COMPETENCY BASED LEARNING MATERIAL

Sector:

TVET
Qualification:

Training Methodology 1
Unit of Competency:

Utilize Electronic Media in Facilitating Training
Module Title:

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training

National TVET Trainers Academy
TABLE OF CONTENTS Cover Page- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - --Table of Contents--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ii-iv Learner’s Guide- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - -1-2 Competency Summary- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --3 Learning Outcome Summary------------------------------------------------------------------------------------4-5 LO1 Learning Experiences - - -- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - -- -- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -6-8 Information Sheet No. 6.1.1 – Health and Safety Hazards for Electronic Media Equipment - 9-10 Self-Check No. 6.1.1 -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - -- - - - - -- --- - - - - - - - - - -- - -- - 12 Answer Key No. 6.1.1- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - 13 Information Sheet No. 6.1.2 – Personal Computer -- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - 14-18 Self –Check No. 6.1.2 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ------ - - 19 Answer Key No. 6.1.2- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - -- - - - --20 Task Sheet No. 6.1.2 – Inspecting a Personal Computer - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- 21 Personal Computer Inspection Checklist - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --22-24 Information Sheet No. 6.1.3 – LCD Projector - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - --25-31 Self Check No. 6.1.3 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - --32 Answer Key No. 6.1.3 - - - - - - -- - - - - - -- - - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - 33 Information Sheet No. 6.1.4 – DLP Projector - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -34-35 Task Sheet No. 6.1.4 -Inspecting LCD/DLP Projector - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - -36 LCD/DLP Projector Inspection Checklist - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -37-38
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Information Sheet No. 6.1.5 – VCD/DVD Player - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - ---39-40 Task Sheet No. 6.1.5 – Inspecting VCD/DVD Players- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --41 Video Player Inspection Checklist - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - --42-43 Information Sheet No. 6.1.6 – Overhead Projector - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -44-46 Self Check No. 6.1.6- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - - - -- - --- - - 47 Answer Key No. 6.1.6- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - -- - - - -- - - - - - - - -- - -- -- - - 48 Task Sheet No. 6.1.6 – Inspecting an Overhead Projector- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 49 Inspection Checklist for an Overhead Projector - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -50 Information Sheet No. 6.1.7 – Mixer Amplifier - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - --51-54 Self Check No. 6.1.7- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - 55 Answer Key No. 6.1.7- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --56 Task Sheet No. 6.1.7 Inspecting a Mixer Amplifier - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --57 Equipment Inspection Checklist - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 58-60 Information Sheet No. 6.1.8 – Microphone- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - 61-64 Self Check No. 6.1.8- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - -- - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - -- - - - --- - 65-66 Answer Key No. 6.1.8- - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - 67 Task Sheet No. 6.1.8 – Inspecting a Microphone - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - 68 Checklist for Inspecting a Microphone - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - -- - - - - - -- - - 69-70 Learning Outcome Summary---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------71-72 LO2 Learning Experiences- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - -- - - - 73-75 Task Sheet No. 6.2.1A – Connecting LCD Projector to a Personal Computer - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 76-77 Procedural Checklist No. 6.2.1A –Connecting Personal Computer and LCD/DLP Projector- - - - - 79
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Information Sheet No. 6.2.1 – LCD Projector Presentation Skills - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 80-81 Job Sheet No. 6.2.1- Facilitating Training Using Personal Computer and LCD/DLP Projector- - - - 82 Performance Checklist No. 6.2.1– Facilitating Training Using Personal Computer and LCD/DLP Projector 83 Task Sheet No.6.2.2B- Connecting LCD Projector to VCD/DVD Player - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - -- -84-85 Information Sheet No. 6.2.2 – Using Videos In Training - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - -- -- -- - - - - --86-87 Self Check No. 6.2.2 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 88 Answer Key No. 6.2.2 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - -89 Job Sheet No. 6.2.2 – Facilitating Training