative process for all major cities.
1.2 CITY DEVELOPMENT PLANNING PROCESS
The process of preparation of City Development Strategy began
in the year 1998 with initiation of series of consultations. The
outcome of these consultations was synthesized to form a City
Development Strategy in February 2003. The strategic plan
involves articulating a clear vision for the city over the next 20
years with the active participation of the stakeholders and
subsequently implementing the vision articulated by them. For
effective implementation, the City Development Plan (CDP)
works as Medium-term plan focusing on priority projects.
VISION 2020
The National Urban Renewal Mission gives the city an
opportunity to carry this initiative forward and place the reform
process on a higher plane. This would also be an opportunity for
the city to undertake a mid-course assessment and reposition its
priorities with changing needs within the JNNURM framework.
A City Development Plan is a perspective of and a vision for the
future development of a city. Essentially it addresses following
questions:
Where are we now?
Where do we want to go?
What do we need to address on priority basis?
What interventions do we make in order to attain the vision?
As discussed above, strategic planning has to be action oriented
and linked to tactical and operation planning in order to be
effective. Thus a medium-term plan commonly known as City
Development/Corporate Plan is prepared for the initial 8 years.
The plan will set out in detail the priority projects, outline the
tasks to be undertaken and give investment options ahead. The
plan also proposes a Financial Operating Plan for the period
based on the long-term financial vision and high priority
investment requirements.
The Plan is an iterative process and focuses on the key services
as identified in the Visioning exercise. As envisaged, the plan is
anchored on the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal
Mission (JNNURM) goal of creating economically productive,
efficient, equitable and responsive cities. Among the agencies
the Surat Urban Local Body (Surat Municipal Corporation), the
apex-planning agency is important as it takes care of major
developmental activities in the peripheral areas of SMC. The
consideration is that in the near future these outgrowth areas
either will be merged with SMC jurisdiction or a separate
Municipal Corporation will be formed so that service delivery
improves.
1.3 PREVIOUS CITY PLANNING
PROCESS IN SURAT
Surat City went through substantial
transformation after the Plague of
1994. Rejuvenated civic sense amongst
the citizens of Surat, efficient
administration, focused planning and
governing reforms were continued to
convert the threat to the city into an
opportunity. City development
strategies were one such planning
exercise that was initiated involving
the people of Surat.
1.3.1 CITY DEVELOPMENT
STRATEGIES
The Surat Municipal Corporation
(SMC) took up the project of devising
“City Development Strategies” for the
long term and short term planning of
the city in the year 2000. The purpose:
a more focussed and better use of
resources through clarity in mission
and long-term goals of SMC. The main
objective of the project was to develop
Surat into a “Model City” through a
definite Strategic Plan, covering all
sectors of services with short term
(next 5 years) and long term (up to
2021 A.D.) plans.
IDENTIFICATION OF SECTORS AND
SERVICES
In January 2000, the Surat Municipal
Corporation (SMC) successfully
conducted the workshop on "City
Development Strategies" with Surat
State Government Officials, Municipal
Councillors and leading NGOs. The
workshop was aimed to exchange the
views on "the exquisite formulation of
the City Development Strategies
(CDS)". Sectors and Services were to
be identified for short term and long
term planning of the City Development
Strategies. Accordingly, SMC defined
the sectors/ services to be covered for
the City Development Strategies to
nurture every citizen's dream to make
Surat as the "Model City of India". The
identified sectors/services are:
Finance

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 3
Taxes and duties:- direct tax, education cess, octroi
Accounts:- budgets, developments, fund mobilisation
Identification of new source of income
Infrastructure and Services
Public health:- hospitals, bio-medical waste and solid waste
management
Water supply, sewerage, storm water drainage
Roads, flyovers, street lights, Traffic regulatory system
Special project, Sports, Tourism, culture, parks and gardens,
Library
Slum upgradation
Environment / pollution control management
Fire services
Information technology/ EDP, Wireless control etc.
Town planning and town development
Education:- primary, secondary, higher
Disaster management system

Workshop on "City Development Strategies" conducted on 12th January 2000
at Indoor Stadium, Athwalines, Surat.

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 4
IDENTIFICATION OF STAKEHOLDERS
SMC has identified the stakeholders at zonal as well as election-
ward level through meetings conducted at both the levels. The
stakeholders include NGOs, government organisations (like
Police Department, Collectorate, GST, and GPCB etc.),
commercial organisations, M.P., MLAs, municipal councillors,
Ex-MLAs, eminent citizens, technocrats and social workers.
EVALUATION OF EXISTING SERVICES
In order to elicit the people’s responses in developing the future
vision of the city and to measure the satisfaction level regarding
the existing services, SMC had distributed approximately 30000
copies of a questionnaire to the identified stakeholders.
Questionnaires were also sent to all the senior officials of the
SMC for their suggestions. Nearly 13 percent of the
questionnaires were duly filled in by the stakeholders and
suggestions made were analysed.
SWOT ANALYSIS
The analysis of the filled in questionnaires made the SMC have a
close look at what it believed were the strengths and weaknesses
together with the threats and opportunities it faced.
FUTURE PLANNING
In order to realise the stature of a “Model City” and while taking
into account the expectations of external and internal lending
agencies, which would finance the long-term development goals;
the city corporation felt the need for a short-term strategic
framework that will guide the long-term strategic plan. This
short-term framework is otherwise called the CITY
CORPORATE PLAN. All implementation plans will be based
on the Corporate Plan only. The budgetary provisions,
development of financial and physical resources, augmentation
of existing services and development of new projects are planned
to be based on the Corporate Plan. The SWOT analysis carried
out by SMC also produced a set of core values which will act as
fundamental guidelines for the preparation of the Corporate Plan
and the ultimate measure of the plan’s success or failure.
Based on the SMC’s infrastructure analysis SUDA has also
identified the sectors and services to be improved for model city.
1.3.2 SURAT VISION 2020
Based on the first phase of City development strategies and its
sectoral analysis done by SMC and SUDA, an exercise to
formalize Vision 2020 was launched in March – May 2004 with
the objective of positioning Surat as “Global City with Global
Standards”. This is the vision articulated by the citizens of
Surat, supported by the Government of Gujarat. Surat Vision
2020 took the shape of a public document and was inaugurated
by Shri Narendra Modi, Hon. Chief Minister of Gujarat on May
1, 2004. Section III of this report illustrates the Vision 2020 in
detail. Upon completion of one year, a progress review was done
with a stakeholder meeting organised on September 15, 2005
along with the Chamber of Comerce.
STRUCTURE OF THE REPORT
This report outlines City Development
Plan (2006-2012) and it is divided in
three sections.
Section I is an introduction to the city
development plan, planning efforts in
the city of Surat and socio-economic
profile of Surat City.
Section II is a situation analysis for
various sectors such as urban basic
services, physical planning, Roads and
transportation, Education and Health,
Slums and Housing, urban governance
and Finance.
Section III of the report outlines the
framework of Vision 2020 and
integrating it with sector wise issues,
goals, strategies and action plans
focusing on identification of projects,
their resources allocation and
implementation mechanism.
SCOPE
This report is prepared placing the
needs of Surat City in a holistic
perspective. However, in the peripheral
outgrowth areas under SUDA, the
availability of urban services is limited
to a minimum, while the needs are
included in total to cover the entire
area.







The set of Core Values:
Transparent Administration through
Community Participation
Social Development
Environmental Management


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 5
CHAPTER 2: C¡TY CHAPTER 2: C¡TY CHAPTER 2: C¡TY CHAPTER 2: C¡TY PROF¡LE. PROF¡LE. PROF¡LE. PROF¡LE.
VALUE8 AND 8TRENGTH VALUE8 AND 8TRENGTH VALUE8 AND 8TRENGTH VALUE8 AND 8TRENGTH
2.1 CITY PROFILE
2.1.1 HISTORY & GROWTH
The city of Surat has glorious history that dates back to 300 BC.
The origin of the city can be traced to the old Hindu town of
Suryapur, during 1500 – 1520 A.D., which was later colonised
by the Brigus or the King from Sauvira on the banks of River
Tapi. In 1759, The British rulers took its control from the
Mughals till the beginning of the 20th century.
The city is located on the River Tapi and has about 6 km long
coastal belt along the Arabian Sea. Due to these reasons, the city
emerged as an important trade centre and enjoyed prosperity
through sea trade in the 16
th
, 17
th
and 18
th
centuries.
Surat became the most important trade link between India and
many other countries and was at the height of prosperity till the
rise of Bombay port in the 17th and 18th centuries. Surat was
also a flourishing centre for ship building activities. The whole
coast of Tapi from Athwalines to Dumas was specially meant for
ship builders who were usually Rassis. After the rise of the port
at Bombay, Surat faced a severe blow and its ship building
industry also declined. During the post-independence period,
Surat has experienced considerable growth in industrial activities
(especially textiles) along with trading activities. Concentration
of these activities combined with residential developments has
resulted in considerable expansion of the city limits.
EVOLUTION OF MODERN INDUSTRIES
The evolution of the power loom and handloom sectors led to
gradual growth of textile industries gradually. Another important
addition since the 1950's is the diamond cutting and polishing
industry. In the last two decades, especially during the eighties
large-scale industries have come up in Surat and its peripheries.
This increased the importance of Surat in the regional context,
along with Baroda and Ahmedabad, specifically due to its
location at the core of what is called the "Golden Corridor" of
industrial development. 2 The southern part of the city houses
the industrial complexes of Gujarat Industrial Development
Corporation at Sachin and Diamond Nagar. Besides industrial
potential, the city has fertile agricultural land irrigated by an
itensive canal network. The combined effect of all these on the
economic activities in the city and its outskirts have changed the
otherwise small and quiet town into a bustling metropolis.
REGIONAL SETTING
The city of Surat is the commercial
capital of the state and is of significant
importance to the country. The Arabian
Sea is to its west at a distance of about
22 kilometres along the Tapi and about
16 kilometres by road. The city is a
pivotal centre on the Ahmedabad-
Mumbai regional corridor as well as on
the 225 km long industrial belt, having
direct linkages with the industrial
urban centres of Vadodara,
Ankleshwar and Vapi. National
Highway 8 passes within 16 km of the
SMC boundary and is one of the
busiest inter-state trunk routes in the
country.
Surat is located midway on the 500 km
long Ahmedabad-Mumbai western
railway corridor and as many as forty
pairs of express, mail and passenger
trains pass through it. The state
government has also established an
airstrip to facilitate smaller aircraft
landings but no domestic air service
has been started yet.
TOPOGRAPHY
The city lies at a bend of the River
Tapi, where its course swerves
suddenly from the north-east to south-
west. With the walled city at its centre,
the city forms an arc of a circle, the
bends enclosed by its walls stretching
for about a mile and a quarter along the
bank. From the right bank of the river,
the ground rises slightly towards the
north, but the height above mean sea
level is only 13 metres. The
topography is controlled by the river
and the general slope is from north-east
to south-west.
TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL
The summers are quite hot with
temperatures ranging from 37.78 C to
44.44 C. The climate is pleasant
during the monsoon while autumn is
temperate. The winters are not very
cold but the temperatures in January
range from 10
0
C to 15.5
0
C. The
average annual rainfall of the city has
been 1143 mm.

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 6
Map 1: Important Places


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 7

2.2 DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS
Surat is India's twelfth and Gujarat’s second most populous city
(2001). It became a metropolis in 1991, along with eleven other
major cities across the country, by crossing thewith population of
more than one a million-population mark. Surat has experienced
very rapid population growth during the last 20 years. This rapid
growth in a very short time span is actually the hallmark of
Surat’s demographic trends.
Surat Urban Agglomeration

The city has been experiencing rapid growth in population
during past three decades, which is clear from the comparative
chart given below depicting the population growth in three cities
of Gujarat. The growth rates have been one of the highest in the
country. This consistently high rate of growth over three
successive decades has been a major feature in the city growth.
Along with this the needs for infrastructure the needs of
augmentation have also arise rapidly. The peri-urban growth is a
major cause of concern as about 4 lakh people reside in areas
with only a minimum level of urban services.
Surat City has seen an unprecedented growth in last three
decades and along with that the municipal boundaries have been
increasing. An exceptional decadal population growth rate of
85.09 percent in 1991-2001 suggest that the Surat City region
has to be planned in a broader perceptive and making it possible
for the city to capitalize on its thriving economic development.
The literacy rate has gone up from 63 percent in 1991 to 83
percent in 2001 and the figures are well above that of the state.
Rapid inflow of population has continued. The sex ratio has
dropped down to an alarming figure of 774 in 2001 from 839 in
1991.
Surat Urban Development Authority
- Population
Since the inception of SUDA (Surat
Urban Development Authority) in late
70s, the City is growing at a rapid
pace; though the development in the
peripheral areas was not that rapid until
2001. Decadal population growth rate
between 1991-2001, did not result in
the horizontal urban sprawl; on the
contrary, it densified the core city
areas, which were part of the municipal
corporation. With the municipal area in
Surat reaching a density of 21677
persons/Sq kms, it is believed that the
future development will take place
outside the municipal limits in the
urban development authority areas.
This demographic fact makes the role
of SUDA very crucial in the coming
decades of development in the city.





Comparison with other urban
agglomeration in the State


The table given below places Surat
along with other urban agglomerations
in the Gujarat state. It clearly suggest
that Surat urban agglomeration has
highest decadal population growth rate
1951 19ô1 1971 1981 1991 2001
8urat Hun|c|pa| Area
Area [8q.Km} 8.18 8.18 33.85 55.5ô 111.1ô 112.27
Popu|at|on 223182 28802ô 471ô5ô 77ô583 1498817 2433785
Crowth Rate - 29.05 ô3.75 ô4.ô5 93 ô2.38
0ens|ty 27284 35211 13934 13977 13489 21ô77
8ex Rat|o 91ô 915 887 857 839 774
8urat Urban Agg|omerat|on
Popu|at|on - - 493001 91380ô 1518950 28114ô4
Crowth Rate - - - 85.3ô ôô.22 85.09
Year
8U0A+
8H6
popu|at|on
0ecada|
growth
rate 7
8H6
popu|at|on
8U0A
popu|at|on
exc|ud|ng
8H6
19Z1 ê.20.5Z3 - 1.Z1.ê5ê 1.18.91Z
1981 9.85.3Z0 58.Z8 Z.Zê.8Zê 2.08.191
1991 1Z.1ê.5êê 81.31 11.98.81Z 2.8Z.Z19
2001 30.90.ê8ê Z2.99 21.33.Z85 ê.5ê.901
Year 2001 Popu|at|on Crowth
Rate
8ex-
rat|o
Ahm- U.A. 4519278 3ô.44 885
8urat U.A. 28114ô4 85.09 7ô0
Vadodara
U.A.
1492398 32.44 905
Rajkot U.A. 10021ô0 53.12 90ô
Surat Its Positioning and Growth
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5
1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001
Census Year
P
o
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n

i
n

M
i
l
l
i
o
n
Surat
Ahmedabad
Vadodara

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 8
and the lowest sex ratio directing towards tremendous increase
in the male migration in the city in last decade. This may have
happened due to employment opportunities in the manufacturing
and other sectors in Surat.
Note: Urban Agglomeration is a demographic category and it is not necessary
that population and area of urban agglomeration matches with that of the
urban development authority.

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 9

2.3 URBAN ECONOMY
Surat’s economy is characterized by large number of small and
medium unorganized industries. The industrial base is labour
Intensive. As a result the level of unemployment is also low.
However, the wages are also lower and the workers are generally
deprived of social and other benefits.
Surat is known for its textile manufacturing, trade, diamond
cutting and polishing industries, intricate zari works, chemical
industries and the gas based industries at Hazira established by
leading industry houses such as ONGC, Reliance, ESSAR, and
Shell.
Its entrepreneurial skills are worth noting. The city without a
single location advantage successfully hosts a vibrant diamond
industry. The city has made an important position in the world
and national economy. The textile and diamond units of Surat
region contribute to:
42 % of the world’s total rough diamond cutting and
polishing
70 % of the nation’s total rough diamond cutting and
polishing
40 % of the nation’s total diamond exports
40 % of the nation’s total man made fabric production
28 % of the nation’s total man made fibre production
18 % of the nation’s total man made fibre export
12 % of the nation’s total fabric production

Today Surat is one of the major industrial city contributing major
shares of output especially in diamond and textiles sector. The
entire industrial sector put together contributed a gross revenue
income of Rs.2975.60 million to SMC in1997-98. Rs.18118
million in Excise Tax, Rs.2715 million in Income Tax and
Rs.4215.4 million in Sales Tax. The contribution, problems and
prospects of each of these sectors have been briefly summarized
below:
Textile Industries
Textiles is one of the oldest industries
in the country and continue to be a
significant contributor to value of
industrial production, employment
generation and thus to national income.
An estimated 4 percent of GDP is
contributed from the sector. It adds to
about 30% of country’s export
earnings while adding about 7 to 8% of
the gross import bill. Surat is a
dominant player in the textile sector.
The traditional handloom weaving
industry has given way to power-
looms, printing, and dyeing textiles.
Surat is one of the largest centres in the
world for production of synthetic fiber
w0RK F0R6E 6hARA6TER|8T|68 [1991}
work Force Popu|at|on
6u|t|vators 2508
Agr|cu|tura| Labourers 4240
L|ve stock| forestry| f|sh|ng etc. 2720
H|n|ng & 0uarry|ng 875
Hanufacture & Process|ng |n hh
|ndustr|es
11325
Hanufacture & process|ng other than
hh |ndustr|es
2835ô8
construct|on Act|v|t|es 17097
trade & commerce 95844
Transportat|on| storage &
commun|cat|on
23028
other serv|ces ô7ô59
Pr|mary 8ector 94ô8
8econdary 8ector 2957ô8
Tert|ary 8ector 203ô28
Ha|n workers 5088ô4
Harg|na| workers 34ô2
non-workers 98ô491
Tota| Popu|at|on [6ensus 1991} 1498817
Hajor |ndustr|es [c|ty} Numbers
Text||es
Textur|s|ng un|ts 500
Power |ooms 0.45 m||||ons
Process houses 400
Zar| un|ts ôô10
0ye|ng & pr|nt|ng m|||s 32ô
0yes & chem|ca|s 130
P|ast|c Un|ts 200
0|amond un|ts 0.01 m||||ons
Food Products 5ô
|nformat|on Techno|ogy 300

Sectoral Distribution of Employment Surat 1999-2000
Manufacturi
ng
53.
5
Constructi
on 7.1
Trade
&
commerc
e
24.
1
Transport
4.6
Services
10.6

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 10
22000
100
500
1200
5667
13000
0
5000
10000
15000
20000
25000
1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000
Years
N
o
.

o
f

D
i
a
m
o
n
d

P
o
l
i
s
h
i
n
g

U
n
i
t
s
fabrics, mainly nylon and polyester. The Indian Government’s
policy since 1956 of providing incentives and protection to
small-scale industries boosted the power-loom industry in the
city. Weavers took advantage of the incentives and converted
their handlooms into power-looms. At present, there are about
0.45 million power-looms (about 45,000 units) in the city region
and the sector provides for over 0.7 million jobs in Surat.
Textile processing units are the major backbone of the Surat
city’s economy. Each unit, with a turnover of nearly Rs.5.0
crores, produces about 35,000 to 1.5 lakh meter of Sari and dress
materials every day. Textitle units mainly depend on ground
water for its processing and withdraws about 700 to 1000 cubic
meter of water every day.With about 60 thousand shops and
establishments, the trading activity in general, textiles in specific
acts as major generator of employment and income.
An Apparel Park has also been planned in the city for production
and export facilities to be under one roof and to give a face-lift to
the textile industry. Major industrial concentrations within the
city are found in the east and south zones of the corporation.
Diamond Cutting and Polishing
Surat is one of the world’s largest centers for diamond
processing. The emergence of the industry in the region which
did not have raw material, markets or worker base is a significant
feat. Even majority of the entrepreneurs are from outside. Still
the industry has flourished. Initially the industry began largely as
an initiative of few individuals belonging to a particular
community which has now expanded to large section of the
society.
Under the Import Replenishment Scheme introduced by the
Government of India in 1958, diamond traders were allowed to
import roughs from Diamond Trading
Corporation, London and other sources
abroad and export cut and polished
diamonds. Added support came from
the encouragement offered to small-
scale industries during this time. By
the late 1950s, about 100 diamond
cutting and polishing units had been set
up. With the setting up of the Gems
and Jewelry Export Promotion Council
in 1966, diamond exports received a
further impetus and consequently, the
number of cutting and polishing units
also increased. Coupled with ease of
establishing small-scale industries,
various governmental policies aimed at
increasing the export of polished
diamonds aided the growth of such
units in the city. During the 60s,
exports in polished diamonds grew 14
times! In the early 1970s, there were
about 1,200 units, employing 20,000
workers. In the early 1990s, the
number of units was estimated at
13,000, providing employment to more
than 100,000 workers.
Like textiles, diamond cutting and
polishing is also a labour intensive
industry employing about 2,50,000
workers or 50 percent of 0.5 million
workers, in about 10,000 units
operating within the city limits. India’s
first private Special Economic Zone
has been functioning near Sachin in
Surat since November 2000. From
household industry base, over the
years, the structure of the industry has
changed to small, medium and large-
scale units. Technical advancements
have also contributed to improved
productivity. However, as a result,
though output increased 5 times during
the last 10 years, there has not been
any significant increase in jobs. The
industry requires a low capital base, is
non-polluting, high on employment
generation and is a leading contributor
to foreign exchange reserve. Export
value increased from a mere Rs. 110
million in 1966-7 to 32,0000 millions
in 2002-03.
450000
2282
200000
25488
8105
19025
0
100000
200000
300000
400000
500000
1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000
Census
Years
N
o
.

o
f

l
o
o
m
s

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 11
Developments at Hazira
The establishment of large industrial giants like Reliance, Essar
Steel, KRIBHCO, ONGC, NTPCL etc on the outskirts of the city
in the Hazira industrial complex has changed the industrial
scenario in the region. These industries have come up in and
around Surat for example, a major port at Hazira, petro-chemical
refinery, natural gas, cement, steel plants etc., with a total
investment of about Rs. 1,00,000 million. Projects in the field of
nuclear, heavy water and space research are also under
implementation. Although these are capital-intensive industries,
their employment potential is limited. These industries are
together estimated to employ only about 5,500 persons.
However, the ancillary industries and other related activities are
likely to exacerbate further pressure on the infrastructure and
services in Surat. The latest development in the city is the
Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal at Hazira near Magadalla Port.
Zari Industries
The silver and gold brocade (zari) industry, embroidery, and
weaving of textiles in Surat have a 300-year old history. Since
the 1980s, the industry got some boost due to growing exports.
There are about 6,610 zari units that employ approximately
15,000 workers. Difficulties in availability of skilled labour, high
cost of raw material, outdated technology and changing
preferences of the consumers have led to a severe contraction of
the industry. Innovations through improvements in technology,
alternative product design and development may enable long-
term sustenance of the industry.
GIDC Industrial Estates
There are several industrial estates established by the Gujarat
Industrial Development Corporation (GIDC) in and around the
city like Pandesara, Khatodara, Udhana, Katargam, Sachin and
Bhestan. Textiles, chemicals and diamond are major units
located in these estates.
Prospects
This region is one of the leading city-regions in the country that
has attracted massive investments of which substantial
proportion is under implementation. According to CMIE 2002,
the Surat City region has proposed investment of about Rs.
11,817 crores, and projects worth another Rs. 2,022 are under
implementation. Hazira and SEZ are major focal points for
growth.

|ndustry Type Number |nvestment [H||||on Rs.} Emp|oyment
8ma|| 8ca|e 27238 833.5 145ô85
Hed|um & Large 8ca|e 38ô 12ô335.9 90000
|n the p|pe||ne 133 11220.0 14234

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 12

2.4 POPULATION FORECASTS
The exercise of population projections takes in account the
recent high growth of economy and population along with the
existing migration pattern in the city.
From the analysis above it is evident that the city economy will
continue grow and attract large nuber of migrants from Orissa,
Saurastra and other parts of the contry. However, in the longterm
the growth rates are likely to stabilise. Development of Orissa,
Saurastra, satuaration of existing low uality jobs etc., are
possible sources of this decrease in the migration rate. Keeping
these in context three scenarios have been developed.
Continued High Growth Scenario:
The first scenario estimates with an assumption that population
growth rate will oderately with trends at the state level. But
given high rate experienced in the past four decades the base rate
will still high.
Population Stabilisation:
The second scenarion assumes decline in the overall rate of
growth towards the assumption that the state’s population growth
will stabilise in the next four decades, a decade sooner than
stabilasation period for the nation.
Population Stabilisation plus Reduced Migration Scenario:
In addition to the second scenario, it is expected that other
regions which are sending igrants to Surat will develop and or
other regions will become destinations for migration and hence
further reduction in the growth rate. With proposed peripheral
ares to be merged under SMC jurisidiction, the population
presented below will be the target service population for this
plan.
Population Growth Composition
The projections given in the CDP are of Surat Urban
Agglomeration. However, as per the data availability for the
SMC area, refer the table: It is observed that the annual
migration rate of increase of population in the city is estimated to
be 3.5% to 4%.

No. 0eta||s F|gures
1 Popu|al|or |1991) 11. 98. 81Z
2 Popu|al|or |2001) 21. 33. 835
3 lrc(ease |r popu|al|or 9.35.810
1 0ecada| d(oWlr (ale ê2.30º
5 Tola| ro. ol 8|(lr 1.15.290
ê Tola| ro. ol 0ealr 8ê.Z53
Z Nel ralu(a| |rc(ease |r
popu|al|or
3.58.53Z
8 Nalu(a| (ale ol |rc(ease 23.92º
9 0ecada| (ale ol popu|al|or
|rc(ease due lo r|d(al|or
38.38º
10 Arrua| (ale ol popu|al|or
|rc(ease due lo r|d(al|or
3.8º

Surat Population Projections
3u(al Popu|al|or P(ojecl|ors - Popu|al|or |r |a|rs
6ensus
Year
h|gh
Crowth
8tab|||sat|on
Reduced
H|grat|on
1911 1.15 1.15 1.15
1921 1.1Z 1.1Z 1.1Z
1931 0.99 0.99 0.99
1911 1.Z1 1.Z1 1.Z1
1951 2.23 2.23 2.23
19ê1 2.88 2.88 2.88
19Z1 1.93 1.93 1.93
1981 9.11 9.11 9.11
1991 15.19 15.19 15.19
2001 28.11 28.11 28.11
2011
|P(ojecled)
1ê.Z3 13.25 11.99
2021
[Projected}
ô9.48 58.39 ô3.94
2031
|P(ojecled)
91.ê5 Z5.31 81.99


Map 2:
Industries in
Surat





Population Projections - SURAT U.A.
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
C
e
n
s
u
s

Y
e
a
r
1
9
1
1
1
9
2
1
1
9
3
1
1
9
4
1
1
9
5
1
1
9
6
1
1
9
7
1
1
9
8
1
1
9
9
1
2
0
0
1
2
0
1
1
2
0
2
1
2
0
3
1
P
o
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n

i
n

L
a
k
h
s
High
Growth
Stabilisatio
n
Reduced
Migration

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 13



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 14



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 15
8ECT¡ON ¡¡ 8ECT¡ON ¡¡ 8ECT¡ON ¡¡ 8ECT¡ON ¡¡: : : : Existing Existing Existing Existing
8ituation Analysis 8ituation Analysis 8ituation Analysis 8ituation Analysis
















Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 16
CHAPTER 3: URBAN CHAPTER 3: URBAN CHAPTER 3: URBAN CHAPTER 3: URBAN
PLANN¡NG PLANN¡NG PLANN¡NG PLANN¡NG & & & & GROWTH GROWTH GROWTH GROWTH
MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT
3.1 URBAN SPRAWL OVER THE YEARS
The city was originally established on the southern bank of the
River Tapi with a castle on the eastern bank of the river. A
customhouse was on the southern side of the castle. The
activities were concentrated within the inner wall, construction
of which was started in the year 1664. The area of the city at this
time within the wall was 178 hectares. The entrance to the
walled city area was through twelve gates: to the south were the
Navsari and Majura gates and on the west, the Mecca and
Badshahi gates and along the riverfront, the Dacca Dwara or
Custom House Water gate, Mirbehar and Lati gate. The
construction of the entire wall was completed in the year 1707
enclosing an area of 736 hectares.
Surat witnessed the development of its suburbs Udhna, Athwa
and Fulpada during the beginning of the 20
th
century. The
physical expansion of the town was radial and rapid along five
major corridors on the north, south, east, west and south-west till
the end of 80’s.
Since the 90’s the city has been growing rapidly on the eastern,
southern and south-western sides wherein large chunks of
residential localities were developed under the SUDA area.
The Land Use pattern of the city indicates large parcels of
agricultural lands in the Ved area of North zone and in the
wards- Jahangirabad and Jahangirpura of West zone. The growth
pattern is clearly demarcated with the industrial locations.
Industrial location within SMC area along the main railway line
from Mumbai to Ahmedabad has attracted major residential
development during the past two decades and new industrial
developments on the southern side near Sachin has also been
vital in the growth of the city in the southern direction.
Surat today is an outcome of the expansion of the city’s limits at
various intervals. Presently, Surat covers an area of 112.28 sq.
km.



























Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 17

3.2 PLANNING PROCESS
The planning process for the city of Surat is governed by the
Gujarat Town Planning and Urban Development Act, 1976
under the provisions of which the Surat Urban Development
Authority prepares the development plan for the entire area of
SUDA including the area under the Surat Municipal
Corporation. With this SMC is left with the preparation of Town
Planning Schemes for the area under its jurisdiction based on the
development plan prepared by SUDA.
Formal urban planning was started for the city in 1960 when the
first Development Plan of Surat was prepared. The Development
Plan of the city was then revised for the additional area included
in the city limits at a later stage. The Development Plans of the
Rander and Adajan, which were included within the SMC limits
on February 2, 1970, were sanctioned by the government as in
1961 and 1969 respectively.
3.2.1 DEVELOPMENT PLANS
With the establishment of the Surat Urban Development
Authority (SUDA) the development plan for its entire area
(including SMC’s area) was prepared, as provided under the
Gujarat Town Planning and Urban Development Act, 1976.
The planning area besides the area within the SMC includes 148
villages of Choryasi, Kamrej, Palsana and Olpad taluka.The
urban sprawl has already been started outside of Surat city limits,
along the radial roads and different corridors such as Udhana
corridor, Dindoli corridor, Rander – Adajan – Olpad corridor,
Nana – Varachha – Kamrej corridor etc.
This plan was sanctioned in 1986. The revised development plan
for the SUDA area was submitted to the Government in 1998,
which was sanctioned on 2/9/2004. The land use details as per
the Revised Development plan (SUDA) is shown in the adjacent
table.
The provision suggested in 74
th

Constitutional Amendment Act, 1992,
are already adopted in the Surat
Municipal Corporation, wherein the
liability to prepare Development Plan
as well as Town Planning Scheme is
shouldered by SMC.
Expansion of city limits (SMC area)

Land USE: revised development plan
Suda - 2004 (SUDA Area)
Source: Revised Development Plan, SUDA
No Type of Zone 8U0A
Area |n
1978
7 8U0A
Area |n
1995
7 8U0A Area
|n 2004
7
1 Res|dent|a| 2ê95.ê0 39.9ê ê189.00 1ê.ZZ 980ê.18 5Z.51
2 6ommerc|a| 111.30 2.09 25ê.00 1.93 115.Z2 2.11
3 |ndustr|a| 100ê.10 11.92 2Z81.00 21.01 3023.10 1Z.Z1
4 Educat|ona|
Pub||c Purpose
510.00 8.00 Z35.00 5.55 5Z9.82 3.10
5 Recreat|on
garden and
open space
22.21 0.33 58.00 0.11 10ê.ê1 0.ê3
ô Transport &
6ommun|cat|on
Z90.92 11.Z2 1êê1.00 12.55 15ê1.11 9.1ê
7 Agr|cu|ture 1550.00 22.98 1550.00 11.Z1 1550.00 9.09

Urban|se Area êZ1ê.13 100.00 13233.00 100.00 1Z013.11 100.00

Non Urban|se
Area
ê5153.5Z

589êZ.00

5515ê.8ê


Tota| Z2200.00

Z2200.00

Z2200.00

Year Area
Tota| Area
[8q. Km}
Area
Added
[8q. km.}
1ôô4 |nner wa|| Area 1.78 -
1707 0uter wa|| Area 8.18 ô.40
19ô3 8H6 Area 21.95 13.77
1971 8H6 Area 33.80 11.85
1975 8H6 Area 55.5ô 21.7ô
198ô 8H6 Area 111.1ô 55.ô0
1994 8H6 Area 112.28 1.12
8U0A
Land Use
Area
[ha}
0eve|ope
d area
[percent}
1 Res|dent|a| 980ô.18 57.53
2 6ommerc|a| 415.72 2.44
3 |ndustr|a| 3023.40 17.74
4
Educat|ona| & Pub||c
purpose
579.82 3.40
5 0pen & Recreat|on 10ô.ô1 0.ô2
ô Roads 15ô1.41 9.18
7 Vacant |and N.A. N.A.
8 Agr|cu|tura| 1550.00 9.09
Tota| Urban|sed 17043.00 100.00
9 Non-urban|sed area 55157.00
Tota| Area 72200.00


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 18
Map 3: Revised Development Plan 2004



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 19
Map 4: SUDA area – Phased wise development



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 20

3.2.2 TOWN PLANNING SCHEMES
Within the SMC, a full-fledged Town Planning Department
carries out the physical planning of the city. SUDA has a
separate planning cell which looks after the Town planning
schemes in the peripheral areas. SMC-SUDA is working towards
utilizing the town planning schemes as a mechanism to its full
potentials.
For the implementation of the Development Plan of the city at
micro level, SMC has initiated the preparation of Town Planning
Schemes. A total of 63 T.P. Schemes have been prepared by the
Corporation, which comprise almost 90 percent of the total SMC
land area. This includes schemes prior to the formation of
SUDA, out of which the government has already finalised 16
T.P. Schemes. The entire area within the SMC, thus is covered
by T.P.Schemes. The remained portion is river, creek, areas
wholly under industrial houses or Housing Board/govt. land,
which cannot be put under Town planning scheme.
SUDA has also taken initiatives of preparing the town planning
schemes in the outgrowth of the city outside SMC limits. There
are total 68 town planning schemes being considered in the
SUDA area and are at various stages of completion. These
schemes are covering about 6,348 hectares of areas in the SUDA
jurisdiction outside the municipal area. SUDA is also gearing up
for the implementation of these town-planning schemes and
provide basic amenities to the population living outside the
municipal areas.
Surat city can boast of the effective utilization of the town
planning scheme mechanism. With total of about 13680 hectares
of the usable urbanising land is covered under the town planning
scheme mechanism in the municipal as well as peripheral area.
Besides, The Town Planning Department at SMC is also
involved in other task related to planning. According to the
needs of the city/corporation in line with the proposals of D.P.
and T.P. Schemes, the department is involved in
Land acquisition,
Roads alignment,
Land and estate management
Allotment of tenements, staff quarters, shops, offices of
municipal properties;
Issuing license/ rights for hoarding, kiosks, hawking zone
scheme, pay and park scheme etc.;
Allotment of alternate provision of plot/ shop




Details of town planning schemes
within SMC area (2005)
* Details of the TP Schemes are presented in
the Annexure.


Details of town planning schemes
within SUDA area (2005)
No.
Town P|ann|ng
scheme deta||s
No. of
schemes
Tota|
schemes*
area |n ha.
1 F|ra| 3creres 1 119
2 P(e||r|ra(v screres Z Z25
3
3arcl|ored 0(all
3creres
13 1309
1
0(all 3creres
suor|lled |lo lre slale
dove(rrerl lo(
sarcl|or|rd)
3 2êZ
5
3creres urde(
p(epa(al|or
10 Z3Z
ê
P(oposed T.P.
3creres
31 3191
Z Tola| ê8 ê318
*Excluding Gamtal Area
T.P. 8cheme deta||s
No. of
8chemes
Tota|
8cheme
area [ha}
1
8anct|oned F|na|
8chemes
1ô 2185.91
2
8anct|oned
Pre||m|nary
8chemes
13 1425.91
3
8anct|oned 0raft
8chemes
2ô 2837.48
4
0raft 8cheme
subm|tted to Covt.
for sanct|on
1 83.0
5
8cheme under
preparat|on
7 803.3ô
Tota| ô3 7335.ôô


S
u
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a
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P
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)



































































































































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u
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Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 23

3.3 EMERGING ISSUES
Outgrowth in the Periphery
As observed, about 6 lakhs people live in areas with only
minimum levels of basic services. These areas are unplanned and
unserviced and are in a poor environmental condition.
Urban land management to be improved
While ineffective urban land management in the past has
resulted in the unregulated private sector exploiting land
resources like water bodies, open spaces etc., rapid growth in
population has increased the pressure on land significantly. In
the absence of physical constraints to the growth of the city, it is
found that development towards the peripheral areas has been
haphazard. This has also led to several litigations and court
cases, delaying the land acquisition process. Further the
congestion in the Central Business District (CBD) of the City
presently is due to non-application of any specialized land use
planning techniques in the past. It is imperative that the growth
of the city be directed in manner that improves the urban form
and function of the city.


OPERATING PLAN (URBAN
GROWTH MANAGEMENT/
DEVELOPMENT PLANNING)

Institutions
SUDA
Surat Municipal Corporation
Town Planning Department
Voluntary organizations and NGOs
Citizens’ Council/ Groups








Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 24
CHAPTER 4: CHAPTER 4: CHAPTER 4: CHAPTER 4: BA8¡C BA8¡C BA8¡C BA8¡C
8ERV¡CE8 & URBAN 8ERV¡CE8 & URBAN 8ERV¡CE8 & URBAN 8ERV¡CE8 & URBAN
¡NFRA8TRUCTURE ¡NFRA8TRUCTURE ¡NFRA8TRUCTURE ¡NFRA8TRUCTURE
4.1 WATER SUPPLY
At present SMC is serving about 97 percent of its total populated
area and 95 percent of its population. The area, which is not
served, is mostly made up of agricultural land within the SMC
limits. Apart from these tThe areas still to be covered with piped
water supply are parts of Nana varachhaVarachha, Bamroli,
Adajan and a part of LimbayatJahangirpura-Jahangirabad,
Limbayat, Ved, Dabholi, etc. These areas are at present being
served by water tankers owned by SMC. The work of laying of
pipeline network has already been started in these places, the
work of laying of remaining pipeline network is either under
progress at present or would be starting soon, which will make
100 percent population and populated area coverage of the city
under water supply network, a reality in coming years. The
corporation also caters to the water supply demand of the
floating population. At present gross 195 lpcd is being supplied
to the population of the city. Due to the construction of Rander
Water Works, water supply pipeline grid has been formed, which
will ensure that there would be no disruption of water supply in
any part of the city.
For the areas outside the municipal corporation (SUDA area),
there is no systemic water supply system. The drinking water is
fetched from open wells or from various water supply scheme
implemented by GWSSB (Gujarat Water Supply and Sewerage
Board). SUDA is also planning water supply schemes in the Pal
and Vesu areas.
4.1.1 SOURCES OF WATER
The city exploits both ground and surface sources of water, but
90 percent of the gross daily water supply is from surface
sources. The main source of water for the city is the River Tapi.
The main source of surface water for the city is the river Tapi.
To harness the river basin for flood control, irrigation and power
generation, a weir at Kakrapar in the lower basin and the Ukai
dam on the upper basin were constructed in the year 1954 and
1972, respectively. The Ukai Dam is situated about 100 km
upstream of the city of Surat. Electricity boards and irrigation
authorities regulate the releases from the barrage. The water
released from the Ukai dam, is drawn at WarrachaVarracha,
Sarthana, Katargam and Rander Water Works for treatment.
These are four major water works on the banks of Tapi. Water
Works at Rander is completed and commissioned in January
2003.
Water supply – Existing situation

Quantity of water supply Daily



The drainage area of the River Tapi above the
dam site is 62225 sq. km.
The total supply from WVarachha and Sarthana
Water Works is 180 MLD and from Katargam
Water Works is 260 MLD. Supply from Rander
Water Works is 140 MLD.



head| Year 2005
Tota| area of 8urat [sq. km} 112.274
Area covered by p|ped water supp|y
[8q.Km}
108.90
7 of area served 97.00
Popu|at|on coverage [|akhs} 2ô.ô1
7 of tota| popu|at|on served 95.00
Tota| water supp|y capac|ty [ground
and surface} [HL0}
ô732
Tota| water supp||ed [ground and
surface} [HL0}
580
2

Cross da||y supp|y [|pcd} 195
Purpose 0uant|ty supp|y [HL0}
0omest|c 505
6ommerc|a|
|ndustr|a|
|nst|tut|ona|
20

|ndustr|a||nst|tut|ona| 55
8tand PostsT0TAL 58


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 25
The lower Tapi project that comprised a masonry weir at
Kakrapar and two canals, one on the right bank, 65 km long and
the other on the left bank, 100 km long, both having a command
area of 214490 ha, was initiated in 1954.
The Tapi meets the Arabian Sea at a distance of about 17
km from the city. The effect of the high tide is observed up
to about 30 km from the mouth of the river.
A weir at Singanpore was constructed in 1995 to prevent
seawater intrusion into the river and to create a water body
a pondage for ensuring water supply during lean periods.
GROUND WATER SOURCES
The general practice of using ground water in addition to the
municipal supply has lead to the existence of bore wells in
almost every dwelling unit o f the city.
The total number of tube wells for water supply in the city is 41.
At Sarthana water works, there are 25 tube wells. All these tube
wells are not being used now and they have become obsolete as
maintenance of these has become far more expensive as
compared to their output.
GROUND WATER POTENTIAL
In Chorasi taluka of Surat district, total groundwater recharge
amounts to 330 MLD, out of which the allocation for domestic
and industrial requirements is about 50 MLD. This is far below
the city’s future requirement.
It is observed that the ground water level generally rises to 2-5
meters below ground level during the monsoon (June to
October). During the rest of the year, the ground water level
drops down to below 5 meters and even up to 10 meters at some
locations. Water table in the city, which was 18 metres below
ground level in 1991, has gone down to 20 meters in 2000.

YIELD FROM SURFACE AND GROUND SOURCES
The installed capacity of surface water sources is mostly utilized
at present. The contribution from the ground sources is only
about 10 percent in the daily total water supply to the city. The
system of ground water sources has become old now and the
main reason for the reduced yield of ground water appears to be
the silting of ground water sources after the construction of the
Singanpore weir. The yield of French well no. 1 has substantially
reduced and it is under maintenance. At present surface water
sources contribute 90 percent of the daily water supply.
Average Yield and installed capacity
of Various Surface Sources (2005)


It has become a need of the hour now
to recharge the rainwater to the
maximum possible extent in order to
lift the depleted ground water level and
to improve its quality.
water works
|nsta||ed
6apac|ty
[HL0}
Average
y|e|d
[HL0}
Y|e|d |
|nst.
6ap.7
Katargam water works [199ô,99}
Tota| 240 2ô0 108
Varachha water works
#

Tota| ô8 - 970
8arthana water works
Tota| 120 120 100
Rander water works *
Tota| 200 140 70
Tota| [8urface
8ources}
ô28 520* 82
*
New|y comm|ss|oned Rander wwof 200 HL0
capac|ty, w||| add |n|t|a||y 120 HL0 water |n th|s
tota| 8ource capac|ty |s ut|||zed accord|ng to
economy of convey|ng water through the
ava||ab|e gr|d system.
# warer uork ar waracnna |s remoror||y c|oseo oue
ro oo||ureo rau uarer

water works
|nsta||ed
6apac|ty
[HL0}
Average
y|e|d
[HL0}
Y|e|d |
|nst.
6ap.
Varachha water works
8ystem of
|nf||trat|on
we||s
28 0 0
Tube we||s[1ô} 5 0 0
Tota| 0 0 0
8arthana water works
French we|| 1 45 20 45
French we|| 2 45 40 89
Tube we||s[25} 10 0 0
Tota| 90 ô0 ô7
Tota| * [Cround
water 8ources}
90* ô0 ô7
*0ue to very o|d system, y|e|d has been reduced
cons|derab|y at present. 8o |nsta||ed capac|ty |s
shown as per present max|mum capac|ty.
Average y|e|d & |nsta||ed capac|ty [2005}
8ource
|nsta||ed
6apac|ty
[HL0}
Average
y|e|d
[HL0}
Y|e|d |
|nst.
6ap.
8urface 8ources ô28 520 82
Cround 8ources 90 ô0 ô7
Tota| 718 580 80
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Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 27

4.1.3 TREATMENT FACILITY
The treatment of water is carried out at Varachha, Katargam,
Sarthana and Rander Water Works. At Varachha Waterworks,
three water treatment plants (WTP- II & III) with a total design
capacity of 50 were installed in 1993 to treat water extracted
from the River Tapi. At Katargam 120 MLD capacity WTP was
commissioned in year 1997 and this capacity was increased to
240 MLD in year 1999. A 120 MLD capacity WTP was
commissioned in year 2000 at Sarthana, followed by 200 MLD
capacity WTP commissioned recently in January 2003 at
Rander. All these WTPs are equipped with most modern
facilities, which have latest kind of instrumentation devices and
pneumatically operated valves. At present, work for proposed
200 MLD water treatment plant is under progress at Sarthana
Water Works. This plant will be run automatically by SCADA
System.
Under the water supply monitoring mechanism, hourly check for
turbidity, residual chlorine content is done at the source. A
chemical analysis and bacteriological test is done daily. At
intermediate levels a residual chlorine content check is carried
out in each supply. At the consumer end the residual chlorine
content check in each supply area and the bacteriological test are
carried out as needed. The treatment constitutes of pre-
chlorination, alum/PEC dosing mixing, clariflocculation,
filtration and post chlorination.
4.1.4 STORAGE, TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION
Water from Sarthana is transmitted to the underground sumps at
Varachha Dumbhal and Khatodara Water Distribution Stations.
The water from the surface water treatment plant and tube wells
at Varachha is also stored in the underground sumps. From the
overhead tanks, water is transmitted to Umarwada, Khatodra and
Chowk Bazar distribution stations. The same two mains are used
for distributing water to three of the four water zones viz., east,
north and south. The west zone receives water from the Khatodra
distribution station at present but will be catered by newly
commissioned Rander Water Works. The total distribution
network length including the transmission lines is 2450 kms. A
total storage capacity of 465.05 million litres is available in the
form of underground sumps and overhead service reservoirs at
various water works and other distribution stations. The storage
capacity adequacy of all the water distribution stations to the
total water supply is 53 percent. The storage capacity at the main
water works of Varachha, Sarthana, Katargam and Rander is
about 158.56 million litres with an adequacy of 27 percent to
total water supplied. In year 2005-06, works for 5 UGSR & 3
ESR will be carried out, which will increase the storage capacity
at water works by 45 ML and distribution stations by 38.95 ML.
The supply is for 2 – 3 hours daily. Water is also supplied by
tankers from Khatodara distribution station to some areas where
work of laying of pipeline is going on at present.problem in
either quality or quantity of water supply occurs.
Water treatment facilities
The total treatment capacity at present is 628
MLD against a total supply of 540 MLD.
The total water supplied by tankers is about 0.8
MLD (average of 60-70 trips of 10,000 litres
per day and 80 trips during summer).




lead 2005
Nuroe( ol Wale( supp|v zores Z
wale( 3upp|v P|pe||res |erdlr 2250
T(arsr|ss|or ra|rs 10 |r.
Feede( ra|rs 190 |r.
0|sl(|oul|or NelWo(| 2150 |r.
No.
water works
[Treatment P|ants}
0es|gn
6apac|ty
[HL0}
work|ng
6apac|ty |n
HL0 [2005}
1 Varachha
#
ô8 -
2 8arthana 120 120
3 Katargam 240 2ô0
4 Rander * 200 140*
*$ource uarer caoac|ry |s ur|||zeo accoro|no ro
economy ol convey|no uarer rnrouon rne ava||ao|e
or|o sysrem
# warer uork ar waracnna |s remoror||y c|oseo oue
ro oo||ureo rau uarer.

8ource of water
supp|y | water
works
8torage capac|ty
E8R + UC8R
[H||||onL|tresH||||on
L|tres}
Tota|
water
supp||ed
[HL0}
water works
Varachha 33.05 -
8arthana 29.50 180
Katargam ô7.5 2ô0
Rander
1
21.00 140
water 0|str|but|on 8tat|ons
Katargam 47.25 -
Umarwada 3ô.00 -
Khatodara 47.25 -
Udhna 22.50 -
Athwa 31.50 -
Jogan|nagar 45.00 -
Pandesara 4ô.50 -
0umbha| 22.50 -
A|than 11.25 -
T0TAL^ 4ô5.05 580
1
Work for the 225 lakhs litres capacity UGSR is
in progress at present at Sarthana & Rander
WW.
2
Work for 110 Lakh litres capacity UGSR is in
progress at present at Udhna WDS.
3
Work for 72 Lakh litres capacity UGSR is in
progress at present at Dunbhal WDS.
^Work for 22.5 Lakh litres capacity ESR will be
started soon at Athwa, Dunbhal &
Joganinagar.
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 28

4.1.5 CONSUMER CONNECTIONS
Service connections are of galvanized iron. There are 291,642
connections, out of which only about 6538 are metered. About
95 percent of the connections are of 15mm (1/2 inch diameter).
About 4000 or more new connections are given every year.
4.1.6 EMERGING ISSUES
System (transmission and distribution) losses and
unaccounted for water
The gross average supply in the city is 195 lpcd. The population
coverage is approximately 95 percent with about 2.91 lakhs
water supply connections. It is estimated that transmission and
distribution losses account for 30 percent of the total supply.
Studies are required to check these figures and also amount of
water unaccounted for.
Pollution of river water behind the weir by adjacent villages
The villages like Amroli, Chaprabhata, Mota Varachha, Korad
etc. located upstream of weir, discharge their untreated affluent
directly into the river thereby affecting the quality of water
drawn from the surface watersources. This situation requires
action from other government agencies as they are outside the
jurisdiction of SMC,
Leakage and contamination of water at household
connections
Although rehabilitation of old pipelines has been taken up during
the past five years, the problem of low pressure in water supply
persists due to the existence of an aged network especially in
central zone. Increasing population has also added to the already
existing woes. Apart from these, the use of GI pipes for
household connections leads to leakage and contamination of
water in several areas of the corporation, further increasing the
maintenance cost. A separate leak detection cell with latest leak
detection equipments and sufficient trained staff will be set up
shortly.
Wastage of water at consumer level is increasing due to
intermittent water supply
Inconsistency in watersupply timings, though reduced
drastically, still persists and wastage of water at the consumer
level has been increasing. with only 6538 connections of the
291,642 connections being metered, distribution losses are
bound to increase, as also the unaccounted for water.
Alternative Source of Water
At present, main source of water for total water supply of the
city is river Tapi. River water quality is getting deteriorated more
and more day by day. Causes contributing pollution to river
water are outside the limit & control of SMC. Hence, options for
finding any alternate source of water –like getting water from
Kakrapar weir by pipeline – are to be
worked out considering techno-
economical feasibility.

water supply Connection details

Indicators
System losses and unaccounted for
water
Pollution of river water behind the
weir by adjacent villages
Leakage and contamination of
water apart from low pressure in
water supply
Wastage of water due to
intermittent water supply
Alternative source of water
head 2005 7 to tota|
Tota| 291,ô42 100
0omest|c 285,104 98
Non - domest|c ô538 2
Unmetered 285,104 100
0omest|c 285,104 100
Non - domest|c 0 0
Hetered ô538 100
0omest|c 0 0
Non - domest|c ô538 100
Cross 8upp|y 195 |pcd
T&0 |osses| Tota| 8upp|y
[assumed}
30 7
Popu|at|on served to tota|
popu|at|on
95 7
Treatment capac|ty| Tota| 8upp|y 117 7
8torage capac|ty| Tota| supp|y 53 7
8upp|y Frequency
2-3 hrs
0a||y
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 29

4.1.7 FUTURE PLANNING
WATER DEMAND
The overall net treated water demand for the city for the years
2011 and 2021 is 956 MLD and 1241 MLD respectively
(excluding losses as per the water supply master plan, SMC).
SOURCE AUGMENTATION
With this growing demand, there arises a need for augmenting
the sources and increasing the yield from various water works.
Capacity of Katargam Water Works will have to be augmented
to 360 MLD by 2011 and to 480 MLD by 2021. Capacity of
Sarthana Water Works will have to be augmented to 440 MLD
by 2011 and to 600 MLD by 2021. Rander water works shall
have capacity of 360 MLD by 2021. At present, work for
proposed 200 MLD capacity water treatment plant is in progress
at Sarthana Water Works. Reliability of source will be a
governing factor and accordingly change in location of further
augmentation may be required in future.
STORAGE CAPACITY AND ADEQUACY
225 Lac Liter capacity UGSR with booster house has been
constructed recently at Katargam Water Works to supply water
for T.P. 19, 25, 26, 35 & 49 of Katargam-Dabholi area.
Work for 225 Lac liters capacity UGSR is in progress at
Sarthana & Rander Water Works at present. Works for 72 Lacs
liters capacity UGSR at Dumbhal WDS, 140 lacs liters capacity
UGSR with booster house at Udhna Udyognagar Sangh and 110
Lac liters capacity UGSR at Udhna WDS are in progress at
present.
Moreover, works for 22.5 Lacs liters capacity ESR at Athwa,
Dumbhal & Joganinagar WDS are also in progress at present.
DISTRIBUTION NETWORK
Works for distribution network is presently in progress for the
following areas-
T.P.S. 19, 25, 26, 35 & 49 of Katargam-Dabholi
T.P.S. No. 53 of Magob
Jajangirpura-Jahangirabad area
Part of Limbayat & Dindoli area
Udhna Udyognagar Sangh


Zone Wise Water Demand

# Water work at Varachha is temprorily closed
due to polluted raw water

* Ultimate capacity for the year 2011 is taken
as per long term planning up to year 2021.














Zore 0erard |VL0)
2011 2021
6entra| 151 1ô5
North 1ô2 239
East 183 219
west 131 180
8outh 138 180
8outh-East 73 91
8outh west 118 1ô7
Tota| 95ô 1241
6apac|ty Augmentat|on at wTPs [HL0}
water works Present 2011 2021
Katargam 240 3ô0 480
Varachha
#
ô8 -- --
8arthana 120 440 ô00
Rander 200 200 3ô0
Tota| ô28 1000 1440
6apac|ty Augmentat|on at |ntake we||s [HL0}
water works
|nsta||ed
capac|ty
Present
Ut|||zat|on
Targeted
6apac|ty
|n 2011 *
Katargam 240 2ô0 480
8arthana 240 120 ô00
Rander 3ô0 140 3ô0
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 30

DESIGN CRITERIA OF WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM
Water demand is normally classified as domestic water demand
and non-domestic water demand. Domestic water demand covers
the use of water for drinking, washing, bathing, flushing etc.
Non-domestic water demand includes the water demand for
educational institution, religious institutions, hospitals,
swimming pools, commercial establishments, industries and fire
fighting. Water demand is necessarily assessed for 100%
satisfaction of the consumers. Under constrained resources,
water is allocated to consumers and the actual water supply thus
may not be able to meet the demand. Since most of the water
supply schemes have to be generally designed to meet the water
demand in the long run, it is necessary to estimate the water
demand on a 100% satisfaction basis.
Domestic Water Demand:
Following water demand figures are adopted for planning
purpose, as suggested in Master plan prepared by Tata
Consulting Engineers.
Non-domestic Demand:
For the purpose of this study, non-domestic demand is classified
into commercial, industrial and fire fighting demands.
Commercial Demand
Commercial demand includes demand from hotels, health
centers, educational institutions, gardens, swimming pools,
cinema theatres and working population. Following are the
requirements of water for each of these categories.
Industrial Demand
At present, SMC supplies about 50 MLD water to Pandesara
GIDC industrial area consisting of Dyeing & Printing Mills,
Chemical units etc, by metered water connections. Industrial
water demand may increase rapidly in future.
Fire Fighting Demand:
The demand for water for fire fighting arises occasionally and
hence the fire demand estimates are not accounted for in the total
demand. Fire fighting will be directly dealt with from a
distribution station nearest to the point of fire through fire
fighting tankers. Detailed design of the distribution network will
ensure that important places could be given special supply
through the network in case of fire. Proper provision for fire
hydrants has to be kept for this purpose. Adequate dead storage
at distribution stations is to be kept for fire fighting.
Terminal Pressure
For major networks in the area outside the walled city, terminal
nodal pressure of 15 meters for (G+1) level and 18 meters for
(G+2) level has been considered for design purpose to allow for
about 8 meters head loss in the ferrules, society pipelines & other
branch pipelines for the year 2011 & 2021 respectively.Whereas,
in case of walled city, pressure for
design purpose is considered for (G+1)
& (G+2) level for the year 2011 &
2021 respectively.








Per 6ap|ta water 0emand
water 0emand* [Lpcd} 6ategory
2001 2011 2021
3|urs 95 100 105
LoW R|se F|als 225 235 215
l|dr R|se F|als 215 2ê0 2Z0
T(ad|l|ora| RoW
louses
195 205 215
Ved|ur RoW
louses
255 2ê5 280
8urda|oWs 255 2ê5 280
Ave(ade lo( c|lv 200 210 220
Type of
commerc|a|
consumer
Un|t water
Requ|rement
ßas|s
Vajo(¯ lole|s 820 ||l/oed/dav Corsurpl|or
3u(vev |r olre(
c|l|es.
0lre( lole|s 120 ||l/oed/dav l.3.Code 11Z2.
1983
Vajo(¯ lea|lr
Cerle(s
¯ 8ed sl(erdlr
ro(e lrar
100.
590 ||l/oed/dav Corsurpl|or
3u(vev |r olre(
c|l|es.
0lre( lea|lr
Cerle(s
310 ||l/oed/dav l.3.Code 11Z2.
1983
Educal|or
lrsl|lul|ors
15 ||l/oed/dav l.3.Code 11Z2.
1983
0a(ders 80 ||/recl/dav 0ala or olre(
c|l|es
3W|rr|rd
poo|s
5º Va|eup
wale(
No(ra|
T(ealrerl P|arl
T(ealrerl
C|rera
Treal(es
15 ||l/seal/dav l.3.Code 11Z2.
1983
wo(||rd
Popu|al|or
15 ||l/cap/dav l.3.Code 11Z2.
1983
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 31

4.2 SEWERAGE SYSTEMS
SMC is at present augmenting the existing water supply scheme.
Increased water supply is expected to result in a corresponding
increase in wastewater generation. For the purpose SMC had a
master plan prepared for the augmentation of the wastewater
disposal system in 1997. Of the total 112.274 sq. km of area,
92.19 percent of the habitable area has a comprehensive
sewerage system. This was 29.45 percent in 1997. The
augmented sewerage system under seven drainage zones has also
resulted in the increase of population coverage from 56 percent
to 97.10 percent at present within a span of eight years. The
numbers of sewage pumping stations have also been increased
from 18 in 1996 to 28 in 2005 with another two proposed at
Pisad, and Bhesan-Jahangirabad. There are six sewerage
treatment plants serving each of the six zones of the city.
At present, the peripheral areas outside Municipal Corporation
do not have any sewerage system implemented. SUDA has
proposed water supply and sewerage projects in Pal and Vesu
areas.
4.2.1 SEWERAGE NETWORK
The sewerage network in Surat is presently served under six
drainage schemes inclusive of the sewerage network in walled
city area, namely, Anjana, Bhesan, Bhatar, Karanj, Sainganpore
and the Bamroli-Vadod drainage schemes. The schemes serve a
total population of 23.35 lakhs through 22 main sewerage
pumping stations and six auxiliary pumping stations.
Existing sewerage network
At present, only the central zone has 100 percent coverage while
the efforts during the past three years have led to 98.6 percent
coverage in the south-west zone and 96.8 percent coverage in
east zone. West zone has 74.56 percent area covered by an
effective sewerage system. The north, south and south-east zones
which had practically no coverage till recently now enjoy
coverage of 95 percent, 90 percent and 96.92 percent
respectively. An underground sewerage system is planned for the
entire city and network lines are nearing completion in some
areas. By 2006, the entire area and population of the city is
envisaged to be provided with effective sewerage systems. The
system is also planned to reduce the pollution into the River
Tapi.


Sewerage system – Existing situation


Existing sewerage network






0ra|nage
8cheme
No.
Name of dra|nage scheme
No. of ma|n
8P8
1 Anjana 0ra|nage 8cheme 4
2 ßhesan 0ra|nage 8cheme 3
3 ßhatar 0ra|nage 8cheme 7
4 Karanj 0ra|nage 8cheme 2
5 8|nganpore 0ra|nage 8cheme 4
ô ßamro||-Vadod 0ra|nage 8cheme 2
0escr|pt|on 2001
Area of 8H6 [8q.Km.} 112.274
8H6 tota| popu|at|on [Lakhs} 24.05
Actua| popu|at|on served [Lakhs}
23.35
[97.10 7}
Underground dra|nage [7
popu|at|on served}
97.10
0ra|nage network area [8q.Km.} 103.50
7 of area covered 92.19
Tota| |ength of dra|nage network
[Km.}
1028.50
Add|t|ona| area to be covered by
2003 [8q.Km.}
8.77
Popu|at|on to be covered [Lakhs} 0.70
8ewerage pump|ng stat|ons
|nsta||ed
28
0|a. 0f 8ewers
[mm}
Tota| |ength
[Km.}
Peak f|ow
capac|ty [HL0}
250-1ô00 80.50 82.5
250-750 ô5.30 ô0
250-1800 302.80 120
250-1800 114.30 100
250-1800 285.10 100
250-2000 180.50 100
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 32

4.2.2 SEWERAGE PUMPING STATIONS
Of the total 28 sewerage-pumping stations 22 are main stations
and the remaining six are auxiliary stations, which are of a
smaller capacity and installed in an isolated manner. The
diameters of the raising mains of the main stations vary between
600 mm to 1600 mm and those of the auxiliary stations vary
from 250 – 300 mm. The depths of the stations vary from 9 to 15
metres for main stations and 4 to 9 metres for auxiliary stations.

4.2.3 TREATMENT FACILITIES
There are six sewerage treatment plants catering to the needs of
all the six zones of the city and which have a total capacity of
treating 562.5 MLD of sewage. The sewage collected by the
Anjana and Bhesan drainage schemes is treated at the Anjana
and Bhesan treatment plants before being let out into river or
Khadi. With the increased drainage network over the last three
years, the entire sewage generated in the city can be treated
before disposal by the year 2006.
The total capacity of the six treatment plants is 562.5 MLD. It
was estimated by AIC Watson, Mumbai in 1997 that at the rate
of 172 lpcd, 548 MLD of wastewater is generated during the
year 2001. Taking this figure into consideration, the entire
amount of wastewater generated per day can be treated.
Six treatment plants are located at Anjana, Bhesan, Bhatar,
Karanj, Bamroli-Vadod and Singanpore. At present, all the
sewage treatment plants are under run as per its designed
facilities. The operation and maintenance of four sewage
treatment plants located at Bhatar, Bamroli-Vadod, Singanpore
and Karanj has been carried out by private agencies since last 3
to 5 years, while the two sewage treatment plants located at
Anjana and Bhesan and all the pumping stations are operated and
maintained by the drainage department of SMC. The contractual
cost for the operation and maintenance of the 60 MLD capacity
sewage treatment plant at Bhatar and Karanj each, is Rs. 270.0
lacs, for the total period of five years, which includes the cost of
spares, chlorine and all other consumables except energy. At the
100 MLD capacity sewage treatment plants of Bamroli-Vadod
and Singanpore each, the contractor has to run, operate and
maintain the plant for five years, at a cost of Rs. 160.0 lacs,
which includes the cost of spares, chlorine and all other
consumables except energy.
Treatment plants at Bhatar and Karanj have been augmented
from the Extended Aeration Activated Sludge process to the
Conventional Activated Sludge process facility. They have been
augmented from 60 MLD capacities each to 120 MLD and 100
MLD capacities respectively. The treatment plant at Bamroli-
Vadod is based on the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket
process and is one of the largest plants of its kind in the world.


Zone wise existing sewerage pumping
stations (2002)

Treatment plants and their capacity
(MLD)
SMC gives contracts for de-silting of
manholes and drainage lines in
different parts of the city to private
agencies.
Name of 8P8
Zone
Ha|n [HL0} Aux|||ary
8a|abatpura [ô5}
8a|yadpura [19}
6entra|
Zone
Nanpura [98}
-
Katargam -Tunk| [71}
Katargam-
C|06-0|d [2}
Ved-Katargam [ô9}
Katargam-
C|06-New [2}
North
Zone
0abho||-8|nganpore
[ô2}
8hant|n|ketan
[1}
Navagam [55} Pate| Nagar [2}
East
Zone Karanj [93}
Hod| Hoho||a
[3}
Adajan-Pa| [15}
Adajan [15} -
west
Zone
Rander [30}
Pandesara-C|06 [29} 8outh
Zone ßamro||-Vadod [1ô0}
Anjana [22}
Umarwada [14.5}
8outh-
East
Zone
L|mbayat [41}
-
Athwa [22}
Umra-North [18.5}
Umra-8outh [19.5}
Khatodara [50}
A|than [19}
8outh-
west
Zone
P|p|od [9}
0|d-Khatodara-
C|06 [1}
* F|gures |n Parentheses |nd|cate the 6apac|ty
Treatment
p|ant
Process
6apac|ty
[HL0}
Anjana
[6entra|}
6onvent|ona| Act|vated
8|udge Process
82.5
ßhesan
[west}
6onvent|ona| Act|vated
8|udge Process
60
ßhatar
[8outh-
west}
6onvent|ona| Act|vated
8|udge Process
120
Karanj
[East}
6onvent|ona| Act|vated
8|udge Process
100
ßamro||-
Vadod
[8outh}
Up f|ow Anaerob|c
8|udge ß|anket Process
100
8|nganpore
[North}
6onvent|ona| Act|vated
8|udge Process
100
Tota| 5ô2.5
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 33
Map 8 : Sewerage Systems
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 34
4.2.4 SEWERAGE SYSTEMS (ZONE WISE)
CENTRAL ZONE
A comprehensive sewerage system for the walled city (central
zone) of Surat was planned as long back as 1948 and was
completed in the year 1958. The population of the walled city
area has become nearly 1.5 times its design population.
Because of the excessive population being catered to, all the
three sewage-pumping stations (SPS) have become inadequate,
hence rendering the trunk sewers and main sewers in a
permanently flooded condition. Complaints of overflowing
sewer lines have become a matter of routine.
An attempt has been made not only to improve the efficiency of
the whole sewerage system, but also to make the system cope
with the ultimate population of the walled city.
Sewerage Network
At present, sewage from the Saiyadpura pumping station is
transmitted to the Katargam-Tunki pumping station by a gravity
main. The 4 km rising main of MS Spirally Arc Welded pipes of
1524 mm diameter for Nanpura pumping station has been laid to
carry the sewage from the entire Nanpura and Salabatpura
pumping station area to the sewage treatment plant (STP) at
Bhatar.
Sewerage Pumping Stations (SPSs)
The sewage from Saiyadpura SPS is transmitted to the STP at
Singanpore, whereas the Salabatpura SPS is transmitted to the
STP at Anjana. A new pumping station at Nanpura has been
commissioned with ultimate capacity of 98 MLD.
As per the master plan, after the commissioning of the gravity
main lines, the walled city will have only one sewage pumping
station, namely the Nanpura new pumping station and the
existing pumping stations located at Salabatpura and Saiyadpura
will be abandoned. Out of them, the pumping station at
Saiyadpura is already abandoned.
Sewerage Treatment Plants (STPs)
The primary sewage treatment plant at Anjana, with a capacity
of 25 MLD and 51 MLD capacity was constructed in the year
1958 and 1984 respectively. The secondary sewage treatment
plant, based on the Conventional Activated Sludge Process, and
with a capacity of 82.50 MLD was constructed and
commissioned in the year 1996. At present, it treats the sewage
of the Salabatpura, Limbayat, Umarwada and Anjana sewage
pumping stations. During 2006/08, the treatment efficiency of
sewage treatment plant at Anjana will be upgraded as per the
norms of Gujarat Pollution Control Board.











Gravity mains were laid to divert the
sewage from Saiyadpura SPS to
Katargam-Tunki SPS.







The sewage from the walled city will
be transmitted to sewage treatment
plants located at Bhatar and
Singanpore for further treatment.
Area
[8q.Km}
7 Area
6overed
Popu|at|on
[Lakhs}
7
Popu|at|on
6atered
8.18 100 7 4.15 100 7
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 35
EAST ZONE
At present, 96.8 percent area has been covered with sewage
network. The sewage water is being treated as per the norms of
the consent of the Gujarat Pollution Control Board, in a 100
MLD capacity sewage treatment plant at Karanj and the treated
sewage is being disposed off into the Karanj khadi. Untreated
sewage from remaining areas, along with wastewater generated
from the local small-scale industries is being discharge into the
Karanj Khadi and the River Tapi through storm water drains.
However, as per the master plan, the sewage from the whole East
Zone will be treated at the sewage treatment plant located at
Karanj and the treated sewage will be disposed off into the
Karanj Khadi.
According to the sewerage scheme of this zone, there will be a
sewage treatment plant with an ultimate capacity of 150 MLD,
three sewage-pumping stations, a transmission line from each
pumping station to the sewage treatment plant and a sewerage
network of NP-3 class RCC pipes.
Sewerage Network
With a sewerage network of Navagam and the part area of
Karanj, Fulpada and Umarwada, was covered during the year
1990-1995.The part-area of Fulpada has been covered during
1999/2000. A network in the remaining areas of Karanj,
Kapadra, Fulpada, Magob and Nana Varachha were completed
by end of 2001, thus covering the total area and population of the
entire east zone, which ultimately prevents the pollution of the
River Tapi.
Sewerage Pumping Stations
The sewage from the Navagam area and a part area of Fulpada,
Karanj and Umarwada is collected at the Navagam SPS and
auxiliary SPSs at Patel Nagar and Modi Mohallo and is then
transmitted to STP at Karanj.
The remaining area of the whole East zone will be covered under
the Karanj SPS, which has a capacity of 90.0 MLD..
Sewage Treatment Plant
The sewage treatment plant at Karanj with a capacity of 100
MLD and based on Conventional Activated Sludge Process, is
commissioned in 2003.
As per the master plan, during 2008/10, the capacity of sewerage
treatment plant at Karanj will be augmented by 30 MLD to a
total of 140 MLD. 1.0 MW biogas based power plant will be
installed during the year 2007-11.


























Area
[8q.Km}
7 Area
6overed
Popu|at|on
[Lakhs}
7
Popu|at|on
6atered
13.8ô 9ô.8 5.85 98.57
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 36
NORTH ZONE
At present 95 percent area and 96.54 percent of the population of
the zone are covered by the sewerage network. The sewage water
is being treated as per the norms of the Gujarat Pollution Control
Board, in a 100 MLD capacity sewage treatment plant at
Singanpore and the treated sewage is being disposed off into the
River Tapi. Untreated sewage from remaining areas, along with
wastewater generated from the local small-scale industries is
being discharge into the River Tapi through storm water drains.
However, as per the master plan, the sewage from the whole
North Zone will be treated at the sewage treatment plant located
at Singanpore and the treated sewage will be disposed off into
the River Tapi.
As per the sewerage scheme of this zone, there will be a sewage
treatment plant with an ultimate capacity of 202.0 MLD, three
sewage-pumping stations, a transmission line from each
pumping station to the sewage treatment plant and a sewage
network of NP-3 class RCC pipes.
Sewerage Network
The work of laying of sewerage network for Katargam-Tunki,
Katargam-Ved and Dabholi-Singanpore, has been already
completed in May 2004. It will cover the total area and
population of the entire north zone.
The transmission lines from Katargam-Tunki, Katargam-Ved
and Dabholi-Singanpore sewage pumping stations to the
Singanpore STP have been laid. The total length of these
transmission lines is about 7.0 kms.
Sewerage Pumping Stations
The sewage pumping stations at Katargam-Tunki, Katargam-
Ved and Dabholi-Singanpore is in operation. The installed
capacity of the three pumping stations is 71.0, 62.0 and 69.0
MLD respectively.
Sewerage Treatment Plant
For a total of 202.0 MLD sewage expected to be generated at the
end of design period, it has been planned to construct a sewage
treatment plant, based on the Conventional Activated Sludge
Process, in two phases. The Singanpore STP with a capacity of
100 MLD, is under operation.
As per the master plan, works on augmentation of the capacity of
the plant from 100 MLD to 150 MLD will be taken up during
2008/10. 1.0 MW biogas based power plant will be installed.
The tertiary treatment plant of 100 MLD, to reduce the pollutants
load in the river Tapi, will be also constructed during the year
2007-10.
.





















Area
[8q.Km}
7 Area
6overed
Popu|at|on
[Lakhs}
7
Popu|at|on
6atered
20.54 95.0 3.31 9ô.54
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 37
SOUTH ZONE
At present 90 percent area of the zone is now covered by
sewerage network, which in turn caters to about 95 percent of the
population of the zone. The sewage from the whole South zone
area is treated at the Bamroli-vadod STP except Pandesara GIDC
area and the treated effluent from the same is disposed off into
the Khajod Khadi. The untreated sewage from the remaining
area, along with wastewater generated from small-scale
industries as well as industrial effluent from processing houses,
is being discharged into the Kakra Khadi through storm water
drains.
According to the sewerage scheme of this zone, there will be one
sewage treatment plant at Bamroli-Vadod, with an ultimate
capacity of 156.0 MLD, one sewage pumping stations at
Bamroli, transmission lines from pumping station to the sewage
treatment plants and a sewerage network of NP-3 class RCC
pipes.
Sewerage Network
The sewerage network for Udhana, Govalak, Pandesara, Bhestan
and Dindoli (Part) has been completed.
The SPS at Bamroli is terminal pumping stations in the premises
of the STP at Bamroli-Vadod. Hence, the length of the
transmission line is negligible.
Sewerage Pumping Stations
The sewage pumping station of 160 MLD capacity at Bamroli-
Vadod is commissioned. The effluent pumping station at
Pandesara GIDC area is under run.
Sewerage Treatment Plant
The sewage treatment plant of 100 MLD capacity at Bamroli-
Vadod, based on the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB)
system, is commissioned. The plant is one of the largest capacity
plants in the world. The exisiting plant will be upgraded as per
the GPCB norms during the year 2006-07.
As per the master plan, the industrial effluent collection and
transmission lines along with the pumping station and common
effluent treatment plant of 100 MLD capacity will be executed
during 2005/08. The STP at Bamroli-Vadod will be taken up for
augmentation during 20010/11 from 100 MLD to 140 MLD. 0.5
MW biogas based power plant will be installed




















The sewage collected at the sewage
pumping stations at Bamroli-vadod
will be transmitted to the sewage
treatment plant at Bamroli-vadod for
treatment.




Area
[8q.Km}
7 Area
6overed
Popu|at|on
[Lakhs}
7
Popu|at|on
6atered
21.70 90.00 3.48 95.00
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 38

SOUTH-EAST ZONE
At present 96.92 percent area of the zone is now covered by
sewerage network, which in turn caters to about 95 percent of the
population of the zone. The sewage from the Anjana, Limbayat,
Dindoli and Umarwada area is treated at the Anjana STP and the
treated effluent from the same is disposed off into the Koyli
Khadi. The untreated sewage from the remaining area, along
with wastewater generated from small-scale industries as well as
industrial effluent from processing houses, is being discharged
into the Koyali Khadi through storm water drains.
According to the sewerage scheme of this zone, there will be one
sewage treatment plant at Anjana, with an ultimate capacity of
82.50 MLD, three sewage-pumping stations at Anjana,
Umarwada and Limbayat, transmission lines from each pumping
station to the sewage treatment plant at Anjana and a sewerage
network of NP-3 class RCC pipes.
Sewerage Network
The sewage network for Umarwada, Anjana, Limbayat and
Dindoli has been completed.
The SPS at LImbayat is terminal pumping station in the premises
of the STP at Anjana. Hence, the length of the transmission lines
is negligible.
Sewerage Pumping Stations
The sewage pumping station at Umarwada has an ultimate
capacity of 14 MLD. The sewage pumping station at Limbayat
has an ultimate capacity of 41 MLD, whereas the sewage
pumping station at Anjana has an ultimate capacity of 12 MLD.
Sewerage Treatment Plant
The sewage treatment plant of 82.5 MLD capacity at Anjana,
based on the Conventional Activated Sludge Process, is the
oldest sewage treatment plant in the city.
As per the master plan, it has been planned to upgrade the
treatment facility at Anjana as per the norms of Gujarat Pollution
Control Board during the year 2005-07.





















The sewage collected at the sewage
pumping stations at Anjana, Dumbhal
and Umarwada will be transmitted to
the sewage treatment plant at Anjana
for treatment.




Area
[8q.Km}
7 Area
6overed
Popu|at|on
[Lakhs}
7
Popu|at|on
6atered
8.ô0 9ô.92 2.97 95.00
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 39

WEST ZONE
Almost 74.56 percent of the area is covered by sewerage
network. The sewage is being treated in a 60 MLD capacity
sewage treatment plant at Bhesan and the treated sewage is
disposed off into the Tena khadi. In the area bereft of the
network, the sewage along with wastewater from local small-
scale industries is being discharged into the River Tapi through
storm water drains or is being disposed through septic tanks and
cesspools.
According to the sewerage scheme of this zone, there will be a
sewage treatment plant at Bhesan, with an ultimate capacity of
160 MLD, five sewage pumping stations, transmission lines
from each pumping station to sewage the treatment plant and a
sewerage network of NP-3 class RCC pipes.
Sewerage Network
Seventy Five percent of the area of the zone is provided with an
underground sewage network. The 13.0 km sewage network for
Jahangirabad and Jahangirapura-Pisad, will be completed by the
year 2006.
The transmission line of the Rander, Adajan and Pal sewage
pumping stations is under service since 1995-96 and the 3.5 km
transmission line for Jahangirabad and Jahangirapura-Pisad
sewage pumping stations is planned to be taken up in the first
quarter of 2006. As per the master plan the sewerage system in
Adajan area will be augmented / rehabilitated in year 2006-07.
Sewerage Pumping Stations
The developed area of the zone has been provided with sewage
pumping stations at Rander, Adajan and Pal since 1995-96.
Sewage pumping stations of 40.0 MLD capacity at Jahangirabad
and Jahangirapura-Pisad, will be commissioned by the year
2006.
Sewerage Treatment Plant
A sewage treatment plant of capacity of 60 MLD, based on the
Conventional Activated Sludge Process was completed and
commissioned in 1995 at Bhesan.
As per the master plan, it has been planned to augment the
capacity of the Bhesan sewage treatment plant by 40 MLD
during the year 2006-08.


























Area
[8q.Km}
7 Area
6overed
Popu|at|on
[Lakhs}
7
Popu|at|on
6atered
19.ô3 74.5ô 2.37 8ô.45
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 40

SOUTH-WEST ZONE
In this zone practically 100 percent of the area has been covered
by the sewerage network, barring the Althan area. While sewage
is treated in the 120 MLD capacity sewage treatment plant at
Bhatar and the treated sewage is disposed off into the Kakra
khadi.
According to the sewerage scheme of this zone, there will be a
sewage treatment plant at Bhatar, with an ultimate capacity of
236.0 MLD, eight sewage pumping stations, transmission lines
from each pumping station to the sewage treatment plant and
sewerage network of NP-3 class RCC pipes.
Sewerage Network
Ninety Nine percent area of the zone has a comprehensive
sewerage facility. As per the master plan, the sewerage network
of Athwa and Umara will be rehabilitated during the year 2006-
08.
Sewerage Pumping Stations
The sewage pumping station of 19.5 MLD capacity at Althan has
been completed and is under operation since May 2002. AS per
the master plan, the pumping station at Athwa and its rising main
will be rehabilitated.
Sewerage Treatment Plant
The Bhatar sewage treatment plant of 120 MLD capacity and
based on the Conventional Activated Sludge Process, is
commissioned since 2003 and is the largest capacity sewage
treatment plant in the city.
As per the master plan, the sewage treatment plant at Bhatar will
be augmented by 80 MLD during 2009/11. 1.0 MW biogas based
power plant will be installed































Area
[8q.Km}
7 Area
6overed
Popu|at|on
[Lakhs}
7
Popu|at|on
6atered
14.9ô 98.ô1 3.15 100
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 41

4.2.5 EMERGING ISSUES
Outdated sewerage system in the walled city area,
Athwa, Umra and Adajan
Mixing of sewage with storm water and solid waste in
several areas
Low number of sewer connections
Very low nil per-capita cost recovery
Unavailability of comprehensive wastewater system in
Industrial Area.

FUTURE REQUIREMENTS
Surat Municipal Corporation has prepared a master plan for
comprehensive sewerage system (more than 1000 km of sewers
and 6 sewage treatment works) to serve not only the domestic
and commercial, but also the industrial developments for the
year 2021. Wastewater generated from all this development is to
be collected by a network of underground sewers and pumping
stations and conveyed to sewage treatment works for physical
and biological treatment to meet the parameters prescribed by
the GPCB before discharge into the nearest watercourse.
Sewerage Network
The comprehensive sewerage system designed for the city of
Surat as per the master plan is expected to be in place by the end
of 2006. Phase wise execution of the master plan will cover not
only the present population of the city but also the population
expected by the year 2021. Complete area coverage is expected
to be achieved by 2006. This is apart from the revitalisation of
the entire sewerage network in the central zone, where the
present system is outdated. Complete revitalisation of the system
in the central zone is to be completed by 2010.
At present, there is no drainage system exists in the Pandesara
GIDC area, which leads to the flowing industrial wastewater
open into the open surface water body.
















Indicators


Out-dated Sewerage system in
Walled City Area.
Mixing of Sewage with Storm
water and Solid waste in several
areas.
Less number of Sewer Connections
and almost nill per-capita cost
recovery.


Sewerage Network






Tota| sewerage Cenerat|on 390 HL0
Area served to tota| area 92.19 7
Popu|at|on served to tota|
popu|at|on
97.11 7
Treatment capac|ty| Tota| 8ewage
Cenerated
100.00 7
Area 6overage [7}
Zone
Area [8q.
Km}
2005 2011 2021
6entra| 8.18 100 100 100
North 20.54 95.0 100 100
East 13.8ô 9ô.8 100 100
west 19.ô3 74.ô 100 100
8outh 21.70 90.0 100 100
8outh-East 8.ô0 9ô.9 100 100
8outh west 14.9ô 98.ô 100 100
Tota| 112.274 92.19 100 100
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 42
Sewerage Pumping Stations
With the newly proposed sewerage pumping stations at
Jahangirabad and Jahangirpura-Pisad, the sewerage pumping
stations will total to 30. These are expected to cater to the needs
of the population of the city till 2021. After the completion of the
gravity mains that diverts the sewerage generated in the central
zone to the Singanpore and Bhatar STPs, the sewerage pumping
stations at Salabatpura and Saiyadpura shall be abandoned.
Hence the total number of sewerage pumping stations in the city
will be 28. Few of the existing sewage pumping stations i.e.
Athwa, Umra, Adajan, Salabatpura shall be rehabilitated.
In, Pandesara GIDC area a sewage pumping station exists.
However, practically very little wastewater is collected, as there
is no comprehensive drainage system exists.
Sewerage Treatment Plants
As per the master plan, to cater to the needs of the present
population sewerage treatment plants have been constructed at
Singanpore and Bamroli-Vadod. But to cater to the needs of the
population in 2011 and 2021, the treatment capacities of these
plants need to be augmented without the necessity of new
treatment plants. Augmentation of Bhatar STP to 120 MLD and
Karanj STP to 100 MLD has been recently completed, is under
run since 2003 and the Singanpore STP is operational at present
with a capacity of 100 MLD.
For Pandesara GIDC area, there is no facility for common
effluent treatment plant. Hence, the industrial wastewater
directly flows to the nearby creek.









Sewerage Pumping Stations



Sewage Treatment



Number [Ha|n & Aux|||ary}
Zone
2005 2011 2021
6entra| 3 1 1
North ô ô ô
East 4 4 4
west 3 5 5
8outh 2 2 2
8outh-East 3 3 3
8outh west 7 7 7
Tota| 28 28 28
2002 2011 2021
8TPs
6apac|ty [HL0}
Anjana 82.5 82.5 82.5
ßhesan ô0 100 1ô0
ßhatar 120 200 240
Karanj 100 140 150
ßamro||-Vadod 100 140 1ô0
8|nganpore 100 150 202
Pandesara --- 100 200
Tota| 5ô2.5 912.5 1194.5
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 43

4.3 STORM WATER DRAINAGE
Due to its location on banks of the River Tapi near the estuary of
the Arabian Sea, the land drainage in Surat City is relatively poor
and in the past, during the monsoon months, many areas of Surat
city suffered temporary flooding and blockage of storm water.
The monsoon in the region is seasonal and is active between the
months of June to December. Rainfall during this period can be
extremely intense. Hence, the SMC has laid an extensive
network of storm water drains in the entire city.
4.3.1 EXISTING SITUATION
The gentle slope of the city has greatly aided in the natural storm
water drainage. 85% of the city is covered with a storm water
drainage network, but well built leader lines to support the
natural system are lacking in most parts of the town except in the
well-developed areas. Generally, the storm water flows through
un-built open surface drains and joins the nearby khadi or the
River Tapi.
These drains discharge storm water in to the River Tapi at 16
locations in 5 zones of the municipal corporation. The storm
water outlets provided backwater entry to the floodwaters of
River Tapi and thereby caused temporary flooding of areas from
which they were carrying out storm waters.
Hence, it was felt necessary to provide flood protection gates at
the outlets of storm water drains. SMC completed the
construction of flood protection gates at 15 locations in the year
1999 at a total cost of Rs.210 lakhs. These works were
completed in 3 months. A total of 22 cast iron manually operated
vertical sliding gates were provided. Normally, these gates are
kept open, but at the time of heavy floods in the River Tapi,
these gates are closed to prevent the entry of floodwater in to the
city.
At present the area outside Municipal Corporation does not have
any storm water drainage system. SUDA has proposed storm
water drainage system covering 68 TP schemes to be developed.
4.3.2 FLOOD PROTECTION SCHEME OF RIVER TAPI
After the ravaging floods of the River Tapi in 1968, the
Government of Gujarat had decided to have a flood protection
scheme to protect Surat city and its adjoining area. It was
planned to provide flood protection for a total of 46.85 km. on
both banks.
The Tapi embankment scheme was designed for a 10 lakh cusecs
flood, which is inclusive of 1.5 lakh cusecs discharge,
contributed from the catchment between the Ukai Dam which is
about 80 km. upstream of Surat city. The flood protection works
consist of raising of both banks of the river by construction of an
earthen embankment/ brick masonry retaining walls with/without
river slope pitching and also by constructing sluice regulators
across natural creeks/drains etc. meeting the River Tapi.




Storm Water Drains

During the floods of 1994 (About 5.25 lakh
cusecs) and 1998 (About 7.0 lakh cusecs), the
backwater entry of floods played major role in
submerging the many low laying areas of Surat
city.

A majority of the slums drain storm waters
through open drains.

The River Tapi is a perennial one and it drains
a total catchment of 65,000 sq.km. It originates
in Satpura Hills of















0ra|n type Length [kms}
0pen 0ra|ns [Pucca} 70.25
0pen 0ra|ns [Kutcha} 38.02
6|osed 0ra|ns 321.532
Tota| 429.577
Basic Services & Urban Infrastructure
Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 44
Map 9 : Flood Prone Areas (1998)


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 45
The major part of the scheme was executed by the Government
of Gujarat from 1971 to 1995 at a total cost of Rs.1542 lakhs.
But the long delay in completion of the project proved fatal
during the floods of 1994 and 1998. The works of
embankment/sluice regulators at village Chhaprabhatha, Variav
and Tunki were not completed.
With technical guidance from the Narmada and Water Resources
Department of the Government of Gujarat, SMC executed the
flood protection works, which fall within the Surat city limit.
The project cost of Rs.2406 lakhs is being borne equally by the
Government of Gujarat and SMC. Initially, SMC will execute
the works from its own resources and later on, the Government
of Gujarat will reimburse its 50 percent share within 3-5 years
depending upon the availability of funds. The works of the first
phase have already been completed by SMC and the remaining
works are proposed to be taken up only after finalisation of the
scheme/ design-drawings etc. by the Irrigation Department of the
Government of Gujarat.
4.3.3 EMERGING ISSUES
Mixing of Sewer and storm water drains
With a very small number of sewerage connections in the city,
large amounts of sewage are let out illegally into the storm water
drains. The closed drains of the city amount to only 20.3 percent
of the total length of surfaced roads. Solid waste is also dumped
into the natural drains of the city in many areas near the slums.
Due to this, the city witnesses frequent flooding of roads during
the monsoon.
Delay in implementation of the Flood Protection Scheme.
The flood protection scheme of the River Tapi that started in
1971 is still under progress. This long delay on the part of the
Government of Gujarat proved fatal during the floods of 1994
and 1998. A large portion of the scheme falling under the city
limits is still pending and is largely dependent on the availability
of funds with SMC as the reimbursement from the Government
is expected to come only at a later stage.
Silting of khadis and open storm water drains.
The city has the advantage of a good natural drainage pattern,
which is not, unfortunately, exploited properly. Silting and
constriction due to uncontrolled solid waste dumping and
encroachments by the poor on the banks have interrupted the
flow of wastewater and storm waters, thus, causing them to spill
into neighbouring areas. Never has there been an attempt to
desilt and clean the natural drains of the city. The open storm
water drains are in a similar condition, with sewerage waters
getting mixed with them at places.
















SMC has constructed earthen embankments and
sluice regulators at villages Tunki and
Bharimata by spending Rs.356 lakhs during the
first phase. SMC has already spent a total of
Rs.530.50 lakhs including the land acquisition
cost etc



Indicators


Mixing of sewer and storm water
drains
Delay in implementation of flood
protection scheme
Silting of khadis and open storm
water drains
8torm 0ra|n network| Tota| Road
Length
30.ô 7
6|osed 0ra|ns |ength| Tota|
8urfaced Road Length
20.3 7


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 46
FUTURE REQUIREMENTS
The Surat Municipal Corporation has appreciated the importance
of an effective storm water drainage wherein the current and
future needs point to effective roadside storm water lines. This is
in consideration of the fact that apart from draining the storm
water they also help in maintaining the condition of the road
surface. A total length of 532 km of present storm water drains
are to be extended to a minimum of 401.076 km by 2011 to
effectively control flooding during the monsoon. This is also
expected to assist the flood protection scheme of the River Tapi
by reducing the sudden pressure on the system during
emergencies.

STORM WATER DRAINAGE IN THE PERIPHERAL AREAS
(SUDA AREA)
Due to its location on banks of the river Tapi and on the bank of
river Mindhola near the estuary of the Arabian Sea, the land
drainage in SUDA area is relatively poor. In monsoon months,
during heavy rains many areas of SUDA suffer flooding. Till
now, such flooding was not posing a major problem as major
part was agricultural area. With rapid development of SUDA
area, it is necessary to see that the storm water is disposed off as
early as possible to exert only minimum hardships on residential,
commercial and industrial area.
Due to paucity of funds, normally low priority is being given to
the costly project of disposal of storm water. Moreover, as the
area is located on the banks of the river, there are number of
natural creeks which meander at number of places. It is possible
to provide systematic underground system of storm water
disposal, unless storm water drain in place of these creeks are
properly planned on the roads of TP Schemes, as by preparing
TP Schemes at many places the land falling under portion of the
schemes are allotted to final plot holders. Now, as the TP
Schemes are being prepared and finalized gradually the road
network is also finalized which facilitates to provide storm water
drain. Initially projects are prepared for Vesu and Pal-Palanpor
area at a cost of Rs. 60 crores covering the total area of 1800 Ha.
It is proposed to cover the major part of the SUDA area by
efficient network of storm water disposal at a cost of Rs. 176
crores over a period of 7 years. The project becomes costlier, as
the same is to be designed keeping in view the disposal points
which are mainly in river, the latter is not only in tidal range but
also has to face abnormal floods. To prevent the flood water
entering into SUDA area, provisions are to be made for flood
gates at disposal points.

Zone Wise Storm Water Drains

Year-wise Area to be Covered Under
Storm Water Drains in SUDA Area



Zone
Area
[8q.km.}
Tota| Length [km}
2001 2005 2011
6entra| 34.14 39.94
North 48.44 59.42
East 57.47 ô8.50
west 75..00 93.80
8outh 20.13 24.13
8outh-East 34.00 39.50
8outh-west 52.3ô 75.79
Tota| 321.53 401.08
Yea( A(ea |r la.
200ê 285
200ê-0Z 2385
200Z-08 2385
2008-09 2385
2009-10 180
2010-11 210
2011-12 210
Tola| 8100


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 47

4.4 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT
Efforts to improve solid waste management in the city of Surat
were made by the health department after the havoc of the
plague in 1994. It is the only city of its kind in Gujarat where
private contracting and private participation in solid waste
management is being tried out. The city has been divided into 7
zones for efficient management and the waste generated is
collected through out the city and dumped at the Khajod disposal
site (200 ha).
Source segregation of recyclable waste is practiced and a large
percentage of households practice storage of waste at source.
About 96 percent of the households and 99 percent of the shops
and establishment practise storage of waste at source.
At present in SUDA area, there is no scientific collection and
disposal for solid waste available.

4.4.1 WASTE GENERATION & COLLECTION
Everyday, Surat generates 400gms per capita per day of waste
amounting to roughly 1000 metric tons. This is collected by
SMC, private contractors and the rag pickers.
About 70 percent of the waste generated every day is contributed
by households, shops and other commercial establishments. Just
over 30 percent of the total waste generated is recyclable. This
comprises of paper, plastic, metal, brick stone and glass
primarily. Combustible waste accounts for 22.75 percent of the
total and organic waste is nearly 42 percent.
Doorstep bins are roadside cradle types and are 314 in number.
The total number of waste collection bins is 1170. These are
mainly 4.5 cu.m in size with a capacity of 1.5 tonnes (4.5 cu. m)/
dustbin and cover the entire population of the city. The spacing
between waste storage depots is about 100 m.
For door-to-door collection 3000 bins would be installed by 3
private agencies. The cradle type would be designed in such a
way that revenue generation through advertisement is possible.
There are also initiatives for segregation of waste at source
including awareness generation through pamphlets. For this to
create awareness pamphlets are distributed.
At present there are 4503 sweepers engaged in the
collection of waste across the seven zones of the city. Of
the total waste collected, the corporation manages 98
percent i.e., 980 tons/day while the rest is collected by rag
pickers.




Solid Waste Management – Existing
situation


Waste Generation & Collection

Quantity of waste generated


Composition of waste




head 2005
Refuse garbage co||ected per day
[HT}
950
7 garbage hand|ed by 8H6 40
7 garbage hand|ed by contractor ô0
6o||ect|on per person [gm| day} 390
Cenerat|on per person [gm| day} 390
7 Eff|c|ency [6o||ect| Cenerate} 98.1
0ens|ty of waste [kg| cu.m.} 533
7 Ho|sture content of waste - 42
No. of dustb|ns [2-3 cu.m capac|ty} 2ô3
No. of dustb|ns [4.5 cu.m capac|ty} 1440
Tota| capac|ty of dustb|ns [6u. m}
8. No. head 0eta||s
1 Cenerat|on
a. Tons Per 0ay 980HT
b. Cms| cap|ta| day 400 gm
2 6o||ect|on
a. 6orporat|on [TP0} 980HT
b. Rag p|cker [TP0} 25 HT
8ources Percentage
househo|ds 53
8hops and Estab||shments 1ô
Vegetab|e| Fru|t| Heat| F|sh market 14
6onstruct|on and demo||t|on
mater|a|
8
ß|omed|ca| waste 1
hote|| Restaurant waste 8
8. No. Type of waste Percentage
1 6ombust|b|e - wood 22.45
2 Recyc|e ab|e 30.28
A Paper 12.75
ß P|ast|c 4.12
6 Heta| 2.75
0 C|ass 2.05
E ßr|ck 8tone 8.ô1
3 Earth - 0rgan|c 41.97
4 H|sce||aneous 5.00


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 48
4.4.2 WASTE TRANSPORTATION AND DISPOSAL
Waste collected from all over the city is transported to the
processing and disposal sites by 450 labourers and 104 drivers.
The fleet of vehicles available for the purpose includes dumper
placers, trucks, tractors, market vans and heavy machines which
are 162 in total. 41 labourers are involved in processing and
disposing waste at the Khajod disposal sites.
The frequency of transportation of waste from various waste
storage depots is once or twice a day and the total capacity of the
fleet is 980 M.T. The transportation process is partly mechanised
in the form of loaders, bulldozers and breakdown vehicles. The
mechanised process accounts for 27 percent of the total
transported waste. The remaining 73 percent is manually
transported.
The private sector is partly involved in the transportation of
waste in terms of manpower or a transportation of garbage and
vehicles. They are mainly involved in transportation of
municipal solid waste by dumper trucks and by containers
through dumper placers.
PROCESSING AND DISPOSAL OF WASTE
Processing and disposal methods like incineration etc. are not
used in Surat. Land available for treatment and disposal of waste,
where the land filling is carried out, is about 10 km from the city.
The life expectancy of land for the treatment and disposal of
waste is 30 years at the Khajod final disposal site. There is
sanitary landfill cell created and the cell is ready for its use for
disposal of inert material obtained at the end of treatment process
of MSW Treatment.
One Bio-Medical Waste Treatment Plant is working on a BOOT
basis from 2003. The agency to which the work is granted is
responsible for collection and treatment of Bio-Medical Waste.
There are total 27 UHC, which are collection centers and Rs. 10
per kg are collected as charge.
4.4.3 EMERGING ISSUES
The havoc of plague in Surat helped to convert the city into one
of the cleanliest cities of the country. This was made possible
through a complete revamping of the entire solid waste
management system. The system is working efficiently and
effectively at present, wherein private sector is involved.
Lack of effective technology for scientific disposal of solid as
well as bio-medical waste.
Bhatar waste disposal site is at present the only serving site and
this site has reached the end of its life span now. Moreover, the
location of the site right within the city limits has exposed the
entire process to the open air and life threatening parasites.





Existing fleet of vehicles


















Indicators






Type of
veh|c|e
No.
Age
[Years}
No. of
sh|fts
0a||y
6apac|ty
[|n tonnes}
Hed|um T|pp|ng Veh|c|es [152 No's}
Trucks 49 8 2 330
Tractors 39 10 1 170
0umper p|acer ô7 ô 2 250
Harket Vans 4
heavy Hach|nes [10 No's}
6o||ect|on Performance [7
6o||ected to Cenerated}
98.1 7
Tota| veh|c|e capac|ty to tota|
waste generated
108.5 7
Tr|ps per veh|c|e of Ex|st|ng F|eet -
7 of tota| waste put to recyc|e|
reuse
-


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 49
FUTURE REQUIREMENTS
SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN SMC AREA:
The Surat Municipal Corporation has been efficient in collecting
the solid waste from all over the city and maintaining
cleanliness. The need of the day is maintenance of the system in
an efficient manner. For this purpose, it is required that the
collection and disposal system be upgraded. To cater to the
needs of the population in 2011 and 2021, when 1278 MT and
1550 MT of solid waste is expected to be generated everyday in
the city, additional containers, collection and transportation
vehicles, waste storage and transfer stations, and infrastructure at
the new waste disposal site at Khajod are the immediate
requirements.
As part of augmentation of the system, a new fleet of vehicles
should be obtained from 2007-08, till which time the existing
fleet is deemed sustainable. Waste storage and transfer stations
should also be added from the year 2007-08. Wheelbarrows of
0.60 cu. m capacity should also be acquired, starting 2006-07. A
waste segregation system also should be installed at a later stage
in all the storage and transfer stations. Infrastructure at the
Khajod waste disposal site is to be provided by 2008.
SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN SUDA AREA:
To provide Dust Beans.
To have collection system from each house.
To provide transfer station.
To provide vehicles for Transportation of solid waste.
Develop landfill site for systematic disposal of solid waste
including segregation of the waste.
The scheme will be provided for 67 T.P. Schemes at a cost of
Rs. 80 Crores.
SUDA has identified and reserved land of 24 lacs sq.mtr for
solid waste and garbage disposal.










Solid waste Generation (Metric Tons)




8o||d waste Cenerat|on
Zone
Area
[8q. Km}
2001 2011 2021
6entra| 8.18 150.1 139.5 11ô.2
North 20.54 121.7 179.1 220.ô
East 13.8ô 210.7 295.9 337.7
west 19.ô3 90.9 1ôô.3 224.5
8outh 2ô.01 177.ô 291.45 383.1
8outh East 9.1 59.2 97.15 127.7
8outh west 14.9ô 73.2 108.7 139.9
Tota| 112.28 883.5 1278.0 1549.7


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 50
CHAPTER 5: CHAPTER 5: CHAPTER 5: CHAPTER 5: ROAD8 AND ROAD8 AND ROAD8 AND ROAD8 AND
TRAN8PORTAT¡ON TRAN8PORTAT¡ON TRAN8PORTAT¡ON TRAN8PORTAT¡ON

“The contours of the city landscape underwent basic and cosmetic changes in
the mid 1990s along with growth of infrastructural facilities, which earned
Surat the tag of being one of the cleanliest cities of the country. But lack of a
viable transport system, has left the city with a crumbling face. In the absence
of any traffic planning, over 7.5 lakh vehicles leave the city roads gasping for
space. The public transport services have remained as they were years back
and need for a proper system to cater to the growing population is felt
overwhelming. For industrialists, with lack of an airport in the second largest
city of the state, business travels abroad still mean taking a flight from Mumbai
or Ahmedabad”.
– Surat Forum : Times of India, May 22, 2001.
5.1 ROADS
5.1.1 EXISTING SITUATION
Recent efforts at better management of the road network in the
city have resulted in effective widening of the main corridors of
the city. The roads in the city cover an area of 28.29 sq. km,
which is about 25 percent of the total area of SMC. So far, 80
percent of the area of the city has been effectively connected
through a total length of 1133.37 km. of road network. Of this,
93.5 percent of the roads are surfaced mostly with asphalt.
The region is characterized by “black cotton soil with high
shrinkage and swelling” and high rainfall. These are the major
causes for the unsatisfactory condition of the asphalt roads in the
city. Keeping this in view, SMC has come up with a proposal to
change the major arterial road network into a cement concrete
road. The conversion of asphalt road in to C.C. Roads has been
started in the city since 2004. In the first phase, The Surat-
Dumas Road was selected. The other roads selected in this year
are: Surat-Navsari Road and Kadodara Road.In the next phase,
major ring roads and corridors, important link roads, roads wider
than 24.39 m. are proposed to be changed to CC roads; the total
cost of this work will be Rs. 4409.96 million.
RING ROADS
The Ring Road is one of the major roads in the city and
channelises the traffic from the congested roads of the walled
city to other parts of the city. The road encircles the eastern and
southern sides of the walled city. The outer ring road lacks
continuity at certain areas and is still to be constructed at several
parts.






Ex|st|ng Road Network as on 31-3-2004
Roads Length
[Km}
Percentage
8urfaced roads 1080.12 95.3
ß|ack topped 1059 93.44
wßH 19.ô77 1.74
6oncrete 1.319 0.1
Un-surfaced roads 53.250 4.ô
Tota| |ength of
roads
1133.37 100
A rad|a| pattern of roads |s the character|st|c of
the c|ty.
A gr|d-|ron pattern |s observed most|y |n the case
of |oca| streets and m|nor roads.
The gr|d-|ron pattern |s a|so observed w|th some
rad|a| ||nks |n the wa||ed c|ty area.

Transport And Traffic Management

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 51
Map 10 : Transportation Network

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 52
OTHER ROADS
Roads leading away from the walled city gates bifurcate into
radial roads extending to the urban areas that have developed
outside the city walls. These radial roads are significant because
regional bus trips from all these corridors enter the city area near
the railway station. The north-south flow of traffic is
predominant.
In SUDA area there are about 170 km of existing roads of
various category, NH, SH, MDR, ODR etc.
5.1.2 BRIDGES AND FLY-OVERS
At present there are 37 major and minor bridges and two
underpass ways in the city. Of them eight bridges are across
River Tapi at various locations. One of them is a weir cum
causeway and another is a railway bridge. The rest of the six are
major roadway bridges. Another roadway bridge is proposed to
be constructed on the River Tapi near Dabholi.
There are three fly over bridges in the Surat city. Of these, two
fly over bridges are on the Ring road, one at Athwa gate junction
and another from Nan Darwaja junction to Sahara Darwaja.
Another fly over bridge is on Varachha road. There is one
overbridge above L.C.No. 146 on Sumul Dairy Road. At present
one fly over bridge at Majura Gate Junction on Ring Road and
one road over bridge above Railway Culver No. 436 AT Dindoli
are under construction..
The Bridge Cell of SMC carries out the construction and
maintenance of bridges, culverts, underpasses, flyovers and road
over bridges within SMC limits.
Two major bridges across the River Tapi are planned to be
constructed within a span of three years each. While the one at
Ved-Dabholi shall start during this year (2005-06) the other one
near Paanch Pandav bunglow, Athwalines shall start in 2006-07.
The construction of two major fly-overs road over bridge will be
completed during 2006-07 and the other fly over on the Ring
Road near Majura-Udhana Gate, will be completed during 2007-
08.
Two small bridges shall be constructed across Kankhara Khadi
near Althan and Gandhi Kutir to improve connectivity in the
south and south-west zone. A bridge is being constructed on
Mithi Khadi near Limbayat in South-East Zone to improve
connectivity.
In addition, several fly overs and bridges are proposed on major
and busy junctions/routes to ease traffic congestion and for easy
movement of vehicles; thereby reducing air/noise pollution also.
In SUDA area there are two major bridges across river Tapi and
15 bridges across various creeks.


Major Radial Roads/ Corridors

Athwa Lines Road
Udhna – Majura Road
Navsari Gate to Udhna Road
Salabatpura Gate to Anjana society
Road
Salabatpura Gate to Dumbhal road
Delhi Gate to Karanj Road
Lal Darwaja to Nana Varachha
Road
Katargam Gate to Katargam Road
Ved Gate to Ved Road
Chowk to Rander-Adajan Road
Chowk to Station-Rajmarg
Recently Completed
Bridge across Khadi near Puna –
Kumbhariya (2002-04)
Construction of minor bridge across
Khadi near FP 80, Dumbhal (2003-
04)
Bridge Across Koyli Khadi near
Model Township (2003-05)
Under Progress
R.O.B across Railway Culvert
No.436 (2003-07)
Fly over on Ring Road near Majura
& Udhana Gate (2005-08)
Bridge Across Mithi Khadi near
Limbayat (2005-07)
Bridge Across Kankara Khadi near
Althan (2006-07)

Ex|st|ng br|dges across r|ver tap|
1 hope ßr|dge adjo|n|ng Nehru ßr|dge [1877}
2 Ra||way ßr|dge No. 452 near Utran [1915}
3 Nehru ßr|dge Near 6howk ßazar [19ôô}
4 Katargam - Amro|| ßr|dge [1982}
5
8ardar Va||abhbha| Pate| ßr|dge near Atwa
Cate [1991}
ô Horarj| 0esa| 8etu near 8|nganpore [1995}
7
8wam| V|vekanand ßr|dge near Haka| Poo|
[199ô}
8
8h 1ô7 & 8h 1ô8 connect|ng br|dge near
Nana Varachha [2001}
* F|gures |n parenthes|s |nd|cate the year of
comp|et|on and comm|ss|on|ng

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 53

5.1.3 EMERGING ISSUES
The current network of roads in the city comprising asphalt,
WBM, concrete and un-surfaced roads covers 8.46 km. per
sq.km of the corporation area accounting for a per capita road
length of 0.40 m. On an average, the area covered by the present
network is around 25.20 percent of the total area of the
corporation. Some of the related issues include:
Improper connectivity in peripheral areas.
While the peripheral areas in the west, east, south and south-west
zones have grown considerably, the connectivity of these roads
with the main corridors is inadequate. While nearly 80 percent of
the city area is well connected, the rest lacks good linkages. Only
94 percent of the existing network is surfaced mainly with
asphalt.
Major operation and maintenance costs on roads.
The city receives intense rainfall during the monsoon. The black
cotton soil of the region (with its high shrinkage and swelling
characteristics) has made the roads with an asphalt/ bituminous
top highly susceptible to damages. After every monsoon, the
roads have to be re-laid, leaving the corporation with very high
operation and maintenance costs.
Discontinuity in Ring Road and Major Roads.
The Ring Road from Lal Darwaza to Ved Darwaza on the
periphery of the walled city is discontinuous. Several other major
roads in the north, west and south zones are also discontinuous
leading to major traffic movement on other roads and minor
roads in residential areas.
Encroachments and informal activities on major corridors of
the city.
The margins of major roads and the footpaths are encroached
upon in several sections by small time street vendors, illegal
parking and other informal activities. With no margins left, the
extension and widening process of these roads is hampered.
No consideration for future growth patterns in planning for
roads outside SMC
The growth pattern of the city clearly indicates major growth
clusters towards the Eastern, Western and Southern peripheral
areas. The lack of a comprehensive planning outlook will make
these areas improperly connected when they are merged within
the corporation at a future date. Hence, there is a need for
incorporating the Outer-Ring Road concept in to the TP schemes
of these areas in the SUDA limits.


Indicators
















Improper connectivity in peripheral
areas
Major operation & maintenance
costs on roads
Discontinuity in Ring Road and
major roads
Encroachments and Informal
activities on major corridors of the
city
Lack of consideration for future
growth patterns in planning for
roads outside SMC
Road 0ens|ty 8.4ô km| sq.km
Per cap|ta Road Length 0.4 m
6oncrete Road |ength| Tota|
Road Length
0.0ô percent

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 54
FUTURE REQUIREMENTS
The adverse climate with respect to road infrastructure and the
growing pressure of traffic on the roads have led the SMC to
propose up-gradation of the roads to a cement concrete topping
that could withstand all weather conditions. This up-gradation
will be carried out accordingly in a phased manner with a target
of up-grading 65 percent of the roads in the city ones by 2021.
To tackle the problems of congestion and high volumes of
traffic, the corporation has already commenced the construction
of fly-over on certain important roads of the city. Apart from
these there have been long pending proposals of constructing
bridges on the Khadis to improve the connectivity and another
two bridges across the River Tapi near Bhadra Ashram and near
Ved-Dabholi. To improve the connectivity within the city as well
as with the areas on the other side of the River Tapi, these works
should be taken up on priority basis to be completed before
2012. To overcome the voluminous traffic problem new roads
are identified for development. There are canals, plying through
the city, which can be utilized for surface transport. Considering
the same, two major canals are included to be developed. The
identified canals are:
Canal starting from Karmrej to Althan, which bisects the city
(60m wide)
Canal starting from Karanj Sewage Treatment Plant to Surat-
Navsari Road (45 m wide)
ROADS IN THE PERIPHERAL AREAS (SUDA AREA)
SUDA has planned to provide new roads and improve existing
roads for better movement of vehicles including continuation of
a ring road to reduce congestion on existing roads. This effort of
SUDA would result in better connectivity.
Proposal of road projects in SUDA area
Approximately 670 K.M. of Roads will be constructed in 67
T.P. Schemes to facilitate movement of vehicles.
A Ring Road of 66 K.M. length will be constructed. Of the 66
K.M. length 44 K.M. is of existing Road, which will be
upgraded to 4-lane roads, and 22 K.M. of new road to be
constructed.
The existing / developed road network will be planned in
such a manner that it will have better connectivity to the Ring
Road.
Approximate cost for development of roads will be Rs. 675
crores
The cost for construction of Ring Road will be Rs. 195
Crores the Ring Road will be developed under Public/Private
Partnership and viability gap funding will be provided to
make project viable.



Distribution of Roads in SUDA Area


CONSTRUCTION OF BRIDGES IN
SUDA AREA
Bridge on River Tapi Near Valak to
complete the Ring Road.
Bridge on River Mindhola near
Abhwa for shortening the travel
distance to Ubhrat.
Construction of ROB at Sachin,
Kosad and Gothan to complete the
Ring Road.


No. w|dth
[Htr}
Lane Tota|
|ength
[Hts}
Tota|
|ength
[Kms}
1 ô 1 13400 13.40
2 7.5 1.5 2ô800 2ô.80
3 9 2 93800 93.80
4 12 2.5 180900 180.90
5 .15 2.5 388ô00 38.8ô
ô 18 4 1ô0800 1ô0.80
7 24 4 5ô950 58.95
8 30 ô 80400 80.40
9 3ô ô ô700 ô.70
10 40 ô+2 11390 11.39
ô70000 ô70.00

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 55

5.2 TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT
Traffic engineering aspects for regulating and controlling the
traffic of the city are important to fulfil the mission of "overall
regulation and control of vehicles, pedestrian traffic and
transportation, so as to provide safe and un-delayed travel trips
to the citizens”.
5.2.1 TRAFFIC CHARACTERISTICS
The number of vehicles in the city has gone up from 2.94 lakhs
in 1991 to 9.83 lakhs in 2005; due to the rapid addition of two-
wheelers and four-wheelers. This indicates the economic status
of the populace due to the distributed economic growth and
reflects the lack of efficient and adequate public transportation
facilities.
Vehicular Growth

In contrast to this large number of private vehicles, the amount
of public parking space available throughout the city is just
sufficient for 1652 two-wheelers and 400 four-wheelers.
5.2.2 ROAD-RAIL CROSSINGS
The main section of Western Railway connecting Ahmedabad
and Mumbai passes right through the city forming the border for
the north and east zones and across the south zone.There are five
road-rail crossings which are important with respect to traffic
management.
Traffic flow at these crossings has not been smooth either due to
level crossings with heavy traffic flow or grade separator
crossings, which are very, narrow.

The main functions carried out by the
Traffic cell are:
Traffic and transportation surveys
Installation of traffic signals on
road junctions
Construction of channelisers on
road junctions
Construction of road dividers either
with guard stones or R.C.C. pardi
with a facility of plantations
Install automatic night blinkers at
critical curves, vehicular gaps,
accident prone points etc
Construction of traffic island
(rotary) at road junctions
Installation of Traffic Sign Boards
(cautionary, mandatory,
informatory etc.) and installation of
sign boards indicating the names of
new streets and squares
Construct speed breakers in
consultation with the Traffic Police
Department
Make road markings like zebra
crossings, stop lines, junction
markings, centre lines, and lane
lines etc. and to fix cat eyes on dark
roads along the centre line for
enhanced visibility
Maintenance of traffic signals and
blinkers previously installed and
commissioned
Maintenance of islands,
channelisers, road dividers by
making minor repairs and painting
them once in a year
Earmark spots for rickshaw stand,
bus stand and traffic related
structures
Road-Rail Crossings
Sahara Darwaja Crossing
Lambe hanuman road Crossing
Khand bazaar Crossing
Sachin over bridge
Dindoli Garnala Crossing

Part|cu|ars As on 31 | 3 | 04
As on
31|3|01
Crowth Rate [91-
01}
1 Hotor 6yc|e 781779 ô07074 1ô8.0
2 Hotor 6ar 85ô38 ô2991 200.5
3 Auto R|ckshaws 44837 34043 171.0
4 Jeep + Tax| cabs 8380 7ô34 1ô9.0
5 P|a|r 187ô 1807 15.0
ô 8tage 6ar + Pub||c ßuses 1018 98ô 135.3
7
8choo| ßus + Pr|vate
8erv|ce Veh|c|es
4ô9
335 53.8
8 Po||ce Van 115 84 23.ô
9 Coods Truck 13195 11ô11 47.8
10 Tanker + Tempo ô79 597 103.8
11 0.L.V. 20187 17027 1ô9.4
12 Trans Tra|| 8794 8304 44.8
13 Non Trans Tra|| 57 5ô -2.8
14 Tractor 13049 12391 5ô.0
15 Ambu|ance 229 1ô7 ô8.8
1ô 0thers 103 431 205.8
17 Hax| cab 19ô 11ô -
Tota| 982713 7ô5ô55 1ô0.8

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 56

5.2.3 JUNCTIONS
There are 89 such junctions in the city that have traffic islands.
Of these, 42 junctions have traffic islands or channelisers which
are sponsored. These junctions were mostly constructed largely
during the years 1998-2001. Considering the rapid growth of
vehicles, coupled with the poor public transport system, SMC
has taken up a number of traffic management initiatives during
the past decade. Road dividers of about 67.0 km length were
added to the existing 28 km length. Traffic signals were installed
at 25 junctions and traffic islands were constructed at 45
junctions. Traffic blinkers were also installed at 28 junctions in
the city.
These measures have reduced the incidence of traffic accidents
in the city. There has been a reduction of 32.94 percent in fatal
accidents and a 19.83 percent reduction in serious accidents
since 1997.
5.2.2 PUBLIC TRANSPORT
The Gujarat State Road Transport Corporation (GSRTC)
operates buses for the mass transportation of passengers in the
city with its existing fleet of 148 buses. GSRTC has three depots,
of which Lambe Hanuman and Udhna Gam depots are used for
Within-city buses. The Adajan Patiya depot is used for outside-
city buses.
Over the years, the number of routes covered by city buses has
increased, but fleet availability has drastically come down to a
poor 6 buses per lakh population. Buses run by GSRTC are not
favoured by the citizens. This is clearly indicated by the ever
decreasing number of passengers using the buses. The figure
declined by 37.12 percent over the previous decade.
Intermediate modes of public transport are very high in the city.
They are mainly contributed by trips made by auto rickshaws,
jeeps, taxicabs, stage cars, and maxi-cabs and so on. The
phenomenal growth of these vehicles during the last decade
(above 135 percent) can be mainly attributed to the inadequate
Public Transport System, thus creating traffic and pollution
problems.
There is a study being carried out on IPTS (Integrated Public
Transport System) by CES which is supported by GIDB (Gujarat
Industrial development Board).




Traffic Management Initiative





Traffic Management Initiative





Buses, routes and passengers



Acc|dents Year Veh|c|es
reg|stered Fata| 8er|ous Cenera| Tota|
1997 525ô3 147 487 58ô 1120
1998 59857 148 500 559 1207
1999 ôô030 173 489 43ô 1098
2000 55327 138 3ô9 408 915
2001 49210 11ô 392 359 8ô3
2002 57437 132 411 3ô1 904
2004 1102ô0 158 518 453 1129
Junct|ons T||| 1994 1995-2005 Tota|
Traff|c |s|ands 9 80 89
Traff|c s|gna|s 4 25 29
Traff|c ß||nkers 43 82 114
0|v|ders [kms} 28 ôô.95 94.95
Z0NE w|8E 8P0N80RE0 TRAFF|6 |8LAN08
Zone No. of Traff|c |s|ands and
6hanne||sers [sponsored}
6entra| ô
North ô
East ô
west 10
8outh 3
8outh-East 1
8outh-west 10
Tota| 42
Year
Routes
covered by
c|ty buses
ßuses |n
operat|on
per day
Passenger
s us|ng
buses
da||y
1981 123 133 221113
1991 229 1ô8 158771
2001 3ô8 148 99840

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 57

5.2.5 STREET LIGHTING
Street lighting is decentralised with respect to all the zones and
the Streetlight Department at the head quarters co-ordinates all
these activities.
The city’s 48098 street lights are spaced at an average distance
of 25.05 m. adequately lighting the city. 68 percent of them are
tube lights and 31.9 are percent sodium vapour and Metal
Halide lamps. High mast tower lamps are being introduced onto
important junctions on the arterial roads and are currently
located at 28 junctions in the city, using a total of 524
luminaries.
The number of luminaries has grown at an annual average
of 17 percent during the past three years. The average
operation and maintenance cost incurred on street lighting
for the past five years is about Rs.261 lakhs.
5.2.6 EMERGING ISSUES
Rapid growth of private vehicles.
Inadequate parking facilities.
Lack of Traffic Segregation.
Lack of pedestrian facilities.
Inefficient and poorly maintained public transport.
High operation and maintenance costs on street lighting.
FUTURE REQUIREMENTS
Putting in place an efficient traffic management system and an
efficient and adequate public transport system are the immediate
requirements. A Traffic Management Study is necessary to
indicate a number of measures. These include increasing the
public parking facilities, pedestrian facilities, improvement of
junctions and rail crossings, provision of traffic signals wherever
necessary, lane separators to segregate traffic etc.
To keep an adequate and efficient public transport system in
place by 2012, it is necessary that the corporation initiate
dialogue with GSRTC for its improvement.
An effective enforcement mechanism by the Traffic Police is
also necessary to enforce smooth traffic flow in the city.
A study is being carried out by CRRI / GIDB in SUDA area for
placing an efficient traffic management system. The measures
suggested will be carried out.


Indicators

Streetlight Department Functions are:
Providing street lights on all the
roads within SMC limits.
Installing high masts on all the
major traffic junctions.
Providing decorative luminaries
and poles wherever necessary.


Luminaries in various zones (31-03-
2001)

The city of Surat suffers from lack of
enforcement of the traffic management
system. Coupled with the high growth
of private vehicles, an inefficient
public transport system, inadequate
parking facilities and lack of pedestrian
facilities, encroachments on footpaths
and road margins, informal activities
and small-time business activities
along the major corridors, have
increased the traffic congestion in the
city.
Pub||c park|ng |ots for 2 & 4-
whee|ers to tota| 2&4-whee|ers
0.003 |ots|
veh|c|e
Average spac|ng of street
||ghts
25.05 m
Zone
32 w
Lum|nar|es
0ther
Lum|nar|es
Tota|
6entra| ô211 28ô1 9072
North 4918 1933 ô851
East 3331 2590 5921
west 4312 2810 7122
8outh 5338 1803 7141
8outh-East 4ô49 ô18 52ô7
8outh west 3993 2731 ô724
T0TAL 32752 1534ô 48098

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 58

Housing Condition (1971-2001)
0.00
1.00
2.00
3.00
4.00
5.00
6.00
7.00
1971 1981 1991 2001
Occupancy Rate House Hold Size
CHAPTER 6: CHAPTER 6: CHAPTER 6: CHAPTER 6: HOU8¡NG AND HOU8¡NG AND HOU8¡NG AND HOU8¡NG AND
URBAN POOR URBAN POOR URBAN POOR URBAN POOR
6.1 HOUSING
The housing condition in the city of Surat has reached saturation
levels with vacancy rates lingering around 15 percent during the
last two decades. This could be mainly due to the constraints
posed by the Rent Control Act, which dissuades owners from
renting out properties.
House listing – census 2001
*South zone was further bifurcated in the year 2004.
6.1.1 OCCUPANCY RATE AND HOUSEHOLD SIZE
The general housing condition in the city of Surat has shown
great improvement during the decade 1981-91. During this
decade, the occupancy rates came down to less than five persons
per house and matched the household size at 4.90. But during the
decade 1991-2001, the occupancy rate went down well below the
household size as is represented in the adjacent graph.
Occupancy Rates and Household Sizes (2001)
This indicates a large vacancy rate, though the rate has been
constant at 15 percent since 1981. The other possibility could be
the large number of bachelors occupying individual houses. This
is also indicated by the composition of population growth
wherein the male population growth was 68.39 percent during
1991-2001 while the same for females stood at 55.32 percent.



During the year 2000, the vacancy rate was 15.6 percent.

Sixty three and a half percent of the
houses in the city are being used
wholly for residential purposes while
19.2 percent of the houses are entirely
under uses other than residential.


Occupancy Rates & Housesold Sizes


Occupancy rate going below
Household sizeThis is a clear indicator
of high incidence of male migration
into the city.
Zone
Tota|
house
ho|ds
Tota| No.
of houses
who||y
Res|dent|a|
Part|y
Res|dent|a|
houses put
to other
uses
Vacant
houses
6entra| 74ô79 145008 ô9487 5204 41ô00 28717
North ô5183 87543 ô3849 1239 13845 8ô10
East 11933ô 1ô8527 118037 1219 322ô4 17048
west 50090 73412 49318 1023 783ô 15235
8outh* 139575 2072ô0 13ô053 3834 3771ô 29ô57
8outh-west 41ô29 70ô91 407ô4 944 11014 179ô9
8H6 490492 752441 477508 134ô3 144275 11723ô
Zone
Area
[8q. Km}
Popu|at|on
0ens|ty
[persons|
8q. Km}
house
ho|d
8|ze
Tota|
0ccup|ed
houses
0ccupancy
Rate
6entra| 8.18 413598 505ô2 5.54 11ô291 3.5ô
North 20.54 335239 1ô321 5.14 78933 4.25
East 13.8ô 580451 41880 4.8ô 151519 3.83
west 19.ô3 250410 1275ô 5.00 58177 4.30
8outh* 35.11 ô52330 18580 4.ô7 177ô03 3.ô7
8outh-west 14.9ô 201757 1348ô 4.85 52722 3.83
8H6 112.28 2433785 21ô7ô 4.9ô ô35245 3.83
* 8outh zone was further b|furcated |n the year 2004.
Year
Area
[8q.
Km}
Popu|at|on
house
ho|d
8|ze
0ccupancy
Rate
1971 33.55 471ô5ô 5.14 5.42
1981 55.5ô 77ô583 5.16 5.78
1991 111.1ô 1498817 4.90 4.90
2001 112.28 2433785 4.96 3.83

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 59
Within the city the occupancy rates have also come down to
below 4.5 in all the six zones. The Central zone with the highest
density has a house hold size of 5.54 but the occupancy rate has
come down to 3.56 persons per house. This is against a total of
41600 houses being put to other uses than residential purpose.
This clearly indicates the shifting of population from the walled
city to other areas of the city for residential purpose.
6.2 HOUSING FOR URBAN POOR
Owing to rapid industrialisation in and around the city, a large
influx of migrants has been observed, which has resulted in the
formation of slums. The city presents a wide range of activities
in various industrial and commercial sectors. Growth in such
activities, possibilities of absorption in industrial, allied as well
as service sectors, scope of employment in trade and business
activities, hawking, retailing, carting and other such possibilities
have attracted rural poor to the city.
There are a total of 312 slums in the city of Surat in which 19.24
percent of the total population the city lives. This figure was 27.5
percent of the city’s population during 1992. Growth of the slum
population has also decreased considerably from an annual
average of 14.6 percent in 1992 to an annual average of 1.46
percent in 2001. This achievement on the part of SMC is due to
the effective implementation of various slum re-location and
development programmes after the havoc of the plague in 1994.
During 1995-98, five slums were relocated and in 1999, those
settlements, which were not considered earlier as slums, were
also added along with new slums that developed. The total
number of slums thus stands at 312 at present. Development of
new slums could not be avoided by the SMC due to the easy
access to open spaces in the south and southeastern areas of the
city.
Zone wise Slum Settlements (-2005)
* south zone was bifurcated in the year 2004.
Sixty four percent of public land has been encroached upon by
slums in the city, with 44 and 20 percent respectively belonging
to the corporation and to the government. Encroachments on
private land have been cleared off in certain areas, bringing
down its share 37 percent in 1992 to 26 percent in 2000. This
also could be reason behind the addition of new slum pockets in
the city.



Growth Trends in Slum Population


Growth in the Number of Slums

The south zone, followed by the east
continues to house the maximum
number of slums as well as the
maximum slum population of the city.
These are also the zones, which are
most densely populated in the city. The
west and south-west zones have about
20 and 17 percent of their respective
populations residing in slums.


Status of Land of Slum settlements

Zone
No. of
8|ums
No. of s|um
househo|ds
8|um
Popu|at|on
Percentage to
zone
popu|at|on
Percentage to
tota|
popu|at|on
6entra| 25 9189 45ô18 11.03 1.87
North 40 9ô03 4559ô 13.ô0 1.87
8outh* 128 58213 233ô58 35.82 9.ô0
East 53 193ô4 79009 13.ô1 3.25
west 38 11333 51712 20.ô5 2.12
8outh west 23 89ô1 34712 17.20 1.43
8H6 307 11ôôô3 490305 20.15 20.15
Crowth Trends 1983 1992 2001 2005
Tota| c|ty
popu|at|on
[|akhs}
9.2 15.7 24.34 28.00
Annua| growth
rate
8.2 7.8 ô.24 1.41
Tota| s|um
popu|at|on
[|akhs}
1.87 4.34 4.91 5.ô9
Annua| growth
rate [7}
21.4 14.ô 1.4ô 1.49
8|um popu|at|on
as 7 of tota|
popu|at|on
20.3 27.5 20.14 19.24
Per|od
Number of
8|ums Added
6umu|at|ve Tota|
Up to 19ô0 79 79
19ô1 - ôô 54 133
19ôô - 72 4ô 179
1973 - 78 41 220
1979 - 84 50 270
1985 - 90 24 294
1991 - 95 0 294
1995 - 98 -5 289
1999 -2001 18 307
2005-200ô 05 312
0wnersh|p of |and 1973 [7} 1992 [7} 2001 [7}
Pr|vate 43.7 37.3 2ô.30
Covernment 4.7 13.3 20.10
Hun|c|pa||ty 42.2 41.0 4373
0thers 9.4 8.4 9.87

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 60
Slum locations have been determined mainly by nearness to
work sites and availability of patches of land along the roads and
rail tracks, adjacent to factory walls, low lying areas and canal
banks. The density in all the slums that existed before 1994 is
significantly high, making them congested and unhygienic.
Of the 312 slums in the city, 124 are within and around the city
wall and another 85 are along transport corridors. A significant
number (51) of slums exist in the interior areas of the wards.
6.2.1 URBAN POVERTY AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILE
With its changing industrial landscape and growth of its
economic activities, the city has not only attracted a substantial
amount of capital but also a large proportion of migrant
population from within Gujarat and other states like
Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh,
Tamil Nadu, Kerala, etc.
About 80 percent of the slum households in Surat are migrants
from rural areas of Gujarat as well as from other states of the
country. The city presents a wide range of activities in various
industrial and commercial sectors. Growth in such activities,
possibilities of absorptions in its industrial, allied as well as
service sectors, scope of employment in petty trade and business
activities, hawking, vending, carting etc. have attracted rural
poor people to the city. Accordingly, there has been a shift in the
monthly income range of slum households between 1994 and
2001. The households in the income range below Rs 1000 have
improved their status marginally while the new households that
were added after 1995 remain in the lower income ranges.
HOUSING CONDITION AND BASIC AMENITIES
It was reported way back in 1997 that 86 percent of the dwelling
units in the slums of Surat are one room units and 58 percent of
them are less than 100 to 200 sq.ft in area. Migrant labourers
often share a single kutcha room on a shift basis.
The condition of public utilities and services is dismal. Lack of
drainage, choked gutters, uncleaned filth, muck, garbage, pigs
and stray dogs together make many of these locations easy prey
to water borne diseases like malaria, hepatitis B, typhoid, gastro
enteritis etc. While slums within the city wall have access to
piped water supply, the rest of the slums are not covered by any
such network. Though efforts to provide the slums with better
amenities were carried out, the increasing number of slums has
made such efforts in adequate.
Subsequent to the plague in 1994, all basic services like water
supply, drainage lines, stone paved foot paths, road with carpet,
hand pumps, pay-and-use toilet, individual toilet, Balwadis,
street lights, stand posts, storm water lines etc., have been
provided in a majority of the slums as part of the slum
improvement programme.
Socio Economic and Physical survey of the slums of the Surat
city was conducted in March 2005 and the work is recently
completed.
Location of Slums in the city

Occupation Pattern Of Surat Slums
elative location of slums

0ccupal|or
Tvpe
lousero|ds
Pe(cerlade
0ccupal|o
r Tvpe
lousero|ds
Pe(cerlade
3e|l-Erp|oved
l|dre( |eve|
0.2 Ad(|cu|lu(
e ard
a|||ed
1.Z
3e|l-Erp|oved
|LL) |sa|es)
12.1 Corsl(ucl|
or
1.2
3e|l-Erp|oved
|LL)
|p(oducl|or)
1.Z Texl||es 30.Z
3e|l-Erp|oved
|LL)
|p(ocess|rd)
ê.9 0lre(
occupal|o
rs
Z.1

Note : Excludes 7% for they belong to
categories like unemployed, disabled, invalid,
retired, house wives and those who are living
on land and house on rent, inherited wealth or
property etc


Distribution of Slum Households by
Income











Locat|ons Number Percent
w|th|n the c|ty wa|| 92 30.0
0utsk|rts of c|ty wa|| 32 10.4
A|ong transport corr|dors 85 27.7
A|ong or near r|ver banks 19 ô.2
Near 0|d sett|ements 28 9.1
|nter|or areas of wards 51 1ô.ô
7 8|um
houseso|dshouseho|ds
|ncome range
[Rs.}
1994 2001
<700 8 ô
701- 1000 27 12
1001- 2000 42 3ô
2001- 3000 12 31
>3000 11 15

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 61


Basic Amenities in Slums


Details of Zone-wise Provision of Basic Amenities in Slums
Pav ard use
To||el Fac|||lv
lea|lr Cerl(e
|r lre \|c|r|lv
Zore No. ol
3|urs
No. ol
ll
No. ol
ll
p(ov|ded
W|lr
wale(
No. ol
ll
rav|rd
|rd|v|dua|
To||els
No. ol
3|urs
No. ol
ll
No. ol
3|urs
No. ol
ll
3oulr
|udrra)
50 20.150 13.910 2115 11 12.1ê8 13 5.335
3oulr-Easl
|L|roaval)
ZZ 2ê.ê09 20.3ê0 1ê.558 28 13.132 38 13.11Z
Easl
|\a(acrra)
15 12.000 Z.812 Z11 30 ê.11Z 38 10.11Z
No(lr
|Kala(dar)
1Z 8.8ê9 5.195 ê10 15 5.198 5 ê80
Cerl(a|
28 9.001 ê.1ê0 5.220 ê 3.150 28 9.001
3oulr wesl
|AlrWa)
23 ê.ê18 1.521 1.13ê 9 3.Z10 13 1.558
wesl
|Rarde()
12 10.0Z8 9.Z95 3.êZ9 22 Z.590 1Z 2.002
Tola|
312 93.ê55 êZ.81ê 33.059 121 51.995 152 15.110









































Amen|t|es 1992 2001 2005
Pr|vate water taps [7 househo|d} 18.9ô 20.00 72
Pr|vate |atr|nes [7 househo|d} 20.93 27.50 35
8eparate e|ectr|c|ty connect|on [7
househo|d}
25.01 32.00 45
Pr|vate ownersh|p of |and [7
househo|d}
37.30 2ô.30 NA
0ra|nage fac|||ty [7 s|ums} 40 ô8.00 80
Pr|vate water connect|on |n s|ums [No.} 23040 23332 ôô81ô
Pub||c stand posts [No.} 1299 1350 NA
househo|ds per pub||c stand post [No.} 72 8ô NA
Persons per stand post [No.} 334 3ô3 NA
Pr|vate |atr|nes [No.} 19ôô7 NA 33059
Pub||c to||ets [No.} 558 NA 1914
househo|ds per pub||c to||et [No.} 1ô8 NA 27.1ô
Persons per pub||c to||et [No.} 777 NA 13ô
Non- ava||ab|||ty of mun|c|pa|
d|spensar|es [7 s|um}
72 NA 52
Non ava||ab|||ty of ba|wad|
[7 s|um}
ô2 NA NA
Ava||ab|||ty of pr|mary schoo|s
[7 s|um}
11 NA NA
8|um househo|ds per pub||c
conven|ence seat
NA NA 27
Pay & Use to||et b|ocks constructed |n
s|ums
NA NA 124

S
u
r
a
t

C
i
t
y

D
e
v
e
l
o
p
m
e
n
t

P
l
a
n

(
2
0
0
6
-
2
0
1
2
)



































































































































6
2


M
a
p

1
1
:

S
l
u
m
s

i
n

S
u
r
a
t



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 63
6.2.2 HOUSING FOR URBAN POOR -
Slum Upgradation
Surat Municipal Corporation is providing basic infrastructure
facilities like water supply, drainage, roads, street light, nursery
schools etc. since many years. 10% of municipal budget is
allocated by every year under section 63 / 2 for providing the
basic infra-structure in slum area. Upto this day, about 70-80%
of slums have been provided all the basic services. It is estimated
that about 125 crores of rupees has been spent for this mission.
Water Supply in Slum Areas
Almost 70% of the total hutments in the slum area are catered
through piped water supply network and remaining hutments are
served either by stand posts or tankers at present. The remianing
area is planned to be covered under pipeline network at an
approx. cost of Rs. 20 Crore.
By 1996, SMC had paved 75 percent of the internal roads in
slums with Kota stone. The municipality sweepers clean these
roads everyday. After the plague, surface drains were
constructed in all the slums and are cleaned every week. In 1995,
SMC had launched the construction of toilets and till date 136
such complexes have been constructed by two NGOs, viz.
Sulabh and Paryavaran. Functioning on the basis of ‘Pay and
Use’, each toilet block has 8 WCs, 4 baths and 4 urinals
separately for men and women. Men pay Rs. 15/- per month or
Rs. 0.50 per use and the facility is free for women and children
below 12 of years of age. The under-usage of these blocks calls
for an awareness campaign regarding cleanliness and sanitary
habits.
Around 48 slum pockets were covered under the "National Slum
Development Programme". The Gujarat Municipal Finance
Board has been sanctioning loans/ grant under this programme to
upgrade the existing environment in slums. Besides this, SMC is
also administering a few centrally sponsored programmes for
uplift of the poor and slum dwellers under the Integrated Child
Development Scheme (ICDS), Urban Community Development
(UCD) and Urban Basic Services for the Poor (UBSP). The
major thrust of the UBSP programme is on health, nutrition,
formal education, provision of clean potable water and disposal
of waste. But the reach of most of these programmes has been
limited so far.
SLUM REHABILITATION
Site & Service Scheme
Surat Municipal Corporation started the site & service scheme
on large scale from the year 1994. The slum pockets located on
important public roads as well as on important public lands
required for city development was vacated by removing the
hutments. The effected hutments were shifted to other SMC land
by providing them individual open plot of 3.0m x 5.0m size with
all basic infrastructure facilities. The cost of land and
infrastructure is borne by SMC. About 12,000 households have
been rehabilitated upto June 2005 on
21 various sites with the total
expenditure of Rs. 57.60 crores.
Built House Programme
Surat Municipal Corporation constructs
RCC Pucca houses for the slum
beneficiaries. The hutments, which are
compulsorily required to shift from its
original place to another place because
of city development works, such
affected slum households are provided
the Built Houses.The built house
approach for the rehabilitation of slum
dwellers is carried out for the three
categories such as LIG, EWS & BPL
housing.
LIG Housing
Under Government of India’s 20 point
program, the Government has given
target to construct about 65 dwelling
units. Against it, Surat Municipal
Corporation has constructed 113
dwelling units on 2 different sites.
The housing design for L.I.G Category
is Ground + Three Storied RCC framed
structure. On each floor, there are four
dwelling units. The total Built-up area
of single D.U. is 38.00 Sq.m. (i.e.
408.88 Sft.). The unit has living room,
Bed room, kitchen, W.C., Bath and
balcony.
The cost of the single dwelling unit is
approximately Rs.2,00,000/-
including land, construction &
infrastructure cost. The average
housing density is 376 D.U.s./Hector
(i.e.1880 PPH).
The projects implemented by SMC are
listed below.
8r.
No.
Locat|on No.
of
un|ts
P|ot
area
[8q.mt}
Est|mated
cost
[|n |acs}
1. T.P.8cheme
No. 13
[Adajan}
F.P.N0 30
75 1910 150
2. T.P.8cheme
No.32
[Rander-
Adajan}
F.P.No. 151
38 1084 7ô
Tota| 113 2994 22ô

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 64
EWS HOUSING PROJECTS
Under the Chief Minister’s 15 point development program, and
Government of India’s 20 point program, the Government has
given target to construct about 7754 dwelling units including
target for the Year 2005 -2006. Against which the Surat
Municipal Corporation has constructed 7616 dwelling units on
24 different sites. Planning is under process of remaining units.
The construction work of 7424 D.U.s. has been completed and
possession to the beneficiaries has been handed over. 3533 units
are handed over to the beneficiaries by draw and in 3891 units
hutments on road alignment and such other inappropriate
locations have been shifted.
The housing design for E.W.S. Category is Ground + Three
Storied RCC framed structure. On each floor, there are four
dwelling units. The total Built-up area of single D.U. is 22.45
Sq.m. (i.e. 241.00 Sft.) The unit has single living room, kitchen,
W.C., washing place and balcony.
The land cost is not considered as part of total project cost.
1,49,596 sq.mt. of land has been covered for 23 sites. The
average housing density is 453 D.U.s./Hector (i.e.2265 PPH).
Basic infrastructure like water supply, drainage, pucca roads and
street lights are also provided by Surat Municipal Corporation.
The construction cost of the single dwelling unit was Rs.58,000/-
for the project prior to 26 Jan, 2001. While for the post
earthquake projects, the building design was revised and the
construction of single dwelling unit rise to Rs.68,000/-. Rs. 5,000
per D.U subsidy is provided by the Government.
L|st of Ew8 hous|ng Projects
3(.
No.
Local|or No. ol
ur|ls
P|ol A(ea
sc.rl
Experd|l
u(e
|rcu((ed
Rs. |r
|acs
North Zone - Katargam
1. T.P.3crere No. 19
|Kala(dar) F.P.N0 R - 19
1ê0 2Z8Z 101.15
2. T.P.3crere No.18
|Kala(dar) F.P.No. R - 111
221 5000 115.ê0
East Zone - Varachha
3. T.P.3crere No.15
|Fu|pada) F.P.No. 118
33ê 18Z5 1Z1.Z3
1. T.P.3crere No.15
|Fu|pada) F.P.No. 119
1ê0 3ZêZ 91.52
5. T.P.3crere No.1ê
|Kapad(a) F.P.No. 1Z
511 19Z31 32ê.21
ê. T.P.3crere No.1ê
|Kapad(a) F.P.No. 1ê
9ê 309Z 5ê.3ê
Z. T.P.3crere No.3 |Ka(arj)
F.P.No. 38
528 9318 290.0ê
west Zone - Rander
8. T.P.3crere No.10 |Adajar)
F.P.No. Z3
33ê 5êZ2 1Zê.03
9. T.P.3crere No.13 |Adajar)
F.P.No. 21
221 1155 110.Z1
10. T.P.3crere No.13 |Adajar)
F.P.No. 251
80 1Z13 52.81
11. T.P.3crere No.13 |Adajar)
F.P.No. 19
320 3021 208.Z8
12. T.P.3crere No.12
|Jarard|(aoad) F.P.No. 91
210 31ê8 111.13
13. Voje Jarard|(aoad R.3
No.3Z
25ê 13Z1 118.38
11. T.P.3crere No.13 |Adajar)
F.P.No. 19
2Z2 1508 115.83
15. T.P.3crere No.23
|Rarde() F.P.No. 3Z
80 1155 15.10
8outh Zone - Udhana
1ê. T.P.3crere No.2 |udrara)
F.P.No. 1ê
80 2119 1ZZ.13
1Z. T.P.3crere No.2 |udrara)
F.P.No. 53
2Z2 Z205 111.11
18. T.P.3crere No.21
|8reslar) F.P.No. 51
pa||ee
Z52 1Z918 188.80
8outh - East Zone - Athwa
19. T.P.3crere No.Z |Arjara)
F.P.No. 15
512 9351 321.êê
8outh - west Zone - Athwa
20. T.P.3crere No.ê |P|p|od)
F.P.No. 121
ê88 1129Z 3Z0.22
21. T.P.3crere No.1 |ur(a -
3oulr) F.P.No. 129
180 1081Z 2Z0.5Z
22. T.P.3crere No.1 |ur(a -
3oulr) F.P.No. 131
Z01 12823 393.Z2
23. T.P.3crere No.1 |ur(a -
3oulr) F.P.No. 90
80 1392 15.Z1
Tota| 7424 1,49,59ô 4450.ô8



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 65
VAMBAY HOUSING PROJECTS ( BPL Housing )
The Central Government subsidized scheme Valmiki Ambedker
Awas Yojana began in 2002-2003. This is the scheme specially
design for the families those who are living in slums and are
below poverty line.
It is estimated that about 55,066 household are living below
poverty line in Surat City. The VAMBAY Housing Scheme is
directly benefited to these families.
The Government has recommended to provide the housing unit
with 15 Sq. m. of built-up area. The cost ceiling per dwelling
house is Rs.50,000/- for Surat. The Central Government will
provided Rs.25,000/- subsidy per dwelling unit. and Rs.25,000/-
per dwelling unit will be in form of loan component.
The Government has given a target of 3700 dwelling units
including target for the year 2005-2006. Against that, Surat
Municipal Corporation has already planned to execute 2120
dwelling units on different 10 sites. The implementation of the
scheme had started in Feb' 2004.
Amongst them, 296 row houses on 3 sites are design with single
multi-purpose room, attached with toilet unit. Front ottah and a
small backyard has been provided. The total built-up area of
single dwelling unit is 20.16 Sq. m.
1824 dwelling units are design with single room, cooking space,
W.C. and chowkdi. The building structure is Ground + Three
storied RCC framed structure. There are six dwelling units on
each floor. The total built-up area of single dwelling unit is 20.69
Sq. m.
53,262 Sq. m. of land will be utilized for the projects. The
probable total construction cost will be Rs.1912.18 lacs. The
land cost and infrastructure services cost will be borne by Surat
Municipal Corporation.
Slums to be Relocated either completely or partially by 2012












List of VAMBAY Housing Projects
3(.
No.
Local|or No. ol
ur|ls
P|ol
a(ea
3c.rl
Experd|lu(e
|rcu((ed/
esl|raled
cosl
Rs.|r |acs
6omp|eted
1. T.P.3crere No.21
|8reslar) F.P.No.51
pa||ee
53 2050 31.00
2. T.P.3crere No.21
|8reslar) F.P.No.19
1Z5 ZZ08 100.00
3. T.P.3crere No.11
|Rarde() F.P.No.112
Z2 1291 3Z.50
1. T.P.3crere No.23
|Rarde() F.P.No.28
Z2 1335 3Z.50
Tola| 3Z2 1238Z 20ê.00
6onstruct|on |n progress
1. T.P.3crere No.38
|Nara-\a(acrra)
F.P.No.103
ê8 30ê0 11.20
2. T.P.3crere No.39
|udrara-L|roaval)
F.P.No.R-21 & 11
ê18 18000 ê8Z.31
3. T.P.3crere No.23
|Rarde() F.P.No.51
120 2119 10ê.80
1. T.P.3crere No.23
|Rarde() F.P.No.ê3
2ê1 1ê13 231.9ê
5. Voje Jarard|(aoad
R.3.No.213
132 Zê35 381.18
ê. T.P.3crere No.33
|0urora|)
F.P.No.R-21
21ê 5118 218.10
Tola| 1Z18 108Z5 1Z0ê.18



Zone0escr|pt|on
No. of
8|um
sett|emen
ts
No. of
huts|
houses
Popu|at|on6ost
[|akhs}
Rehab|||tat|on6entra| 121 31781 3ô000
Redeve|opment 111 34553 40000
Upgradat|onEast 80 27321 2425

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 66

6. 3 EMERGING ISSUES
Unregulated and Speculative Land and Real Estate Marted
Lack of implementation of T.P.Schemes and inadequate
infrastructure in the newly developed areas has led to a
speculative land market, wherein there is no differential pricing
for developed and undeveloped areas. Insecure tenure, rent
control act, inappropriate regulation, pricing and taxation have
all perpetuated the issue.
Increase in the number of slums.
While 5 new slums were added increased during 2000-2005, it
has been observed that the relative location of the slums is along
water bodies or transport corridors. The concentration of such
slums is very high in the east and south zones. Growth of slums
in isolated locations has also led to poor living conditions and
poor service availability in such areas.
Lack of information on services availability in slums
Though the corporation has set up a separate Slum Up-gradation
Cell, lack of complete information on service availability in all
the 312 slums in the city has been hampering the implementation
of slum improvement/ rehabilitation programmes.
Meager availability of land within the corporation area for
slum relocation.
Several slums, which are either along water bodies or transport
corridors, have to be relocated as infrastructure cannot be
provided in such areas and the amount of land available with the
corporation is not adequate to relocate such a large number of
slums.



Indicators


Increase in the number of slums
Lack of information on service
availability in slums
Meagre availability of land within
the corporation area for slum
relocation









0ccupancy Rate
5.1 persons|
house
Vacancy Rate 15.58 7
No. of 8|ums a|ong water bod|es
and transport corr|dors| Tota|
No. of 8|ums.
33.9 7
No. of 8|um 0we|||ng un|ts
Re|ocated| Rehab|||tated
ôô334
Honth|y househo|d |ncome of
rehab|||tated s|um dwe|||ng
un|ts| |ncome before
rehab|||tat|on
Avg. Rs. 1500

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 67
CHAPTER 7: CHAPTER 7: CHAPTER 7: CHAPTER 7: URBAN URBAN URBAN URBAN
ENV¡RONMENT ENV¡RONMENT ENV¡RONMENT ENV¡RONMENT
The environment of a city is a critical determinant of the health
of its inhabitants and consequently, urban productivity. This is in
turn determined by the water and air quality. The Gujarat
Pollution Control Board is responsible for monitoring water and
air quality. It includes under its purview, testing of both surface
water and ground water and testing the ambient air quality.
7.1 WATER
The water quality of the River Tapi is tested analysed every
month by GPCB. Over the years, three locations are selected for
sampling viz. Ukai Dam, Mandvi and Kathor Bridge.
Surat and the nearby industrial areas account for 89 of the 563
large and medium water-polluting industries listed by the
inventory of the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB). It has
been stated by CPCB that the stretch of the River Tapi that
passes through the city of Surat is moderately polluted. Tapi
waters at Ukai Dam and at Mandvi were upgraded to Class A
(drinking water source without treatment but after disinfection)
in 1997 from class B (useful for outdoor bathing only) in 1991.
The waters at Kathor Bridge after entering the city are put under
class B. It has been observed that there has been a rise in the
COD levels at all three locations during the last six years.
7.2 AIR
Ambient air quality is being monitored by GPCB regularly at
three locations in Surat. They are: Air India Building, SVR
Engineering College and BRC Udhna (industrial). Monitoring
stations were also set up at Dumas, Surat Station, Old Civil
Surat, GIDC Pandesara and GIDC-Sachin from where
monitoring was done during 1993-94 but was later discontinued
from the succeeding year. The monitoring station at GIDC
Sachin was reopened during 1998-99.
The NO
x
levels have always been below the CPCB prescribed
standards but during the year 1998-99 there was a major rise in
the values at all three locations. SO
2
levels, which were earlier
above the prescribed limits have come down significantly and
are now below the limits.


















The stretch of the Tapi after it leaves
the city near Hazira village has been
dangerously polluted with COD, BOD,
faecal coliforms and total coliforms,
with values alarmingly higher than the
prescribed standards.


Status of Ambient Air Quality



Source: GPCB Reports (1995-99)
Note: Ambient Air Quality Standards
(CPCB) for Rural and Residential areas is as
under:
SPM 200 g/ m
3

SO
2
80 g/ m
3

NO
x
80 g/ m
3
2004-05
Locat|on
8PH 802 N0x
A|r |nd|a ß|dg. 173 24 32
8.V.R. Engg. 6o||ege 140 1ô 25
ß.R.6.,Udhna 180 38 24
1995-9ô
Locat|on
8PH 802 N0x
A|r |nd|a ß|dg. 3ô3 101 33
8.V.R. Engg. 6o||ege 214 75 24
ß.R.6.,Udhna 23ô 92 27

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 68

But the SPM levels have always remained above the prescribed
limits for residential and rural areas. This can be mainly
attributed to the high concentrations of dust and other
construction materials in most parts of the city. Though the city
is cleaned almost twice a day by the sand on the roads (which
lack proper margins) and footpaths are the main reason for the
particulate matter in high concentrations.
It is to be noted that these values do not reflect the situation in
the entire city and during 1993-94, when monitoring was done at
other places like Surat Station, Dumas, Old Civil Surat, GIDC-
Pandesara and GIDC Sachin, SPM levels at all the locations
were above the prescribed residential and rural area limits.

7.3 POLLUTION CONTROL MECHANISMS
7.3.1 INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK
The GPCB is the nodal agency that looks after the enforcement
and implementation of environmental laws in the city. The
environmental management of the city is looked after by several
agencies. All these agencies are to act under the co-ordination of
GPCB.
GPCB implements pollution control laws in the entire state and
is guided by the Central Pollution Control Board. The Surat
Municipal Corporation can now take up policy matters with
respect to environmental protection under the 74
th
CAA’s
provisions. The SMC’s role assumes significance as the provider
and facilitator of any development in the city.
The SMC has set up the ambient air monitoring van in
partnership with the TIFAC center under mission REACH at the
cost of Rs. 120 lacs in the year 2004.
State Public Works Department is responsible for the
maintenance of the major water bodies in the city. The State
Highways Department and the National Highway Regulatory
Authority are responsible for the maintenance of the highways in
the city. The Regional Transport Office in Surat has
responsibility of managing issues due to the Vehicular growth in
the city and the Surat Traffic Police is responsible for the
implementation of traffic management initiatives.
7.3.2 REGULATORY FRAMEWORK
GPCB is empowered to take legal action and punishable
measures against law offenders under the EP Act. The Board can
also monitor the industrial discharge and terminate the
operations if an industry is found flouting the norms.

Note: Ambient Air Quality Standards
(CPCB) for Industrial areas.
SPM 500 g/ m
3

SO
2
120 g/ m
3

NO
x
120 g/ m
3







The agencies looking after the
pollution problems with respect to
vehicular pollution, discharge of
untreated sewage, etc. in the city are:
GPCB
SMC
PWD
State Highways Department
National Highways Regulatory
Authority
RTO, Surat
Surat City Traffic Police

The “Environmental Protection (Prevention &
Control) Act, 1986”; Water Pollution
(Prevention & Control) Act and the Air
Pollution (Prevention & Control) Act govern
pollution control and prevention activities in
the city.
1997-98
Locat|on
8PH 802 N0x
A|r |nd|a ß|dg. 210 35 31
8.V.R. Engg. 6o||ege 185 27 14
ß.R.6.,Udhna 240 33 30
1998-99
Locat|on
8PH 802 N0x
A|r |nd|a ß|dg. 350 49 55
8.V.R. Engg. 6o||ege 213 22 30
ß.R.6.,Udhna 291 37 44

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 69
7.4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT IN SUDA AREA
Several initiatives have been planned. These include the
development of gardens, lakes, gas/electricity based crematorium
etc. some ot the details include:
One Garden in each T.P.Scheme will be developed for
Beautification of the Area at the cost of Rs. 50 Lacs per Garden
with a total cost of Rs. 33.5 Crores.
Existing 4 Lakes in SUDA Area will be developed at the cost of
Rs. 5 Crores per Lake with a total cost of Rs. 20 Crores. The
Lakes will be developed in such a way that the Water Bodies are
preserved and are also useful in storing the Rain water and
reducing the flooding of area.
Two Crematoria in the SUDA Area will be constructed at the
cost of Rs. 5 Crores each with a total cost of Rs. 10 Crores. The
Crematorium will be run on Gas / Electricity to reduce the
Pollution and to save the natural wood which is used in present
Crematorium.

7.5 EMERGING ISSUES
Water Pollution.
Several reasons can be attributed to the pollution of the
water bodies in the city. The most important of them are:
Encroachments along major natural drains of the city
resulting in obstruction of the natural flow of water. This
results in flooding and stagnation of water, thereby rendering
the surrounding areas susceptible to infectious and
communicable diseases.
Till recently, the lack of comprehensive sewerage system has
led to large quantities of untreated wastewater being drained
into the River Tapi. This has led to degradation of ground
water too.
The letting out of wastewaters by several small-scale
industries in the east and south zones, either into the nearby
drains or dub-bores has polluted the surface as well as
ground waters.
There are no monitoring stations to estimate and assess the
quantity and quality of wastewaters being generated in the
city. The obvious results of all the above-mentioned reasons
are health risks to the citizens of the city.
Air Pollution.

All the air quality monitoring stations in the city has
recorded dangerously high SPM levels in the the past. This is
due to several internal and external factors of which the most
important are:the high volume of dust suspension in the city
is mainly due to the climatic conditions as well as the un-
surfaced margins on almost all the roads in the city.
Rapid growth of vehicular
population during the past decade
is also a concern. Most of these
vehicles are mostly not compliant
with the BHARAT-II norms and
release dangerous exhausts. The
climatic conditions of the city
generally cause these exhausts to
remain suspended in the air.
Inadequate traffic management
measures have reduced the average
speed of vehicles on the roads
thereby increasing the travel time
and hence the vehicular pollution.
Chaotic movements at junctions
have increased the dimension of
the problem. The small number of
air quality monitoring stations in
the city with an area of 112.28
sq.km and population of above 25
lakhs do not generate the true
picture of air pollution in the city.














Water Pollution
Air Pollution




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 70
CHAPTER 8 CHAPTER 8 CHAPTER 8 CHAPTER 8: :: : 8OC¡AL 8OC¡AL 8OC¡AL 8OC¡AL
DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT
8.1 EDUCATION
From primary school to research level, educational facilities in
Surat are provided by a host of agencies, ranging from the
central government, state government and local government to
the agencies aided by the state government as well as private
institutions.
The city has 596 primary schools of which 258 schools are run
by SMC and as many as 332 schools are under the management
of private institutions. A considerable numbers of the secondary/
higher secondary schools are also under the management of
private institutions.
Apart from these there are 22 colleges, which are either affiliated
or self financed. Professional Institutes located in the city are
S.V. Regional Engineering College, Government Medical
College and the SMC Medical College. The South Gujarat
University is also located in the city and acts as a research
institute. The Department of Business Administration under the
university acts as a professional institute and offers a Masters in
Business Economics.
There are schools and colleges in the city but most of them lack
an environment conducive to learning. Even today, Suratis prefer
the family business or setting up new business soon after
finishing high school. Because of this trend, despite its potential
for economic growth, Surat will have to depend on professionals
from outside though this trend is changing recently.
8.2 HEALTH
From decay to resurgence, the city has emerged in recent years
as an example for other civic agencies to follow. Devastated by
the plague in 1994, the city got a new lease of life thanks to
SMC’s efforts increasing and improving the health facilities. A
new civil hospital has come up along with a new medical
college. A new super specialty cardiac centre was set up in the
year 2000.









Primary Schools









Secondary/ Higher Secondary
Schools







Agenc|es
6entra|
Covt.
8tate
Covt.
8.H.6 A|ded Pr|vate
Tota|
2 2 258 2 332 59ô
Agenc|es
6entra|
Covt.
8tate
Covt.
8.H.6 A|ded Pr|vate
Tota|
1 - 4 12ô 139 2ô0

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 71
Birth & Death Rates
0
10
20
30
40
1
8
8
5
1
9
8
6
1
9
8
7
1
9
8
8
1
9
8
9
1
9
9
0
1
9
9
1
1
9
9
2
1
9
9
3
1
9
9
4
1
9
9
5
1
9
9
6
1
9
9
7
1
9
9
8
1
9
9
9
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
2
0
0
2
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
4
C.B.R. C.D.R.

8.2.1 HEALTH FACILITIES
The ever-increasing population in the city is expected to put
pressures on the existing health facilities. The SMIMER with
medical collage has 750 beds while the Civil Hospital (attached
to a Govt. Medical College) has 1040 beds in 32 wards looked
after by 200 medical teaching staff, over 400 interns and PG
students. There are around 650 trained nurses in the hospital. At
the lowest level there are basic health centres, anganwadis,
dispensaries, etc
Distribution of Hospitals run by Various Organisations
There are a total of 513 hospitals in the city that are registered
with the SMC. Of these as many as 475 (92.59 percent) hospitals
are run by private organisations. SMC runs 13 hospitals of which
6 are in the central zone. On the whole, 46 percent of the
hospitals are within the central zone, which has a considerably
smaller area than the other zones but is most densely populated.
8.2.2 BIRTH & DEATH RATES
Both the birth rate and the death rate have come down in the
recent years, especially after the outbreak of plague in 1994.
While the birth rate has stabilized at 19 births per 1000
population, the death rate is hovering around 4 deaths per 1000
populations.






Existing Health Facilities in SMC









Births and Deaths in Surat (1985-2000)
The birth rate, death rate and the
infant mortality rate are less than the
state averages as well as the averages
of urban areas of Gujarat.

Zone Government Private Charitable Trust SMC Total
Central Zone 0 195 15 6 216
North Zone - 27 2 - 29
South Zone - 55 - 1 56
East Zone - 95 1 3 99
West Zone - 58 1 1 60
South West Zone 2 37 4 1 44
South East Zone 8 - 1 9
Total 2 475 23 13 513
Fac|||t|es Number
Civil Hospital 1
Major Hospitals 8
Urban Health Centre 27
Pathological Laboratory 1
Mobile Dispensary with I.E.C services 6
I.C.D.S 2
Anganwadis 316
Year L|ve ß|rths 0eaths ß|rth Rate 0eath Rate
1985 28ô3ô 7077 27.75 7.35
198ô 33242 7435 25.95 5.81
1987 35877 7ô21 2ô.7ô 5.ô8
1988 3ô57ô 8887 2ô.09 ô.34
1989 38733 78ô2 2ô.42 5.3ô
1990 45ô92 737ô 30.45 4.93
1991 45583 8085 29.95 5.31
1992 4ô512 8715 29.14 4.4ô
1993 388ô1 8035 23.24 4.8
1994 38ô99 8075 22.08 4.ô1
1995 42732 7888 23.2ô 4.29
199ô 42873 88ô2 22.22 4.ô
1997 45ô87 8ô59 22.ô5 4.29
1998 452ôô 9395 21.41 4.44
1999 47919 9404 21.ô2 4.24
2000 51118 9ô35 22.01 4.15
2001 47114 10198 19.04 4.12
2002 49194 10208 18.84 3.91
2003 53452 11255 19.10 1.08
2004 55522 11921 19.09 1.10

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 72

8.2.3 MORTALITY PATTERN
Infant Mortality Rate is 36.32 per 1000 live births in the year
1985 while the Infant Mortality rate of Surat Municipal
Corporation is as low as 19.79 per 1000 live births This is also
true of Maternal Mortality Rate, which reduced from 2.13 in
1985 to 0.61 per 1000 deliveries.
8.2.4 DISEASE PATTERN
The maximum number of reported cases in the city is of Malaria,
Infective Hepatitis and Gastro Enteritis. This trend has been
confirmed over the years. The fall in the reported cases of all the
diseases after 1995 can be attributed to the cleanliness drive
started by SMC in 1994.
SMC employed paramedics who have been monitoring and
treating minor ailments on a fortnightly basis and serious cases
are reported to the government hospitals or the dispensaries. The
numbers of reported cases proving fatal have come down
significantly, especially of Gastroenteritis and Infective
Hepatitis.
With the mortality and morbidity rates having come down
significantly, there has been a noticeable improvement in the
health status of the city. A rise in the actual number of infant
deaths and stillbirths calls for increased awareness regarding pre
and postnatal care. The maximum numbers of deaths in the city
are due to disorders related to the heart, lungs and kidneys. Surat
has a very high incidence rate of heart attack and diabetes. Under
the National Malaria Eradication Programme the entire city
population is covered with an Annual Blood Examination Rate
(ABER) of 22.22 during the year 2004. The over all impression
indicates that malaria cases have drastically declined over one
decade in Surat City inspite of huge surveillance.
Positive cases had remained 2.99 percent of the total samples
collected during 2004 which was at around 30 percent during
1990-91. Of the total positive cases seen in year 2004, P.Vivax is
seen predominantly compared to P.Falciparum.
Disease Pattern
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
4000
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
GASTRO-ENTRITIS VIRAL HEPATITIS
ENTRIC-FEVER PNEUMONIA
PULMONARY T.B. A . R . I .


Infant Mortality rate & MATERNAL
Mortality rate (1985-2004)

Infant Mortality & Maternal Mortality
Rates
0.00
5.00
10.00
15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
1
8
8
5
1
9
8
6
1
9
8
7
1
9
8
8
1
9
8
9
1
9
9
0
1
9
9
1
1
9
9
2
1
9
9
3
1
9
9
4
1
9
9
5
1
9
9
6
1
9
9
7
1
9
9
8
1
9
9
9
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
2
0
0
2
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
4
INF.MORTALITY RATE MAT.MORTALITY RATE

Year |HR HHR
1985 3ê.32 2.13
198ô 31.80 1.23
1987 32.11 0.ê1
1988 30.ê8 0.8Z
1989 23.11 0.90
1990 20.92 0.81
1991 23.80 0.81
1992 22.ê2 0.ê9
1993 21.êZ 1.1ê
1994 22.5ê 0.59
1995 21.11 0.ê3
199ô 20.50 0.Z2
1997 19.00 0.11
1998 19.ê8 0.ê8
1999 22.2Z 0.21
2000 23.98 0.22
2001 20.9Z 0.25
2002 19.58 0.59
2003 19.31 0.19
2004 19.Z9 0.ê1

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 73

8.2.5 ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE
After the plague, various organisational measures have been
taken up by SMC, which are also reflected in Health department.
The decentralisation of powers involved conversion of health
workers from uni-purpose to multi-
purpose workers (each health worker
covers 10,000 people in the slum and
slum like areas).



Commissioner

Dy. Commissioner of
Health & Hospital
Dy. Medical Officer of Health
Asst. Medical Officer of Health
(7 Nos)
Urban Health Care Programmes
• Preventive, Promotive and Curative Care
• National Health Programmes like Malaria.
T.B., Leprosy, Filaria, S.T.D. Care
Immunition & Family Planning
• Surveillance and Monitoring of Diseases:
Health Mapping
• I.E.C Activities
• Data Collection, Analysis and Feedback

Urban Health Centers (27 Nos)
• Lady Medical Officer
• Medical Officer
• Health Inspector
• Lab Technicians
• Lady Health Visitor
• Vaccinator
Health Workers
(Paramedical Workers)
Medical Officer of Health


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 74

8.3 RECREATION/ OPEN SPACES
Open spaces in Surat are categorised as open spaces, gardens,
playgrounds, recreational areas and green belts. The city which
had 0.57 sq. km of such spaces in 1997 today has 2.15 sq. km for
the said purpose thanks to the efforts taken during the
preparation of the development plan by SUDA
Playgrounds are mostly included within the school premises and
the rest of the areas are open for public use. The present figure of
2.15 sq. km of open spaces, gardens, playgrounds, recreation
areas, etc all put together is far less than the actual requirements
for the year 2001, which is 6.77 sq. km.
Preservation of Water Bodies
Water bodies are an integral part of city open spaces and
connected to various traditions and religios functions. At the
same time it provides at time larger open space to the city. It also
maintains eco-system. It provides immence potential to tourism
in the city. Many times human interface with the water fronts of
these water bodies may liable to contaminate and pollution.
Therefore it is necessary to preserve and develop these large
open space – water bodies. As per the direction of The Hon.
Gujarat High Court, dated .2-8-02 in S.C.A.No. 10621 of 2000,
the Government of Gujarat issued a Notification on 1st April,
2003, notifying the different water bodies, in the State of
Gujarat. According to the order of the Hon. Gujarat High Court,
State Govt, all area development Authorities & Local bodies
were held responsible for protection, maintenance and
preservation of all the water bodies in the state.
As per the Gujarat Government Notification, dated. 1-4-2003,
following water bodies were notified in the Surat Municipal
Corporation Area.
0esc(|pl|or ol Lard 3(.
No
.

Nare ol wale( 8odv Voje R.3.No /
8|oc| No
A(ea |r
3c.Vl.
1 0ove(rrerl Pord. Adajar Adajar ê12 315ê0
2 8r|rla|ao. Adajar Adajar 59 2219
3 0ove(rrerl La|e. \ar|a
Ta|ao. udal
Jarard|(ao
ad
1êZ 85Z10
1 3u(al Vur|c|pa| Co(po(al|or
La|e. 3uorasr 3a(ova(. Vo(a
8rado|
Rarde( 111.115 188ZZ
5 3VC La|e. Karsarada( La|e.
Kala(dar
Kala(dar 301/A/1/A/1 2Z200
ê 0ove(rrerl La|e. 0aoro|| 0aoro|| 100 19ê55
Z 0arla|ao. 3|rdarpo(e 3|rdarpo(e 23 2385
8 3u(al Vur|c|pa| Co(po(al|or
La|e
Vaju(a-
Kralod(a
T.P.3.ê |Vaju(a
-Kralod(a)
F.P.1ê1
9811
9 3VC La|e 8reslar 15 138ê1
10 0|rdo|| 0(ar Parcraval La|e 0|rdo|| 352 9105
11 3u(al Vur|c|pa| Co(po(al|or
La|e. La|e \|eW. P|p|od
P|p|od T.P.3.ê
|P|p|od) F.P.99
1100Z
12 0ar Ta|ao. A|lrar A|lrar T.P.3.3Z
|A|lrar). F.P.2
315ê1

Existing Open Spaces, Gardens
(sq.km)



T.P.S (F) = Town Planning Scheme, Final.
T.P.S (P) = Town Planning Scheme, Primary.

Details of development projects of
water bodies undergoing execution :

3(.
No.
Nare ol
wale( 8odv
A(ea |r
3c.Vl.
0ela||s ol
deve|oprerl
Cosl Rs.
|r |acs
1
3u(al
Vur|c|pa|
Co(po(al|or
La|e.
Karsarada(
La|e.
Kala(dar
2Z200
T(ad|rd &
0es||l|rd.
P|lcr|rd.
0a(dar.
Rec(eal|or &
8oal|rd
lrc|ud|rd
(erova| 0l
lulrerl
erc(oacrrerl
125
|Rs. 88
sperl)
& |r
Fulu(e 3Z
Lacs rave
oeer
P(oposed)
2
0ove(rrerl
La|e. \ar|a
Ta|ao. udal
85Z10
8olor|ca|
0a(der
Accual|c
0a(der
Arpr|
Treal(e
Vudra|
0a(der
Roses
0a(der
Fourla|r
Food P|azza
59Z
3
0ove(rrerl
La|e.
0aoro||
19ê55
0a(der &
Rec(eal|or
25
|Rs. 10
sperl)
& |r
Fulu(e 15
P(oposed)


0pen 8paces Cardens P|ay ground
ward |
T.P.8.
No Area No
Are
a
No Area
0|d 6|ty 8 0.04 21 0.11 5 0.01
T.P.8.[F} 45 0.10 20 0.11 5 0.02
T.P.8.[P} 7 0.04 11 1.30 9 0.05
8urat c|ty ô0 0.19 52 1.52 19 0.09
Creen be|ts Recreat|on Tota| ward |
T.P.8.
No Area No Area No Area
0|d 6|ty - - 3 0.10 37 0.2ô
T.P.8.[F} - - 5 0.07 75 0.30
T.P.8.[P} - - 13 0.19 40 1.59
8urat c|ty 0 0 21 0.3ô 152 2.15
Creen be|ts Recreat|on Tota| ward |
T.P.8.
No Area No Area No Area
0|d 6|ty - - 3 0.10 37 0.2ô
T.P.8.[F} - - 5 0.07 75 0.30
T.P.8.[P} - - 13 0.19 40 1.59
8urat c|ty 0 0 21 0.3ô 152 2.15


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 75
In addition to the above the historic Gopi Talao development
project is also under planning stage. The proposed development
consists of Historical Vav conservation, development of jogging
track including displaying old city cultural value and trades such
as textile, jari & diamond Industry. The estimated cost of the
proposed development will be app. Rs.680 lacs.
To preserve for water bodies it is necessary to control the
development around the water bodies. The State Government has
sanctioned the Revised Development Plan of Surat City vide
Notification No. GH/V/100 OF 2004/DVP/1403/3307/L, Dtd,.
2/9/2004. The revised Development Control Regulations have
also come into force with sanction of the Development Plan.
Provision has been made in the regulations that no development
be allowed within a distance of 9.0 mts. from the boundary of the
talao, lake, water bodies etc.
In order to raise the sub-soil water, Surat Municipal Corporation
has developed percolating bore well with rain water harvesting
system on major projects sites.
To enforce this the project under taken by the private developers,
provision to construct recharging bore well with rain water
harvesting system has been made in the revised development
control regulations, which is being implement presently.
The details of development projects of the water bodies, which
are under planning, are as under.
8r.
No.
Name of water ßody Area
|n
8q.Ht.
0eta||s of
deve|opment
Appx.
Rs. |n
|acs
1 T.P.3.ê |Vaju(a -Kralod(a)
F.P.1ê1
9811 0a(der &
Rec(eal|or
30
2 3|rdarpo(e La|e 2385 0a(der &
Rec(eal|or
15





Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 76

8.4 EMERGING ISSUES,
Lack of educational facilities.
A spatial disparity is observed in the educational facilities
with most of the primary, secondary and higher secondary
schools in the city located in and around the central zone.
At one primary / secondary / higher secondary schools for
every 425 students, there is a clear inadequacy in the number
of schools available in the city. An average of one school for
every 300 students is the necessity.
Educational facilities in the slum localities of the city are
also inadequate. For a city with a phenomenal growth rate
the number of colleges and professional institutions is very
low. There is also a need for research institutions.
Inadequacy of health facilities to cater to the needs of
Population in 2011 and 2021.
The number of Multi-disciplinary and Super speciality
Hospitals are also inadeuate. Apart from the New Civil
Hospital there is only one cardiac super speciality hospital
that has been recently set up in the city. The Civil Hospital is
also lacking in the number of trained nurses and paramedical
staff, which in turn hinders the implementation of health
programmes in the city, especially in the slums.
The Civil Hospital is not easily accessible for a large number
of slums spread throughout the city. For a city with about 4.9
lakhs of slum population there are only 22 health centres.
It has also been observed that the number of HIV (+) cases
in the city is growing gradually, which is of grave concern.
Efficient management of health facilities after the Plague
have helped to tackle the needs of the present city population
but without additional facilities the future appears bleak.
Lack of recreational facilities.
There has been a continuous decrease in the amount of open
space present in the city over the past decade.
In the past, the green belts, gardens and parks were put to
different urban uses . At present these are not sufficient to
cater to the recreational needs of the population.




















Lack of educational facilities
Inadequacy of health facilities to
cater to the needs of population in
2011 and 2021
Lack of recreational facilities



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 77
CHAPTER 9: CHAPTER 9: CHAPTER 9: CHAPTER 9: URBAN URBAN URBAN URBAN
GOVERNANCE AND GOVERNANCE AND GOVERNANCE AND GOVERNANCE AND
MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT
The functioning of SMC is governed by the Gujarat
Municipalities Act of 1963 and the Bombay Provincial
Municipal Corporations Act, 1949. SMC performs obligatory
and discretionary functions, as incorporated in the said Acts.
The hydraulics Department under SMC is responsible for water
supply and sewerage schemes in the city. The Gujarat Municipal
Finance Board, incorporated under the Gujarat Municipal
Finance Act, routes the loan and grant money and central aid
provided by the State and Central Government to the ULBs.
The governance of urban local bodies assumes importance in the
wake of the 74
th
Constitution Amendment Act which delegates
mandatory elections and greater devolution of powers and
functions to the city corporations. This theme outlines the
present structure of the elected and administrative wings of the
corporation related to management functions, operations and
reforms
9.1 74
TH
CONSTITUIONAL AMENDMENT
The 74
th
Constitution Amendment Act, 1992 has its essence in
reforms and building new systems in the structural, functional
and planning areas of municipal management and capacity
building. The Gujarat Government appropriately adopted the
notification and amended the Gujarat Municipalities Act, 1963
and the Bombay Provincial Municipal Corporations Act, 1949.
The provisions under the amendments are:
Structural
Regular and fair conduct of elections to municipalities by
statutorily constituted state election commissionsA framework
assigning appropriate civic functions to urban local bodies as
envisaged in the Twelfth Schedule of the Constitution. Besides
the core functions, the municipalities are now expected to play a
crucial role in preparation and implementation of local
development plans and programs for social justice,
andConstitution of a Finance Commission, to recommend to
their legislature measures to improve the financial health of
municipal bodies once in every five years.
















Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 78

Functional
The Gujarat Municipalities Act, 1963 and the Bombay
Provincial Municipal Corporations Act, 1949, have been
amended in 1993 but no actual devolution took place as
functions like regulation of land-use, town planning with
development authorities, safeguarding the interests of the weaker
sections, promotion of cultural, educational and aesthetic aspects
etc. have still not been devolved to the fullest extent.
Planning
The absence of Metropolitan Planning Committees in Gujarat, as
envisaged by the 74
th
CAA has limited the functional role of the
ULBs in planning and management to a series of sectoral and
departmental plans and programs, which under no circumstances
can lead to integrated planning and development of ULBs.
9.2 GOVERNING STRUCTURE OF SMC
The governing structure of SMC consists of both political and
administrative wings. The political wing is an elected body of
councillors headed by a Mayor. The Commissioner, from the
IAS cadre, heads the administrative wing and is responsible for
the strategic and operational planning and management of the
Corporation. The Commissioner takes the decisions on behalf of
the Board or the Standing Committee formed from the elected
Councillors, while performing the duties of the Corporation.
9.2.1 ELECTED WING
The elected wing consists of Corporators elected by the citizens
of SMC and the actual number of Councillors is related to the
total population. At present, the Corporation consists of 102
Corporators elected from single member constituencies on an
adult franchise. A deputy mayor assists the mayor and is elected
from amongst the corporators. The term of both the mayor and
his deputy, is for a period of five years.
The city is divided into seven zones with a total of 34 election
wards and 102 ward constituencies. Ward committees operate at
the zonal level and consist of elected corporators of the
respective wards and are headed by a chairperson. These
committees are responsible for assisting the council in the
planning and execution of development works at the zonal level.
Under the BPMC Act, powers are vested with three distinct
statutory authorities of the elected wing, viz. the General Body,
the Standing Committee and the Other Committees. The General
Body is the supreme body of the corporation and the mayor is
the chairman of the General Body for conducting its proceedings
and is also the ceremonial Head in the British tradition. Though
he is not vested with executive powers, as the First Citizen of
Surat, he commands a position of great prestige and honour.


































The city has seven zones, 34 election
wards and 102 ward constituencies.



The statutory authorities of the elected
wing are
the General Body,
the Standing Committee and
The Other Committees.

One third of the seats are reserved for
women. The proposed General Body
will have 68 male corporators and 34
female corporators representing each
ward constituency.


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 79

The Corporation has several statutory and non-statutory
functional Committees to set out the obligatory and discretionary
functions bestowed upon the Corporation by the 74
th
CAA. The
Standing Committee is one of the 13 statutory Committees under
SMC and is the most powerful Committee. Powers to sanction
and award major works costing more than Rs. 5 lakhs are vested
with this Committee. The Committee is also vested with
financial powers and has 12 members and is headed by a
Chairman elected from among the Corporators. The other twelve
Committees look after specialised functions of SMC.
9.2.2 ADMINISTRATIVE WING
In Gujarat, the municipal administration comes under the
purview of Urban Development and Urban Housing Department.
It is the policy making body for the urban sector in the state and
undertakes the functions as specified in the local Acts.
After 1994, significant changes were made in the administrative
setup of SMC, from a vertical-rigid-hierarchical system to a
horizontally-more-interactive system. There has been a shift to
‘field level operations’. Decentralization of administration is a
major aspect of this change. The city has been divided into seven
zones viz. Varachcha (East), Rander (west), Katargam (North),
Udhna (South), Limbayat (South-East), Athwa Lines (South-
West) and Muglisara (Central). Each zone is vested with
complete authority to address local problems and mitigate them
at the source. Further, transparency and collective decision-
making have become key elements of the administrative process.
DECENTRALISED ADMINISTRATION: ZONES AND WARDS
During the last three decades, the city has expanded in all
directions. For administrative purposes, the area of SMC has
been divided into seven zones after suggestions from various
sectors. The zonal system came into existence in 1996 with six
administrative zones and one zone is further bifurcated in May
2004. It envisages decentralisation of activities and a more
responsive administration at the zone/ ward level.
Each zone is headed by a divisional Head, who is either an
Assistant Commissioner or a Deputy Municipal Commissioner.
Depending upon the size of the ward, the divisional head has one
or two zonal officers under him, who in turn, has about three to
four Deputy Engineers working for him. In each zone there are
six to seven junior engineers, typists etc.
Under the decentralised administrative setup the powers and
functions at each level are clearly delegated for the Heads to
discharge their functions adequately. Even the junior engineers
and other inspectors working at the ward level are provided with
adequate powers for effective discharge of their duties. By
decentralising various public services provided by SMC a zonal
system has been implemented.
Health Committee
Law Committee
Public Works Committee
Hospitals, Medical Aid and Hygiene
Committee
Water Committee
Housing & Gardens Committee
Town Planning Committee
Light & Fire (Extinguishment)
Committee
Social Welfare, Entertainment and
Cultural Committee
Slum Improvement Committee
Drainage Committee
Khadi Committee








The central zone mainly consists of
the old city (also called the inner
city)The eastern zone mainly
consists of Varaccha, Karanj,
Fulpada The northern zone mainly
consists of Katargam,Ved,
Dabholi and Singanpore
The western zone mainly consists
of Rander and Adajan
The southern zone mainly consists
of Udhna Pandesara, Bhestan and
Bhedawad,
The southeast zone mainly consists
of Anjana, Limbayat, and Dindoli,
The southwest zone mainly consists
of Athwa, Umra, Piplod Bhatar
and Ghod Dod.








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Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 81
Legal procedures for illegal
connections and repair of
polluted water connections.
Issuing permits regarding
stand posts, free connection
hand pump, drainage.
Legal procedures against
illegal drainage connections
and illegal construction.
To construct and maintain
(box drain) rainwater drain


Functions of a Zone Office
Health Department
Scavenging the entire area of the zone,
Clean choked, gully-trap and sewer traps,
Food inspection, branch license permit,
Vaccination, birth/death registration, family planning.
Market department to remove the nuisance of stray animals
Malaria control
Assessment and Recovery Department
Assessment of properties, recovery of property taxes,
education tax, etc.
Appeals regarding assessment and rent recovery of the
corporation's various properties,
Registration of shops/firms renewal and court complaints
regarding breach of law.
Engineering Department
Build new roads up to 60 feet with, to widen the roads, to
repair and re-carpet the roads etc
Build society roads by raising public funds - to prepare new
footpaths, to repair them, scraping etc
Build roads upto 80 feet width and carry out their repair
work
Build new buildings and to maintain the municipal
properties
Build and maintain school buildings
Sanction 1/2" domestic and 1" industrial connection
Repair work of main water pipelines upto 22"
Maintain and clean temporary/ permanent drainage
Disposal of rainwater through new catch pits
Issuing permits for layout of low-rise buildings, procedure
against illegal construction
Implementation of town planning scheme, recovery of
betterment charges
Take action against public nuisance and damaged property
Issuing permits for mandap, banner, hoarding-collection of
land-rent, property rent
Remove permanent / temporary encroachments, to make
alternative arrangements for obstructing slums
The Central zone mainly consisting of the old city; also
called the inner city,
The Eastern zone of Varaccha road
The Northern zone of Katargam and Ved road;
The Western zone of Randher and Adajan
The Southern zone of Udhna and Pandesara and,
The Southwest zone of Athwa lines Bhatar and Ghod Dod.
City Civic Centers
There are fourteen City Civic Centers established in the city with
a state-of-the-art community services, where several counters
will be provided for citizen services.



FUNCTIONS OF A WARD OFFICE
Cleaning and sprinkling of
pesticides collection,
Transportation and final disposal
of solid waste.
Disposal of small and big
carcasses .
License renewal of non-edible
things (matches, kerosene, coal,
fireworks etc.) And edible things.
Clean choked gully-trap.
Cleaning of drip well.
Chlorination of the well in use and
chlorine test of water samples.
Legal actions against citizens who
are creating nuisance.
Legal actions against citizens who
are creating nuisance.
Inspection of hotels, hawkers and
small shopkeeper with hygienic
point of view.
Cleaning of public urinals.
Inspection of cinema halls,
theatres and other public
entertainment places form hygiene
point of view.
Gather details of the epidemic
immediately inform higher
authority regarding disease-
controlling measures. Issue
license for eatables and non-
eatable items under the BPMC act,
1949.




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Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 83
ADMINISTRATIVE SETUP – POST 1994














9.3 RECENT MANAGEMENT REFORMS
Urban reforms are the main focus of good governance and
service delivery to the inhabitants of the urban area. Several
initiatives have been taken up at national level like 74
th

Constitutional Amendment Act and Model municipal law.
Further at State level Govt. of Gujarat has taken up several
initiatives like creating investor friendly environment, repeal of
Urban Land (Ceiling & Regulation) Act -1976 (ULCRA) etc.
At ULB Level Surat Municipal Corporation had taken up several
reforms and many of these are first of kind in country.
Followings are the reforms done by S.M.C.
Financial & Taxation Reforms
Accrual Based Double Entry Book Keeping Accounting
System
Outsourcing of Services & PPP
Total Computerization Of Accounts With Balance Sheet
Approaching Debt Free Financial Administration
User Charges
Efficient Tax Collection
Life time vehicle tax
























Administrative & Technological
Reforms
Vision – 2020 Plan and City
Corporate Plan
Micro and Macro Action plans
Standardization, ISO certification,
SCADA and induction of modern
gadgets
DCR Revision
Transparency in administration
Training to employees
e-Governance & GIS
Biometrics attendance system
Energy reforms
Energy Audit (Internal)
Economical channel in Water
Supply Grid, Demand
Rationalization, Energy Bill
Monitoring, etc. Saving realised:
Rs. 27.52 million / annum
Energy Audit (External)
Saving Identified: Rs. 22.1 million /
annum
Saving Realised: Rs. 7.56 million /
annum
Use of electronic ballast & hi-
lumen fluorescent lamps. Saving
realised: Rs. 7.6 million / annum
User 6harges
6ost [Rs. |n Lacs} Recovered [Rs. |n Lacs} 8erv|ces
2003-04 2004-05 2003-04 2004-05
Recovery Target
T|me Frame
water 8upp|y
5ô92 7ô42 2992 35ô3 5 Yr
6onservancy
8554 10500 3342 3591 4 Yr
Roads &
|||um|nat|on
2138 2549 1188 1ô77 4 Yr
Divisional head (Deputy or Asst. Commissioner) Typical for all zones
Zonal Officer (Executive Engineer)
Deputy Engineer
Junior Engineer
Deputy Engineer
Deputy Engineer
Surat Municipal Corporation (Municipal Commissioner)
East Zone (Varachha)
South West Zone
(Municipal shopping centre, Athwa
North Zone (Katargam)
West Zone (Rander)
Central Zone
(Corporation Office, Muglisara)
South Zone (Udhna)
South East Zone
(Limbayat)


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 84
Power Factor Rebate: Rs. 16.66 million / annum
Alternate street lighting during low traffic period: Energy
saving of Rs. 5 million / annum
Energy generation from Biogas produced at Anjana STP:
Expected saving: Rs. 6 million / annum
LED based retrofits for traffic signaling system: Saving
realised: Rs. 0.9 million / annum
Disaster Management
Disaster Preparedness and Municipal Response Plan
Strengthened relief & rescue system
CONTINUOUS MONITORING SYSTEM
Monitoring within SMC is done at four levels, namely,
corporation level, zone level, ward level and on the field. The
standing committee meets once in a week every afternoon
between 3 to 4 p.m. (headed by the standing committee
chairman) Municipal Commissioner, wherein all the heads to
discuss their problems issues and mitigation measures if
possible, is done on daily basis.
ENHANCED POWERS
The divisional head has been given the authority to sanction
works up to a value of Rs 2 lakhs, with the permission of the
Municipal Commissioner.
COMPLAINT MONITORING SYSTEM
At the ward level, all complaints are lodged in a register and a
complaint lodger is given a white card for sanitation purposes
and red card for engineering and public works. These complaints
can be made between 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. either in person or on the
phone. Complaint mitigation is carried out within a specific time
period, a minimum of 24 hours with the upper limit as a week.
COLLECTIVE RESPONSIBILITY
There is no distinction between departments in the SMC. Any
official who observes something on the field is free to make
suggestions or complaints and a. There is no water tight
compartmentalisation. All the officials are in a way responsible
for all activities of the zone, in addition to their regular duties.
There is perfect teamwork and all employees of SMC right from
the Municipal Commissioner to the karamchari are equal
partners in administration. Further, all the senior SMC officials
who comprise the Standing Committee take decisions with
respect to transfers, etc. within SMC.
IMPROVED SUPPORTIVE INFRASTRUCTURE
Communication has become far more efficient. Officials are
provided with vehicles fitted with wireless sets and are expected
to pass information to the zonal commissioner, if they find any
thing wrong, and are expected to visit the nearest ward officer or
instruct the SSI / SI to attend to a particular job.






















Four levels of continuous monitoring:
Corporation level,
Zone level,
Ward level and
On the field

Complaint register maintained at the
ward level and mitigation carried out
within a period of minimum of 24
hours and a maximum of a week.




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 85
PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
The present drive in Surat is to upgrade its status from the
second cleanest city to the cleanest city of India. Each locality
has a member chosen on a voluntary basis, and he/ she in turn
interact with the SMC and try to mitigate the problems at the
earliest. It is an attempt to take management to the masses.

COMPUTERISATION
SMC is the first municipal corporation in India to develop an IT
policy. SMC introduced computerisation in all its departments’
way back in 1998. Statistics are computerised on a daily basis
and efforts are on to computerize the past records too. The town
maps are digitised and details of each department are laid over.
For the purpose SMC has imparted training to its staff through
professional IT institutes.
The Information Systems Department dutifully carries out the
functions listed below so as to achieve the objectives of
providing better services to the citizen at his doorstep, reducing
overall administrative response time for various tasks, reducing
the total cost of operations for the SMC, providing centrally
organized information dissemination, having speedy and
effective communication system, establishing a knowledge
repository for various processes and having an effective
management information system and decision support system
with utmost effectiveness and efficiency:

Analysis of business processes of various departments of
SMC and to design the information system for the same
Development of computerised systems for the information
systems of the departments. Procuring the hardware and
peripherals necessary to operate various computerised
systems through tendering and providing it to the end users.
Procuring the pre-printed stationery necessary for various
computerised systems through tendering and providing it to
the end users
Organising the training of employees and officers for
subjects related to information technology and
computerisation
Archiving the data and information of various computerised
processes to reproduce it and provide it to the end user on
their demand
Imparting training to the users of various systems developed
at SMC
Providing support and maintenance to various hardware
systems and peripherals and to the systems developed at
SMC.
Designing and developing the internet and intranet website
of SMC










The Information Systems Department
[EDP Department] spearheads the
information technology drive of the
Surat Municipal Corporation with the
mission “To achieve overall
efficiency in various fields of
administration of SMC by using the
Information Technology in the form
of electronic computing devices,
related gadgets, software, etc. so as
to provide the citizens with better
services and a dynamic and
transparent administration”.






Procuring the pre-printed
stationery necessary for various
computerised systems through
tendering and providing it to the
end users
Organising the training of
employees and officers for subjects
related to information technology
and computerisation
Archiving the data and information
of various computerised processes
to reproduce it and provide it to the
end user on their demand
Imparting training to the users of
various systems developed at SMC
Providing support and maintenance
to various hardware systems and
peripherals and to the systems
developed at SMC.
Designing and developing the
internet and intranet website of
SMC





Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 86
The Corporation has its own website (www.suratmunicipal.com)
which boasts of updated information regarding the various
departments under the SMC. The website has wide-ranging
details regarding the progress of various development projects
taken up. the site also facilitates downloading of forms related to
shops and establishments, property tax assessment, water supply
connections, land & estate, birth & death registration, town
development, drainage connections and SMIMER. On the whole,
35 forms are available online, in addition to the various
legislation pertaining to the corporation and the citizens of the
city
The website facilitates online complaint lodging and status check
of the complaints. It also provides the property tax structure,
which consists of the water charges, water taxes, conservancy
taxes and general taxes; allows one to check the status one’s
outstanding property taxand look at the budget for the ongoing
financial year. New tenders that are floated by the SMC are put
on the website for public information.
IT POLICY
In line with the IT policy of the Government of India, the
Government of Gujarat enacted its own IT Policy on 9th March
1999. SMC has launched its own IT Policy and Plan for the next
five years to usher in a citizen-friendly delivery system.
SMC’s drive towards e-governance started way back in
November '79. From then onwards SMC has always stood up to
the challenges offered by the ever-evolving IT field. SMC is the
forerunner in IT among all the other government institutions and
computerisation at SMC still ranks among the best in the
country; praised and appreciated by various international
institutions. But now, this computerisation has reached such a
stage that it requires streamlining to realise the SMC’s
organizational goal.
The following departments are either partly or fully
computerised:
Accounts department
General system
Personnel department
Revenue department
Octroi department
Health department
Information systems department
City engineer's special
Town development department
Town planning
Drainage department
Hydraulic department
Public works department
Bridge cell
Parks and garden department
Secretariat
Municipal libraries
Municipal theatres
Municipal workshop
Law department
Public lighting system
Fire department
Audit department
Municipal press
UCD department
Vigilance department
PRO

Information Online:
Updated information regarding the
various departments under the
SMC
The various legislations pertaining
to the corporation and the citizens
of the city
The progress of various
development projects taken up
New tenders that are floated by the
SMC
The budget for the ongoing
financial year

A SWOT (Strength, Weakness,
Opportunities and Threats) analysis of
the existing scenario of SMC has been
carried out and the outcomes formed
the primary recommendations for the
IT policy. A situational analysis of the
major departments of the SMC was
also carried out to identify the systems
to be computerised so that
requirements like operating skill sets,
hardware, software, training, etc could
be ascertained. The outcome of the
analysis constituted the IT plan and
policy of SMC.
It also covers the operational plan for
the two years of focus wherein overall
computerisation will be targeted. The
organizational structure of the IT
department, which will be necessary to
achieve the targeted goals, is presented
in the form of an annexure. This covers
various professional posts, their
functions, responsibilities and
qualifications.



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Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 88
Summary of Option Reforms in SMC


3(.
No.
Relo(rs Cu((erl 3lalus/P|ar
1
Rev|s|or ol ove-|aWs
lo sl(ear||re lre
app(ova| p(ocess lo(
corsl(ucl|or ol
ou||d|rds.
deve|oprerl ol s|le
elc.
Rev|sed |r 2001. Fu(lre( Rev|s|ors |s
exp|o(ed

2
Ea(ra(||rd al |easl
20-25 pe( cerl ol
deve|oped |ard |r a||
rous|rd p(ojecls |oolr
puo||c ard p(|vale
aderc|es) lo( Ew3
ard Ll0 caledo(v W|lr
a svsler ol c(oss
suos|d|sal|or.
As pe( ToWr P|arr|rd 3crere up lo 10º ol
lre screre a(ea |s (ese(ved lo( Wea|e(
secl|or rous|rd. 3l(|cl erlo(cererl l(or
screres rade alle( 1995.

3
Rev|s|or ol ove|aWs lo
ra|e (a|r-Wale(
ra(vesl|rd rardalo(v
|r a|| ou||d|rds ard
adopl|or ol Wale(
corse(val|or
reasu(es.
A|(eadv lr P|ace.
1
8ve|aWs lo( (euse ol
(ecvc|ed Wale(

To oe |rp|ererled ov 2008
5
Adr|r|sl(al|ve (elo(rs
|.e. (educl|or |r
eslao||srrerl cosls
ov adopl|rd lre
\o|urla(v Rel|(ererl
3crere |\R3). rol
l||||rd posls la|||rd
vacarl due lo
(el|(ererl elc.. ard
acr|ev|rd spec|l|ed
r||eslores |r lr|s
(eda(d.
Cu((erl eslao||srrerl experd|lu(e as a
pe(cerlade ol (everue |rcore |s 2Z pe(
cerl.



ê
3l(uclu(a| (elo(rs. To oe |rp|ererled ov 2009
Z
Ercou(ad|rd PPP. we|(-cur-causeWav. l(all|c |s|ards.
d|v|de(s elc.
0ulsou(c|rd ol se(v|ces lo(
3wV. wale( 0|sl(|oul|or.
Purp|rd 3lal|or. sl(eel ||drl - 0pe(al|or &
Va|rlerarce elc..


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 89

SUDA

The organization chart of SUDA is presented below. Normally
the Chairman is non official representative from the area
nominated by Government. Main functions of SUDA include
development in systematic manner and to control unplanned and
unauthorized development. To ensure aforesaid functions,
SUDA prepares Development Plans and Town Planning
Schemes.

The Board of SUDA consists of elected members from SMC,
Nagarpalika and district panchayat.




SUDA has carried out a number of
management reforms in the
organization for the benefits of the
citizens. These reforms are: continuous
monitoring system enhanced powers,
complaint monitoring system,
improved supportive infrastructure,
public participation, computerisation,
IT policy, e-gvoernance etc.





ORGANIZATION CHART OF SUDA
Chairman
Chief Executive Authority
Town Planning
Department
Construction
Wing
Administrative
Wing
Accounts
Wing
Senior Town
Planner
Assistant Town
planner
Planning
Assistant
Surveyors
Drawing
Branch
Senior Draft
Man
Computer
Operator
Executive
Engineer
Deputy Engineer
Junior Engineer /
Superivsor
Work Assistant
Unauthorized
Construction Dept.
Mamlatdar
Building
Supervisor
Clerk
Mamlatdar
Head Clerk
Building
Supervisor
Accounts
Officer
Assistant
Accountant
Clerk
Computer
Operator
Chairman
Chief Executive Authority
Town Planning
Department
Construction
Wing
Administrative
Wing
Accounts
Wing
Senior Town
Planner
Assistant Town
planner
Planning
Assistant
Surveyors
Drawing
Branch
Senior Draft
Man
Computer
Operator
Executive
Engineer
Deputy Engineer
Junior Engineer /
Superivsor
Work Assistant
Unauthorized
Construction Dept.
Mamlatdar
Building
Supervisor
Clerk
Mamlatdar
Head Clerk
Building
Supervisor
Accounts
Officer
Assistant
Accountant
Clerk
Computer
Operator



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 90
9.4 CAPACITY BUILDING MEASURES
Some of the capacity building measures being implemented in
the administrative wing of the corporation are as follows.
Decompartmentalisation
Decentralisation - 6 Zones – 56 Wards
Eleven Divisional Heads - 450 Files to 80 files per day
Office to site : Seeing is Believing
Daily Meetings : 365 Days : 52 Sundays
Innovations in Plastic Waste Usage, Administration Charges
Computerisation : Accounts, Budget, Taxes, Health,
Personnel, Mapping, Engineering
Delegation of financial powers up to Rs. 2 lakh to Zonal in
charge
More than 500 trained technical man power
Weekly monitoring of the projects
Daily monitoring of the public grievances
9.5 EMERGING ISSUES
Sanctioning powers for major capital works.
Sanctioning powers and approvals of sanctions by divisional
Heads for major capital works are vested in the Municipal
Commissioner and political interference at this level delays
sanctioning process.
Multiplicity of line agencies.
In addition to the Corporation there are various other State and
central organisations that play a role in the city’s management.
Multiplicity problems are observed under several functions like
Town Planning, planning and design of the state highways and
national highways, capital works of river front development,
monitoring pollution and so on.














Facilities Online:
Downloading of forms related to
Shops and establishments,
Property tax assessment,
Water supply connections,
Land & estate,
Birth & death registration,
Town development,
Drainage connections and
SMIMER.
On the whole there are 35 forms
available online
Online complaint lodging and
status check of the complaints
Property tax structure, which
consists of the water charges,
water taxes, conservancy taxes and
general taxes
Status check of one’s outstanding
property tax

Daily Meetings
Sharing of success and failures
Joint policy making
Joint Reveiw and monitoring
Journey of self-discovery-synergy
Team spirit
Awards to junior colleagues

Professional Consultants
Montgomery Watson India Ltd.
Tata Consulting Engineers
Multimedia
Price Water House
CRRI
School of Planning. and
Architecture. New Delhi.
Regional Engineering College,
Surat
School of Planning, CEPT,
Ahmedabad










Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 91
CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER CHAPTER 10 10 10 10: :: : URBAN URBAN URBAN URBAN
F¡NANCE AND F¡NANCE AND F¡NANCE AND F¡NANCE AND
MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT
To perform a series of obligatory and discretionary functions,
the corporation is vested with powers to raise resources through
several tax and non-tax sources under the BPMC Act, 1954 and
the Gujarat Municipalities Act, 1963. The Gujarat Municipal
Finance Board incorporated under the Gujarat Municipal
Finance Act, routes the loan and grant money and aid provided
by the State and Central Government to ULBs. In terms of
financial performance, SMC has done fairly well during the past
five years. The performance during the recent past has been
quite good, with the revenue and total income showing a steep
increase. The expenditure has also increased along with the
income. The corporation has also recorded a reasonable
operating ratio.
10.1 74
TH
CONSTITUTION AMENDMENT ACT
The Amendment, in addition to assigning specific functions, has
also provided a framework to improve the financial and
administrative management of ULBs. As per the guidelines of
the 74
th
CAA, the first State Finance Commission was
constituted by the Government of Gujarat to recommend a
framework to assign appropriate civic functions to urban local
bodies through the Twelfth Schedule of the Constitution. An
important task of the Commission was to recommend measures
to improve the financial health of municipal bodies.
10.1.1 STATE FINANCE COMMISSION
The State Finance Commission (SFC), which submitted its
report in 1998 made a series of recommendations (the
recommendations are still under review by the state government)
to augment the financial base of urban local bodies, which
include:
Assignment of taxes, duties, tolls and fees
Sharing of state revenues
Grants-in-aid
The Commission has recommended the introduction of a new
tax, the Vacant Land Tax, for private lands at a rate ranging from
0.125 percent to 0.25 percent of the market value on an annual
basis.
Important recommendations of SFC
regarding state transfers to ULBs:
50 percent of the total income
recovered through professional
taxes under its area of jurisdiction
to go to ULBs. ULBs were not
permitted to levy professional tax
after the Gujarat State
Professional Trade, Business and
Employment Act, 1976.
The entire proceeds of
Entertainment Tax should go to the
ULBs, instead of the 50 percent
transfer by the state government
through GMFB.
The entire amount of Education
Cess is provided as a grant to the
ULBs responsible for primary
education, instead of the Education
Cess being levied on the properties
as a percent of the ARV.
The ULBs’ share against Non-
Agricultural Land Assessment in
the form of grant-in-aid at the rate
of 75 percent of the total recovery
effected in their jurisdiction should
be raised to 85 percent and the
conversion tax should be paid to
ULBs at the rate of 85 percent of
the total recovery against 0 %.
Land revenue from agricultural
land, which was abolished from
1997, should be re-introduced and
85 percent of the land revenue
recovered within the ULBs’
jurisdiction should be provided as
grant-in-aid.
Enhancing the cess on land
revenue from 50 paise to one rupee
and irrigation cess from 20 paise
to 50 paise.
50 percent of the recovery through
entertainment tax on Cable TV,
etc., (introduced in 1993 through
an amendment to the Gujarat
Entertainment Tax Act) to be
provided to the ULBs. The
collection to be entrusted to ULBs
themselves.
Important recommendations of SFC
regarding Grant-in-Aids to ULBs:


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 92
The grant towards pay and allowances is to be linked with
the population of the municipality instead of the sanctioned
establishment. The per capita grant on establishment
expenditure is to be increased from Rs.26/- to Rs.30/- and
further increases are to be linked with the Consumer Price
Index.
The grant-in-aid for natural calamities should reimburse 25
percent of the expenditure incurred in the case of municipal
corporations.
The Road Grant should be given as a capital grant instead of
a revenue grant as is in vogue currently. The grant is
recommended as 4 percent of total expenditure.
Grants for the maintenance of dispensaries, hospitals,
maternity homes and child welfare centres should be
enhanced from the present levels and a minimum charge of
Rs.2/- per case is to be introduced for patients whose income
is above the poverty line.
The grant-in-aid for leprosy control should be as per the
actual expenditure incurred against 50 percent of the
expenditure towards establishment and training.
The grant to the District Planning Board should be increased
from 20 percent to 25 percent and should be disbursed at
8.146 percent for Municipal Corporations (as per the formula
suggested by the Finance Commission).

10.2 STRUCTURE OF MUNICIPAL FINANCES
For long, financial reporting has been considered an important
tool of accountability. A set of financial reports produced
periodically by the Accounts Department enables the policy
makers to assess the efficiency of the SMC in carrying out its
stewardship responsibilities. It also provides the Corporation as
well as the state government with relevant financial information
to serve as a basis for their decision. In recent years, it has also
been felt necessary for the corporation to communicate reliable
information concerning their financial activities and financial
position to various interest groups, for which they have initiated
the accrual basis of accounting systems.
For review of finances includes a time-series analysis of the
income and expenditure of the Corporation to ascertain the
trends and the major sources and uses of funds. In addition to
this, certain key financial indictors relating to property tax, water
charges, per capita income, per capita expenditure and debt
servicing, have been analysed to assess the financial
performance of the corporation.
The booking of transactions in SMC is carried out under major
and minor heads. The corporation performs a series of obligatory
and discretionary functions according to the powers vested in it
through the BPMC, 1949. Under this Act, the corporation is
empowered to levy taxes and rates.












Section 127 of the BPMC Act allows
the corporation to levy octroi, property
tax and tax on vehicles, boats and
animals etc. The property tax levied on
buildings consists of a water tax,
conservancy tax, a general tax (at a
rate of not less than 12 percent
6
of
ARV). The Act has special provisions
relating to water and conservancy
taxes. By virtue of Section 134 of the
Act, the Commissioner has powers to
levy a volumetric charge for water
supplied in lieu of water tax, subject to
its consistency with the by- laws. These
by-laws are framed by virtue of powers
granted under Sections 458 of the
BPMC Act. Similarly, based on the
approval of the Standing Committee,
the Commissioner may fix a charge for
provision of conservancy service
As per taxation rules the base for
property taxes will have to be assessed
once in four years. The Municipal
Corporation is also empowered to levy
property tax for residential and non-
residential for which the minimum and
maximum limits are fixed. It needs
mention that except for the ceiling on
general tax, all other taxes have no
minimum or maximum limits
specified.


6
The maximum tax should not be more
than 30 percent


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 93

10.3 FINANCES OF SMC
To ensure transparency and to give a true picture of its assets and
liabilities, SMC has introduced a Computerised Double-Entry
Commercial Accounting System. The system involves two
functions namely a Revenue Function, involving receipt of taxes,
charges, loans and grants, and an Expenditure Function,
involving release of funds against establishment, works and
supplies.
The actual accounts of SMC for the last five years (2000-01 to
2004-05) have been analysed to assess the finances of the
Corporation. Detailed accounts compiled from the budget books
of SMC are presented in Annexure 7. An abstract of annual
accounts and tables of the sectoral contribution, growth trends
and per-capita values of different items of income and
expenditure are also presented in Annexure 7.
The Corporation maintains its assets in the form of fixed assets,
capital work-in-progress, and investments in a sinking fund,
earmarked fund, loan fund, general fund and interest accrued. In
addition to this, the corporation also maintains record of its
current assets including, stores and spares in hand, debtors tax
and non-tax revenue, bank balance and cash balance. The loans
and advances paid to the employees and other agencies are also
accounted as assets, which the Corporation possesses.
As a part of its liabilities, SMC maintains a municipal fund,
including a corpus fund, sinking fund, as well as committed/
earmarked fund, and depreciation fund. The reserves and
surpluses contained by the Corporation include income from
capital receipts and credit balance from the revenue income.
Secured loans and unsecured loans are also reflected in the
balance sheet of the Corporation. In addition to these there are
current liabilities in the form of sundry creditors, deposits
received, employee related liabilities and other liabilities.
The city of Surat holds a special status in its own revenue
sources for its efficient way of functioning and has shown an
operating surplus, in spite of its developmental activities. The
corporation has shown a mix of surplus and deficit in its revenue
and capital accounts during 2001-2005. The revenue account
portrays a surplus, whereas the capital account has shown a
deficit, indicating transfers from the revenue account surplus.

The Bombay Municipal Accounts Code, 1961, governs accounts
in SMC. The Chief Auditor conducts the audit in the corporation
and is independent of the accounts department. He is responsible
to the Standing Committee.
Essentially, all functions are carried out through either receipts
or payments, with certain transfers and adjustment provisions,
mainly in the form of errors in
classification, adjustment of
expenditure on receipt of a bill against
an advance, and adjustment of refunds
of revenue or recoveries of expenditure
by deduction.






Income Pattern

Expenditure Pattern
* Includes Principal Payment on Loans


Surplus/ Deficit Pattern
* Loan Income also considered.

|ncome [Rs. Lakhs}
Year
Revenue 6ap|ta| Loan
2000-01 4003ô.14 1214ô.55 4305.81
2001-02 41542.58 13922.ôô 82ô5.53
2002-03 49402.99 1ô9ô.19 0.00
2003-04 5297ô.51 5374.97 0.00
2004-05 ô1983.92 4ô5ô.88 0.00
Expend|ture [Rs. Lakhs}
Year
Revenue* 6ap|ta|
2000-01 30982.03 20739.27
2001-02 3ô253.22 15927.37
2002-03 33371.43 1ôô40.49
2003-04 35385.81 17270.0ô
2004-05 43905.59 17487.08
8urp|us| 0ef|c|t [Rs. Lakhs}
Year
Revenue 6ap|ta|* Tota|
2000-01 9054.12 [8592.72} 41ô.40
2001-02 5288.98 [2004.71} 3284.ô5
2002-03 1ô031.57 14944.30 1087.25
2003-04 17590.70 11895.09 5ô95.ô1
2004-05 18078.33 12830.21 5248.12


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 94
The revenue account has shown significant surpluses, which
have increased from Rs. 9,054 lakhs in 2000/01 to Rs. 18078
lakhs in 2004/05, while the capital account has registered a
negative closing balance during 2000/01, 2002/03 and 2003/04.
This indicates that a substantial amount of revenue surplus has
been transferred to the capital account for asset creation, which
is a positive feature.
The revenue income of the corporation has grown at a rate of
11.73 percent, while the growth in revenue expenditure during
the same period was 9.79 percent. The trends in capital income
and expenditure have been fluctuating. The growth rate in capital
income has been about 32.58 per cent, while the capital
expenditure has presented negligible growth rate. Capital
expenditure by SMC during the period 2000/01 to 2004/05 is at
an average of Rs. 17612 lakhs per year.
Valuation of Inventories
The accrual basis of accounting standards applies to inventories
of material, stores and supplies. As per the net realisable value of
material, stores and supplies held for use of production has also
been determined and forms a part of the fixed assets.
10.3.1 REVENUE ACCOUNT
The revenue account comprises of the operating income and
expenditure items of the corporation. These are generally
recurring items viz. income from taxes (octroi, property, other
direct taxes), non-tax income (rents on municipal properties,
charges, fees), grants, etc. and expenditure on establishment,
repairs and maintenance, debt-servicing, etc.
REVENUE ACCOUNT - INCOME
SMC derived 90 percent of its revenues during the assessment
period from own sources in the form of octroi, taxes, non-tax
sources etc and remaining 10 percent in the form of state
government grants. Octroi and property tax dominated the tax
structure, with octroi accounting for 57 percent of tax revenues
and property tax (and related taxes) accounting for 25 percent of
tax revenues. Non-tax receipts are low at 6 percent of the
revenues due to low rates of user charges for services against
considerably good service coverage. In effect, the corporation’s
income largely depends on a single source i.e., octroi. The total
revenue income for the year 2004-05 was Rs. 61983.91 lakhs.
In the absence of any assigned revenues, deposits and advances,
SMC has been able to generate 90 percent of the total revenue
income through its own sources during the last five years.
Property tax collections are Rs. 15011 lakhs during 2004-05 up
from Rs. 8153 lakhs during 2000-01. This is largely due to the
decentralisation efforts of SMC initiate since 1996, due to which
there has been a rise in the number of property tax assessments
and revenue.




Trends in Municipal Income & Expenditure
0
20000
40000
60000
80000
2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05
Revenue Income Revenue Expenditure
Capital Income Capital Expenditure
Income Expenditure












Summary of Revenue income (2004-
05)





8. No head [Rs. Lakhs}
0wn 8ources 57524.59
1 0ctro| & To|| |ncome 35417.51
2 Property Tax 15011.17
3 0ther Taxes 554.05
4 Non-Tax 8ources 4315.73
5 Non-Tax [0thers} 2225.32
Crants & 8ubs|d|es
ô Non-Tax [Revenue Crants} 4459.32
Tota| Revenue |ncome ô1983.91


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 95
Own Sources – Tax Income
Taxes levied by the corporation are mainly listed in Section 127
of the BPMC Act. Property tax, tax on vehicles, boats and
animals are the two taxes which are compulsorily levied, while
octroi, theatre tax and other tax (as may by levied by the state
government) can be imposed by the corporation. SMC levies
property tax and service-based taxes of different types against
the services provided by it to the citizens. The corporation also
owns assets in the form of land and buildings, which are leased/
rented out to generate revenue. The income from such sources
contributes to the "own-source” income of SMC.
Tax sources accounts for about 81 percent of the total revenue
income. Tax sources have increased from Rs. 65993 lakhs to
48197 lakhs during 2001/2005 at an average annual growth rate
of about 25 percent. The taxes levied by the corporation include:
Octroi;
Property tax;
Mechanical vehicle tax and theatre tax.
Octroi
Octroi is still the largest grosser for SMC at 59 percent of the
total revenue income, helping it to meet its expanding financial
obligations. Though the share of income from other taxes has
increased the importance of income from octroi remains. Octroi
is levied on the entry of goods into Surat city for use,
consumption or sale therein. The rates are ad-valorem ranging
from ½ percent to 3 percent.
Property Tax
Property tax is a generic term, under which at present three
different revenue taxes are being levied. They are:
General tax
Conservancy tax
Water tax / Water charge / Water meter charge
During the period 2000-01 to 2004-05 property taxes contributed
25 percent of the revenue income. The tax is levied on
residential, commercial and industrial buildings. The basis for
levying all these taxes (except water charge and water meter
charge) is the ‘Annual Rateable Value’ of the premises. There
are about 12.8 lakh property tax assessments in the city.
The present overall tariff rates of property tax are a maximum of
34 percent & 44 percent of Net Rateable Value (NRV) for
domestic and non-domestic uses respectively. General tax at 30
percent of NRV largely contributes to the overall rate.

Income From Tax Sources (2004-05)
















Rates of Property Taxes (01-01-2005)

Property Tax assessments

Experience suggests that there is
usually no significant uncertainty
about property tax collection and the
recovery is generally quick. This is
because of SMC having first charge
over the property for unpaid property
tax and also sufficient legal powers for
attachment of property to collect
arrears. Property tax may, therefore be
recognised as revenue as it accrues.
8. No| head [Rs. Lakhs}
Tax |ncome
1 0ctro| & To|| |ncome 35417.51
2 Property tax 15011.17
Cenera| Tax 8077.09
6onservancy Tax 33ôô.50
water Tax 928.0ô
water 6harge 50ô.ô8
water Heter 6harge 2132.84
3 0ther 0|rect Taxes 554.0ô
Tota| Tax |ncome ô5993.91
Present Tar|ff Rates as per ARV
Res|dent|a| Non Res|dent|a|
Property
Taxes
H|n. Hax. H|n. Hax.
Cenera| 12 7 30 7 12 7 30 7
water 1 7 1 7 2 7 2 7
6onservancy 3 7 3 7 ô 7 12 7
Tota| 1ô 7 34 7 20 7 44 7
Assessments
Year
2000-01 2002-03 2004-05
Tota| 1047315 112ô778 1288410


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 96
General tax: The share of general tax in tax income has been 13
per cent. The income from general tax has increased from Rs.
5573 lakhs in 2000/01 to Rs. 8077 lakhs in 2004/05. The high
value under property tax is attributable to the revamping of the
tariff rates apart from the increase in the number of property tax
assessments.
Conservancy tax: Conservancy tax is charged on the basis of a
fixed Net Rateable Value (NRV), along with general tax. The
income from this source has increased from Rs. 2151 lakhs in
2000/01 to Rs. 3367 lakhs in 2004/05- a growth of 12 per cent
over the last five years. It is also the second major source of tax
income contributing about 6 percent of the total tax income.
Water tax: Water tax is also charged on the basis of a fixed Net
Rateable Value (NRV), along with general tax in line with
conservancy tax.
Tariff for water connections inside and outside the city limits
vary drastically, depending on the purpose of the connection and
the connection size. SMC has raised the tariff after 1996 to
sustain the growing demand as well as to curb the rise of
unmetered connections.
One-half inch to one and a half inch unmetered connections
inside city limit area will have a flat rate of Rs.240/- per annum
per connection per family in case of domestic/ religious
purposes. Monthly water charges depending on the connection
size and purpose are shown in the adjacent tableTariff rates per
1000 litres of usage for various purposes by metered connections
inside the city limits vary from a minimum of Rs.2/- to a
maximum of Rs.24/-. Outside the city limits, purpose of usage is
broadly classified into residential, commercial and industrial
purposes and the prevailing tariff rates per 1000 litres of usage
are Rs.10/-, Rs.20/- and Rs.24/- respectively.
SMC levies water tax on all assessments having a House Service
Connection (HSC). The contribution of water tax and water
charges to the total revenue income is 4 per cent at the aggregate
level. Realisations by way of water tax and charges have been
about Rs. 3657 lakhs during 2004/05. The income from water tax
has grown at a rate of 22 percent during the last five years.
The corporation levies water charges against the House Service
Connections issued to the properties within the SMC limits. The
corporation also levies water charges and water meter charges
other than water tax on property tax assessments that have a
HSC.

General Tax Tariff Rate per Annum

Conservancy Tax Tariff Rate per
annum (01-04-2005)


Water tariff rates for metred
connections (01-04-2005)

Water charge per month (01-04-2005)


Cenera| tax [7 of ARV}
1 < ô00 N||
2 ô01 - 20000 12
3 20001-40000 15
4 40001-ô0000 20
5 ô0001-80000 25
ô >80001 30
6onservancy tax Hax|mum of
Res|dent|a| Rs. 3 or 3 7 of Cenera| tax
Non-res|dent|a| Rs. 8 or ô 7 of Cenera| tax
Non-res|dent|a|
[|ndustr|a|, 0a|ry,
Restaurant,
hosp|ta|s, Theatres,
L|brary etc}.
Rs. 8 or 12 7 of Cenera| tax
Rate [Rs.| 1000 ||tres}
Purpose of usage

outs|de c|ty
||m|ts
Res|dence purpose. 10.00
6ommerc|a|
purpose.
20.00
|ndustr|a| purpose. 24.00
|ns|de 6|ty L|m|ts
[Rs. per month}
0uts|de 6|ty L|m|ts
[Rs. per month}


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½ 20 20 240 5ô0
7 20 240 5ô0 1020
1 20 ô00 1020 2240
1½ 20 1200 2400 4000
2 420 18ô0 3ô00 ô080
2 ½ 540 3000 4750 8800
3 900 45ô0 8800 15200
4 15ô0 9000 15200 30400
ô 3120 15000 3ô800 72000
9 7500 33ô00 81000 1ô0000
10 9ô00 45000 101000 200000
12 14400 75000 152000 300000


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 97
Other Taxes
The other major tax items levied by the corporation are
mechanised vehicle tax and theatre tax. The share of these two
taxes together in the total revenues is negligible. During the last
five years they have contributed 0.89 percent of the revenues
associated with fluctuating growth rates. The income from this
source during the year 2004/05 was about Rs. 554.85 lakhs.
Own Sources – Non-Tax Income
The non-tax own revenue sources of the corporation account for
6.58 percent of the total revenue income. These revenue sources
include fees and charges levied as per relevant legislations.
Accordingly, these income sources have been classified under
the following broad categories:
Municipal properties,
Collection from public places,
Realization under special statutes,
Public services charges/fee,
Other sources like;
o Interest earned,
o Sale proceeds, and
o Miscellaneous income.
These revenue sources include the income from leased/ rented
out municipal property and from the fees and charges levied for
the different services rendered by the corporation. The
contribution of non-tax income to the total revenue income is Rs.
6541 lakhs during 2004/05.
Revenue Grants and Contributions – Non-Tax Income
SMC receives grants and contribution from the state government
under eleven heads, for general as well as specific purposes.
About 7.15 percent of total revenue income (Rs. 4459.32lakhs in
2004/05) comes from this source.

Trends in Revenue Income
0.00
1000.00
2000.00
3000.00
4000.00
5000.00
2000-
01
2001-
02
2002-
03
2003-
04
2004-
05
Rents from Muni. Properties
Collection from Public Places
Realisation under special statutes
Public Service Charges/ Fees
Tax Non-Tax Income










The set of resources comprising the tax
base of the Corporation hasn’t
changed over years. In the light of the
74
th
constitutional amendment, instead
of devolving more resources to the
ULBs, the state government has taken
over certain resources, like the
entertainment tax and professional tax.
The State Finance Commission has
recommended the devolving of these
sources of income to the ULBs
themselves.





Non-Tax income – Own Sources
(2004-05)

The noted heads of Revenue grants for
SMC are:
Family Planning
75 percent of Non-Agricultural
Assessment and 15 percent of Land
Revenue
Primary Education
Integrated Child Development
Scheme (ICDS)
Urban Community Development
(UCD)
Assistance for Road Repairs and
Maintenance
Local Fund and Irrigation Cess
Penalty under BPMC Act and
other Acts
Share in tax collected under Motor
Vehicle Act

Non-Tax Revenue [Rs. Lakhs}
1 Rents from Hun|c|pa| Propert|es 4ô5.15
2 6o||ect|on from Pub||c P|aces 397.30
3 Rea||sat|on under 8pec|a| 8tatutes 3ô.93
4 Pub||c 8erv|ce 6harges| Fees 341ô.35
5 0ther 8ources 2225.32
|nterest on F0s, Loans and 0ues 17ô2.44
8a|es Proceeds 233.33
H|sce||aneous |ncome 229.55
Tota| non-tax 0wn |ncome ô541.05


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 98
REVENUE ACCOUNT - EXPENDITURE
Apart from administration and general expenses, SMC uses its
resources for establishment, operation and maintenance of the
obligatory and discretionary services provide by it, direct
expenses on services provided and debt servicing.
Establishment head, which includes salaries, allowances,
employee welfare etc accounted for 52 percent of revenue
expenditure during 2004-05, followed by general administration
expenses at 24%. A notable feature of the revenue account is the
share of repair and maintenance expenses at just 11 percent of
the revenue expenses during the assessment period. 22 percent of
the revenue income is incurred in debt servicing.
The total revenue expenditure has increased from Rs. 30982
lakhs in 2000/01 to Rs. 43905.59 lakhs in 2004/05 – a growth of
5.5 percent. 33 percent of the total revenue income is spent
towards payment of salaries, allowances, reimbursements and
terminal benefits of the employees under the establishment head.
Over the past five years, SMC has been able to generate enough
income to manage its expenses, and to transfer excess income to
capital funds. The excess of revenue income against revenue
expenditure since 2000-01 averages around Rs. 13209 lakhs
annually. Debt servicing is another important head under the
revenue account, wherein the interest due on various loans taken
from financial institutions is paid from the income generated
from revenue sources. The operating ratio during the assessment
period is 0.71.
Establishment Expenditure
About Rs 17702 lakhs is spent on the salaries, wages,
allowances, pension etc of the personnel employed by SMC,
which is about 46 percent (average of past five years) of the
revenue expenditure. Expenditure on salaries and wages to the
personnel has more than doubled during the period 2001-2005.
The shares of each sub-head under the establishment expenses
have remained almost the same during the past five years.
The payroll burden on the city’s expenditure budget is explained
by a legacy of rigid contracts, which significantly reduces the
administration’s effectiveness in containing expenditure.
Redundancies and cost control have plagued most of the
departments in the corporation, because of which, half of the
expenditure is incurred on personnel expenses, leaving very little
scope for developmental activities.
Administration & General Expenses
The most important heads under which there has been a
significant rise in expenditure are the Electricity charges, Rents
on properties (other than buildings) hired, security personnel
charges and Professional Consultancy charges. General
administration expenses increased at 6.6 percent growth rate
during 2000/01 to 2004/05.












Revenue account – expenditure (2004-
05)


Establishment expenditure (2004-05)

8. No| head Rs. Lakhs
1 Estab||shment Expenses 17701.78
2 Adm|n|strat|on & Cenera| 8175.59
3 Repa|rs & Ha|ntenance 401ô.35
4 8erv|ce & Programme re|ated 22ô8.88
5 0ther Expenses 1ôôô.93
ô Appropr|at|on 11.09
7 0ebt 8erv|c|ng [Pr|nc|pa| Payment} 9385.21
8 0ebt 8erv|c|ng [|nterest Payment} 534.14
Tota| Revenue Expend|ture 43905.59
Excess of Rev. |nc. over Rev. Exp. 18078.33
0perat|ng Rat|o 0.71
8. No.| head Rs. Lakhs
7 of Rev.
Exp.
Estab||shment Expenses 17701.78 40.32
1 8a|ary & wages 8230.ô8 18.75
2 A||owances ô229.17 14.19
3 Re|mbursements 307.18 0.70
4 Emp|oyee we|fare 182.10 0.41
5 Term|na| ßenef|ts 2ô40.00 ô.01
ô 0ther Emp|oyee 6osts 112.ô5 0.2ô
Tota| Revenue
Expend|ture
43905.59 100.00


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 99
Repairs and Maintenance
The total expenditure under the repairs and maintenance head is
just 9 percent of the total revenue expenditure. This has come
down from around 14 percent during 2000-01. Even within this
head most of the expenses are accounted for by the repairs and
maintenance of roads, bridges, streetlights, pavements, traffic
dividers and signals etc. Considering the coastal climate of Surat,
where the condition of roads deteriorates very fast, the expenses
are also high for maintaining the same. SMC has initiated the
conversion of the roads in the city to cement concrete to reduce
the repairs and maintenance expenses incurred every year.
The repair and maintenance expenditure of the corporation has
decreased from Rs. 4350 lakhs in 2000/01 to Rs. 4016 lakhs in
2004/05. All the items in this category have shown a high level
of fluctuation over the last five years, but at an aggregate level
they show a declining trend. This may also be attributed to the
creation of new capital assets during the past five years, on
which the O&M expenses are yet to be incurred.
Service and programme related direct expenses
Expenditure under this head is mainly incurred on power and
fuel, material and labour, overheads, contracts, materials and so
on. The expenditure has increased from Rs. 1366 lakhs in
2000/01 to Rs. 2,269 lakhs in 2004/05 – a growth of 14 percent.
Debt Servicing
Debt servicing through interest and principal payment on loans
accounts for about 16 percent of the revenue expenditure of the
corporation. The annual accounts of the corporation indicate that
it has been servicing its debt regularly. The debt servicing
expenses have increased from Rs. 3339 lakhs in 2000/01 to Rs.
9919 lakhs in 2004/05. The Debt Servicing Ratio has been an
average of 12 percent during 2000-01 to 2004-05.
Growth in Expenditure
The annual growth in expenditure during the last five years was
9.79 percent against a growth of 10 percent of the revenue
income. While the expenditure on the repairs and maintenance of
assets of SMC has come down, so has the expenditure on roads
and street lights. But repairs and maintenance of water supply
assets has increased considerably, registering a 94 percent
growth during 2001-05.
STATUS OF REVENUE ACCOUNT
SMC’s revenue account has shown surpluses all through the
assessment period, which was in turn, mainly contributed to the
capital account for taking up new works. The amount of transfer
from the revenue surpluses to capital funds is merely based on
adjustments to amounts spent on capital works rather than on any
capital utilisation plan.






Repairs and Maintenance Expenditure
(2004-05)






Debt Servicing Pattern








head
Rs.
Lakhs
7 of Rev.
Exp.
Repa|rs & Ha|ntenance 401ô.35 9.15
Land Ha|ntenance 8.05 0.02
ßu||d|ngs 180.40 0.41
Pub||c 8paces 227.94 0.52
Roads| ßr|dges| 8treet
||ghts
2552.92 5.81
8ewerage & 0ra|nage L|nes 178.40 0.41
water 8upp|y 32ô.07 0.74
P|ants, Hach|nery &
Equ|pment
3ô7.31 0.84
0thers 175.2ô 0.40
Tota| Revenue Expend|ture 43905.59 100.00
0ebt 8erv|c|ng Expenses [Rs. Lakhs}
Year
Pr|nc|pa| |nterest Tota|
2000-01 1ô28.27 1710.94 3339.21
2001-02 ô27ô.00 1937.9ô 8213.9ô
2002-03 2855.00 1925.90 4780.90
2003-04 2ô83.00 1572.99 4255.99
2004-05 9385.21 534.14 9919.35


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 100

10.3.2 CAPITAL ACCOUNT
SMC funds its capital works by way of grants and loans from the
state and central governments and other institutions under
different project specific schemes. It also utilises revenue
surpluses on capital works. The capital account deficit for the
years 2000-01 was Rs. 8593 lakhs. There was an excess during
the year 2004-05 to the tune of Rs. 5248 lakhs indicating non
utilisation to the complete extent of the new loans and grants.
SMC maintains a capital fund, which comprises special purpose
grants from the SMC itself and the revenue surpluses transferred
to meet the capital needs.
CAPITAL INCOME
SMC is empowered by the BPMC Act to levy a betterment
charge for increase in the value of land and building, if they are a
result of a scheme of improvement, clearance or are
developments carried out by the corporation. SMC levies an
incremental contribution termed as a betterment charge, which is
realised from the landowners, at a rate equal to one half of such
increase in the value of the land. The revenue under this head has
shown a constant rise from Rs. 24 lakhs during 2000-01 to about
Rs.57 lakhs during 2004-2005.
A major share of the capital income is also contributed by the
capital profit on sale of fixed assets which is fluctuating and
current in nature. The income under this head was as high as Rs.
6206 lakhs during 2000-01. During 2004-05, the income from
this head is Rs. 1758 lakhs. During the same year capital
contributions from the public were also high at Rs. 469 lakhs.
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE
By the end of the year 2004-05, the roads and bridges sectors
became the most prioritised sector with 37 percent of the capital
expenditure being incurred on them. The highest growth in
expenditure is also under this head with a total expenditure of
Rs. 4655 lakhs in 2000-01 to Rs. 6524 lakhs in 2004-05. Capital
works under this head include conversion of major roads to
cement concrete roads and construction of new flyovers. The
share of this sector during 2000-01 was 22 percent of the total
capital expenditure. Water supply is next in order with a share of
23 percent followed by expenses on procuring machinery and
equipment. The amount spent on capital works in water supply
was an average of about Rs. 2650 lakhs per year during 2001-05
and remains one of the most prioritised sectors. Sewerage and
drainage sector also received priority with 8 % of investment
during 2004-05 at Rs. 1392 lakhs spent.
Capital expenditure during the last five years by the SMC has
followed the planned expenditure pattern under the first CCP
prepared in 2001.




Capital Account - Summary


Capital Income (2004-05)



Capital Expenditure (2004-05)



8. No| head Rs. Lakhs
1 ßetterment 6harges 57.37
2
Non-Refundab|e Reg|strat|on|
Prem|um Fee
22.59
3 Prof|t on 8a|e of F|xed Assets 1,757.58
4 Crants| 6ontr|but|ons & 8ubs|d|es 4ô9.02
5 6ontr|but|on from Pub||c -
ô ßorrow|ngs from CoC 0.00
7 ßorrow|ngs from other F|s 0.00
8 |mpact Fee 2350.32
Tota| 6ap|ta| |ncome 4ô5ô.88
8.No| head
|Rs.
|a|rs)
º ol
lola|
CAPEX
Land 1172.23 ô.70
ßu||d|ngs 15ô5.59 8.95
Pub||c P|aces 31ô.10 1.81
Roads| ßr|dges| 8treet ||ghts ô523.72 37.31
8ewerage & 0ra|nage L|nes 1392.09 7.9ô
water 8upp|y 4034.91 23.07
P|ants, Hach|nery & Equ|pment 1847.81 10.57
Veh|c|es & Transp. Equ|pments 114.ô5 0.ôô
0ff|ce Equ|pments 243.37 1.39
Furn|ture, F|xtures and F|tt|ngs 27ô.ô0 1.58
H|sce||aneous F|xed Assets 0.00 0.00
Tota| 6ap|ta| Expend|ture 17487.08 100.00
|ncome Expend|ture
8urp|us|
0ef|c|t Year
[Rs. Lakhs}
2000-01 1214ô.55 20739.27 [8592.72}
2001-02 13922.ôô 15927.37 [2004.71}
2002-03 1ô9ô.19 1ô,ô40.49 [14944.30}
2003-04 5374.97 17,270.0ô [11895.09}
2004-05 4ô5ô.88 17,487.08 [12830.02}


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 101
CAPITAL ACCOUNT – DEFICIT
The deficit of income over expenditure was an average of Rs. 33
lakhs during the last five years which has come down from a
high of Rs. 13737 lakhs during 1999-00. This is contributed
mainly by the planned programme intervention of SMC through
the first City Corporate Plan prepared in 2001. Revenue
surpluses transferred to the capital fund and loans secured from
national and international lending agencies like the World Bank,
state government, LIC, HUDCO etc are effectively scheduled to
manage the capital account deficit.
LOANS
The capital account is largely dependent on loans to take up new
capital works. The borrowings of SMC during 2001-2005 are
from the state government, HUDCO, NHB, World Bank,
commercial banks and from the open market. Short-term loans
obtained during 1998-2000 were converted to long-term loans
from 2000-01. New loans to the extent of Rs. 125 Crores are
procured during the period 2001-05 to take up a large number of
planned capital works for the overall development of the city of
Surat.

New Loans taken by SMC during 2000-01 to 2004-05 (Rs. Lakhs)
Outstanding Loans
The total outstanding loan amount with SMC at the end of the
financial year 2004-05 as on 31
st
March 2005 is Rs. 2602 lakhs.
This includes new loans obtained during 2000-01 to 2004-05
from open market and National Housing Bank.




















Outstanding Loans as on 31
st
March
2005 (Rs. Lakhs)

Lend|ng Agency 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05
Long Term Loans
0pen Harket 0ebenture - - - - -
8tate Covernment - - - - -
wor|d ßank - - - - -
L|6 - - - - -
hU060 207.97 - - - -
Nat|ona| hous|ng ßank 1,347.84 - - - -
6ommerc|a| ßank 2,750.00 - - - -
0thers - 82ôô.00 - - -
8hort Term Loans - - - - -
Lend|ng Agency Rs. Lakhs
Long Term Loans
0pen Harket 0ebenture 1,537.00
8tate Covernment 0.00
wor|d ßank 0.00
L|6 0.00
hU060 0.00
Nat|ona| hous|ng ßank 10ô5.00
6ommerc|a| ßank 0.00
0thers 0.00
8hort Term Loans 0.00
Tota| 0utstand|ng 2ô02.00


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 102

10.3.3 ACCOUNTING OF DEPRECIATION
Depreciation is an important item of expense under this system
of accounting. Under provision for depreciation would vitiate the
view presented by the income and expenditure account.
Therefore, the corporation has worked out a lump sum factor of
depreciation over the last five years. It has assumed depreciation
on buildings, plant and machinery and vehicles and
transportation equipment amounting to about Rs. 3 lakhs per
annum.
It is important that in some cases, several kinds of fixed assets
may form part of a single asset, eg. parks may comprise a part of
land, building, pumping station, etc., some of which may be
depreciable while others may be non-depreciable. Even the
depreciable assets may have varying useful lives. In order that
depreciation can be computed properly, it is important to account
for each of these items under different account heads.
10.4 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
Indicators are facts about project implementation results, not
actions. The standard practice by banks and borrowers is to
consider performance targets as indicative. The technique of
financial analysis is a useful tool to analyse the municipal
corporation’s financial position. Ratio analyses presented here
provide information about efficiency and operational
performance, and debt servicing. As such they provide insight
into areas that merit further investigation but do not, in
themselves, provide definite answers on the financial condition
of a given service. And hence, they have been calculated as an
average over a period of five years, to provide a realistic picture.
Operating Ratio
Operating Ratio (OR) is the ratio of revenue expenditure to
revenue income and it indicates financial status or “profitability”
of local body operations. Sound financial management requires
that this ratio should be less than unity. The average OR of SMC
works out to 0.71. The OR below 1.0 in SMC indicates that it
has had a surplus revenue account over the last five years.
Revenue surpluses indicated by the operating ratio are mainly
used for capital works. This is a healthy indicator.
Debt Servicing Ratio
Debt Servicing Ratio (DSR) is the ratio of debt payment to total
revenue income. This indicator helps in assessing the implication
of debt on the local body’s finances. It has been observed that
SMC services its debts on a regular basis. The analysis indicates
that the average DSR with respect to revenue income is 16
percent. It gives an indication of debt payment to the total
revenue income. The outstanding loan amount with SMC was Rs
2602 Lakhs and there are no overdues to any of the lending
organisation with respect to principal as well as interest.















head| F|nanc|a| |nd|cator [Average of 2001-2005}
Resource Hob|||sat|on [Cenera|}
Per 6ap|ta |ncome Rs. 1780

8hare of 0wn resources
|n Revenue |ncome
93 7
Crowth |n Revenue |ncome 11.73 7

Crowth |n 0wn Resources of
Revenue |ncome
12.37 7
Per 6ap|ta own |ncome Rs. 1ô49

8hare of Non-tax own resources
|n Revenue |ncome
15.ô5 7
Resource Hob|||sat|on [Property Tax}
Property Tax Rate 127 to 307

8hare of Property Tax |n
Revenue |ncome
25 7
0emand Per Assessment Rs. 55ô
Persons Per Assessment 2.3 persons
Expend|ture Hanagement
Per 6ap|ta Expend|ture Rs. 1298

8hare of Estab||shment expend|ture
|n tota| revenue expend|ture
53.34 7

8hare of Estab||shment expend|ture
|n tota| revenue |ncome
33 7
L|ab|||ty Hanagement
0utstand|ng |oan per-cap|ta Rs. 107

overdue ||ab|||ty as
7 of tota| outstand|ng
0
Performance Assessment
0perat|ng Rat|o 0.71

6o||ect|on Performance
[Property Tax}
89 7
6ap|ta| Ut|||sat|on Rat|o 3.7ô
0ebt 8erv|c|ng rat|o 1ô.00


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 103
Capital Utilisation Ratio
Capital Utilisation is the ratio of capital expenditure to the
capital income. This ratio indicates the performance of the local
body in terms of utilisation of capital income- it could also be an
indicator of the local body’s capacity to utilise capital resources.
A capital utilisation ratio of greater than unity indicates that the
revenue account surplus has been utilised for capital works,
which is a positive feature. A CU ratio below unity indicates that
either capital income is being diverted for revenue expenditure
(when O.R. is also above 1), or that part of the capital income
was unspent during the financial year under consideration.
The Capital Utilisation Ratio (CUR) of SMC is just above unity
at 3.76. The planned expenditure over the past five years is a
clear indication of the CUR being just above unity along with
operating ratio being below unity. However, the situation also
refers to non-utilisation of the capital available in that financial
year to the complete extent, which SMC will need to plan
accordingly.
Share of Establishment Expenditure in Total Revenue
Income
This is expressed as a ratio of establishment expenditure to
operating cost (revenue income). Its contribution (including
salaries and wages, pension, reimbursement, etc) has accounted
for 40.32 percent of the total revenue income during 2001-2005.
This has come down from over 50% till FY 2000-01 indicating
the effective control of the establishment expenses on one hand
and enhancement of revenues on the other hand by SMC during
the assessment period.
10.4.1 STATUS OF MUNICIPAL FINANCES
• Revenue expenditure has been primarily directed towards
establishment expenses (40.32 percent) followed by
administration and general expenditure (18.62 percent).
• Revenue through the levy of octroi contributes to over 57
percent of the total revenue of the corporation and property
tax contributes to about 25 percent of the total revenue
income. The average collection performance of the same has
been over 88 per cent from 2000-01 to 2004-05.
• Capital expenditure has been mainly directed towards the
public works (roads/bridges/street lighting) and water supply
at 37 and 23 percent respectively, which is followed by
plant, machinery and equipment (11 percent).
• While the capital account has witnessed a deficit over the
years, the revenue account has been accruing a substantial
amount of surplus. CAPEX has decreased from Rs. 207
Crores in 2000/01 to Rs. 175 Crores in 2004-05.
• SMC's performance with respect to resource mobilisation
and expenditure has been reasonably good during the recent
past. The per capita incomes, (both revenue as well as own
sources) of SMC, are found to be
marginally higher than that of
Ahmedabad Municipal
Corporation.
• Income from own-sources is fairly
high but is dominated by income
from octroi. The resource position
of SMC is sound with income from
property tax assessments at 25
percent of revenues against
collection performance ranging
between 85 and 89 percent. The
tax rates of water and conservancy
have not been revised during the
past five years.






Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 104

10.5 FINANCES OF SUDA

10.5.1 REVENUE ACCOUNT
The revenue account comprises of the income from scrutinity
charges, development charges, zoning fee, water charges and
interest on deposit and expenditure on establishment,
administration and O & H charges, repairs and maintenance,
debt servicing etc.

10.5.2 CAPITAL ACCOUNT
SUDA’s main source of capital income is betterment charges for
increase in the value of land and buildings, as it is a result of
implementation of TP schemes. Other sources include:
contribution from the beneficiaries, sale of land allotted under
TP scheme for public purposes and capital expenditure mainly
on construction of new roads, water supply schemes, sewerage
projects, street light, storm water projects, lake development,
solid waste management etc. preparation of TP schemes and
acqisition of land.

Due to availability of sufficient funds on capital surplus, SUDA
does not need to go for major borrowing from financial
institutions, nevertheless, SUDA needs adequate fund for taking
up all development works, to provide basic aminities like water
supply, sewerage, storm water disposal, road, street light,
disposal of solid waste which is almost lacking in this area as
discussed in detail in previous chapters. For expenditure on
building, SUDA arranges loans on behalf of the beneficiaries. As
such there is no major impact on revenue expenditure from
capital surplus.


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 105









8ection ¡¡¡: Vision. Goals
8trategies and Projects


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 106
CHAPTER 11: CHAPTER 11: CHAPTER 11: CHAPTER 11: Vision Vision Vision Vision 2020: 2020: 2020: 2020:
8trategies 8trategies 8trategies 8trategies and and and and Project Project Project Project
¡dentification ¡dentification ¡dentification ¡dentification
11.1 STRATEGIC FOCUS
The genesis of this Vision emerges from the fact that this city’s
population, with its continuing high growth, is likely to double
from the present 2.8 million to 5.5 to 6.0 million by the year
2020*. For sustained growth of its economic base for the city to
be attractive, and improve quality of life, there is a need to
position this city in a manner to sustain this level of growth and
strengthen the response mechanism of agencies to address
growth demands.
The Suratis' homespun kindliness, charity, entrepreneurship and
above all a strong civic pride are the traits that have helped the
city flourish. The resourceful and inclusive city, with a dynamic
local authority, thrives for excellence to become a dominant
player in the global scenario. SMC- SUDA initiated a public
consultation in this regard to define the cities vision and
priorities. The collective vision of the stakeholders as outlined is
based on assessment of a wide range of elements affecting
growth and the quality of life. To realize the vision of a 'Global
City with Global Standards' by 2020, a structured program of
actions and initiatives has been defined.
The Strategic Focus is structured around three elements of
Promoting Growth for economic development; Good
Governance to enable Improved Service Delivery. However, the
overarching objective of this strategy is to promote safety,
security, and environmental quality. The strategic focus and
operational strategies have been detailed in the following
sections.







SURAT VISION 2020
STRENGTHS
Diversity in economic base: Textiles, diamond
cutting and polishing, zari industry, major market
for yarn and major center for trade in the region
Sustained growth spread over four decades
Emergence of a petrochemical complex in the
region and centrally promoted SEZ
Quality-Cheap labor
Responsive Local Administration
Strong sense of belongingness and pride of being a
Surati and at the same time always willing to accept
and include people from other cultures
The city is known for its social harmony
Adequate social services such as education and
health
Seen as an alternate to Mumbai as a place of
residence
WEAKNESSES
Medium quality of Power supply
Weak connectivity with major centers/ world cities
from a competitive perspective
In between two major metro's (Mumbai and
Ahmedabad)
Multi tiered protocols for industrial clearances
Rigid land conversion and town planning process
Unregulated peri-urban growth and weak
institutional structures
Large segment of work force and population living
in slums
Dominant informal sector
High costs of living
Quality of services in peri urban areas
Absence of education facilities to respond to local
industrial demand
Lack of premier institutions
OPPORTUNITIES
Growth in the region and potential for down stream
industries
Potential for demand in terms of trade and transit
services, and social sectors such as health,
education, leisure and tourism
Enhancing quality of life
THREATS
Policy risks such as incentives in neighboring
states, trade and tariff regimes on raw materials
Health concerns related to migrant population (HIV)
Environmental degradation
SURAT VISION 2020
STRENGTHS
Diversity in economic base: Textiles, diamond
cutting and polishing, zari industry, major market
for yarn and major center for trade in the region
Sustained growth spread over four decades
Emergence of a petrochemical complex in the
region and centrally promoted SEZ
Quality-Cheap labor
Responsive Local Administration
Strong sense of belongingness and pride of being a
Surati and at the same time always willing to accept
and include people from other cultures
The city is known for its social harmony
Adequate social services such as education and
health
Seen as an alternate to Mumbai as a place of
residence
WEAKNESSES
Medium quality of Power supply
Weak connectivity with major centers/ world cities
from a competitive perspective
In between two major metro's (Mumbai and
Ahmedabad)
Multi tiered protocols for industrial clearances
Rigid land conversion and town planning process
Unregulated peri-urban growth and weak
institutional structures
Large segment of work force and population living
in slums
Dominant informal sector
High costs of living
Quality of services in peri urban areas
Absence of education facilities to respond to local
industrial demand
Lack of premier institutions
OPPORTUNITIES
Growth in the region and potential for down stream
industries
Potential for demand in terms of trade and transit
services, and social sectors such as health,
education, leisure and tourism
Enhancing quality of life
THREATS
Policy risks such as incentives in neighboring
states, trade and tariff regimes on raw materials
Health concerns related to migrant population (HIV)
Environmental degradation


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 107

11.1.1 STRATEGIC FOCUS 1: PROMOTING GROWTH
OPERATIONAL STRATEGY 1A: ENABLING ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
Surat recognizes the importance of local economic development
as a deciding factor to achieve its vision of a global city with
global standards. The concerns are in terms of continued growth
and adding value to the existing labour intensive economic base
with necessary qualitative improvements. The way ahead relates
to exploiting opportunities for diversification, both in industrial
as well as service sectors, taking into consideration the potential
offered by the petrochemical and natural gas based activities in
the region. Associated downstream activities are also to be
explored. Towards this end, the city will initiate a City Economic
Development Strategy (CEDS).
Creating and Rejuvenating Markets Relates to
Availability of land and sites in appropriate location with
required quantity and quality is necessary
Delineate areas of economic development interest in the city
within the proposed City Economic Development Strategy
(CEDS)
Projects identified through this plan will be implemented
through public-private partnerships
Immediate investment priority area are the textile markets on
the Ring road and old city area, GIDC estates and Udhana,
Pandesara, Bhestan, Varachha, Katargam, Sachin, other
industrial areas
New city-level projects include: Gems & Jewelry park,
Apparel Park and Agro Export Zone
Surat bazaar / haat may be developed to show case specialties
from Surat: textiles, zari, diamond and food items
Trade and Tariff
Appropriate tax and tariff regime for creating a business
friendly environment
Streamline procedures for clearances
Quality of Power Supply
Reliable, affordable and quality power supply to meet the
demands of industry and trade
Mainstreaming Informal Trade
Providing for informal trade within context of the city's
Development Plan, street design by earmarking hawking/
non-hawking areas and specific town planning schemes/
urban design plans
Provide necessary public amenities and infrastructure like
pay-and-use toilets, parking and onsite improvements like
paving, vending platforms and designed kiosks
Serviced Land
Simplification of land conversion
process to make available serviced
land for growth of economic
activities
Promote New Towns
Facilitate development of new high
quality residential areas with good
connectivity and high levels of
infrastructure and connectivity with
the involvement of the corporate
sector
These new residential areas will
attract investors and corporate
houses to locate in Surat
Value Services
Offer an enriched cultural
environment and upgraded sports
facility for a better quality of life
and thereby enhancing its
positioning amongst other
competing cities:
Trade cum convention center
High-end shopping malls,
multiplexes, river cruises, clubs etc.
Leisure clubs with tennis,
swimming and golf facilities
City Museum, Art Gallery,
Museum, Planetarium, Science City
and Amphi-theatres
Invite premier institutions to
establish high quality education and
training facility
OPERATIONAL STRATEGY 1B:
IMPROVING CONNECTIVITY
Substantial improvements are required
in Surat's connectivity with other cities
in the world. A combination of high-
speed, strategic connectivity through
international air-links, national
expressways and water ways would be
mandatory for positioning Surat as
Gujarat's Global City by 2020.







Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 108

11.1.2 STRATEGIC FOCUS 2: GOOD GOVERNANCE
OPERATIONAL STRATEGY 2A: MANAGING URBAN
GROWTH
For effective, safe and sustainable growth management:
Establishing a framework for planning and management of
Metropolitan City Regions, Greater Surat and Surat City
Ensure that infrastructure development and enforcement of
regulations keep pace with actual growth of cities
Improve the quality of built environment by developing good
residential areas
Effective Spatial Planning Framework
Land for Housing the Urban Poor
Create new towns to offer high quality residential and
business environment
Preparation of Town Planning Schemes
OPERATIONAL STRATEGY 2B STRENGTHENING
URBAN GOVERNANCE
To make the city more responsive and responsible, improve
governance and management through:
Establishing mechanisms for making city governance more
transparent and accountable and enhancing public
participation in governance
Streamline administrative procedures for efficient urban
management
Initiate e-governance for improved performance and service
delivery.
Raising adequate resources for realizing the vision of a
Global City with Global Standards
Resources Mobilization to Realize the Vision of Global City
Global Standards
SMC/SUDA to be Transparent, Accountable and Responsive
Public Participation in Governance
Capacity Building
OPERATIONAL STRATEGY 2C INTER AGENCY
COORDINATION
Surat Municipal Corporation is to play a pivotal role for
coordinating with the state government departments and other
important agencies for cohesive growth in the City Region. It
will also have to improve and streamline its inter-departmental
coordination.
Inter-departmental Coordination
Coordinating with State Government
Coordinating with other agencies


































Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 109

11.1.3 STRATEGIC FOCUS 3: IMPROVED SERVICE
DELIVERY
OPERATIONAL STRATEGY 3A ACCESS TO BASIC
SERVICES
Surat must invest to strengthen its city basics and upgrade its
water supply, wastewater management, municipal solid waste
disposal, public sanitation to the next level by improving the
quality of services and improved service delivery. It must adopt
world-class infrastructure standards. Undertake phased
upgrading of infrastructure, expanding infrastructure to SUDA
areas, in
Water Supply
Public Health and Sanitation
Integrated Water Management Strategy
Storm Water Management
Municipal & Bio-Medical Waste Management
OPERATIONAL STRATEGY 3B MASS TRANSIT
Urban transport through enhanced accessibility and mobility
enables increase in efficiency and productivity, increase in
access to amenities, reduction in commuting costs, efficient use
of scarce land resource and contributes to improvement of the
environment.
Circular Surface Railway
Bus Transit System
Integrated Mass Rapid Transit
OPERATIONAL STRATEGY 3C ROAD NETWORK
IMPROVEMENTS
Today Surat is experiencing traffic congestion causing traffic
delays, inconvenience because of limited provision of public
transport facility, amplified due to rapid growth of population
and a very rapid increase in motorization. Parking problem is
very acute in the old city, institutional area and in the business
districts of Surat.
Neglecting pedestrians, bicycles and other non-motorized traffic
has added to the problem, resulting in severe traffic delays,
accidents and deteriorating air quality. These adversely impact
on economic efficiency, environmental, and health aspects. The
social costs incurred by the poor due to cumulative health
impacts, land price impacts and journey time & cost impacts are
large. The strategy to improve the road network will essentially
comprise of improving linkages within the city by removing
bottlenecks and constructing new flyovers/ ROBs/ underpasses
New Road Links, Fly overs and Road Over Bridges
Remove Bottlenecks and Improve Road Network
Parking

































Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 110

11.1.4 OVERARCHING OBJECTIVES
A SAFE AND SUSTAINABLE CITY
Surat aims at becoming an enterprising and inviting city by
creating a safe living and business friendly environment. Surat to
offer a safe and sustainable environment to promote growth
Enforce Safety Regulations
Improve Civic Safety
B IMPROVE ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
Pollution-free, clean and green environment by managing
pollution. A cleaner river and sustained efforts towards natural
resource management and energy efficiency in internal systems
are important.
Environmental sustainability is the basic foundation for any city
aiming for world-class living standards. Surat will consciously
make efforts to ensure a pollution-free, clean and green city
environment that does not threaten the local ecological balance
by fast-paced developments. “Eco City Surat” status has
achieved through a judicious mix of environmental sustainability
measures, pollution control, urban forestry development,
wastewater reuse/ recycling, rainwater harvesting and energy
conservation focussing on:
Industrial Pollution Prevention
Environmental Management Plan
Vehicular Pollution Control
Protect and Develop Tapi River
Energy Conservation
11.1.5 TOWARD IMPLEMENTATION
SMC/SUDA has initiated actions to update its medium term
financial framework to prioritize investment and related policy
interventions. The consultations with stakeholders would
continue and form the basis for operational decisions.
On the extra Municipal issues, a high-powered Steering
Committee under the Chairmanship of the Chief Minister should
be established to steer the agenda. SMC-SUDA would continue
to facilitate the dialogue.
A Senior Officer of the local body will act as the focal point to
oversee the dialogue and progress in implementation; Heads of
Departments will head the sectoral groups- responsible for
initiation of actions to prepare working documents and develop
appropriate interventions, packaged for implementation.




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 111
11.2 URBAN PLANNING AND GROWTH MANAGEMENT -
STRATEGIES & ACTION PLAN
STRATEGIES
Urban growth management strategies shall take into account the
environmental concerns developing of late in the city. The
strategies are to facilitate a balanced growth with an efficient
urban form devoid of congestion and conflicting land uses.
Rapid and rational implementation of development plan.
Implementation of the development plan lies in the
finalisation of the Town Planning Schemes covering the
corporation area as well as the SUDA area. In these,
regularisation drives for illegal non-conflicting changes in
land use and demolition drive for illegal non-confirming
land uses shall be taken up.
Development restrictions in specific areas.
Restriction of development in specific areas shall be taken
up by finalising TP schemes with provisions for open/ green
spaces acting as buffer zones. This is also to create an
efficient urban form and for decongestion of the CBD,
wherein the state transport bus-stand has to be shifted to an
alternate location.
Decentralised planning and increased citizens’
involvement in the development planning process.
Public participation and consultation at neighbourhood level
regarding land use and growth patterns shall create social
benefits and avoid non-conforming land uses. Increased
citizens’ involvement in the development planning process
shall be pursued actively to achieve the above-mentioned
social benefits.
Improved co-ordination between various sanctioning and
implementing agencies.
Non-conforming land uses and major non-aligned sections
towards the periphery of the corporation shall be corrected
with improved co-ordination between the implementing
agencies, SMC and SUDA, and necessary changes shall be
incorporated in the development plan.
Optimum use of municipal land and inviting private
sector to act work with the public sector.
The land and real estate owned by the corporation in the city
shall be utilised for commercial development either by itself
or through leasing out to private users. This shall help to
mobilise financial resources for implementation of the
SMC’s Capital Improvement Programme.




ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Implementation of development
plan to cover the entire city and its
outgrowth with town planning
schemes
Discouraging excessive urban
sprawl by establishing appropriate
building and density regulations
for selected areas
Establish green belts and buffer
zones
Development of geographical
information systems
Implementation of major road
alignments



Institutions
SUDA
Surat Municipal Corporation
Town Planning Department
Voluntary organizations and
NGOs
Citizens’ Council/ Groups




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 112

11.2.1 IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS
INNER CITY REVITALIZATION
The Surat Inner City or the historical walled city has an area of
8.16 sq.km. It is a densely populated area with a population of
3.63 lakh in 1971 and 4.14 lakh in 2001. Ageing infrastructure,
old municipal services (such as B.B. masonry box drain and
storm drain system) loss of traditional character, deteriorating
environmental quality and maximum slum population in inner
city are the basic factors, which lead to the need for revitalization
of inner city. The study area delineated for this revitalization
plan includes the municipal wards no. 1 to 12 covering the inner
city and part of the area in the immediate periphery of the Ring
Road.
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SALIENT FEATURES OF THE
PROJECT
This revitalization plan for the next
five years includes:
Cement Concrete roads for all
major having width between 10 m
and 24 m and concrete pavers
block roads for minor roads
having width less than 4 m.
Development of Ring Road,
including parking, and traffic
amenities below flyover/bridges
etc.
Parking facilities in most
congested areas like Hira Bazaar
at Khan Saheb’s Dela and Dhobi
ni Wadi.
Providing sewerage system for
various areas in the walled city
Providing storm water drain
structures of B.B. masonry
Repairs and Restoration of
Heritage properties like the Sir J.
J. Training institute, Old Civil
Hospital, and ASI monuments like
Mirza Swami’s Tomb, Kavi
Narmad’s house, etc.
Restoration of ovaras
(embankments) like Raja Ovara,
Ghanta Ovara, Patalia Hanuman
Ovara, by making a welcome gate,
road, pavements, compound wall,
etc.
Housing related projects like
construction of vegetable, fruit and
fish markets, community halls and
administration buildings.
Erection of new light poles for
proper illumination.
Providing traffic amenities like
footbridge at Chowk Bazaar
junction, intersection development,
construction of channelizers, etc.




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 113

11.3 BASIC SERVICES AND URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE –
STRATEGIES AND ACTION PLAN
State of Urban Infrastructure 2005
Existing Public Private Partnerships
No 8ector PPP Project|E|ement w|th
br|ef 0escr|pt|on
1 water 8upp|y 0utsourc|ng - 0&H of wTP,
water qua||ty mon|tor|ng,
house keep|ng, supp|y
d|str|but|on.
2 8w0 |nc|ud|ng
|akes, r|ver etc.,
0utsourc|ng - 0&H
3 8ewerage 0utsourc|ng - 0&H of 8TP,
house keep|ng
4 Roads 6.6. & Po|ymer|c roads - 5
year ma|ntenance guarantee
5 Transport Proposed 6NC c|ty bus
serv|ces
ô 8treet L|ghts 0utsourc|ng - 0&H
7 8o||d waste
management
0utsourc|ng - 0&H
8 hea|th 6remator|ums - grant
9 Educat|on
10 F|re Ambu|ance & hearse
11 Parks & P|ay
Crounds

12 0|saster
management
Awareness campa|gn,
tra|n|ng at grass root |eve|
through NC0s & vo|untary
organ|sat|ons
Service Delivery Agency – Institutional
responsibility matrix


water
water ava||ab|||ty |nsta||ed 6apac|ty [HL0} 718
Re|eased|da||y [HL0} 580
w|th |n c|ty ||m|ts 580
8ource of water supp|y 10-50 sq. km 1007


Popu|at|on covered by pub||c
water supp|y 7
957
water coverage Per cap|ta supp|y [|pcd} 195
8upp|y durat|on [hrs.} 2-3

wastewater 0|sposa|
water generated da||y [HL0} 590
0|sposa| [underground sewerage} capac|ty [m|d} 5ô2
Present operat|ng capac|ty [m|d} 5ô2
househo|ds connected to underground sewerage 7 977

8o||d waste
waste generat|on da||y [tonnes|day} 950
6o||ect|on da||y [tonnes|day} 925

8torm water 0ra|nage
Annua| ra|nfa|| [cms} 114.3
Length of storm water dra|ns [kms} 313.93

Roads and road Transport
Hun|c|pa| roads [kms} 1133.37
Pub||c Transport ßuses [number} 148
ßus capac|ty| Per |akh popu|at|on ô
Pr|vate reg|stered veh|c|es 1102ô0

8treet L|ght|ng
Number 48098
Average d|stance Hts. 25.05
0e||ve(v Respors|o|e Adercv
No 3eclo(
Prov|s|on 0 & H
1 water 8upp|y
8H6
+8U0A
0utsourc|ng +
8H6
2
8w0 |nc|ud|ng
|akes, r|ver etc.,
8H6
+8U0A
0utsourc|ng +
8H6
3 8ewerage
8H6
+8U0A
0utsourc|ng +
8H6
4 Roads 8H6 8H6
5 Transport
C8RT6|
8H6|PPP
Proposa| of 6NC
bus serv|ces by
8H6
ô 8treet L|ghts 8H6 0utsourc|ng
7 8o||d waste 8H6 0utsourc|ng
8 hea|th 8H6|PP 8H6
9 Educat|on 8H6|PP
8H6 [807 C0C
& 207 8H6}
10 F|re 8H6|C0C 8H6
11
Parks & P|ay
Crounds
8H6|PP 8H6
12
0|saster
management
8H6 +
C0C

13
Traff|c Eng||
Hanagement
8H6|PPP 8H6 + PPP


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 114

11.3.1 REFORMS IN WATER SUPPLY
Water Supply Grid System - For Uninterrupted Water
Supply
Initially, entire water supply for Surat city was dependant on one
water works only. Therefore, shutdown/ closure of the plant
caused regular interruption in the entire water supply system.
Today, there are four water works and nine water distribution
stations interconnected in a grid in such a way that :
Failure of any water works does not cause any disruption on
the entire water supply system
All the water distribution stations can be fed from any of the
alternative water works.
Private Sector Participation
At present, Surat Municipal Corporation is outsourcing
following services for water supply;
"Operation & Maintenance" of water treatment plants at
Sarthana & Rander.
Valve operation in the different parts of the city.
Collection of water samples during the water supply period.
Housekeeping & gardening of Water Works & Water
Distribution Stations
Surat Municipal Corporation is exploring more possibilities for
private sector involvement - Like Annual "Operation &
Maintenance" contract for one Water Distribution Station and
Intake well on experimental basis.
ISO-9001-2000 Certification for Water Supply
Surat Municipal Corporation is the very first local body in the
whole country to think and start the process for getting ISO
certification for the entire water supply system. Quality, quantity
and timing of water supply will be the main criteria under the
ISO Certification. The process of training of the staff regarding
ISO certification has already been started. It is expected to be
achieved positively in the year 2006.
Modernization of Existing Infrastructure of Water Supply
Following modernization/ up-gradation of existing infrastructure
of water supply are in the process at present;
Implementation of SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data
Acquisition) system.
On-line Ultrasonic Flow meters on all the transmission mains
For accurate measurement of water being supplied and water
auditing
To detect the leakages and un accounted water flow in the
system
To monitor and control the pumping operations

24 X 7 Water Supply System
24 X 7 Water supply scheme is
envisaged in the year 2021 as per the
water supply Master Plan prepared by
Tata Consulting Engineers. But Surat
Municipal Corporation intends to
implement the same by the year 2011..
To minimize the risk level, scheme
will be implemented first for pilot zone
only. After reviewing the results for
pilot zone, the scheme will be
implemented further for the rest of the
city as per the recommendations of the
consultant to be appointed.
Implementation of the scheme in the
phased manner and hence lower
segmental investment.
Estimated expenditure of proposed 24
x 7 water supply scheme is Rs.1530
Lacs.
Key Benefits
Consistent pressure & quantity of
water at all the times - means less
chances of leakages &
contamination of water.
Less chances of outbreak of water-
borne diseases.
Wastage of water is reduced at
consumer level.
Continuous water supply to citizens'
- means higher satisfaction at
consumer level.
Prevention of breeding of
mosquitoes, as storage of water is
mostly eliminated.


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 115

STRATEGIES
The strategies are in accordance with the suggestions of the
citizens, elected representatives and the other stakeholders
involved in the entire City Development Strategies process.
Water Supply Planning
While the current works shall focus on the source
augmentation, yield increase, adequate storage and treatment
facilities for future requirements, the programme shall be so
designed to match the community needs. The entire system
shall be augmented and structured in a sustained process.
Water Auditing
Water auditing is the best practice to reduce the system
losses and make the entire supply of water accountable. This
involves leak detection studies apart from studies on the
quality and quantity of water drawl at the consumer end and
explores ways and means for effective water supply systems.
Institutional Strengthening and Capacity Building
The members of the hydraulic department shall undergo
training in project planning, implementation, monitoring and
evaluation. The significance of people’s participation in
water conservation shall also be realised.

ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Assessment, management and utilisation of ground water
resources in and around Surat city.Controlling and diversion
of polluted waste water discharge into the river at the
upstream of weir.
Finding an alternative source of water for improved
sustainability of water supply to citizens.
An inventory of possible leaks and sources of unaccounted
for water followed by water auditing every three years (a
technical team from S.M.C. or a private consultancy shall
take up the task).
Procurement of quality meters and conversion of un-metered
connections to metered ones and revision of tariff with
political willingness
Involve private sector in operation and maintenance on
contract basis.



The Goal
.Surat Municipal Corporation intends
to get ISO-9001-2000 certification for
consistent quality, quantity & timing of
water supply given to the citizens.
Documentation part of the certification
has been mostly completed. It is
expected that the whole process of
getting the ISO certification shall be
completed by March 2006.



Institutions
Ground Water Resources
Development Corporation
Central Ground Water Board
Surat Municipal Corporation

Sustainability Indicators
Gross supply
T&D losses and unaccounted for
water
Treatment capacity to total supply
Storage capacity to total supply
Distribution network to total road
length
Number of house service
connections to total property tax
assessments




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 116

11.3.2 IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SMC AREA
Surat Municipal Corporation has prepared a long-term master
plan in the year 1995 for water supply scheme of Surat city in
consultation with Tata Consulting Engineers, Mumbai. The
master plan was prepared to fulfill the water demand for the
projected population growth for the horizon year 2021,
considering the base year as 1995.water treatment plant. The
project identified here are in consensus with this master plan.



Project Phasing



PROJECTS
IDENTIFIED FOR WATER SUPPLY (SMC AREA)
8R.
N0
NAHE 0F ThE 8E6T0R|NAHE 0F ThE w0RK E8T|HATE0
608T
[Lakhs}
2005-
200ô
200ô-
2007
2007-
2008
2008-
2009
2009-
2010
2010-
2011
1 wATER TREATVENT PLANT
a 0es|dr. Corsl(ucl|or. Tesl|rd & Corr|ss|or|rd lo( 200
VL0 capac|lv wale( T(ealrerl P|arl al 3a(lrara wale(
wo(|s. 3u(al
2122
1200 1222
o 0es|dr. Corsl(ucl|or. Tesl|rd & Corr|ss|or|rd lo( 120
VL0 capac|lv wale( T(ealrerl P|arl al 3a(lrara wale(
wo(|s. 3u(al 1500 1500
c 0es|dr. Corsl(ucl|or. Tesl|rd & Corr|ss|or|rd lo( 120
VL0 capac|lv wale( T(ealrerl P|arl al Kala(dar wale(
wo(|s. 3u(al
1500
100 1100
2 lNTAKE wELL3

a. Corsl(ucl|or ol 3ê0 VL0 lrla|e we|| al 3a(lrara ê00
200 100
o. Corsl(ucl|or ol 210 VL0 lrla|e we|| al Kala(dar 500
50 150
3 3ER\lCE RE3ER\0lR
a Corsl(ucl|or ol 225 Lac L|l(es capac|lv u03R W|lr
p(ov|s|or ol ooosle( rouse al 3a(lrara wale( wo(|s. 3u(al
102
190 212
o Corsl(ucl|or ol 225 Lac L|l(es capac|lv u03R W|lr ooosle(
rouse al Rarde( wale( wo(|s. 3u(al
185
22Z 258
c Corsl(ucl|or ol Z2 Lac L|l(es capac|lv u03R al 0urora|
wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or. 3u(al
112
83 59.38
d Corsl(ucl|or ol 110 Lac L|l(es capac|lv u03R W|lr ooosle(
rouse al udrara udvodrada( 3ardr. 3u(al
311
130 181
e Corsl(ucl|or ol 22.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv E3R al Jodar|rada(
wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
231.15
100 131.15
l Corsl(ucl|or ol 22.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv E3R al 0urora|
wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
285.51
110 115.51
d Corsl(ucl|or ol 22.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv E3R al AlrWa
wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
201.18
85 11ê.18
r Corsl(ucl|or ol 112.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv u03R al P(oposed
8reslar wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
300
300
| Corsl(ucl|or ol 225 Lac capac|lv u03R al Kala(dar wale(
wo(|s
500
200 300
j Corsl(ucl|or ol 112.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv u03R al
Kala(dar wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
220
220
| Corsl(ucl|or ol 112.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv u03R al A|lrar
wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
200
200
| Corsl(ucl|or ol 112.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv u03R al P(oposed
\ed wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
220
220
8r.
No.
Year Amount [|n Rs. Lakhs}
1. 2005-0ô 3540.ô
2. 200ô-07 7028.8
3. 2007-08 8ô74
4. 2008-09 380ô
5. 2009-10 1ô5ô
ô. 2010-11 100ô
7. 2011-12 -
T0TAL 25711.4


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 117
r Corsl(ucl|or ol 22.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv E3R al A|lrar
wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
300
300
r Corsl(ucl|or ol 22.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv E3R al udrara
wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
300
300
o Corsl(ucl|or ol 15 Lac L|le( capac|lv E3R al udrara
udvod Nada( 3ardr
230
230
p Corsl(ucl|or ol 22.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv E3R al Rarde(
wale( wo(|s
300
300
c Corsl(ucl|or ol 22.5 Lac L|le( capac|lv E3R al 3a(lrara
wale( wo(|s
100
100

3 wATER 3uPPLY NETw0RK3
a P(ov|d|rd & Lav|rd 100 lo ê00 rr d|a. 0.l. p|pe||re ard
911 lo 1219 rr d|a. V.3. p|pe||re relWo(| lo( udrara
udvodrada( 3ardr ard su((ourd|rd (es|derl|a| a(ea ol
udrara zore.3u(al.

ê81.ZZ
511



1Z0.ZZ
o NelWo(| ol T.P.3crere No.12 lo 1ê ol Rarde( Adajar.
Jarard|(pu(a Jarard|(aoad.
5ê8.30
111

121.30
c 0.l. P|pe||re NelWo(| lo( T.P. 3crere 39. 10 & 11
L|roaval-0|rdo||
2ê1.09
1ê5 99.09
d P(ov|d|rd & Lav|rd 1ê2êrr d|a l(arsr|ss|or ||re l(or
3a(lrara wale( wo(|s lo 0urora| wale( 0|sl(|oul|or
3lal|or
2000
1000 1000
e NelWo(| ol T.P.3crere No.50 lo 52 ol \ed-0aoro||.
Kala(dar
500
500
l T(arsr|ss|or ra|r ol 900 rr d|a lo( \ed wale(
0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
300
300
d NelWo(| ol T.P.3crere No.51 lo 55 ol 8reslar 300
300
r T(arsr|ss|or ra|r ol 1000 rr d|a lo( 8reslar wale(
0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or
100
100
| P(ov|d|rd NelWo(| |r Res|derl|a| lous|rd 3oc|elv |r a||
Zores.
3500 Z00 Z00 Z00 Z00 Z00
1 21¯Z wATER 3uPPLY 1.530.00 30ê 30ê 30ê 30ê 30ê
5 PuVPlN0 & RELATE0 ELECTRlCAL- VEClANlCAL
VACllNERlE3- wATER w0RK3


a Kala(dar Wale( Wo(|s ard Rarde( Wale( Wo(|s 308 200 108
o Kala(dar Wale( Wo(|s |NeW lrla|e & P(oposed 8oosle(
louse)
1.520.00
1000 520
c 3a(lrara Wale( Wo(|s |lrla|e we||) 111.ê3
Z0 Z1.ê3
d 3a(lrara Wale( Wo(|s |8oosle( louse) 88.51
50 38.51
e 3a(lrara Wale( Wo(|s |lrla|e we|| 2 & P(oposed 8oosle(
louse)
520
200 320
l lead Wale( Wo(|s |LT Pare|) ê
ê
ê PuVPlN0 & RELATE0 ELECTRlCAL- VEClANlCAL
VACllNERlE3- wATER 0l3TRl8uTl0N 3TATl0N


a K|rra(v purp|rd slal|or 121
100 21
o udrara Wds 22
22
c udrara udvod rada( 3ardr 125
15 110
d 0ola|aWad| 50
50
e A|lrar ard croW| oaza( 50
50
d Purp racr|re(v lo( \ed w.0.3. 250
250
r Purp racr|re(v lo( 8reslar w.0.3. 250
250
| E|ecl(|ca| / Vecrar|ca| wo(|s al 3a(lrara 200
200
j E|ecl(|ca| / Vecrar|ca| wo(|s al Kala(dar 200
200
| V|sc. lo( Purp & Vacr|re(v upd(adal|or 250
250
0RAN0 T0TAL
25Z11.1Z 3510.ê Z028.8 8êZ1 380ê 1ê5ê 100ê




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 118
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SUDA AREA

At present, SUDA area has no water supply system of its own.
The main source of water for various villages in SUDA area is
the ground water; being tapped through bore wells or the water
supply schemes supported by GWSSB. With the rapid
urbanization in the SUDA area water supply schemes are the
utmost priority developmental work.
GWSSB (Gujarat Water Supply and
Sewerage Board) has proposed and
approved Variav Regional Water
Supply project to cater the drinking
water needs of 156 villages of
Choryasi, Olpad and Kamrej taluka of
Surat district which also includes a
water filtration plant at the cost of Rs.
66.43 crores. Besides, a provision has
also been made in this project for the
requirements of 60 MLD of water for
Surat Urban Development Authority
(SUDA) and 5 MLD of water for the
upcoming Special Economic Zone
(SEZ). The Singanpore Weir on Tapi
river near Surat has been therefore
identified as a sustainable source of
water supply for this Variav Regional
Water Supply Project.
Vajo( Corporerls ol wale( 3upp|v
3creres
Cosl |r
Rs.
C(o(es
1 lrla|e We||
90 r|d Capac|lv or (|drl oar| 8
218 r|d capac|lv or |ell oar| 13
2 wale( T(ealrerl P|arl
90 r|d capac|lv 9
218 r|d capac|lv 22
3 T(ur| Va|r 80
wale( 0|sl(|oul|or 3lal|or &
0|sl(|oul|or NelWo(|
2ê1
4 Tota| 6ost 39ô
GWSSB has also agreed to supply the
aforementioned volume of water to
SUDA from the Variav Regional
Water Supply Scheme. On the basis of
this scheme, SUDA has now proposed
Water Supply Schemes for Vesu as
well as Pal-Palanpore areas. The
salient details of both these schemes
along with their estimated costs are
given in the adjoining table.
In addition to this, other water supply
projects are also proposed in the
periphery areas of the city covering
about 8400 hactres. These additional
peripheral areas are included in the 68
TPS proposed by SUDA. The
estimated cost for the water supply
projects in this TPS areas is amounting
to be about RS. 396 crores.
water 8upp|y 0|str|but|on systems for T.P. 8chemes No. 1 to 7 of Vesu of 8U0A
area [608T |N R8. 6R0RE8}
N0. 0escr|pt|on| 6omponents Phase | Phase ||
1 P(ojecl a(ea |r la. 1102.01 1102.01
2 Popu|al|or |pe(sors) 2.20.108 1.10.81ê
3 wale( derard ||r VL0) 35.5 Z1
1 Cap|la| cosl ol p(ojecl 19.31 5.88
R.C.C. u/0 3urp. Purp louse & Cr|o(|ral|or
Roor

lead wo(| -l : ZZ La|rs ||l(e capac|lv 1.58Z -
1
lead wo(| -ll : 101 La|rs ||l(e capac|lv 1.839 -
Vecrar|ca| & E|ecl(|ca| |rsla||al|or al Purp
rouse

lw-l : 0.52Z -
2
lw-ll : 0.ê39 -
3 0|sl(|oul|or P|pe||re NelWo(|
lw-l : 5.êê --
lw-ll : 8.09Z --
1
V|sce||areous C|v|| wo(|s sucr as Corpourd
wa||s. lrle(ra| Roads. 3ar|la(v o|oc| elc.

lw-l : 0.0ê5 --
lw-ll : 0.0Z3 --
5
PoWe( Correcl|or Cra(des. 0a(der|rd. T(ee
P|arlal|or elc.
0.5 --
3uo Tola| 18.99 -
5 º corl|rdercv 0.919 -
Crand Tota| 19.937 -
Tota| 6ost of the project = 19.94 + 5.88 25.82
water 8upp|y 0|str|but|on systems for T.P. 8chemes No. 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 1ô of
Pa|-Pa|anpor of 8U0A area [608T |N R8. 6R0RE8}
1 P(ojecl a(ea |r la. êZ9.35 êZ9.35
2 Popu|al|or |pe(sors) 1358Z0 2Z1Z10
3 wale( derard ||r VL0) 21.8 13.8
1 Cap|la| cosl ol p(ojecl 10.31 -
1
R.C.C. u/0 3urp. Purp louse & Cr|o(|ral|or
Roor
1.92Z -
2
Vecrar|ca| & E|ecl(|ca| |rsla||al|or al Purp
rouse
0.ê5 -
3 0|sl(|oul|or P|pe||re NelWo(| ê.95 --
1
V|sce||areous C|v|| wo(|s sucr as Corpourd
wa||s. lrle(ra| Roads. 3ar|la(v o|oc| elc.
0.0Zê --
5
PoWe( Correcl|or Cra(des. 0a(der|rd. T(ee
P|arlal|or elc.
0.25 --
3uo Tola| 9.85 -
5 º corl|rdercv 0.193 -
Crand Tota| 10.34 -
Tota| 6ost of the project = 10.34 + 3.31 13.ô5
Phase I: for the requirement till 2019 AD
PhaseII: for the requirement till 2034 AD

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 119

11.3.3 SEWERAGE SYSTEM
STRATEGIES
With a comprehensive sewerage system already nearing
completion, the strategies would focus upon planning for the
future needs with cost effective operation and maintenance.
Augmentation and rehabilitation of the system
The sewerage system being put into operation caters to the
population needs for the year 2021 Extension of the capacity
of the existing sewerage treatment plants becomes necessary
to cater to the needs of 2011 and 2021. This shall also
involve revitalisation of the sewerage network in the walled
city area, Athwa, Umra and Adajan, which will solve a large
number of issues with regard to frequent spilling, leaks etc.
Regularisation
The large number of illegal outfalls/ outlets into the drains of
the city is a major hurdle in revenue generation as the
number of connections is comparatively low. A
regularisation drive affecting an impact fee shall direct the
system towards effective cost recovery with an increase in
the number of connections.
Effective operation & maintenance
With two of the sewerage treatment plants already under
private operation and maintenance, the corporation has plans
to extend the same principle to the newly constructed STPs.
at Bamroli-Vadod and Singanpore. Incentives for improved
performance shall be included in the management contract.
At the same time, SMC shall continue to operate and
maintain the Anjana and Bhesan STPs and all the SPSs. The
0.5 MW biogas based power plant is under operation since
2004. The other 5 STPs shall also equipped with the Biogas
based power plant to run the STP more efficiently with less
maintenance cost.
System maintenance plan
A system maintenance plan involving the components of
routine, corrective and preventive maintenance shall be
prepared apart from an inventory of the entire system to aid
the preparation of Geographical Information System.
Common Effluent Treatment Plant
A common effluent treatment plant is necessary to install to
stop the industrial wastewater flow to the creek without
treatment plant.
Awareness campaign on recycling/ reuse
An awareness campaign regarding the importance of
recycling and reuse of wastewater for various household
purposes shall be taken up to tackle any unforeseen situation
in the future.
The Goal
The year 2021 sees a wastewater
generation of nearly 912.5 MLD by
about 51.7 lakh persons through 100%
population and area coverage (to be
achieved by 2012). For the year 2021,
an ultimate treatment capacity of
1194.5 MLD is envisaged. The
distribution network will extend to a
length of about 1250 km.
ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Extension, augmentation and
rehabilitation of existing systems
in an efficient manner to match the
community needs and desired
targets by 2012.
Installation of biogas based power
plants at all the STPs.
Execution of drainage network in
the Industrial area along with the
pumping station and common
effluent treatment plant.
An inventory of locations of spills,
leaks and mixing areas of storm
water with solid waste.
Mapping and creation of
Geographical Information System
(GIS) detailing out system
location, characteristics, and age to
enable a constant check on
malfunctions
Regularisation drive to be taken up
as also an awareness campaign on
getting a sewerage connection.
Institutions
Surat Municipal Corporation
Private Sector
Citizens’ Council
Sustainability Indicators
Total sewerage generation
Total area served to total area
Total population served to total
population
Sewer network length to total road
length.
Treatment capacity to total
sewerage generated

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 120

11.3.4 IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SMC AREA
Augmentation of Adajan Drainage Scheme
The Adajan S.P.S. was designed to transmit the flow of 15
MLD, whereas presently 20 MLD flow has been reaching
this S.P.S. To cope with the present situation as well as to
meet future demands new augmentation scheme is adopted. .
Augmentation of Bhesan Sewage Treatment Plant
The expected flow reaching the Bhesan STP by 2011 is 95
MLD. To cope up with this requirement and to
accommodate the generated flow for treatment it is planned
to augment the capacity of 40 MLD and making it 100 MLD
capacity.
Sewage Gas Based Power Plants
Since October 2003, the sewage gas based power plant
having capacity of 0.5 Mw has been run by SMC. Inspired
from the successful running of this plant at Anjana STP, the
SMC has decided to set up other such sewage gas based
power plants at Bhatar, Karanj, Bhesan, Bamroli and
Singanpore sewage treatment plants at a total cost of Rs. 22
crores.
Augmentation of Athwa Sewerage Scheme
The Athwa Scheme was put into operation way back in 1979
as well as due to unexpected rise in contributory population
the amount of sewerage generated has increased greatly,
making the drainage capacity insufficient. All this
necessitates the augmentation of the scheme.
Augmentation of Anjana sewage treatment plant including
SITC of dewatering system
The capacity of the existing STP at Anjana 82.5 MLD and
about 55 MLD of sewage is being pumped into it. The
effluent transfer pumps are to be replaced and it is proposed
to increase the levels of primary treatment unit by
constructing new ones. The estimated cost of the project is
Rs. 11 crores. It is proposed to be implemented in the years
2006-08.
Secondary Treatment Plant at Bamroli
The capacity of the existing sewage treatment plant at
Bamroli is 100 MLD with current flow reading 25 MLD. In
order to support the existing plant and improve the quality of
treatment another secondary plant is proposed.

Common Effluent Treatment Plant along with drainage
system for Pandesara GIDC.
At present, flow from the entire
Pandesara GIDC area is 100 MLD.
To cope up with the future
requirement of 200 MLD in 2021,
the drainage network along with
the pumping station will be
constructed. The CETP will be
constructed for the present flow of
100 MLD.
Augmentation of Singanpore Sewage
Treatment Plant
The expected flow reaching the
Singanpore STP by 2011 is 150
MLD. To cope up with this
requirement for treatment it is
planned to augment the capacity of
50 MLD and making it 150 MLD
capacity, with tertiary treatment
facility
Augmentation of Karanj Sewage
Treatment Plant
The expected flow reaching the
Karanj STP by 2011 is 140 MLD.
To cope up with this requirement
and to accommodate the generated
flow for treatment it is planned to
augment the capacity of 40 MLD
and making it 130 MLD capacity.
Augmentation of Bhatar Sewage
Treatment Plant
The expected flow reaching the
Bhatar STP by 2012 is 200 MLD.
To cope up with this requirement
and to accommodate the generated
flow for treatment it is planned to
augment the capacity of 80 MLD
and making it 200 MLD capacity.
Augmentation of Bamroli Sewage
Treatment Plant
The expected flow reaching the
Bamroli STP by 2012 is 140 MLD.
To cope up with this requirement
and to accommodate the generated
flow for treatment it is planned to
augment the capacity of 40 MLD
and making it 140 MLD capacity.
Miscellaneous works for the various
sewerage systems

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 121
The modification, replacement works for old sewerage
systems will be carried out as and when required.
Furthermore, the drainage line works in the slums, public
roads will also be carried out as and when it requires.
SCADA system for all SPS and STP’s
The SCADA system to all SPS and STP’s will be installed in
a stepwise manner in the span of six years i.e. during the
year 2006-2012. The SCADA system for STP’s will be
provided in the first phase. This will be followed by the
installation of SCADA system on various SPS. Finally, they
will be interlinked centrally. The project will be carried out
in the span of six year.
Wastewater Recycle and Reuse
At present, the treated effluent is being discharged to the
open surface water bodies in the city. Looking to the scarcity
of the water into the near future, it is of utmost requirement
to recycle and reuse the wastewater. It is planned to provide
necessary further treatment to the secondary treated
wastewater, so that it can be used to reuse it in industries as
well as in the irrigation. This projects are planned to carried
out during the year 2008-2012.
Machineries and equipments for sewerage, SPS and STP’s
The Hon’able high court has given the direction to minimize
the use of labors in the maintenance of sewerage and sewage
pumping stations. In that direction, it is planned to purchase
the machineries and equipments like sewer jetting machine,
deep-suction machine, gulpur machine, camera for sewerage,
gas detectors, etc. The equipment will be purchased in a
phasewise manner during the period 2006-2012.
Benefits
The proposed projects will ensure underground sewerage facility
to the hitherto uncovered areas of city as well as will rectify the
drawbacks of the existing system. The different projects include
laying RCC sewers, modification and augmentation of Sewage
Pumping Stations and Sewage Treatment Plants. By
implementing this project, it is estimated to cover the population
of about 4.339 Millions of the year 2021 with the sewerage
system. By augmenting the existing system, the problems of
overflowing of sewerage manholes and overflowing of untreated
sewage into the river will be eliminated and the city will have
comprehensive sewerage system
The proposed project will also strengthen the existing sewerage
system within Athwa-Umra, Adajan and Old city area. Due to
this the overflowing and choking problems of existing sewers
will be eliminated.
As per the Water (Pollution Control) Act of 1974, any person of
local body has to treat the sewage water up to the desired
standard before discharging into the natural bodies of water or
land. Some sewage treatment plants in the city were constructed
10-15 years back and with the time, the effluent disposal criteria
are getting stringent. This necessitates
the augmentation / construction of
Sewage Treatment Plant. The proposed
project also covers the augmentation of
existing Sewage Treatment Plants. The
sewage from the entire city will be
treated up to desired standard in these
treatment plants and then will be
disposed off in nearby creek / nulla
thereby preserving the aquatic lives
also.
Thus, this project will not only
improve the sanitation and hygienic
condition of the city but also preserve
the environment as a whole.
Project Phasing
8r. No. Year Amount [|n Rs. Lakhs}
1. 2005-0ô 1415
2. 200ô-07 7750
3. 2007-08 8830
4. 2008-09 ô125
5. 2009-10 5900
ô. 2010-11 5800
7. 2011-12 3100
T0TAL 38920

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 122

Summary of Projects – Sewerage (SMC AREA)



Tota| cost 2005-0ô 200ô-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
8ector
|nvestment |n Rs. Lakhs
8ewerage Projects 38920 1415 7750 8830 ô125 5900 5800 3100
Augmentat|on of Adajan 8ewerage 8cheme 1200 25 50 1125 - - - -
|. 8ewerage Nework '00 25 25 50 - - - -
||. 8ewage Pump|ng 8tat|on '00 - 25 75 - - - -
|||. R|s|ng Ha|n '000 - - '000 - - - -
Augmentat|on of ßhesan 8ewage
Treatment P|ant [40 HL0}
1500 - 900 ê00 - - - -
ß|ogas based power p|ant at 5 8ewage
Treatment P|ants
3200 - Z50 Z50 500 Z00 500 -
|. ßhatar 700 - 250 250 '50 50 - -
||. Karanj 700 - 250 250 '50 50 - -
|||. 8|nganpore 800 - 250 250 200 '00 - -
|v. ßamro|| 500 - - - - 200 J00 -
v. ßhesan 500 - - - - J00 200 -
Augmentat|on of Athwa 8ewerage 8cheme 1000 100 100 500 - - - -
|. 8ewerage Network 600 - '00 500 - - - -
||. 8ewage Pump|ng 8tat|on '00 - '00 - - - - -
|||. R|s|ng Ha|n J00 '00 200 - - - - -
Upgradat|on of Anjana 8ewage Treatment
P|ant
1100 100 800 200 - - - -
8econdary Treatment P|ant at ßamro|| [100
HL0}
1000 - 100 900 - - - -
6ommon Eff|uent Treatment P|ant for
Pandesara [100 HL0}
Z200 100 3500 3ê00 - - - -
|. Eff|uent Network & R|s|ng Ha|n 2000 - '000 '000 - - - -
||. Eff|uent Pump|ng 8tat|on 700 '00 500 '00 - - - -
|||. 6ommon Eff|uent Treatment P|ant 4500 - 2000 2500 - - - -
Augmentat|on of 8|nganpore 8ewage
Treatment P|ant [50 HL0}
1000 - - - 3000 1000 - -
Augmentat|on of Karanj 8ewage Treatment
P|ant [40 HL0}
1ê00 - - - 800 800 - -
Augmentat|on of ßhatar 8ewage Treatment
P|ant [80 HL0}
3200 - - - - 1500 1Z00 -
Augmentat|on of ßamro|| 8ewage
Treatment P|ant [40 HL0}
1ê00 - - - - - 1ê00 -
H|sce||aneous 8ewerage 8ystem works 53Z0 1090 950 830 500 ê00 Z00 Z00
86A0A system for a|| 8P8 and 8TP's 1200 - 125 1Z5 200 200 200 300
wastewater recyc|e and reuse 5000 - - - 1000 1000 1000 2000
Hach|ner|es and equ|pments for sewerage,
8P8 and 8TP's
Z50 - 1Z5 150 125 100 100 100
8ewerage Projects [Tota|} 38920 1415 7750 8830 ô125 5900 5800 3100


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 123
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SUDA AREA

In SUDA area, there is a lack of adequate sewerage system with
adequate treatment and disposal system for any of the outgrowth
areas. Therefore, SUDA has given a
top priority for a systematic sewerage
system with sewage treatment and
disposal facilities for the Town
Planning Schemes of Vesu as well as
Pal- Palanpor area of SUDA, along
with the proposed water supply system
and storm water drainage system of
these T.P. Schemes.
Sewerage Scheme For Amroli –
Chhaprabhatha (Six Villages)
Similarly, the sewerage prepared,
covering six villages, which is being
rapidly developed peripheral area, near
Surat city. The phase-I scheme for this
area is designed for 25 MLD of sewage
at an estimated cost of Rs. 220 million.
The implementation of this project
may be taken up, after getting land for
sewage treatment plant near village
Variav.
Sewerage scheme for Puna-Simada
and Parvat – Goddhara
The sewage scheme for this area is
under preparation by SUDA, covering
the above area, which is also being
rapidly developed near Surat city. The
Phase-I scheme for this area is
designed for 50 MLD of sewage at an
estimated cost of Rs. 450 million.





PR0P08E0 8EwERACE 8Y8TEH8 T.P. 8chemes No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ô, 7 and 13 for
Vesu of 8U0A REA
N0. 0escr|pt|on| 6omponents Phase | Phase ||
1 P(ojecl a(ea |r la. 1102.01 1102.01
2 Popu|al|or |pe(sors) 2.20.108 1.10.81ê
3eWade F|oW ||r VL0)
Ave(ade F|oW 25.35 50.Z
3
Pea| F|oW 5Z 111.0Z
1 Cap|la| cosl ol p(ojecl 3Z.9Z 9.39
5 0(a|rade NelWo(| 1ê.39 --
ê Te(r|ra| 3eWade Purp|rd 3lal|or 3.05 --
Z lrle(red|ale 3eWade Purp|rd 3lal|or | C|v|| wo(|s
)
2.09 --
8 R|s|rd Va|r l(or lrle(red|ale 3eWade Purp|rd
3lal|or lo 3TP.
3.ZZ --
9 R|s|rd Va|r l(or lrle(red|ale 3eWade Purp|rd
3lal|or lo RCC Craroe( rea( rarro|e.
0.089 --
10 V|sce||areous c|v|| Wo(|s al Te(r|ra| 3eWade
Purp|rd 3lal|or
0.1ê --
11 V|sce||areous c|v|| Wo(|s al lrle(red|ale 3eWade
Purp|rd 3lal|or.
0.3ê --
12 3eWade T(ealrerl P|arl - Exlerded Ae(al|or Z.ê -
13 E|ecl(|ca| / Vecrar|ca| cosl lo( Te(r|ra| 3eWade
Purp|rd 3lal|or
1.8 -
11 E|ecl(|ca| / Vecrar|ca| cosl lo( |rle(red|ale seWade
Purp|rd 3lal|or
0.Z5 -
15 PoWe( correcl|or cra(des. da(der|rd. l(ee
p|arlal|or elc.
50
1ê Tola| 3ê.1ê 89.11
1Z Add 5º corl|rdercv 1.8 -
18 0(ard lola| 3Z.9Z -
19 Tota| 6ost of the Project 47.37
Proposed 8ewerage system for T.P. 8chemes No. 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 1ô of Pa|-
Pa|anpor of 8U0A area
1 P(ojecl a(ea |r la. êZ9.35 êZ9.35
2 Popu|al|or |pe(sors) 1.35.8Z0 2.Z1.Z10
3eWade F|oW ||r VL0)
Ave(ade F|oW 15.ê3 31.25
3
Pea| F|oW 31.1Z Z0.31
1 Cap|la| cosl ol p(ojecl 23.5 -
5 0(a|rade NelWo(| 10.88 --
ê Te(r|ra| 3eWade Purp. 3l. | C|v|| wo(|s ) 2.53 --
Z R|s|rd Va|r l(or lrle(red|ale 3eWade Purp|rd
3lal|or lo 3TP.
2.3ê --
8 V|sce||areous c|v|| Wo(|s al Te(r|ra| 3eWade
Purp|rd 3lal|or
0.015 --
9 3eWade T(ealrerl P|arl - Exlerded Ae(al|or 1.ê8 -
10 E|ecl(|ca| / Vecrar|ca| cosl lo( Te(r|ra| 3eWade
Purp|rd 3lal|or
1.5 0.Z9
11 PoWe( correcl|or cra(des. da(der|rd. l(ee
p|arlal|or elc.
0.35
12 Tola| 22.38 -
13 Add 5º corl|rdercv 1.11 -
11 0(ard lola| 23.5 -
15 Tota| 6ost of the Project 29.25
Phase I: for the requirement till 2019 AD
PhaseII: for the requirement till 2034 AD
Hajor 6omponents of
8ewerage 8cheme
6ost Rs.
|n crores
1 6o||ect|ng system w|th
|ntermed|ate pump|ng
stat|on
28ô
2 Term|na| 8ewage
pump|ng stat|on

2ê VL0 8
1Z VL0 12
êê VL0 11
111 VL0 20
3 8ewage Treatment P|ant
and d|sposa| system

2ê VL0 10
1Z VL0 1ê
180 VL0 51
4 Tota| 6ost 420


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 124

11.3.5 STORM WATER DRAINAGE
STRATEGIES
Strategies for storm water drainage have been based on the fact
that roadside storm water drains are as important as the flood
protection scheme for natural drains.
Drainage Rehabilitation Programme
Under this programme a study shall be taken up to identify
the flood spots within the city. This shall be based on the
past history of floods and a survey of all the drains in the city
and their conditions. Mere cleaning of the drains could drain
most of the flood spots. In almost all the cases, strengthening
of the drains and construction of leading drains will have to
be taken up. A desilting exercise has to be taken up in all the
natural and open drains.
Construction of Roadside drains
Adequate attention has to be given to the construction of
roadside storm water drains (both open and closed) to
facilitate proper draining of storm water into natural drains
and also to maintain proper road surface. It is expected that
around 950 km of storm water drains are necessary by 2007.
Rapid implementation of the Flood Protection Scheme
Funds shall be set aside for the scheme to be completed by
2012. Rapid implementation of the scheme would definitely
reduce the operation and maintenance costs borne by SMC
during floods.
Effective operation and maintenance
Once the flood protection scheme is in place, an operation
and maintenance plan for the entire system involving the
roadside drains, storm water drains natural drains and the
river Tapi is necessary and shall be drafted by 2007.
ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Extension, Augmentation and rehabilitation of the existing
network to match the desired targets by 2012.
Coordinated effort with other agencies for completing the
flood protection scheme by 20059 and taking up new capital
works (bunding of khadi’s and canals).
De-silting of the River Tapi, khadi’s and open roadside
drains. And an inventory of flood spots and areas of mixing
areas with sewer lines.
An operation and maintenance plan for the embankments, sluice
regulators etc of the flood protection system and the storm water
drain network.






The Goal
The year 2012 sees a complete
embankment of the River Tapi and
other important Khadis and canals and
a total storm water drain network of
about 85 % of the road network in that
year.
Institutions
Narmada and Water Resources
Department, Government of
Gujarat
Irrigation Department,
Government of Gujarat
Surat Municipal Corporation
Private sector
Citizen’s council

Sustainability Indicators
Storm drain network/total road
length
Closed drains length/total surfaced
road length


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 125

11.3.6 IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SMC AREA
Capital works towards an extensive storm water drain network
will be taken up on a priority basis. Based on the past history of
floods, the central and east zones will be where the network will
be completed by 2008. a network length of 5.8 km will be added
to the central zone by 2008-09 and a length of 39.66 km is to be
added to the east zone also by 2008-09. The network in the north
zone will be completed by 2009-10 with an addition of 10.98
km. Work in the South West, South East and West Zone will
also be completed by 2012. By the end fo 2008-09 79.544 km of
storm water drains shall be added to the existing 321.532 km
network, taking the total length to 401.076 km. The capital
works will involve procurement and alying of 1600 mm
diameter, 1400 mm diameter, 900 mm diameter and 600 mm
diameter RCC NP2 class storm drain lines.
Under the Flood Protection Scheme of the River Tapi, Capital
works towards embankment of the natural drains from the origin
to outfall will be taken up apart from the embankment of the
river Tapi which is already in progress. The entire scheme is
expected to be completed by 2009. constructing of roadside
storm water drains in all zones to an estimated total length of
about 401.076 km by 2012 and completion of the Tapi Flood
Protection Scheme by 2009.
Benefits
The proposed projects will ensure underground storm water
drains facility to the hitherto uncovered areas of city as well as
will rectify the drawbacks of the existing system. The different
projects include laying RCC storm drains. By implementing this
projects, it is estimated to cover the population of about 4.339
Millions of the year 2021 with the storm water system. By
providing storm water system, the
problems of flooding in the area will
be eliminated and the city will have
comprehensive storm water system.
The proposed projects also reduce the
rehabilitation expenses towards the
slums located on the banks of creeks.
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS –
SUDA AREA
SUDA has given the priority to storm
water drainage system for the town
planning schemes of Vesu area of
SUDA which will solve the flooding
problems of the low-lying area under
the project. The estimated cost of the
project is Rs. 37.31 crores.
Storm Water Drains For Pal-
Palanpor
This area covers about 670
hectares of SUDA area. For this
project, the survey and
investigation work is under
progress. The probable cost
estimates for this project is Rs.
21.00 crores.
Storm Water Drains For Amroli
Area
This area covers about 600 hectors
of SUDA area. Survey and
investigation work is under
progress. The probable cost
estimates for this project is Rs.
19.50 crores.


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 126
8ummary of Projects - 8trom water [8H6 Area}








Projcet 6ost 2005-0ô 200ô-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
8ector
|nvestment |n Rs. Lakhs
Prov|d|ng and |ay|ng 8torm
water dra|ns |n TP 50, 51, 52, Ved
and 0abho|| areas and
secondary dra|ns |n d|fferent
areas of the North Zone
710.00 - 110.00 125.00 175.00 140.00 110.00 50.00
Prov|d|ng and |ay|ng 8torm
water dra|ns |n 8arthana,
Lambehanuman, Karanj,
Fu|pada and Ashwan|kumar
areas and secondary dra|ns |n
d|fferent areas of the East Zone
730.00 - 115.00 175.00 140.00 125.00 95.00 80.00
Prov|d|ng and |ay|ng 8torm
water dra|ns |n Jahang|rpura,
Jah|ngarabad, Ugat, adjo|n|ng
Pa| & Pa|anpur areas and
secondary dra|ns |n d|fferent
areas of the west Zone.
1540.00 - 155.00 315.00 345.00 275.00 245.00 205.00
Prov|d|ng and |ay|ng 8torm
water dra|ns |n Pandesara,
ßhestan areas and secondary
dra|ns |n d|fferent areas of the
8outh Zone.
375.00 - 25.00 75.00 70.00 85.00 ô5.00 55.00
Prov|d|ng and |ay|ng 8torm
water dra|ns |n 0|ndo||,
L|mbayat, 0umbha|, Anjana and
Umarwda areas of the 8outh-
East Zone.
455.00 - 105.00 95.00 80.00 75.00 50.00 50.00
Prov|d|ng and |ay|ng 8torm
water dra|ns |n TP 3ô & 37,
A|than and ßhatar areas and
secondary dra|ns |n d|fferent
areas of the 8outh-west Zone.
1ô70.00 - 220.00 275.00 345.00 330.00 2ô5.00 235.00
8torm water project 5480.00 - 730.00 10ô0.00 1155.00 1030.00 830.00 ô75.00


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 127

11.3.5 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT
STRATEGIES
New mechanisms of collection and disposal have to be brought
in, unless lack of the same develops into an unmanageable issue.
While 2021 envisages a solid waste generation of 1550 MT, the
immediate task before the corporation would be to identify
suitable collection and disposal methods.
Developing and maintaining a transfer station network.
As the Bhatar site is completing its life and the Khajod
disposal site (which is away from the city) will become
operational shortly, intermediate transfer stations have to be
developed and maintained. There will be a need for one or
two such stations in each zone. This decision shall be based
on a survey of the quantity of waste generated from each
ward of the city. The existing storage depots shall be
converted into such stations wherein facilities of a refuse
compactor, waste segregators, recycling units and disposal
facilities shall be provided.
Effective positioning of solid waste collection facilities
A Geographical Information System shall be developed
regarding the existing locations of collection facilities, the
characteristics of the neighbourhoods being served by each
container, the total amount and types of waste being
generated, effective walking distance from each
neighbourhood to the container spot etc. The idea is to come
out with the Geographical Positioning System for the
containers. This, apart from an effective location will help in
optimum usage of containers and upkeep of surroundings.
Waste segregation and reuse.
Source segregation of solid waste is practised in the city and
shall be effectively increased and materials of value shall be
segregated for recycling and income generation. Waste
material from demolition sites such as timber, masonry and
other process-able wastes shall be diverted to the transfer
stations and reused. In consultation with Community
development groups, creation of rag pickers’ societies shall
be initiated in slums. Based on a survey of process-able and
recyclable wastes being generated and the various reuses
they can be put to, such societies shall be facilitated in
contacting all such units and industries that can reuse them,
thereby creating a corporation assisted rehabilitation and
employment generation program.
Increased private sector and community participation.
For the private sector involved in solid waste management,
incentives shall be introduced for improved performance.
Awareness campaigns shall be taken up in all slums and
through the media about waste minimisation, source
segregation, healthy ways of storage at source and reuse.
This is aimed at increasing level of community participation.



The Goal
The year 2021 envisages a
comprehensive and sustained solid
waste management system with modern
and scientific answers to collection,
transportation and disposal of about
1550 MT of solid waste and bio-
medical waste.
Institutions
Surat Municipal Corporation
Private sector.
Citizen’s council
ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Maintain and manage the existing
system through improved methods
of waste collection.
Preventive maintenance of refuse
collection vehicles
Increase the door-to-door waste
collection performance and make
the staff accountable and
responsible for the same as well as
cleanliness and effective use of
public spaces.
Create waste transfer centres at
appropriate locations with refuse
compactor systems, waste
segregator systems and reuse or
recycle facilities.
Khajod waste disposal site to be
commissioned shortly
Scientific disposal methods to be
introduced
Bio-medical waste treatment plant
at Bhatar to be commissioned by
2003
Introduce private sector
participation in operation and
maintenance of waste transfer
centres and disposal sites.


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 128

11.3.6 IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS
Details of Solid Waste Management Machinaries to be
purchased

Tota| Amount |n Rs. |n Lacs 8r.
No.
|tem Nos.
Tota| 2005-

200ô-
07
2007-
08
2008-
09
2009-
10
2010-
11
1 Procurement of 8waraja
Hajda 0ua| 6ab|n Truck
3 25 25
|. Procurement of Road
Ro||er
10 200 200
||. Procurement of
Pock|ane
1 50 50
2
|||. Procurement of 0e-
weeder Hach|ne
1 125 125
|. Procurement of J6ß
Excavator
7 112 112 3
||. Procurement of J6ß
h.C.V. 0umper Truck
10 ô0 ô0
4 Procurement of J6ß
heavy Loader Hach|ne
3 78 78
5 Procurement of 6raw|er
Hounted ßu|| 0ozer
Hach|ne
3 90 90
ô Procurement of H.C.V.
Truck Veh|c|es
ô ô0 ô0
Tota| 800 25 375 172 78 90 ô0

Surat Municipal Corporation has developed a site near Khajod
village for scientific land filling for the disposal of solid waste
collected as per the standards and specifications for the
collection of solid waste within the framework of MSW Rules –
2000.
Further Surat Municipal Corporation has constructed weir-cum-
causeway across the river Tapi. The water stored on the
upstream side is useful as source for intake wells. Beyond the
SMC limit drainage water is directly poured into river water.
This leads to the development of vegetation (algae, hydrilla) in
the river which affects the quality of water. In order to cut down
lots of vegetation in the river water, de-weeder machines are
required, which will be very useful to maintain the quality of
water.
Project Phasing

8r. No. Year Amount [|n Rs.
Lakhs}
1. 2005-0ô 25
2. 200ô-07 375
3. 2007-08 172
4. 2008-09 78
5. 2009-10 90
ô. 2010-11 ô0
7. 2011-12 -
T0TAL 800


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 129

11.4 ROADS AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT- STRATEGIES
AND ACTION PLAN
11.4.1 ROADS, FLYOVER/ BRIDGES
STRATEGIES
The strategies aim at covering the entire area and population of
the city with an effective road network by 2012, as well as
improving the surface condition of the roads by 2021.
Augmentation and asset rehabilitation.
While the peripheral areas are to be provided with surfaced
roads, up-grading of the existing roads shall be taken up to
extend, renovate and enhance the roads. Plans shall be taken
up in a phased manner so as to optimise the cost and surface
condition and shall include upgrading earthen roads to
bituminous roads and Major corridors and roads shall be
upgraded to cement concrete roads. The programme shall
also include completion of the Ring Road.
Widening and strengthening of road structures and
removal of encroachments.
With due consideration to the growing traffic intensity,
major roads, corridors and state highways running through
the city are to be extended and expanded. This shall involve
construction of fly-overs, bridges etc., the works on which
are already in progress. This shall also involve removal of
encroachments on road margins and strengthening of road
structures with pavements, footpaths and surfaced margins
with a provision for storm water lines.
Planning for an outer ring road
To avoid any improper connectivity and to have proper road
alignments at a later stage when the peripheral areas outside
SMC are merged with SMC, the concept of an outer ring
road connecting all such areas should be envisioned.
ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
All major roads to be expanded to 4-lanes and converted to
cement concrete roads
Increase degree of connectivity to 100 percent and
Introducing the concept of outer-ring road
Completion of the ring road from Lal Darwaja to Ved
Darwaja and Connecting the areas on the northern side of the
River Tapi with a bridge across the river
Improve connectivity in peripheral areas of the south and
south-west zones by construction of small bridges across the
khadis

During the first phase, the ring road,
all major roads and important regional
corridors within the city limits shall be
taken up for up-gradation by 2012.

The Goal
The year 2021 envisages 65 % “all
weather roads” and a total road length
of 1130 km is expected to cover the
entire area and population of the
Corporation by 2012.


Institutions
National and State Highway
Regulatory Authorities
Traffic Police, Surat
Surat Municipal Corporation
SUDA
NGOs
Citizen’s council
Sustainability Indicators
Road density
Per capita road length
Concrete road length/ total road
length

The Capital Improvement Programme
towards investments in roads &
bridges is directed towards improving
the intra & inter connectivity of the
peripheral areas of the corporation
and up-gradation of major roads to all
weather roads by 2012 and 2021,
respectively.


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 130

11.4.2 TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT
STRATEGIES
The strategies address the issues of traffic management and
public transport. Since it is the need of an efficient system rather
than any up-gradation or extension, the strategies shall focus
upon system re-structuring mechanisms.
Preparation of traffic and transportation master plan.
A comprehensive traffic and transportation master plan shall
be prepared for which consultants shall be hired. The plan as
a whole shall address issues with respect to traffic
management and the public transport system.
The plan shall be a comprehensive effort in identifying all
the roads, all such junctions and road-rail crossings that are
facing or will face traffic congestion problems. It will also
identify spatially, the inadequacy of public parking facilities,
pedestrian facilities, road dividers and traffic segregation
measures etc.
The plan shall also look into the inefficient functioning of
the public transport system and shall explore measures and
options for improving the system to cater to the needs of the
population in 2011 and 2021.
Improvement of parking and pedestrian facilities.
It shall be seen that all new commercial developments
adhere to the minimum provision of parking facilities. Apart
from providing public parking spaces on important roads
steps shall be initiated to avoid parking at junctions.
Footpaths of requisite width, pedestrian crosswalks and
subways should be introduced. Vehicular traffic should be
banned or limited to only access lanes in certain stretches of
the CBD near the ST bus stand and railway station stands.
Traffic streamlining at intersections.
Channelisers, traffic islands, traffic signals, dividers, lane
separators and traffic police control shall be introduced at all
important junctions based on necessity and design. A
separate study shall be carried out consultants to suggest
improvements in the design and layout of junctions in the
city.
Decongestion of the CBD.
Proposals shall be drawn up to decongest the CBD, in which
a mix of commercial and public activities invites a lot of
traffic. Options of an alternate site location for the ST bus
stand shall be explored. The existing terminal can be utilised
as an alighting point. Also, possibilities of shifting certain
wholesale activities to new locations can be explored.

The Goal
The year 2021 envisages an outer ring
road concept with an effective traffic
management and efficient public
transport systems and introduction of
metro/ suburban trains on/ under the
outer ring road, elevated roads and
fly-overs as also on the major
corridors of the city by 2021.
Institutions
Surat Municipal Corporation
SUDA
Traffic Police, Surat
NGOs
Citizens’ groups
ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Traffic and transportation master
plan for 2021.
Identification of locations for
provision of parking facilities.
Alternate site location for the
central ST station.
Traffic signs to be converted by
modern elements such as thermo
plastic paint, retro-reflective
boards, gantry signage, countdown
clocks etc.
Lane separators on major roads to
segregate traffic and improvised
junctions to streamline traffic flow.
Provision of adequate footpaths
and pedestrian ways.
Awareness programme on
implementation of TP schemes,
traffic regulations and civic sense.
Regular maintenance and energy
management so as to cut down on
the O & M expenses on street
lighting.




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 131

11.4.3 IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS


8r.No. Project Years
2005-0ô 200ô-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 Tota|
1 T(all|c Acaderv |T(ar) 50 25 20 10 05 110
2 Road 0|v|de(s 100 118 100 80 90 100 588
3 T(all|c ls|ards & Jurcl|or
lrp(overerls
50 Z0 80 100 100 100 500
1 3|dra|s W|lr T|re(s ard
Care(as
30 100 300 200 300 1230
5 Puzz|e Pa(||rd¯ 1000 2000 1000 1000 2015 2985 1ê000
ê 0arl(v 3|drades¯ 30 50 ê0 50 Z0 2ê0
Z A(ea T(all|c Corl(o| 30 120 100 110 3ê0
8 P(|val|zal|or ol C|lv 8us
T(arspo(lal|or
100 200 200 200 200 900
9 lPT3 25 200 2000 1000 5000 11225
10 Esca|alo( Tvpe Pedesl(|ar
0ve( 8(|dde/3uoWav
300 900 2000 3000 2000 2000 10200
11 3alelv 0ev|ces & 3|drades 25 25 30 30 50 1ê0
12 Tre(rop|asl|c Road Va(||rd
Pa|rl
50 20 20 10 50 150
Tola| 150 1Z98 1030 8930 11Z90 10000 1985 11ê83
* This will be done on b-o-t basis (Public Private Partnership)



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 132

11.4.4 IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SMC AREA
Surat Municipal Corporation has planned to construct 2 Major
Bridges on river Tapi, 4 Fly over, 2 Road over bridges and
bridges across creeks, details given as below.
Details of the Bridges/Flyovers/ Roads
Project Phasing (Roads, Bridges & Fly overs)
Project Phasing
Other Road Development Projects
Surat-Navsari road between Udhna Darwaja to Unn Jakat
Naka having length of 7.86 km.
Surat-Bardoli road between T-Junction with Ring Road up to
junction with Godadara road near Poona Octroi Naka having
length of 2.40 km.
Surat-Dumas road between Sargam shopping centre to
Rundh Octroi naka having length of 2.80 km.
Rander road between Adajan Patiya to Ramnagar Junction
having length of 2.8 km.
Canal Road Development
Existing Canal Service Roads on both the sides of the canal that
is passing across the city to be developed into a high quality
cement concrete roads with all street furniture. This includes the
improvement of the intersections along the major linkage roads.
The length of canal inside the SMC limit is considered i.e from
Udhna Magdalla Road to Puna Jakat Naka 8.937 Km.


Development cost of corridor
Flyover/ Bridges/ ROB = Rs 143
Cr.
CC Roads – 44.25 Cr.
Street Furniture – 11.1 Cr.

Impact Area Development
Roads = 8,18,060.63 sq. mt .x 1000
Rs/sq. mt= Rs 81.8 Cr.

Shifting of Services
Miscellaneous Shifting of Service
– Rs. 19.85 Cr

Total project cost = Rs 300 Cr.
Total project cost =150+45+15+90=
Rs 300 crores

6ana| 0eve|opment 8cheme Tola| 2005-0ê 200ê-0Z 200Z-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
ßr|dges| F|yovers| R0ß
1 R08 al (a||Wav cu|ve(l No. 110. Arjara
3000 100 1100 1500
2 F|v ove( rea( Pura Kurora(|a 0cl(o| ra|a 1500 25 800 êZ5
3 F|v ove( o(|dde al Kra(Wa(rada(. rea( 3u(al-
Navsa(| Road Jurcl|or 1500 25 Z00 ZZ5
1 F|v ove( o(|dde rea( 8ralrera
2000 50 800 800 350
5 F|v ove( o(|dde al 8ar(o|| (oad jurcl|or
2500 Z5 800 800 825
ê F|vove( 8(|dde al C|lv L|drl Road Jurcl|or
3000 100 800 800 800 500
Z Adjo|r|rd lo ex|sl. o(|dde rea( Kra(Wa(r ada(
800 50 100 50
Tola| 11300 125 5Z00 5Z00 19Z5 500
6.6. Road on 6ana| 6orr|dor 1125 132 1ZZ0 1ZZ0 ê13 110
8treet Furn|ture 1110 33 113 113 153 38
|mpact Area 0eve|opment - Roads 8180 213 3259 3259 1129 290
8h|ft|ng of 0|d Ex|st|ng 8erv|ce 1985 59 Z91 Z91 2Z1 Z0
C. Tota| 30000 892 119ô3 119ô3 4144 1038
8r. No. Year Amount [|n Rs. |akhs}
1. 2005-0ô 3ô81
2. 200ô-07 115ô2
3. 2007-08 14733
4. 2008-09 18353
5. 2009-10 23492
ô. 2010-11 21828
7. 2011-12 0
T0TAL 93ô49


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 133

Est|mated cost |n Rs. |akh
8r.
No. Name of work
Tota|
2005-

200ô-
07
2007-
08
2008-
09
2009-
10
2010-
11
Road P(ojecls
Pac|ade l 3u(al Navsa(| Road
1 3u(al 8a(do|| Road 3181 13ê9 1815
Pac|ade ll 3u(al 0urus Road
2 Rarde( Va|r Road 1511 1300 211
Pac|ade lll udrara Vadda||a Road
3 Adajar Road 1220 1220
Pac|ade l\ \a(acrra Va|r Road
Rarde( Va|r Road
1 Ar(o|| Road 1221 1221
5 Resu(lac|rd ol ler (oads us|rd ACC Va(d Tecrro|odv 188Z Z8Z 1100
ê C|v|| Road - Vaju(a 0ale lo udrara-Vadda||a Road 1Z2 1Z2
Z 0(.leddeWa( Road 13Z9 13Z9
8 15 r W|de Road T.P. 3 Ka(arj 218 218
9 Kapoda(a lo Racrara 3oc. 182 182
10 lod| 8arda|oW lo 0aje(a C|(c|e 101ê 101ê
11 RarcraW| lo udrra Vadda||a Road 3ê8 3ê8
12 8rala( 3cua(e lo 8r|r(ad Ja|alra|a Z01 Z01
13 Pardesa(a 0l0C lo lous|rd 8oa(d Road 191 191
11 Pardesa(a 0l0C Va|r Road 305 305
15 Vaju(a 0ale lo 8rada| Z11 Z11
1ê TadWad| lo K(|srrarada( 330 330
1Z La| 8aradu( 3rasl(| Va(d |Rarde() 305 305
18 CraW| lo AlrWa 0ale 581 581
19 T|ra||vaWad lo AlrWa 0ale Zê Zê
20 lorevpa(| Road Z30 330 100
21 EL8EE F|(e 3l. lo 8rala( 3cua(e 20Z 20Z
22 K(|srrarada( Nad Road 19ê 19ê
23 Zlr 0av losp|la| lo 0roddod Road 252 252
21 Kala(dar 8a|asr(ar lo F|vove( 19ê 19ê
25 Kala(dar 8us slard lo we|( cur CauseWav 1090 1090
2ê \a(acrra Road wa(erouse lo PuraKurora(|va Road 523 523
2Z Arard Vara| Road ê99 ê99
28 \ed Road ZZ0 ZZ0
29 0uras Road 1Z1ê 1Z1ê
30 \a(acrra Road Z08 Z08
31 CraW| lo lod| 8arda|oW 3ê8 3ê8
Tola| 23319 315ê 88êZ 3901 31ê3 39ê2

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 134


IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SUDA AREA
SUDA is also planning for 4-lane ring road of 66 km length in
this peripheral area. For this, survey and investigation work is,
under progress. The probable cost of this proposed ring road is
Rs. 50 crores. Similarly, SUDA is planning for Town Planning
roads in 20 TP schemes of SUDA. The estimated cost for this is
Rs. 89.3 crores. Thus, total probable cost for the proposed roads
is Rs. 139.3 crores.







8r.
No. Name of work
Est|mated cost |n Rs. |akh

Hajor ßr|dges| F|yovers
Tola|
2005-

200ê-0Z 200Z-08 2008-
09
2009-
10
2010-
11
2011-
12
1 8(|dde oelWeer 0aoro||-Jarard|(pu(a or (|ve( Tap| ê500 180 1020 3000 1500 800
2 8(|dde oelWeer AlrWa||res-Adajar or (|ve( Tap| Z000 200 2000 3500 1300
3
8(|dde ac(oss Kar|a(a Krad| oelWeer udrara
Vadda||a (oad ard 8ar(o||. 800 25 200 5Z5
1 F|v-ove( o(|dde or 0e|r| 0ale or R|rd Road 2500 25 1000 10Z5 100
5 R08 al R|v. Cu|ve(l No. 119. 3u(avapu( 0ale. 2500 25 900 10Z5 500
ê F|v-ove( o(|dde or 0uja(al 0as c|(c|e. Adajar (oad. 2000 100 900 1000
Z F|v-ove( o(|dde or Pa(|e po|rl Jurcl|or. 3200 200 1000 1550 150
8 F|v-ove( o(|dde or Kapoda(a l|(e 3l. Jurcl|or. 900 350 350 200
9 F|v-ove( o(|dde rea( Nara \a(acrra. 800 350 350 100
0ther ßr|dges
1 Tap| 8(|dde 8elWeer P|p|od-8ralra 10000 500 2500 5000 2000
2 Tap| 8(|dde rea( \ed 0a(Waja 8000 1200 2500 1300
3 Tap| 8(|dde oelWeer \ed-\a(|av Z000 800 2500 3Z00
1 R08 al 8rusava| ||re 0|rdo|| 2000 100 Z00 1200
5 8(|dde ac(oss c(ee| rea( P(aru|r pa(|. Pardesa(a 500 100 200 200
ê R08 al LC rea( 8reslar 1500 100 Z00 Z00
Z R08 al 3ara(a 0ale Ra||Wav Cu|ve(l No. 115 1000 100 1100 2800
8 F|v ove( o(|dde al 3osvo c|(c|e. uV Road 2200 Z00 1500
9 F|v ove( o(|dde al 8rala( Jurcl|or. uV Road 1800 1800
10
F|v ove( o(|dde al 0axesrWa( Jurcl|or 3u(al Navsa(|
Road 2500 1000 1500
11
F|v ove( o(|dde al 0rao|a ard Rusraor jurcl|or or
Rarde( Road 3000 1300 1Z00
12 Ex|l Rarp lo \a(acrra F|v ove( o(|dde 200 20 180
13 P(ov|d|rd 0es|dr & PVC 3e(v|ces lo 3.V.C. 1100 20 50 232 290 380 128 0
Tola| Z0300 225 2ê95 10832 15190 19530 21828 0
0(ard Tola| |Roads. 8(|ddes/F|vove(s) 93ê19 3ê81 115ê2 11Z33 18353 23192 21828 0

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 135

11.5 HOUSING - STRATEGIES & ACTION PLAN
STRATEGIES
While the housing strategies are focused on facilitating the land
market in the city, the strategies for slum improvement are
focussed on relocation and rehabilitation programmes.
The land to be made available either by Land Acquisition
Act, 1894 or from the open market.
Micro level slum survey to be carried out to decide the
category of slum i.e slum upgradation, rehabilitation or
redevelopment.
Priorities of the operation to be decided.
Preparation of year wise and category wise housing
target upto next seven (7) years.
As per year wise target, selection of sites for the housing
projects to be decided.
CPM programming will be prepared referring the
annual targets of the housing and the execution will be
carried out accordingly.
Involvement of reputed NGOs (for the awareness
programs, development of civic habits of the slum
dwellers, for the operating recovery mechanism, quality
construction of houses etc.).
Preparation of building plans and estimates and its
sanction from the Competent Authority.
Submission of the projects to the Government.
Execution of the project after Govt. approval.
Identification of beneficiaries.
Provision of basic and social infrastructure.
Allotment of houses.
Regularisation of illegal land conversions and
unauthorised layouts.
Illegal conversion of agricultural land on the fringes of the
city has happened in the past and several unauthorised
layouts have sprung up. The corporation intends to regularise
these conversions through the levying of an impact fee after
which the land use for the specified areas shall be made legal
and adequate infrastructure shall be provided.
Relocation of slums along water bodies and transport
corridors.
It has been observed that 34 percent of the total numbers of
slums in the city are either along major transport corridors or
water bodies. Identification of relocation sites and provision
of infrastructure in these areas shall be in consultation with
the community development.
Slum Rehabilitation Programme.
The community development groups shall help the Slum Up-
gradation Cell of the corporation in preparing an inventory
of the service availability in the
slums and in all those slums which
are not being shifted, rehabilitation
programmes shall be taken up to
improve the living conditions.
Services and Individual
Connection to all
Evolving financial mechanisms
for making housing and services
affordable to urban poor
ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Coordinated infrastructure
development to facilitate land
market
Slums that are not to be shifted to
be provided with all basic services
and new EWS housing schemes to
be introduced
Creation of community
development groups from within
the slums for effective
participation in rehabilitation and
relocation
Capacity building of the
community development groups.
The cleanliness drive already taken
up in the slums of the city to be
further strengthened through
participatory techniques.
The Goal
The year 2021 envisages a “zero slum
city” in a phased manner.
Institutions
Real estate developers
Surat Municipal Corporation
Voluntary Organisations
NGOs, CBOs
Citizen’s council
Sustainability Indicators
Occupancy rate
Vacancy rate
Number of slums along water
bodies and transport corridors/
total number of slums.
Number of slum dwelling units
relocated/ rehabilitated
Monthly household income of
rehabilitated slum dwelling units/
income before rehabilitation

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 136

11.5.4 IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SMC AREA
SLUM UPGRADATION
Surat Municipal Corporation has provided most of the basic
infrastructures in most of the slums. The slums, which are not to
be shifted in future, such 80 slums with 27321 households, will
be upgraded by SMC. Considering Rs.8000/- fund requirement
per household for providing additional infrastructure, Rs. 2185
lacs will be required for Slum Upgradation project.
It is observed that in above identified 80 slums, 30 pay & use
toilets and nursery schools will be required. About Rs.240.00
lacs will be required for the development of this facilities.
It is estimated that about 85% of households are of kachcha and
semi pucca type structures. Referring this, the upgradation of
existing huts on site will be one of the prime requirements.
Looking to the present situation and primary estimates, about
24,000 households needs reconstruction and considering Rs.
60,000 expenditure per household Rs. 14400 lacs will be
required.
SLUM REHABILITATION
As a part of rehabilitation program SMC resort site & service
program in the beginning stage. By experience, it is observed
that the development on the site & service scheme was more or
less slum like area. Moreover the land requirement per
household was about 40sq.mt per household. Looking to the
availability of land with SMC, the horizontal development for
slum rehabilitation is atmost very difficult. Because of this
reason, SMC started constructing the structurally well designed
low rise buildings for the rehabilitation of slum dweller.
Surat Municipal Corporation intends to relocate about 121 slums
with approximately 31781 hutments by providing pucca R.C.C
houses for the urban poor.
For the relocation project, about 74 hectare of land will be
required. For construction of houses, about Rs.317 crore of fund
will be required. For development of infrastructure facilities on
relocation sites, about Rs. 35 crores of additional fund will be
required.
For the social infrastructure like nursery schools, primary
schools, UCD centers, community halls, work places for the
livelihood program etc. will be required. For these purposes
additional fund of Rs. 800.00 lacs will be required.
PROPOSED PROJECTS FOR REHABILITATION
The availability of land for the construction of rehabilitation
housing projects was the prime issue with SMC. With the help of
Urban Development and Urban Housing Department,
Government of Gujarat, the land belonging to GHB at Kosad

various types of housing schemes for
the rehabilitation
Admeasuring about 117 hector has
been allotted to SMC at the cost of Rs.
5100.00 lacs. Further more SMC
purchased land situated at Bhestan and
Vadod admeasuring about 21 hector at
the cost of Rs.2300.00 lacs. About Rs.
8000.00lacs of budgetary provision for
the year 2006-07 is made by SMC for
the purchasing land.
Surat Municipal Corporation has
planned to construct well designed
EWS / LIG houses with healthy and
hygienic environment in forthcoming
years. The houses meant for EWS
comprises of ground + 3 storied
apartment with 4 flats on a floor. Each
unit shall consist of one room, kitchen,
WC, wash area and balcony. The built
up area of a unit shall be 22.45 Sq Mts.
The houses shall be provided with all
infrastructure facilities like roads,
3(.
No.
Local|or No. ol
ur|ls
P|ol A(ea
sc.rl
Rera(|s
1. T.P.3crere
No.30 |Rarde()
F.P.No.11
25ê ê118
\AV8AY
lous|rd
3crere lo(
8PL lar|||es
2. T.P.3crere
No.30 |Rarde()
F.P.No.ê1
380 9188
\AV8AY
lous|rd
3crere lo(
8PL lar|||es
3. T.P.3crere
No.3ê |A|lrar)
F.P.No.111
2ê0 ê500
\AV8AY
lous|rd
3crere lo(
8PL lar|||es
1 T.P.3crere
No.3ê |A|lrar)
F.P.No.11ê
95 23Z5
\AV8AY
lous|rd
3crere lo(
8PL lar|||es
5. Ew3 rouses al
Kosad
10000 220000
Ew3
rous|rd
ê. lous|rd lo( 8PL
lar|||es al
Kosad
10000 1Z0000
lous|rd
3crere lo(
8PL lar|||es
Z. Ew3 rouses al
8reslar
3000 êê000
Ew3
lous|rd
8. Ll0 rouses al
8reslar
2000 ê0000 Ll0 lous|rd
9. T.P.3crere
No.32 |Adajar)
F.P.No.11
192 111Z
lous|rd
3crere lo(
8PL lar|||es
10 T.P.3crere
No.32 |Adajar)
F.P.No.11ê
111 21êZ
lous|rd
3crere lo(
8PL lar|||es
11. T.P.3crere
No.21 |8reslar)
F.P.No.3 Pa(l -
2.3
291 Z350
lous|rd
3crere lo(
8PL lar|||es
12. Ll0 louses al
Pardesa(a.
udrara.
8reslar a(ea
500 25000
lous|rd
3crere lo(
Ll0 lar|||es
Tola| 2Z121 5Z9Z15

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 137
water supply, drainage, streetlight, power supply etc. The
houses meant for LIG comprises of ground + 3 storied apartment
with 4 flats on a floor. Each unit shall consist of two rooms,
kitchen, toilet, bath, balcony and parking facility. The built up
area of a unit shall be 38.00 Sq Mts. The houses shall be
provided with all infrastructure facilities like roads, water
supply, drainage, streetlight, power supply etc. Also, land at
Kosad, Bhestan and other areas are acquired for housing for
urban poor. The tentative planning of the houses to be
constructed in forthcoming five years and its project cost shall be
as follows:
SLUM REDEVELOPMENT
Surat Municipal Corporation has tentatively identified certain
slum locations which can be regularized at its existing place. The
redevelopment program for such slums will be carried out in
such a way that, at the initial stage the beneficiaries will be
temporarily accommodated at transit camp and the land vacated
will be partly utilized for the residential purpose with low rise
buildings allowing more F.S.I. The remaining land available
after residential purpose can be developed for commercial
purpose or can be sold in open market and by the way substantial
revenue can be generated which may be utilized for cross
subsidization of redevelopment program of various slums.
About 111 such slums with 34553 hutments will be covered
under this program at the cost of approximate Rs.40000.00 lacs.
The land belonging to SMC will be develop by SMC. The land
belonging to Government of Gujarat or Central Government, the
concern Government will be requested to hand over the
possession of land to SMC and thereafter SMC will redevelop
the concern slums. In case of slums located on private plots, the
consent of land owner will be taken first for the redevelopment
housing project on the same site and land made available after
the housing project, as per the Government directives upto 25%
of total land area will be allotted to the legal land owner.
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SUDA AREA
SUDA is planning to provide housing facilities to economically
weaker section in the developing areas with basic infrastructure
facilities like water supply, sanitation, lights, roads, health etc.
These housing facilities are proposed to be provided at Vesu,
Pal-Palanpor, Amroli, Puna etc.

Slums to be Relocated either
completely or partially by 2012


























2005-200ô 200ô-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 Type
of
hous|n
g
Nos. Project
6ost
Rs. |n
crores
Nos. Project
6ost
Rs. |n
crores
Nos. Project
6ost
Rs. |n
crores
Nos. Project
6ost
Rs. |n
crores
Nos. Project
6ost
Rs. |n
crores
Ew8 1200 12.00 1200 12.00 1000 11.00 1000 12.50 1000 13.50
L|C 500 8.75 500 8.75 400 7.80 400 8.ô0 300 7.20
Tota| 1700 20.75 1700 20.75 1400 17.00 1400 20.75 1300 20.75
Tota| 6ost of Project - Rs. 100.00 crores
0escr|pt|on
No. of 8|um
sett|ements
No. of
huts|
houses
6ost
[|akhs}
Rehab|||tat|on 121 31781 3ô000
Redeve|opment 111 34553 40000
Upgradat|on 80 27321 2425

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 138
MASTER PLAN TOWARDS MAKING THE CITY SLUM FREE

3(.
No.
0eta||s Yea( W|se Experd|lu(e |Rs. lr Lacs)
200ê-0Z 200Z-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
[Aì 3|ur up d(adal|or
|1) Aooul 80 s|urs cors|sl|rd aooul 2Z.321 rousero|ds ol
L|roaval. 8reslar. \a(acrra. Kala(dar a(ea W||| oe
p(ov|ded W|lr oas|c |rl(asl(uclu(e lac|||l|es |||e |rd|v|dua|
W/s. d(a|rade correcl|or. (oad. sl(eel||drl elc. © cosl
ol Rs. 8.000/- pe( rouse ro|d.
515 ê55 ê55 225 105
|2) Pav lo use To||els
30 Pav & use To||els a(e (ecu|(ed Esl|raled Arourl
ê.0 Lacs/To||el
15 51 51 18 9
|3) Nu(se(v 3croo| | ArdarWad| )
A(ea - 10.00 sc. rl.
Esl|raled arourl 2.0 |acs/No.
15 18 18 ê 3
Tota| ê05 Z2Z Z2Z 219 11Z
[8ì 3|ur Rerao|||lal|or
|1) Aooul 121 s|ur cors|sl|rd aooul 31.Z81 rousero|ds
s|lualed al sever d|lle(erl zores a(e |derl|l|ed lo( lre
screre Tre rulrerls W||| oe sr|lled lo We||-des|dred
ard We||-ou||l rouses W|lr a|| |rl(asl(uclu(e lac|||l|es as
pe( p(|o(|l|es dec|ded ov Corpelerl Aulro(|lv
Esl|raled cosl - Rs. 1.00 Lac / ur|l
lrl(asl(uclu(e - Rs. 11.000 / ur|l
A(ea - Aooul - 21.00 srl / ur|l
êZ00 12225 10550 3850 18Z5
|2) P(|ra(v 3croo|
No. ol scroo|s -10
A(ea - 15.000 sll/scroo|
Esl|raled Arourl - 50.00 |acs / scroo|

-

-



250



150
100
|3) uC0 Cerle(
No. ol uC0 Cerle( - 10
Esl|raled Arourl - 8.00 |ac/ur|l

-

-

10

21

|1) Corrur|lv la||
No. ol Corrur|lv la|| - 3
A(ea - 15.000 sll
Esl|raled Arourl - 50.00 |acs/la||

-

-

-

100

50
|5) wo(| P|aces lo( lre ||ve|v roed p(od(ar 2No.
Esl|raled Arourl - 8.00 |acs/ur|l

-

-





8
|ê) ArdarWad|
No ol ArdarWad| - 15
Esl|raled Arourl - 2.0 / ur|l

-

-

15

10

5
Tola| êZ00 12225 108Z1 1150 2051
[Cì 3|ur Redeve|oprerl
Aooul 111 s|ur poc|els |ocaled or p(|r |ocal|ors ol lre
c|lv a(e lerlal|ve|v |derl|l|ed lo( lre p(od(ar. Tola| ol
31553 rouse ro|de( W||| oe p(ov|ded We|| des|dred
rouse or lre sare |ard ov deve|op|rd lre Lard.
A(ea ol ur|l - 21.05 srl.
Esl|raled cosl - Rs.1.00 |ac/ur|l
lrl(asl(uclu(e - Rs. 11.000 / ur|l







-







-








20000








20000
Tola| |A÷8÷C) Z305 12952 11598 21399 221Z1





Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 139

11.6 ENVIRONMENT - STRATEGIES & ACTION PLAN
STRATEGIES
Since there is no effective monitoring of the pollution levels of
the city, the strategies shall address the same and help the
corporation in maintaining an effective database of the
environmental conditions of the city.
Action plan for cleaning and desilting of important water
bodies in the city.
The action plan shall be formulated after consultations with
the stakeholders, wherein all the water bodies in the city
shall be studied to check the pollution levels and measures
towards the maintenance and revitalisation shall be
suggested. The plan shall also explore various options of
maintenance; like developing recreational activities etc.
based on the plan. The River Tapi shall also be part of the
study.
Effective monitoring of water bodies and quality control.
The corporation shall initiate a dialogue between various
agencies including GPCB, to collect and maintain data on
important parameters of water bodies like BOD, COD,
species present, extent of silt, sewerage outfalls, industrial
discharges etc. on a regular basis. This forms an important
aspect of monitoring the quality of water bodies.
Preparation of inventory of air quality.
The inventory shall include a database on air quality
indicators, identification of potential air pollution sources in
the city, emission concentrations and identification of non-
scheduled industrial and commercial locations with pollution
potential. This programme shall involve the services of
GPCB and the Traffic Police. The study shall form the basis
for regular maintenance of data and can help to initiate
education and awareness programmes on pollution
mitigation and control measures.
Integrated transportation planning.
Since a high concentration of pollutants is observed at
junctions and in the form of SPM along roads, it is
imperative to integrate air pollution mitigation measures
with those of traffic improvement.
Regulatory framework.
In line with the powers vested by the 74
th
Constitutional
Amendment Act on ULBs to maintain the environment of
the city, bylaws shall be drafted in coordination with GPCB
to control air and water pollution in the city.



The Goal
The year 2021 envisages a “Clean and
Environment Friendly Surat” with
environment status reports being
prepared each year to check the levels
of pollution in the city.
Institutions
Gujarat Pollution Control Board
Surat Municipal Corporation
State Highways Department
National Highways Regulatory
Authority
RTO, Surat
Surat City Traffic Police
Industrial associations
NGOs, CBOs and Citizen’s council
ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Preparation of action plans for
control of water and air pollution
in the city
Dredging of the River Tapi
CETPs to be introduced to control
industrial pollution
Small scale polluting industrial
units to be moved out of the city
Effective transportation planning
to avoid congestion on roads and
road margins to be properly paved
Augmentation and capacity
building of public transport
Mixed land use to be accepted to
reduce unnecessary movement of
vehicles
Option of renewable energy
sources to be explored for transport
Green belt provision and plantation
of trees


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 140

11.6.1 IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SMC AREA
Tertiary Treatment Plant at Singanpore
The capacity of the existing sewage treatment plant is 100
MLD. In order to reduce the pollution in the river, the plant
will be upgraded with tertiary level of treatment.
STPs outside the city limits
At present, the villages on the bank of river Tapi, on the
upstream side of the weir at Singanpore, disposes their
sewage directly into the river Tapi, without any treatment. In
order to reduce the load of pollutants into the river Tapi, it is
planned to provide the sewage treatment facility to the
sewage from this villages during the year 2006-07.
Replacement of existing sewer line from Salabatpura to
Nanpura SPS
The Sewerage Scheme of Salabatpura and Nanpura SPS was
put into operation way back in 1958 as well as due to
unexpected rise in contributory population the amount of
sewerage generated has increased greatly, making the
drainage capacity insufficient. All this necessitates the
replacement of the gravity trunk main sewer from
Salabatpura SPS to Nanpura SPS.
Barrage project on river Tapi
Considering various environmental aspects, it was felt that
sea tide should be curtailed near Piplod to prevent
continuous pollution of river by effluent brought in with tide
and to prevent tidal silting. To prevent continuous pollution
of river in d/s. regime of Weir-
cum-causeway a Tidal Barrier
needs to be constructed.
Preliminary feasibility study report
was prepared through consultant
for project of Barrage near Piplod
on river Tapi. The present
estimated cost of the project is Rs.
50 crores.
Diversion of storm drains falling in
Tapi d/s. Of barrage
The Barrage Project proposed on
river Tapi at Rundh will form a
reservoir of 10 k.m. length. There
are number of storm drains falling
into this stretch of river. Due to
creation of reservoir, there will be
backwater effect in these drains
and their functioning will be
affected. Also some drains do
contain illegal sewage connections
that cause pollution in river water.
Therefore the drains need to be
diverted by constructing
Interceptor drains or by extending
the drain to some point U/s & D/s.
(10+20=30 km) of barrage site.
The diversion of these drains
would cost about Rs. 100 Crores.
Surat ‘Pushpa Nagri’ Program
Surat Municipal Corporation
gradually evolved a comprehensive
approach for urban forestry and
environmental upgradation of the
city, "The Surat Pushpa Nagri
Program" include efforts in various
fronts to tackle the city's air
pollution problems. Surat
Municipal Corporation has carried
out plantation activities by
greening of road sides, traffic
islands, parks, garden
development, trees plantation in
open plots, drainage station, water
works, municipal schools, etc.
Objectives of "The Surat
Pushpa Nagri Program" are :
• To promote protection,
management, enhancement of
trees in city.
|mp|ementat|on 8r.
No.
0eta|| Est|mated
6ost [|n Rs.
crores}
8tart 6omp|et|on
1 0ra|nage works
| Rep|acement of subs|d|ary
dra|nage ||ne |n
8a|abatpura-Nanpura 8.P.8.
area.
2 0ct' 07 Jun' 08
|| 6onstruct|on of 8.T.P. for
tert|ary treatment to
d|scharge the treated
sewage to the r|ver water
qua||ty at 8|nganpore 8.T.P.
25 Apr||' 07 Harch' 08
||| 6onstruct|on of 8TPs out
8|de 6|ty L|m|t
20 Apr||' 0ô Harch' 07
2 6onstruct|on of
mu|t|purpose ßarrage
project |n r|ver Tap| near
Rundh
50 0ct. '0ô Jun. '08
3 0|vers|on of storm dra|ns
U|s & 0|s. of ßarrage s|te |n
Tap|. [10+20=30 Km}
100 0ct. '0ô Jun. '07
4 8urat Pushpa Nagr| Project 40 Apr||' 0ô Har'11
5 Ra|n water harvest|ng 5 Feb 05 Har'07
Cross Tota| 242


Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 141
• To work in areas with in city where greening is looking
and to use community participation and implement an
urban green plan in those areas.
• To establish and test methods of community
involvement, the model or process of urban greening
that other communities emulate in order to green their
own communities.
• Establish linkages between community groups and
government to identify and meet environmental
problems in affected areas.
• Develop a process where other communities will be able
to improve environment in their communities.
• To reduce the quantity of storm water flows
• To improve the quality of storm water runoff.

Benefits of the urban forestry Project :
• Trees plantation in Surat Municipal Corporation limit
with improve the environmental conditions as trees have
a proper rate in abating various types of pollution,
including dust, noxious gases, particulate matter,
improving polluted land, countering noise pollution
besides acting as an effective carbon sink and natural air
conditioner lowering temperature.
• Urban forestry project will help in motivating people to
plant trees.
• To inculcate sense of responsibility towards trees in
particular and nature in general.
• To increase awareness among the citizens of Surat about
the importance of trees and their role in pollution
control, thereby enhancing the quality of life.
• To motivate communities and colonies to actively
participate in combating pollution at a local level and
hence be part of city's resolve to improve the
environment of Surat.
• In addition, urban forestry conveys a number of
environmental benefits through air pollutant uptake and
greenhouse gas reduction functions.
• Urban forestry can provide limited improvements to
runoff quality. Pollutants are removed by plant uptake
and storage, preventing soil erosion, and by reducing the
overall quantity of stormwater (thereby reducing
associated pollutants).
• City will be totally green after the year 2011.
• As per the population 1 tree will be for 2 people.
• The city will have 41 more new gardens.
• After 7 years the city will be
pollution free.

































































Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 142
Rain Water Recharging & Harvesting Plan
Surat Municipal Corporation intends to implement the rainwater-
harvesting plan step by step. The core plan has been choked out
and will be put into practice after necessary changes required in
the present policies. At present also, 50 % subsidy maximum
amount up to Rs. 2000/- is given to the citizens to encourage the
noble cause of rainwater recharging. This may be revised as per
the present circumstances and after measuring the response from
the citizens. Plan is also there to make it obligatory by law to
implement the rainwater harvesting methods for large size plots
and large or multi-storied buildings. To begin with, all the large
open plots or rooftops of the buildings owned by Surat
Municipal Corporation are being provided with rainwater
recharging/ harvesting systems.
At present, Surat is mostly dependent on surface water source of
river Tapi, which contributes about 85 to 90 % of gross water
supply to the citizens. So under these circumstances, it will not
be wise to depend solely on the available quantity & quality of
surface water alone. So conservation of ground water is one of
the major aspects to be considered now a day and from this point
of view, rainwater harvesting/recharging has a greater role to
play. If this is not taken seriously now, upcoming generation
will never forgive us.
Rainwater harvesting/recharging has following distinctive
benefits.

• Precious rainwater which is flowing in to the sea will be
saved and thereby ground water table will be uplifted. Due to
this, intrusion of seawater into the ground water will be
minimized.
• Water from boring will be available at lesser depth from the
ground and thereby decreasing the energy saving & costs.
• Quality of ground water will be improved and long lasting ill
effects of draught will be reduced.
• There will be an overall benefit to the environment & the
eco-system making it more sustainable for human beings and
other creatures. Trees & plantation will be benefited by the
uplifted ground water and city will
become more eco-cum-enviro-
friendly.
• Ground water will be available in
sufficient quantity & at cheaper
rates and thereby reducing the
stress on surface water, thereby
indirect burden on SMC can be
reduced.
• Life of road pavements will be
increased, as the water logging will
decrease.

Surat Municipal Corporation has
already started the implementation of
rainwater harvesting/ recharging
system. To start with, the corporation
owned buildings, schools, pumping
stations, open plots; gardens etc. are
going to be covered in the first phase
under rainwater harvesting/ recharging
system. In this context, total 316
locations in different parts of the city
have been identified. Out of these 316
locations, work at 47 spots has been
already completed and on 9 spots it is
currently in progress. At the remaining
260 locations also, the work will be
started soon.























Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 143

Project cost of Urban Forestry for Creen|ng of 8urat

6entra| Zone
Yea( W|se experd|lu(e Rs. |r |acs 3(.
No.
Ta(del A(eas A(ea No. ol
p|arls
2005-

200ê-
0Z
200Z-
08
2008-09 2009-
10
2010-
11
App(.
lola| cosl
Rs. |r
|acs
1 Va|r & suo-(oads s|des
p|arla|or
25.000
(.rl.
Z.500 - 5.92 5.92 5.92 5.92 5.92 59.ê3
2 Road d|v|de(s & ls|ards 5.000
(.rl.
30.000 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00
3 3croo|s & co||ede's
d(ourds
10.000
sc.rl.
3.000 - 2.3Z 2.3Z 2.3Z 2.3Z 2.3Z 11.85
1 Tap| (|ve( oar| p|arlal|or 20.000
sc.rl.
1.000 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 20.00
Tola| 11.500 13.29 13.29 13.29 13.29 13.29 êê.15

East Zone - Varachha
Yea( W|se experd|lu(e Rs. |r |acs 3(.
No.
Ta(del A(eas A(ea No. ol
p|arls
2005-

200ê-
0Z
200Z-
08
2008-09 2009-
10
2010-
11
App(.
lola| cosl
Rs. |r
|acs
1 Va|r & suo-(oads s|des
p|arla|or
ê5.000
(.rl.
25.000 - 19.Z5 19.Z5 19.Z5 19.Z5 19.Z5 98.Z5
2 Road d|v|de(s & ls|ards 11.000
(.rl.
Z5.000 - 2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25 11.25
3 3croo|s & co||ede's d(ourds 25.000
sc.rl.
Z.500 - 5.92 5.92 5.92 5.92 5.92 29.ê0
1 3a(lrara Wale( Wo(|s 5.000
sc.rl.
5.000 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00
5 3a(lrara Zoo & Pa(| 20.000
sc.rl
20.000 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 20.00
ê Ew3 co|or|es 5.000
sc.rl.
1.500 - 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 ê.00
Z Vadoo-0urora| oper p|ols 10.000
sc.rl.
10.000 - 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 10.00
Tola| 1.Z1.000 - 12.12 12.12 12.12 12.12 12.12 210.ê0

North Zone - Katargam
Yea( W|se experd|lu(e Rs. |r |acs 3(.
No.
Ta(del A(eas A(ea No. ol p|arls
2005-

200ê-0Z 200Z-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
App(. lola|
cosl Rs.
|r |acs
1 Va|r & suo-(oads
s|des p|arla|or
ê0.000 (.rl. 20.000 - 15.80 15.80 15.80 15.80 15.80 Z9.00
2 Road d|v|de(s &
ls|ards
11.000 (.rl. Z5.000 - 2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25 11.25
3 3croo|s & co||ede's
d(ourds
25.000
sc.rl.
Z.500 - 5.92 5.92 5.92 5.92 5.92 29.ê0
1 Kala(dar Wale(
Wo(|s
10.000
sc.rl.
10.000 - 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 10.00
5 Tap| (|ve( oar|
p|arlal|or rea(
50.00.000
sc.rl.
20.00.000 - 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 2000.00

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 144
Kala(dar Wale(
Wo(|s
ê Kala(dar 0l0C
Wale( d|sl(|oulo(
cerl(e
5.000 sc.rl. 5.000 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00
Z Ew3 co|or|es 5.000 sc.rl. 1.500 - 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 ê.00
8 Kosad 0l8 |ard-
|. (oad s|de p|arlal|or
25.000 (.rl. 8.000 - - ê.32 ê.32 ê.32 ê.32 25.00
||. Ew3 rous|rd 10.000 (.rl. 1.000 - - 3.1ê 3.1ê 3.1ê 3.1ê 12.ê1
|||. P|arlal|or |r
d(eer space a(ea
1.11.000
sc.rl.
1.11.000 - 22.80 22.80 22.80 22.80 22.80 111.00
|v. P|arlal|or |r
lulu(e deve|oprerl
|ard
3.00.000
sc.rl.
3.00.000 - ê0.00 ê0.00 ê0.00 ê0.00 ê0.00 300.00
Tola| 25.15.000 - 501.9Z 520.15 520.15 520.15 520.15 2583.ZZ

8outh Zone - Udhna
Yea( W|se experd|lu(e Rs. |r |acs 3(.
No.
Ta(del A(eas A(ea No. ol
p|arls
2005-

200ê-0Z 200Z-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
App(.
lola| cosl
Rs. |r
|acs
1 Va|r & suo-(oads s|des
p|arla|or
50.000
(.rl.
12.500 - 9.88 9.88 9.88 9.88 9.88 19.10
2 Road d|v|de(s & ls|ards 10.000
(.rl.
50.000 - 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 Z.50
3 3croo|s & co||ede's
d(ourds
10.000
sc.rl.
5.000 - 3.95 3.95 3.95 3.95 3.95 19.Z5
1 Krajod d|sposa| s|le 5.00.000
sc.rl.
5.00.000 - 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 500.00
5 8ar(o|| seWade
l(ealrerl p|arl
20.000
sc.rl.
20.000 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 20.00
Tola| 5.8Z.500 119.33 119.33 119.33 119.33 119.33 59ê.ê5

8outh East Zone - L|mbayat
Yea( W|se experd|lu(e Rs. |r |acs 3(.
No.
Ta(del A(eas A(ea No. ol
p|arls
2005-

200ê-
0Z
200Z-
08
2008-09 2009-
10
2010-
11
App(. lola|
cosl Rs. |r
|acs
1 Va|r & suo-(oads s|des
p|arla|or
10.000
(.rl.
10.000 - Z.90 Z.90 Z.90 Z.90 Z.90 39.50
2 Road d|v|de(s & ls|ards 8.000
(.rl.
10.000 - 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 ê.00
3 3croo|s & co||ede's
d(ourds
10.000
sc.rl.
5.000 - 3.95 3.95 3.95 3.95 3.95 19.Z5
1 0(a|rade & seWade
l(ealrerl p|arls
15.000
sc.rl.
15.000 - 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 15.00
8 Arjara seWade
l(ealrerl p|arl
10.000
sc.rl.
10.000 - 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 10.00
Tola| 80.000 18.05 18.05 18.05 18.05 18.05 90.25

west Zone - Rander
Yea( W|se experd|lu(e Rs. |r |acs 3(.
No.
Ta(del A(eas A(ea No. ol p|arls
2005-

200ê-
0Z
200Z-
08
2008-09 2009-
10
2010-
11
App(.
lola|
cosl Rs.
|r |acs
1 Va|r & suo-(oads s|des
p|arla|or
ê0.000 (.rl. 20.000 - 15.80 15.80 15.80 15.80 15.80 Z9.00
2 Road d|v|de(s & ls|ards 11.000 (.rl. Z5.000 - 2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25 11.25
3 3croo|s & co||ede's
d(ourds
25.000
sc.rl.
Z.500 - 5.92 5.92 5.92 5.92 5.92 29.ê0

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 145
1 8resar seWade
l(ealrerl p|arl
50.000
sc.rl.
50.000 - 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 50.00
5 8o(Wada Tap| (|ve( oar|
p|arlal|or
10.00.000
sc.rl.
10.00.000 - 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 100.00
ê Rarde( Wale( Wo(|s 5.000 sc.rl. 5.000 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00
Z Ew3 co|or|es 5.000 sc.rl. 1.500 - 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 ê.00
Tola| 11.59.000 - 5ê.1Z 5ê.1Z 5ê.1Z 5ê.1Z 5ê.1Z 280.85

8outh west Zone - Athwa
Yea( W|se experd|lu(e Rs. |r |acs 3(.
No.
Ta(del A(eas A(ea No. ol
p|arls
2005-

200ê-
0Z
200Z-
08
2008-09 2009-
10
2010-
11
App(.
lola| cosl
Rs. |r
|acs
1 Va|r & suo-(oads s|des
p|arla|or
Z0.000
(.rl.
30.000 - 23.Z0 23.Z0 23.Z0 23.Z0 23.Z0 118.50
2 Road d|v|de(s & ls|ards 11.000
(.rl.
Z5.000 - 2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25 11.25
3 3croo|s & co||ede's
d(ourds
25.000
sc.rl.
Z.500 - 5.92 5.92 5.92 5.92 5.92 29.ê0
1 Ew3 co|or|es 5.000
sc.rl.
1.500 - 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 ê.00
5 Tap| (|ve( oar| p|arlal|or 10.000
sc.rl.
10.000 - 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 10.00
Tola| 1.51.000 11.0Z 11.0Z 11.0Z 11.0Z 11.0Z 205.35

Zone w|se summary of expend|tures
3.No. Zore No. ol l(ees |r 5 vea(s Cosl Rs. |r |acs
1 3oulr Zore 5.8Z.500 59ê.ê5
2 3oulr Easl Zore 80.000 90.25
3 wesl Zore 11.59.000 280.85
1 3oulr wesl Zore 1.51.000 205.35
5 No(lr Zore 25.15.000 2583.ZZ
ê Easl Zore 1.Z1.000 210.ê0
Z Cerl(a| Zore 11.500 êê.15
Tola| 1Z.11.000 1033.92

8urat Puhpa Nagar| Project [Y0Y 0ut|ay- Rs |n Lacs}
Zones
2005-0ô 200ô-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Tota|
6entra| Zone -
13.29 13.29 13.29 13.29 13.29
- ôô.45
East Zone - Varachha -
12.12 12.12 12.12 12.12 12.12
- 210.ô
North Zone - Katargam -
501.9Z 520.15 520.15 520.15 520.15
- 2583.77
8outh Zone - Udhna -
119.33 119.33 119.33 119.33 119.33
- 59ô.ô5
8outh East Zone - L|mbayat -
18.05 18.05 18.05 18.05 18.05
- 90.25
west Zone - Rander -
5ê.1Z 5ê.1Z 5ê.1Z 5ê.1Z 5ê.1Z
- 280.85
8outh west Zone - Athwa -
11.0Z 11.0Z 11.0Z 11.0Z 11.0Z
- 205.35
Tota| - 792 810.48 810.48 810.48 810.48 - 4033.92



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 146

11.7 HEALTH AND EDUCATION - STRATEGIES &
ACTION PLAN
Education
Emphasis on pre-primary education and good quality
primary education for all, especially for the residents of slum
localities. Support from various sections of the society and
voluntary organizations for involvement in literacy
programmes shall be encouraged.
Ensuring a minimum level of learning through enhancement
of opportunities towards access to literacy programmes.
Professional and vocational colleges to be given importance
for setting up employment development resources through
education and training programmes.
Ensuring education of the handicapped and development of
self-supporting employment opportunities for them.
Health
Reduction of health risks and practices leading to chronic
and infectious diseases through effective implementation of
sanitary programmes, combined with regular inspection of
food joints by the Food and Civil Supplies Department.
Awareness on pre and post-natal care, and unhealthy
practices leading to still-births and infant mortality shall be
created through door-to-door education campaigns and with
the help of the media.
Reduction of environmental threats and hazards to health
through an integrated approach by various concerned
organisations and departments towards enhancement of the
environment of the city.
Improving the quality of health care systems through
augmentation and modernisation to cater to needs of the
future and further decentralisation of the health care system
at zonal level.
Recreation/ Open Spaces.
Taking up a tree plantation programme along the roads to
make Surat a Green city.
Tapi River-front to be developed and converted to act as an
effective open space and recreational area. Initially, the
Stretch near Athwa can be considered for the purpose.
Private sector participation in revitalisation of the existing
waster bodies and green spaces of the city.
Preservation of Water Bodies

The Goal
The year 2021 envisages a
“Completely Literate and Green
Surat” with adequate lung space in all
the localities and a “healthy Surat”,
free of health risks with adequate
health facilities to tackle any situation
of emergency.
Institutions
Government of Gujarat.
Surat Municipal Corporation
Private educational institutions
REC, Government Medical
College, South Gujarat University
Citizen’s council





Institutions
Government of Gujarat.
Surat Municipal Corporation
Private medical organisations
Voluntary organisations
NGOs, CBOs
Citizen’s council

Institutions
Surat Municipal Corporation
Voluntary organisations
NGOs, CBOs
Citizen’s council

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 147
ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Education
Ensure 100 percent enrolment in primary schools.
Increase the number of primary schools through private
sector involvement to a total of 1000 schools by 2006.
Adequate numbers of teachers to be employed in SMC run
schools
Night schools to be opened in slum localities in consultation
with community development groups.
Setting up schools for the Blind, Deaf and Dumb.
Initiate the setting up of professional colleges in the fields of
physiotherapy, dental medicines, tourism, hotel
management, marine & aeronautical engineering.
Health
Effective implementation of health programmes in the slum
areas of the city
Augmentation of health facilities in maskati hospital and
increasing the number of urban health centres and the
paramedics.
Regular checks for water contamination in all water bodies
of the city.
Regular checks by the Food and Civil Supplies Department
of food served at several eating joints in the city.
Recreation/ Open Spaces
Provision for green belts in future development plans
Encourage tree plantation among residents.
Tapi River Front development plan to be prepared
Private sector to maintain existing parks/ gardens
Beautification of community level open spaces
Preservation & development of water bodies & lakes












Sustainability Indicators
Number of students per primary
school
Number of students per teacher
% slum areas without educational
facilities





Sustainability Indicators
Number of institutions reporting
births and deaths
Infant mortality rate
Number of HIV cases




Sustainability Indicators
% open space to total area
% area under gardens & parks to
total open space




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 148

PROJECTS IDENTIFIED FOR PRESERVATION OF WATER BODIES AND DEVELOPMENT OF GREEN
SPACES
8r. No.
T.P.8. No. & Name F.P. No.
Area
[8q.Ht}
Project 6ost
[Rs.|n Lac}
2005-0ô 200ô-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Parks & Cardens
1 TP-5. ur(a-No(lr
|F|o(a| Pa(| )
13ê & 18Z 11911 100.00 - Z5 100 150 Z5
2 TP-11. Rarde( - Adajar 29 1520 10.00 Z 3
3 TP-21. 8reslar 11 3301 11.00 11
1 TP-21. 8reslar 35 10553 15.00 - 30 15
5 TP-23. Rarde( 20 213ê 10.00 8 2
ê TP-30. Rarde( Z2 êê91 21.00 1ê 5
Z TP-30. Rarde( Z8 ê1ê 5.00 5
8 TP-3ê. A|lrar 8 101ê 5.00 5
9 TP-3ê. A|lrar 125 123 3.00 3
10 TP-3ê. A|lrar 1Z 2190 12.00 12
11 TP-3ê. A|lrar 119 ê11 5.00 5
12 TP-3Z. A|lrar R-8 55ê5 22.00 22
13 TP-3Z. A|lrar R-1Z 51êê 22.00 22
11 TP-28. A|lrar-8rala( R-15 9Z01 12.00 12
15 TP-33. 0urora| R-12 11903 51.00 30 21
1ê TP-39. udrra-L|roaval R-23 2031 9.00 9
1Z TP-51. 8reslar R-ê 22810 9Z.00 50 1Z
18 TP-55. 8reslar R-9 êê80 28.00 28
19 TP-50. \ed 8Z 181ê8 80.00 50 30
20 TP-50. \ed 85-A 3311 11.00 10 1
21 TP-50. \ed 85-8 20ê08 90.00 50 10
22 TP-51. 0aoro|| 1Z9 / A 3930ê 1Z0.00 Z0 50 50
23 TP-51. 0aoro|| 1Z9 / 8 5129 22.00 10 12
21 TP-51. 0aoro|| 1Z9 / C 19035 80.00 50 20 10
25 TP-51. 0aoro|| 1Z9 / 0 3333 15.00 15 -
2ê TP-52. \ed 132 21328 91.00 10 30 21
2Z TP-ê. Vaju(a-Kraloda(a 3Z0 1590 12.00 30 12
28 TP-22. 8reslar |NFl) 30/A. 30/8 9318ê 390.00 ê0 100 150 80
29 TP-35. Rarpu(a W.ro.5.
1021/1.
1025 T0
1029
5000 21.00 18 3
30 Tu(ava Varo|a Nordr No.
1Z11-1Z11
252.81 1.00 1
31 TP-3. Ka(arj 91 9523 10.00 30 10
32 TP-32. Rarde( 8ê 2133 5.00 5
33 8ulle(l|v pa(|.
3a(lrara
12000 90.00 20 10 30
31 0|rosau( Pa(|
3a(lrara
3000 25.00 15 10



35 TP-12. Jrard|(aoad
|8olar|ca| 0a(der)
11 & 15 110ê95 59Z.00 100 200 150 100 1Z
3ê TP-ê. Vaju(a-Kraloda(a 1ê1 9811 20.00 20

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 149
Preservat|on of water ßod|es
3Z 0aoro|| Ta|ao R.3.No.
100 / 11Z
15.00 5 10 -
38 TP-2ê. 3|rdarpo( Ta|ao 18 2353 15.00 10 5
39 Kala(dar Ta|ao 58000 3Z.00 35 2
Tota| 580275 2ôô4 85 373 702 535 518 323 128
10 P|arla|or / Lardscap|rd cosl - - 1000.5 21.25 193.25 2ê3 221.25 1ê8.Z5 101 32
Crand
Tota|
580274.8 3330.0 10ô.3 4ôô.3 877.5 ôô8.8 ô47.5 403.8 1ô0.0

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 150

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 151
11.8 Urban Governance – Strategic Action & Plan
STRATEGIES
Drafting bylaws to control pollution.
The corporation is now also responsible for the pollution in the
city, an issue that was hitherto only the responsibility of the
Pollution Control Board. Hence, the new powers vested in the
corporation shall be used to draft bylaws to regulate within the
SMC limits the discharge of industrial waste/sewerage into
water body; the disposal of solid wastes and GPCB shall be
taken into confidence while drafting these bylaws.
Institutional strengthening and capacity building.
These measures shall focus on identification of training needs
for the staff of the corporation and preparation of a
comprehensive programme to suit to the requirements. The
programme shall include innovative practices of service
delivery and the best practices of governance followed across
the world.
Review of sanctioning limits at various levels to overcome
undue delays.
The sanctioning limits and powers of approval shall be further
looked into. This shall be based on the review of the various
projects taken the Corporation from the year when devolution
of powers was initiated.
Integrated planning with other line agencies involved.
Other Line agencies involved like SUDA, GSRTC, GWSSB,
GWRDC, GoG, GPCB, etc., involved in the city’s
management shall be taken into confidence during the
formulation of programmes and projects. The projects
identified as part of the City Development Planning shall also
be discussed elaborately with these line agencies before actual
implementation.
Creation of Geographical Information System of city.
The Corporation shall also develop a comprehensive
Geographical Information System by plotting all the features
of the city and its environs with necessary data to act as a tool
in development planning.
Involvement of private sector in service delivery.
The encouraging experience of part involvement of the private
sector in service delivery shall be kept in view and it shall be
extended to take up certain capital projects identified under the
city development planning process. This shall be on a BOT/
BOOT basis as per the requirements framed.
ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Revision of property tax structure and water tariff
Computerisation of the activities of SMC as per the IT policy
Expedite long overdue projects
creation of MIS and GIS.
Introduction of innovative urban governance practices and
department specific training programmes
Geographical mapping of all the
property tax assessments and
database development
The Goal
The year 2012 sees SMC as a
“Corporation that delivers” to “the
Citizens who govern”. Efficient
delivery of services shall be realised
through enhanced public participation
at the ward level to the city level in
every issue pertaining to the city.
11.9 IDENTIFICATION OF
PROJECTS
As a part of capacity building and
structural reforms in a administration,
various high technique practices need
to be implemented. E-Governance is
one such part though SMC has
computerized many functions still
many more functions need to be
computerized. Integration of all the
services through GIS for efficient
monitoring and satisfactory services
delivery is prime objective of the
structural reform. The components
under this project are
1. Land Records
2. Building Permission
3. T.P.Schemes & Base Map
Preparation
4. Property Tax Assessment
5. Basic Services like water supply,
sewerage, road network, etc.
6. Traffic Management
7. Supervision & Monitoring of
Services by Staff
8. Operation & Maintenance of
Infrastructure
9. Solid Waste Collection and Disposal
10. Efficient use of vehicular fleet
through vehicle tracking system,
automated logged maintenance, fuel
consumption & milage, etc.
Total Cost of the Project is Rs. 5
Crores.

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 152

11.9 URBAN FINANCE- STRATEGIES AND ACTION PLAN
STRATEGIES
The strategies for the financial soundness of the corporation shall
be focussed on the long-term goal of self-sustainability in
finances. Hence the long-term financial strategies include.
Devolution of funds.
In accordance with the recommendation of more than one
Finance Commission, funds devolved by the state and central
governments would contribute to the revenue sources of the
corporation. It is proposed to put these funds into use under the
Capital Improvement Programme uncovered by investment
plans.
Regular tax base revision and exploration of other revenue
sources.
The subsidies on service delivery should be removed to some
extent to avoid cross subsidisation. The tax base should be
revised regularly on a yearly basis. Apart from these, new
sources of revenue generation shall be explored. These
measures are necessary to avoid over-dependence on octroi.
Maintain transfer of revenue surpluses.
Maintaining the transfer of revenue surpluses to capital funds
in the manner that is being followed is necessary for the
sustenance of the Capital Improvement Programme during the
next five years and also in the long run. This is also necessary
to keep the finances of the corporation in a sound position.
Effective collection performance.
The present collection performance of the taxes and charges by
the Corporation is sound and should be maintained at this
minimum level. Measures shall be incorporated to improve the
collection performance of both current and arrears further.
Effective cost recovery mechanisms.
The most effective cost recovery mechanism is an appropriate
tax base and sustainable user charges and fees. Will and
determination should be shown towards upwards revision of
tax and user charges. Collection from public places in the form
of user charges/ fees shall also be revised but not without
efficient maintenance of the systems.
Improved auditing performances.
In view of the Commercial Double Entry Accounting System
introduced into the corporation, the intricacies involved in the
maintenance of accounts are high and hence the auditing
operations required under this system shall be enhanced to
oversee the effective maintenance of accounts.

The Goal
The year 2021 envisages a “Self-
Sustainable and Commercially Viable”
financial position for SMC with
adequate surpluses to carry out the
capital works that are intended to be
taken up without looking for financial
aid from external lending agencies.
ACTION PLAN/ TASKS
Maintaining the collection
performance
Shift from “Annual Letting Value”
concept to that of “Area Based”
property tax structure to generate
more revenue and mitigate legal
matters
Upward revision of water supply
tariff and user charges
All plan proposals to be
formulated by basing on the
Corporate Plan Proposals
Capacity building measures
Services and cost recovery
mechanisms
No. 8ector 6ost Recovery Too|
1 wale( 3upp|v wale( lax. correcl|or ard
d|scorrecl|or cra(des.
Road (e-|rslalererl
cra(des. rele(ed cra(des
lo( ror-(es|derl|a| use(s
2 3w0 |rc|ud|rd
|a|es. (|ve(
Corse(varcv lax ard use(
lees lo( (ec(eal|or
3 3eWe(ade 0(a|rade correcl|or lees
÷ Corse(varcv cra(des
1 Roads
5 T(arspo(l
ê 3l(eel ||drls
\er|c|e lax. (oad (e-
|rslalererl cra(des. (erl.
advl. lax
Z 3o||d wasle
Varadererl
ard lea|lr
Cra(des lo( o|o-red|ca|
Wasle l(or p(|vale
rosp|la|s ard ru(s|rd
rores. Adr. Cra(des
P(everl|ve rea|lr-
Corse(varcv lax ard
Adr. Cra(des. rosp|la|-
use(s cra(des
8 Educal|or Educal|or cess |80º
(ecove(v)
9 Pa(|s ard
P|avd(ourd
use(e lees/ oul|els lo(
corre(c|a| acl|v|l|es
10 0|sasle(
Varadererl/
F|(e



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 153

11.10 IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIAL PROJECTS
IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SMC AREA
SCIENCE CENTRE, MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY
The SMC has planned the Science Centre, Museum and Art
Gallery Complex in the posh City Light area of the city on an
18,420 sq. m. site. Total Project Cost is Rs. 50 Crores.
TRADE CENTER
The SMC has planned the ultra modern Trade Center on around
10000 sq.m. area at the cost of 22 crores.
SLAUGHTER HOUSE
In order to improve the existing slaughter house area, SMC is
proposing a new slaughter house with updated utilities, space for
live stock marketing and other facilities. This project is estimated
to have cost of Rs. 9 crores.
MULTIDISCIPLINARY AQUARIUM
SMC is proposing a multidisciplinary aquarium comprising
freshwater, brackish water and marine aquarium near the
Jagdishchandra Bose garden, in T.P. 10, F.P. 690-703, Adajan,
Surat having 15000 sq mt area. The estimated cost of the project
is about Rs. 6.57 crores.
OTHER PROJECTS
SMC is also proposing number of civic amenities in various
zones. The details of the projects are given in the table below:
ALIA BET DEVELOPMENT
SMC has planned a recreational spot on the western side of the
city in the vicinity of Arabian Sea. It is proposed to develop a
Beach Resort and a Convention Centre. Due to the proximity to
the industrial places like Surat, Hazira, Dumas has high potential
for coastal tourism. The SMC had put their proposal for
development of Recreational Complex at Aalia Bet as a joint
venture of Public privet partnership for development. Special
attention has been paid to the aspect of “Suitability for
recreational use / tourist attraction”. The total area of the Aalia
bet is 1703.00 hectare.



6ost |n 6rores
No
Type 0f
Project
Phase | [200ô-
2011}
Phase || [2011
- 2012}
Esserl|a| Cosl
1. Rela|r|rd
wa|| 12 31.ê5
2. 8(|ddes 2ê 0
1 3. F||||rd 31 ê
0eve|oprerl
Cosl 50 253.5
1. lrl(a. 0ev.
2
2. 8u||l-up
3paces 50 18.5
INTEGRATED ROAD
DEVELOPMENT SCHEME
Important roads, which have direct
impact on the trade activities and the
image of the city, should be improved
in order to function efficiently as well
as appears aesthetically appealing. The
major road network is converted from
flexible pavement to rigid pavement.
These roads can be taken of for
integrated development whereby all the
component of the roads will be
redesign, which will boost economic
activities along the road. Major
components of this project shall be
taken up by Public Private Partnership.
Total cost of the project is 125 Crores.
(836006.8 Sq. mt. * 1500 Rs. Per per
sq.mt.)
No Road Name
Length
[m}
w|dth
[m}
Area
[sq.m}
1.
3u(al 0urras
Road
2Z00 38 102ê200.00
2
3u(al-Navsa(|
Road¯
9ê0
êZZ0
23.Z2
38.00
22ZZ1.20
25Z2ê0.00
3
3u(al-8a(do||
Road¯
Z00
1000
23.Z2
38.00
1êê01.00
38000.00
1 \a(acrra Road¯
1100
2220
23.Z2
38.00
2ê092.00
813ê0.00
5
Rarde( Va|r
Road¯
ê550 23.Z2 1553êê.00
ê
Adajar laj|(a
Road¯
2380 23.Z2 5ê153.ê0
Z
Pa| Purp|rd lo
Re|ra Pa(|*
2125 3ê.00 Zê500.00
83ê00ê.8
*excluding 22 m wide C.C.Road; ^consider entire
width of road
[Rs. |n 6r.} 8r.
No.
Project
2005-0ô 200ô-07 2007-08
Tota| [Rs.
|n 6r.}
1
Aud|tor|ums [ |n south
and west zone}
0.52 7 10 17.52
2
8w|mm|ng Poo|s [|n
east and North zone}
3 4.5 - 7.5
3
0|v|ng Poo| [west
Zone}
1.5 1.82 3.32
3
Vegetab|e Harket [|n
centra| zone}
1 5 1 7
T0TAL [Rs. |n 6r.} 21.5

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 154
HERITAGE CONSERVATION
City of Surat being a Trade Center, there is lack of political
heritage as the city was never capital of any political seat. As
threat from different rules to city for wealth was always very
high. The city wealth was not expressed through architecture.
However, it is believed that the city is pioneer in establishing
some of the best trade practices. It is claimed that the
administrator of the Surat promoted the concept of excise in the
past. This heritage needs to be highlighted & depicted by way of
highlighted such places of trade centers. For eg. The English
factory, the fort, trade jetties.
No Type 0f Project 6ost |n 6rores
1 Redeve|oprerl ol Fo(l A(ea 5
2 Corse(val|or ol Erd||sr Faclo(v 8u||d|rds 1
3 Redeve|oprerl ol 0|d Po(l 1
1 C.C.Road - 0ard| Palr w|lr Fool Palr Ard l||ur|ral|or. elc. 25
Tola| 32
WATER SPORTS
For enrichment the requirement of potable water for Surat City,
Surat Municipal Corporation has constructed a weir-cum-
causeway type structure across river Tapi between Rander and
Singapore at Surat due to construction of weir a large reservoir
formed on U/S. side of weir and S.M.C. want to develop Water
Sports activities in such reservoir. Cost of this project is
estimated as Rs. 2 crores.
Gopi Talav Development Project
To develop an open urban place – A BREATHING SPACE,
where all citizens participate in recreational and cultural
activities equally…experiencing the Proposal – Transforming
limitations into opportunities

No. ller Esl|raled Arourl
1 Ea(lr wo(| 1.89.30.000.00
2 3e(v|ces ard lrl(asl(uclu(e 99.93.000.00
3 lrle(ra| R|rd Road ard PalrWavs 1.3ê.8Z.000.00
1 C|v|| wo(|s 95.10.000.00
5 Lardscap|rd 1.59.51.000.00
ê ê.81.01.000.00
Tapi River Front Development Project
Tapi is a second largest perennial river of Guajarat. At present
the city of Surat on the bank of river is wayward faced to the
river. The city and the river do not make a homogeneous urban
scape. Both the banks of the river are unutilised and encroached
by different elements. Thereby blocking the face of the river to
the city. The banks provide an enormous opportunity for
developing as a recreational activity center as well as
conservation of the largest water body and protecting the
ecology.
Various studies from time to time were conducted by the civic
body for the development & conservation of river Tapi. Over &
above the recreational aspect, the vast
landscape can be commercially utilised
for the development of river. The apex
decision making body of S.M.C.
(Standing Committee) has decided to
make a comprehensive feasibility and
hydrology study of the river by
consultant.
Tapi river front development in
addition to above mentioned
objectives, will reduced the risk of
flood to minimum.
Surat Municipal Corporation intends to
develop banks of river Tapi by
constructing
River drive road for future traffic
need
Multipurpose barrage project
Gardens/recreational spots
Commercial centers
Water sports centers
Amusement Park
Any other such development
recommended by consultants
Tap| r|ver front deve|opment Project 6ost
No. |tem 6ost |n 6rores
1 2 ¯ 3 Lare R|ve( 0(|ve
Road - 30 |r |erdlr
110
2 8ar| P(olecl|or wo(|s 1200
3 3l(erdlrer|rd ol
Ex|sl|rd 8(|ddes. we|(.
elc.
100
1 Rerao|||lal|or ol 3|urs
5 3l(eel Fu(r|lu(e 50
ê Lard 0eve|oprerl 30
Z 8(|dde or 8a((ade 50
Tola| Rs. |r C(o(es 15Z0
Construction of flood protective
RCC wall with bank protection
on Rander bank of river Tapi
Flood protective wall on Rander
bank is needed to be constructed in
two stretches admeasuring about
600 Mts and bank protection to
about 860 Mts. The work of bank
protection would cost about Rs.
16.36 crores for which the tenders
have been sanctioned and the work
would start shortly. The work of
RCC wall would cost about Rs. 8.5
crores for which the tenders are
about to be invited. Therefore the
entire work would require about Rs.
25 crores. Similar nature of works

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012) 155
is required to be carried out at Bharimata (1050 M) and
Singanpore (600 M) at the cost of Rs. 28 crores.
Construction of flood protective sluice regulator on Umra
and Varachha creek
Umra and Varaccha creeks fall into river Tapi. As presently
these creeks do not have flood protective sluice regulator. To
prevent flood water entering into city through these creeks
design for gated sluice regulator was prepared. The cost for
constructing sluice regulator and Umra creek would be about
Rs. 2.5 crores and that for Varachha Creek would be 3.5
crores. .

IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECTS – SUDA AREA
Development of Lakes and Garden
SUDA is developing lakes and gardens at Bhimrada, Abhva
and Pal area. Various surveys are in process for this. The
estimated cost for this recreation work is worked out as Rs.
10 crores.
Sports Complex
A sport complex with all modern facilities is proposed by
SUDA at village Khasod. For this complex, the land
acquisition work is under progress. The estimated cost for
this is worked out by SUDA as Rs. 25 crores.
Fire fighting facilities
SUDA is proposing fire stations with modern equipment at
the cost of Rs. 4 crores at Vesu, Pal-palanpor, Amroli and
Puna.



Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)
11
11.11 SECTORAL SUMMARY OF PROJECTS IDENTIFIED
Rs. |r La|rs
N0
Project deta||s Tota| 6ost
Est|mated 0ut|ay |n
2005 -0ô
Est|mated 0ut|ay |n
200ô -07
Est|mated 0ut|ay |n
2007 -08
Est|mated 0ut|ay |n
2008 -09
Est|mated 0ut|ay |n
2009 -10
Est|mated 0ut|ay |n
2010 -11
Est|mated 0ut|ay
|n 2011 -12
C|lv
Pe(|pre(
v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v C|lv Pe(|pre(v
1lrre( c|lv Rev|la||zal|or 13Z9 0 0 285 2081 ê10 908 1ê5 0
2wale( 3upp|v | |rc|. scada ) 25Z11.1Z 39ê00 3510.ê 2000 Z028.8 1100 8êZ1 8000 380ê 9500 1ê5ê Z000 100ê ê000 0 3000
33eWe(ade 38920 12000 1115 0 ZZ50 Z500 8830 êZ00 ê125 Z000 5900 9000 5800 8800 3100 3000
13lo(r wale( 0(a|rade 5180 1Zê00 0 100 Z30 1200 10ê0 3000 1155 3800 1030 2500 830 2000 êZ5 2000
53o||d Wasle raradererl 800 8000 25 3Z5 1000 1Z2 1000 Z8 2000 90 2000 ê0 1000 0 1000
êErv|(orrerl |rp(overerl W|lr u(oar Fo(esl(v 21200 0 250 10010 10110 1910 810 810 0
Z8(|dde & F|vove(s Z0300 11000 225 2ê95 1500 10832 5500 15190 1000 19530 21828 0
8Roads 23319 8Z000 315ê 1500 88êZ 10000 3901 15000 31ê3 15000 39ê2 21300 0 13100 8100
9Cara| Road 0eve|oprerl 30000 0 892 119ê3 119ê3 1111 1038 0 0
10T(all|c Varadererl 11ê83 0 150 1Z98 1030 8930 11Z90 10000 1985
11Ew3 / Ll0 lous|rd |u(oar Poo() Z8125 351Z5 0 500 Z305 1300 12952 Z800 11598 10100 21399 9100 221Z1 3300 0 2ZZ5
123c|erce cerl(e. Vuseur. a(l da||e(v 5000 0 Z00 1ê00 1500 1200
13T(ade Cerl(e 2200 0 500 500 ê00 ê00
113|audrle( rouse 900 0 0 250 200 150
150l3 app||cal|ors 500 0 20 130 100 100 150
1ê8oc|a| |nfrastructure

a ) Aud|lo(|urs |r |) 3oulr Zore & ||) wesl
Zore 1Z52 0 52 Z00 1000

o) 3W|rr|rd poo|s |r |) Easl Zore & ||) No(lr
zore Z50 0 300 150
c) 0|v|rd Poo| |r wesl Zore 332 0 150 182
d) \edelao|e ra(|el Z00 0 0 200 250 250
e) La|e deve|oprerl ard da(der
|) 0op| Ta|av ê81 0 25 200 15ê
||) 0a(der 0eve|oprerl 359Z.5 3350 101.25 55ê.25 - 920 Z00 Z19.25 Z00 ê8ê.Z5 Z00 121 Z00 1ê0 550
|||) P(ese(val|or ol wale( ood|es êZ 2000 5 - 10 - 15 500 Z 500 500 500 -
l) 3po(ls corp|ex
|) wale( 3po(ls & Va(|re Accua(|ur 1191 0 10 210 510 101
d) Corrur|lv la|| 0 5000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000
r) C(eralo(|ur 0 1000 - 100 300 300 - -
18Aa||a 8el 0eve|oprerl 20200 0 0 1100 Z000 Z100 5000
19lrled(aled Road 0eve|oprerl 12500 0 1000 2300 2300 2300 2300 1300 1000
20le(|lade 3200 0 0 900 500 500 Z00 300 300

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)
21Tap| R|ve(l(orl 0eve|oprerl 100000 0 2350 1ê50 10000 20000 21000 21000 21000
Tola| 0ul|av 19ê81Z.9Z 251Z25 11êêê.85 1100 Z2ZZ5.05 29ê00 10021ê 19ê00 9039ê.25 51200101519.Z5 5ê100 85991 3ê100 31220 21125
Yea(-W|se 0ul|av Z18512.9Z 18Zêê.85 1023Z5.05 11981ê 11159ê.25 15Z919.Z5 122391 52ê15

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)
CHAPTER 12: CHAPTER 12: CHAPTER 12: CHAPTER 12: CAP¡TAL CAP¡TAL CAP¡TAL CAP¡TAL
¡MPROVEMENT PROGRAMME ¡MPROVEMENT PROGRAMME ¡MPROVEMENT PROGRAMME ¡MPROVEMENT PROGRAMME
12.1 INTRODUCTION TO CIP
The Capital Investment Plan is the multi- year scheduling of
public improvements and investments. The scheduling or
phasing of the plan is based on studies of the fiscal resources
availability (for new investments and O & M), technical capacity
for construction and O & M and the choice of specific
improvements to be constructed for a period of five years into
the future.
As a part of CIP prepared for the first City Corporate Plan during
2001-02, SMC has (a) analyzed and discussed with the public,
the existing applicable norms and standards for infrastructure
services, considering low, medium, high and mixed options, (b)
agreed and recommended a reasonable and realistic option and
(c) justified and provided rationale if the chosen option is not
within the existing service level standards.
In determining a long-term financial strategy, the corporation
plans to raise resources through:
Accessing the grants available under the JNURM
Framework (as % of identified investment in Urban
Governance and infrastructure sectors - 50% Central Govt.
Grants and 20% State Govt. Grants)
Funds devolved by the GoG based on the recommendations
of the State Finance Commission
Revision of the Annual Rateable Value at certain levels
Revision of water and sewerage charges at specific intervals
Transfer of water and sewerage tax to the respective account
heads
Maintaining the collection performance of taxes and charges
at certain minimum levels for current and for arrears.
Underlying the major assumptions, basic assumptions for growth
in property tax assessment, growth in other taxes and
miscellaneous income, as well as changes in the main
expenditure heads have been made, including general
administration, establishment, O & M, debt servicing, etc.
The phasing/ scheduling of investments have been carried out
through an iterative process and the principles of phasing have
been taken into account.
















Principles of Phasing
Priority needs, with developed
areas receiving priority over future
development area
Inter and intra-service linkages,
viz. water supply investments shall
be complemented by
corresponding sewerage/
sanitation improvements.
Size and duration of the
requirements, including
preparation and implementation
period
Project linked revenue
implications, such as installing
house connections where supply
and distribution capacities have
been increased
The Capital Investment Plan involved
the identification of public capital
facilities to cater to the demand of the
city populace by the year 2011/12.

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)

12.2 INSTITUTIONALISING THE CIP PROCESS
The Capital Investment Plan is an important element and is
significant in terms of the city’s management process and
sustainability with regard to the delivery of basic services. While
the CIP provides a framework for the annual budget cycle, for
that purpose alone the CIP presented in 2000-01 is updated and
rolled forward for a further five-year period.
The need for updating is on account of:
Reassessment of city growth and infrastructure needs ( to be
carried out once in five years)
Detailed feasibility/ engineering studies carried out of new
projects.
Rescheduling of investments on ongoing projects due to cost
and/ or time overruns.
Reassigning priorities within the constraints of available
financial resources
12.3 CAPITAL FACILITIES & INVESTMENT NEEDS
Updated Capital Investment Plan and forecasted future needs for
provision of capital facilities under each identified sector is
presented below.
12.3.1 CAPITAL INVESTMENTS
PROJECTS’ IDENTIFICATION
The projects identification has been done based on the strategies
listed out under each of the service sector as identified by SMC.
The projects derived based on the SMC estimates are aimed at
ensuring optimal and efficient utilisation of existing
infrastructure systems. Other developmental projects include
projects other than those for core service sector viz. system
modernisation, river conservation etc. Such projects are also
based on lists and/ or reports prepared by SMC.
The total estimated capital investment required for providing
efficient services to the population of SMC by the year 2011/12
is about Rs. 4968.18 Crores. The table below presents the
summary of sector-wise investment requirements. Of the non-
core sector the maximum investment has been worked out for the
river conservation plan. It accounts for about Rs. 1000 crores (20
percent of the total investment required).

Goals for CIP
Provision of capital facilities that sustains city populace.
Preservation of the physical integrity capital assets.
Capital facilities to be considered community assets.
Grass-root involvement.
Community inputs to the siting of
public facilities.

Strategies for CIP
Strategic Capital Improvement
Facility Siting
Decision Making
Programme Funding








In addition to the investment of Rs.
4968.18 Crores identified by SMC for
SMC area, an additional Rs. 2517.25
Crores is identified as investment
required for areas outside SMC
jurisdiction under SUDA. These
investments are proposed by SMC &
SUDA under the JNURM Framework
wherein 70% of the urban
infrastructure and governance related
investment is funded by way of GoI
and GoG capital grants. The rest of the
30% and investment on social
infrastructure will need funding
through own sources or user
contributions and borrowings.








Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)
Summary of Sector Wise Investment requirement (SMC Area)
PHASING OF CAPITAL INVESTMENT
The phasing has been worked out by SMC. The estimated capital
investment is phased over a 7-year period (2005-06 to 2011-12)
so as to enable completion of capital works identified for the
2011/12 population.
Investments are envisaged and phased over the seven year period
till 2011-12. 36% of the total identified investment is proposed
on improvement and new works on roads, bridges and fly-overs.
Slum improvement, LIG housing etc is allotted 16% of the
investment followed by 8% on sewerage and 6% each on urban
development and environmental improvement projects. 5% of
the investment is proposed for water supply system
improvements.
12.4 MULTI-YEAR INVESTMENT PROGRAMME
Eessentially a multi-year forecast of finances of the local body
for a medium term is termed as the Financial and Operating Plan
(FOP). While the identified investment is phased from 2005/06
to 2010/11
9
, the FOP has been generated from 2005/06 to
2014/2015. A salient feature of the FOP is that all outstanding
dues including debt and non-debt liabilities have been taken into
account. The FOP is generated to assess the investment
sustaining capacity of the corporation adopting a project funding
structure comprising of 70 per cent in the form of grants under
the JNURM framework and the rest (30 per cent) by way of
internal resources and loans. The major criterion for ascertaining
the investment sustaining capacity of SMC is that they should
have year-to year positive Opening Balance and that the debt
servicing ratio during each year not to exceed 25%. The finance
data updated for the F.Ys 2000-01 to 2004-05 from SMC annual
accounts has been used as the base to prepare the FOP. A
spreadsheet FOP model has been customised so as to work out
the investment sustaining capacity of SMC, based on the FOP
assumptions.











The main items of income and
expenditure classified into revenue
account and capital account are
projected in the FOP under the
following categories.
Categories of FOP Projections
Revenue Account Receipts;
o Taxes ,
o Non Tax Sources, and
o Grants, Contribution and
Subsidies.
Revenue Account Expenditure;
o Establishment,
o Operation and Maintenance,
o Debt Servicing- Existing and
New Loans,
o Phasing of non debt
liabilities, and
o Additional O&M.
Capital Income; and
Capital Expenditure

2005-0ê 200ê-0Z 200Z-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 Tola|
3eclo(
lrveslrerl |r Rs. La|rs
water 8upp|y 3511 Z029 8êZ1 380ê 1ê5ê 100ô - 25Z11
8ewerage & 8an|tat|on 1115 ZZ50 8830 ê125 5900 5800 3100 38920
8o||d waste Hanagement 25 3Z5 1Z2 Z8 90 ô0 - 800
8torm water 0ra|n - 730 10ô0 1155 1030 830 ô75 5480
Roads & ßr|dges 5Z23 2Zê23 3302ê 33Z2Z 38ê20 33128 5985 1ZZ832
Urban 0evp, 8ystem Hodern|sat|on & Urban
Cov
20 2115 9ê81 8310 êZ58 7ô5 300 282Z9
8|ums| Ew8| L|C - Z305 12952 11598 21399 22171 - Z8125
Env|ronment 381 10ZZê 11831 2êêê 119Z 1234 1ô0 2851ê
8oc|a| |nfrastructure 1212 1122 3990 2901 ê00 - - 12825
R|ver Embankment| 6onservat|on P|an 2350 1ê50 10000 20000 21000 21000 21000 100000
0(ard Tola| 11êêZ Z2ZZ5 10021ê 9039ê 101550 85994 31220 19ê818

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)

12.4.1 FOP ASSUMPTIONS
FORECAST OF REVENUE INCOME
Octroi
10
has been the single largest source of revenue for the
SMC contributing about 59 per cent. The assumption adopted in
forecasting octroi tax, property tax (general tax, conservancy tax,
water tax, water charges, and water meter charges) and other
revenue items are presented in the following tables.
Assumptions Adopted for Forecasting Realisation under
General Tax Head
Other Taxes


10
Octroi has been discontinued from the Municipalities in the State
of Gujarat, but exists in all Corporations in the state.
Other tax items including fees, etc.
have been assumed to grow at the past
growth trends, subject to a minimum of
5% and maximum of 15% per annum.
Assumptions Adopted for Forecasting
Realisation under Other Tax Heads


Assumptions Adopted for Forecasting
Realisation under Octroi Head
ller
Assurpl|or Adopled lo(
Fo(ecasl
8as|s
| 0ctro|
Forecast adopt|ng current average
growth rate, subject to m|n|mum
of 57 and max|mum of 157.








ASSUMPTIONS ADOPTED FOR FORECASTING
REALISATION UNDER OTHER TAX HEADS
ller
Assurpl|or
Adopled lo(
Fo(ecasl
8as|s
||| 0ther taxes
2
water charges,
water meter
charges,
mechan|ca|
veh|c|e tax,
theatre tax, and
other taxes
Forecast adopt|ng current
average growth rate,
subject to m|n|mum of 57
and max|mum of 127.
3
8ewer
connect|on
charge
Forecast based on:
No. of connect|ons,
m|n|mum month|y charge,
per|od|c rev|s|ons and
co||ect|on performance
a}
No. of
connect|ons
Equ|va|ent of Property tax
co||ect|on
b} Honth|y charge Rs. 25 per month
d}
6o||ect|on
performance- 7
Cradua| |ncrease |n
co||ect|on performance
from current performance.
e} Per|od|c rev|s|on
507 rev|s|on |n charges |n
Years 200ô|07 & 2010-11
f}
New connect|on
charge
Rs. 1000 per connect|on
g}
|ncrease |n new
connect|on fee
©25 per cent every 4 years
from 200ô|07

ller
Assurpl|or Adopled lo(
Fo(ecasl
8as|s
|| Cenera| tax
Forecast based on.
Crowth |n assessments
Tax demand
Per|od|c rev|s|ons and
6o||ect|on performance
1 Crowth |n assessments
Popu|at|on growth rate- 1991-2001 or 37
wh|chever |s m|n|mum
2 Tax demand
Equ|va|ent to ex|st|ng average demand per
assessment
3
Per|od|c rev|s|ons
[perm|ss|b|e every 4
Years}
25 7 |ncrease |n current demand |n years 200ô|07,
& 2010|11
4 6o||ect|on performance- 7
Cradua| |ncrease |n co||ect|on performance from
current performance. Arrears: current average or
407, wh|chever |s h|gher
6urrent: current average subject to m|n.707, and
max. 957
ller
Assurpl|or Adopled lo(
Fo(ecasl
8as|s
||| 0ther taxes
1 water tax
Forecast based on:
Crowth |n connect|ons,
H|n|mum month|y charge,
Per|od|c tar|ff rev|s|ons and
6o||ect|on performance
A} Crowth |n connect|ons ©ô7 per annum
ß}
H|n|mum month|y
charge
m|n|mum of Rs. 25 per month
6} Per|od|c tar|ff rev|s|on
|n Years 200ô|07 and 2010|11- 507 rev|s|on |n
charges
0}
6o||ect|on performance-
7
Cradua| |ncrease |n co||ect|on performance from
current performance. Arrears: current average or
407 , wh|chever |s h|gher
6urrent: current average subject to m|n. 707 and
max. 957
E} New connect|on charge Rs. 2000 per connect|on
C}
|ncrease |n new
connect|on fee
©25 per cent every 4 years from 200ô|07

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)
Non-Tax Income (Own Sources)
Non tax income from the corporation’s operations and assets,
like income from municipal properties, collection form public
places, realisation under special acts, and public service charges
and fees, etc. are assumed to grow at the past trends, subject to a
minimum of 5% and maximum of 8% per annum, over the
average income during the last five years.
Non-Tax Income (Other Sources)
Other sources mainly include interest earned from deposits and
dues, sale proceeds (scrap sale, farm product, publication, tender
form, etc), and miscellaneous income. These sources of income
are assumed to increase at the past trends, subject to a minimum
of 5% and a maximum of 8% per annum.
Non-Tax Income (Revenue Grants)
The revenue grants announced from time-to time are assumed to
grow at past trends, subject to a nominal growth of 8 per cent.
These grants mainly include grants for various purposes viz.
UBSP, grants for educational and medical services and other
grants announced from time to time.
FORECAST OF REVENUE EXPENDITURE
ASSUMPTIONS ADOPTED FOR FORECASTING REALISATION UNDER NON-
TAX INCOME HEADS


















ller
Assurpl|or
adopled lo(
Fo(ecasl
8as|s
|V Non-tax |ncome
1
|ncome from
mun|c|pa|
propert|es,
rea||zat|on under
sp. Acts, |nst.,
Rent & 0thers
Forecast adopt|ng current
average growth rate,
subject to m|n|mum of 57
and max|mum of 87.
V Revenue grants
1
8tate Covernment
and pr|vate 0ther
Crants
8ubject to a standard
growth rate of 8 7
ller Assurpl|ors Adopled lo( Fo(ecasl
|
Estab||shment
expend|ture
Forecast adopt|ng;
Nom|na| annua| growth rate
|ncorporat|ng effect of V| Pay 6omm|ss|on rev|s|on
1 Annua| growth rate
Past trend, subject to a m|n|mum of 8 7 and max|mum
of 127 p.a
2
V| Pay 6omm|ss|on
|n 200ô|07
Add|t|ona| |ncrease of 257
||
Repa|r &
Ha|ntenance on
ex|st|ng serv|ces
water 8upp|y- © Rs. ô.ô1 |akhs per HL0 per annum at
2001-02 pr|ces, and |ncreas|ng at ô7 p.a
0ther 8erv|ces- Forecast adopt|ng current average
growth rate, subject to m|n|mum of ô7 and max|mum of
157.
Adopted as 7 of cap|ta| cost, to |ncrease at ô7 p.a
water 8upp|y 4.00
8ewerage & 8an|tat|on ô.00
8o||d waste Hanagement 10.00
8torm water 0ra|n 4.00
Roads & ßr|dges 4.00
Urban 0eve|opment| Covernance 2.00
Env|ronment 4.00
8oc|a| |nfrastructure 2.00
|||
Add|t|ona| 0&H
expend|ture due to
new |nvestments
|dent|f|ed as part of
6|P [e||g|b|e sectors
to be catered from
the Revo|v|ng Fund
of 257 of JNURH
Crants to be
created}
R|ver Embankment| 6onservat|on P|an ô.00
|V 0ebt serv|c|ng
Ex|st|ng Loans [CoC, L|6, hU060, ßank, |nst|tut|ona|
Loans, etc.}- To be repa|d |n 10 to 15 years © |nterest
rates of 8.57 p.a, beg|nn|ng from 2005-0ô.
New Loans [to fund 6|P}- To be repa|d |n 10 years + 5
years Horator|um w|th |06 © 7.57 |nterest rate p.a.
V
0utstand|ng non-
debt ||ab|||t|es
[8a|ar|es, P.F,
Cw88ß, CEß, CoC
Edu. 6ess, etc.}
|f any, to be c|eared |n 1 to 5 Years start|ng 2005-0ô

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)
FORECAST OF CAPITAL INCOME AND EXPENDITURE
Capital Income (Own Sources)
The amount realised under own sources contribute mainly from
betterment charges, non-refundable registration/ permit fee, sale
of capital assets. A standard nominal growth rate of 12 per cent
per annum over the average realisation during the last five years
has been assumed.
Capital Income (Regular Scheme-Based-Capital Grants)
SMC receives capital grants from the State Government under
various state and Central Government sponsored schemes for
specific capital works. The income under such grants does not
show specific trends during the last five years. 70% of identified
investment under infrastructure and governance sectors is
proposed for grants from GoI and GoG under the JNNURM
framework. The adjacent table presents the assumptions adopted
for forecasting the items of capital income and expenditure.
Other Capital Income
The other income realised under capital accounts head is from
borrowings from government and other institutions. It is
assumed that other capital would have a growth rate of 12 per
cent per annul on the average realisation of last five years.
Capital Expenditure (Regular Scheme-Based-Capital Works)
SMC is required to utilise the scheme-based capital income for
specific works alone. It is assumed that the entire amount of
capital income received for such works from state/ central
Government will be expended on specific schemes for which
they are meant.

SIZING OF CAPITAL INVESTMENT
The phased investment is loaded onto the FOP model, and based
on the assumptions adopted; the annual finances of SMC are
forecasted until F.Y 2014-15. The criterion for ascertaining
investment sustainability is a
Year-to-year positive closing balance;
Debt servicing ratio during each year not to exceed 25%.
In cases where SMC does not satisfy the above criterion, the
investment needs to be scaled down uniformly across all sectors
of identified investment, till the criterion is met. The investment
level at which the criterion is met is the sustainable investment
by SMC. It needs mention, that the FOP is structured such that
while demonstrating zero sustainability the SMC will still incur
capital expenditure against scheme-specific capital grants
received from GoG.



Assumptions Adopted for Forecasting
Realisation under Capital Income
Items

Assumptions Adopted for Forecasting
Realisation under Capital Expenditure
Items








ller
Assurpl|ors Adopled lo(
Fo(ecasl
A 6ap|ta| |ncome
|
0wn 8ources,
Crants and
6ontr|but|on
Ex|st|ng cap|ta| |ncome to
grow based on current
average growth rate, subject
to standard growth rate of
127
|| JNURH Crants
507 of |dent|f|ed |nvestment
under Urban |nfrastructure
and Urban Covernance
sectors to be funded by Co|
6ap|ta| grants and another
207 through CoC 6ap|ta|
grants
|||
Revenue
8urp|uses and
Loans
0wn Resources- 307 of
|nvestment and other 8oc|a|
|nfrastructure projects to be
funded from revenue
surp|uses and Loans.
ller
Assurpl|ors Adopled lo(
Fo(ecasl
ß 6ap|ta| expend|ture
|
8ector-w|se
cap|ta|
expend|ture
ßased on the |nvestment
susta|nab|e by the 8H6,
phased over the p|an per|od.
[8ee phas|ng of cap|ta|
|nvestment and s|z|ng of
cap|ta| |nvestment}. The
|nvestment needs has been
|dent|f|ed by the 8H6

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)

12.5 FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN (FOP)- RESULTS
The FOP was generated from the sustainable investment point of
view with consideration also towards the additional O&M
expenses to be incurred on the new capital assets to be created.
The 10-year FOP of SMC is presented in the Annexure. It may
be noted that, under the assumptions made and the full identified
investment loaded, the investment sustainability criteria are
satisfied during all years of planning horizon. SMC would have
operating surpluses along with prompt repayment of all
outstanding loans and non-debt liabilities. This is mainly due to
the consideration of about 70% of the total identified investment
being funded in the form of grants under the JNURM
framework.
The results of the FOP in terms of the total investment required,
investment sustainable and source-wise funding of the
sustainable investment for the SMC is presented in Annexure.
FUND REQUIREMENT
Recommended investment of Rs. 4968.18 Crores
One of the purposes of this assignment is to ascertain the
requirement for funding within a municipal finance framework.
It has been assumed that by enhancing the collection
performance and widening the tax base of current taxes, SMC
would be able to sustain the entire identified investment, Rs.
4968.18 Crores (Rs. 5996.44 Crores at current prices), phased
over a seven-year period from 2005-06 to 2011-12. The actual
investment sustainability of SMC under the adopted assumptions
and funding structure is 145% of the identified investment i.e.,
about Rs. 7204 Crores. The funding for the identified investment
of Rs. 5996.44 Crores in current prices as worked out in the FOP
model would be by way of.
JNURM Capital Grants - Rs. 4097.57 Crores (68%)
o Rs. 2926.84 Crores (48% - GoI)
o Rs. 1170.73 Crores (20% - GoG)
Own Contribution of the ULBs
o Rs. 1798.93 Crores (30%)
Loans
o Rs.99.68 Crores (2%)
It needs mention that the FOP indicated sustainability for Rs.
7204 Crores against proposed investment of Rs. 4968 Crores for
SMC. This indicates the sound financial condition of SMC with
respect to taking up large scale investments. In the absence of
JNURM grants, the sustainability of SMC is 95% which is the
significant feature of current SMC finances however subject to
rationalization and regular revision of user charges and better
collection performance. The combined investment requirement
of SMC and SUDA is Rs. 7485 Crores.



























The JNNURM framework and the
grants to be made available would
assist in keeping the soundness of
financial condition of SMC intact and
further provide the leverage to SMC to
take up additional investments towards
creation of better infrastructure for its
ever growing populace and city.
An assessment of the financial viability
of SUDA to take up the projects
identified is carried out and presented
below along with the
recommendations.

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)

12.5.1 SUDA – FOP ASSUMPTIONS
FORECAST OF REVENUE INCOME
Land
In the absence of tax related income for SUDA, the single largest
source of revenue income is lands. Premium on lease of lands
and development charges would be major revenue source for
SUDA and accordingly the same has been projected to increase
further in the future.
User Charges
There hasn’t been any collection of user charges with respect to
water supply and sewerage services being provided to the
citizens. SUDA proposes to introduce and also affect regular
revision of the charges for better service delivery as well as cost
recovery.
Other Income Sources
Other sources mainly include interest earned from deposits and
dues, sale proceeds (scrap sale, farm product, publication, tender
form, etc), and miscellaneous income and comprise a minimal
quantum of the total revenues.
The growth rate for these sources is assumed at the current
average growth rate, subject to a minimum of 7% and a
maximum of 15%.
FORECAST OF REVENUE EXPENDITURE
The assumptions made in forecasting the items of revenue
expenditure are presented below.
















ller Assurpl|ors Adopled lo( Fo(ecasl
|
Estab||shment
expend|ture
Forecast adopt|ng Nom|na| annua| growth rate
||
Repa|r &
Ha|ntenance on
ex|st|ng serv|ces
Forecast adopt|ng current average growth rate, subject
to m|n|mum of 57 and max|mum of 87.
Adopted as 7 of cap|ta| cost, to |ncrease at ô7 p.a
water 8upp|y 4.00
8ewerage & 8an|tat|on ô.00
8o||d waste Hanagement 10.00
8torm water 0ra|n 4.00
Roads & ßr|dges 4.00
Urban 0eve|opment| Covernance 2.00
Env|ronment 4.00
8oc|a| |nfrastructure 2.00
|||
Add|t|ona| 0&H
expend|ture due to
new |nvestments
|dent|f|ed as part of
6|P
R|ver Embankment| 6onservat|on P|an ô.00
|V 0ebt serv|c|ng
Ex|st|ng Loans [CoC, L|6, hU060, ßank, |nst|tut|ona|
Loans, etc.}- To be repa|d |n 10 to 15 years © |nterest
rates of 8.57 to 97 p.a, beg|nn|ng from 2005-0ô.
New Loans [to fund 6|P}- To be repa|d |n 10 years + 5
years Horator|um w|th |06 © 7.57 |nterest rate p.a.
V
0utstand|ng non-
debt ||ab|||t|es
|f any, to be c|eared |n 1 to 5 Years start|ng 2005-0ô

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)
FORECAST OF CAPITAL INCOME AND EXPENDITURE
Capital Income (Own Sources)
The amount realised under own sources contribute mainly from
capital grants, sale of capital assets/ lands, etc. Estimates as
available with SUDA for the next five years have been assumed.
Also the one-time connection deposits arising out of water
supply and sewerage services to be provided out of the planned
investments is expected to contribute a significantly.
Capital Income (Regular Scheme-Based-Capital Grants)
SUDA proposes to utilize capital grants as may be available
from the State Government under various state and Central
Government sponsored schemes for specific capital works. The
income under such grants does not show specific trends during
the last five years. Estimates of such grants as considered to be
available for the next five years have been assumed.
Other Capital Income
The other income realised under capital accounts head is from
borrowings from government and other institutions. The
quantum of external borrowings required is estimated depending
on the estimated gap of resources after considering various other
capital sources (grants, own sources etc).
Capital Expenditure
The assumptions made in forecasting the items of capital account
are presented in Table below.
PROJECT IDENTIFICATION
Project identification is based on SUDA’s proposed projects and
cost estimates together with planned implementation period. The
forecast population for the planning horizon- 2011 is 15 Lakhs.
The projects derived based on SUDA
estimates are aimed at ensuring
optimal and efficient utilisation of
existing infrastructure systems. Other
developmental projects include
projects other than those for core
service sector viz. LIG/ EWS housing,
environmental management, etc.
The total estimated capital investment
requirement for providing services for
the population of SUDA by the year
2011/12 is Rs. 2517 Crores as
presented in the Annexure.
Roads and Bridges sector accounts for
the maximum investment at 39%,
followed by sewerage and drainage
sector at 24% of the identified
investment. Water supply accounts for
16% and Housing and Slums’
improvement accounts for 14% of the
investment. Social infrastructure is also
given importance at 5% of the
identified investment.
SIZING OF CAPITAL INVESTMENT
The phased investment is loaded onto
the FOP model, and based on the
assumptions adopted; the annual
finances of SUDA are forecasted until
F.Y 2014-15. The criterion for
ascertaining investment sustainability
is a
Year-to-year positive closing
balance;
Debt servicing ratio during each
year not to exceed 25%.
In cases where SUDA does not satisfy
the above criterion, the investment
needs to be scaled down uniformly
across all sectors of identified
investment, till the criterion is met.
The investment level at which the
criterion is met is the sustainable
investment by SUDA. It needs
mention, that the FOP is structured
such that while demonstrating zero
sustainability the SUDA will still incur
capital expenditure against scheme-
specific capital grants received from
GoG.
|tem Assumpt|ons Adopted for Forecast
A 6ap|ta| |ncome
|d(arl ard
corl(|oul|or)
Ex|sl|rd cap|la| |rcore lo d(oW oased or cu((erl ave(ade
d(oWlr (ale. suojecl lo slarda(d d(oWlr (ale ol 8º
Loans NeW Cap|la| Wo(|s lo oe lurded l(or
• Z0º ol |derl|l|ed |rveslrerl |exc|ud|rd soc|a|
|rl(asl(uclu(e)
• JNuRV 0(arls - as pe(cerlade ol |derl|l|ed
|rveslrerl |exc|ud|rd soc|a| |rl(asl(uclu(e) 50º
l(or 0ol. 20º l(or 0o0 - |25º ol d(arl arourl |r
case ol u(oar lrl(asl(uclu(e & 0ove(rarce p(ojecls
ard 10º ol d(arl arourl |r case ol u(oar poo(
p(ojecls lo oe corl(|ouled ov uL8 lo 3lale
lrl(asl(uclu(e Furd ov lre erd ol JNNuRV pe(|od)
• 30º ol (era|r|rd |rveslrerl |rc|ud|rd soc|a|
|rl(asl(uclu(e
• 0Wr Resou(ces- 10º ol |rveslrerl (ecu|(ed lo oe
lurded l(or (everue su(p|us.
• 8o((oW|rds l(or olre( |rsl|lul|ors.
ß 6ap|ta| expend|ture
1 3eclo(-W|se
cap|la|
experd|lu(e
8ased or lre |rveslrerl susla|rao|e ov lre 3u0A.
prased ove( lre p|ar pe(|od. |3ee pras|rd ol cap|la|
|rveslrerl ard s|z|rd ol cap|la| |rveslrerl). Tre
|rveslrerl reeds |derl|l|ed ov 3u0A ras oeer adopled
lo( lre p|ar pe(|od

Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)

12.5.2 FOP – SUDA – RESULTS
The FOP was generated from the sustainable investment point of
view with consideration also towards the additional O&M
expenses to be incurred on the new capital assets to be created.
Recommended investment of Rs. 2517.25 Crores
The 10-year FOP of SUDA is presented in Annexure. It may be
noted that, under the assumptions made, and the available
resources for funding SUDA records 45% sustainability. That is
SUDA can sustain 45% of the identified investment of Rs. 2517
Crore amounting to Rs. 1133 Crores. Though during the intial
four years, it was observed that the operating surpluses would
not be available, SUDA would be able to tide over the situation
in the next financial year at the indicated sustainability figure of
45% while continuing to maintain overall surpluses during all
the years.
SUDA will need to find additional resources to the tune of Rs.
1385 Crores in the form of grants or own sources to fund the
remaining 55% of the identified investment. At this juncture, it
however needs mention that SMC has indicated excess
sustainability to the tune of Rs. 2234 Crores. Considering the
possibility of SMC area getting extended to include parts of
SUDA area under its jurisdiction in the near future, a framework
of implementation between SMC and SUDA to take up the
remaining investment is suggested. It also needs mention that the
FOP for SMC indicated sustainability for Rs. 7204 Crores,
which is marginally less than the combined investment
requirement of SMC and SUDA of Rs. 7485 Crores. In which
case an appropriate project funding and revenue sharing
mechanism between SMC and SUDA will project a combined
sustainability much higher than the total identified investment of
Rs. 7485 Crores. Such cooperation and association between
SMC and SUDA in the backdrop of JNNURM framework will
assist them in maintaining a healthy financial condition and
further provide the leverage to take up additional investments
towards creation of better infrastructure for its ever growing
populace.











OPTIONS/ SCENARIOS FOR
IMPROVING SUDA’S
SUSTAINABILITY AGAINST
IDENTIFIED INVESTMENT OF RS.
2517 CRORES
The sustainability of SUDA
improves to a significant 68%, that
is Rs. 1712 Crores if the revenues
from sale of lands’ doubles.
Considering the rise in real estate
sector and increase in land values
in the near future, SUDA can
expect to garner more profitability
on the sale and development of
lands under its jurisdiction thereby
improving upon their
sustainability.
Tripling of the revenues from sale
of lands’ will take the
sustainability of SUDA close to
100 percent of the identified
investment.




Surat City Development Plan (2006-2012)





















Annexures Annexures Annexures Annexures













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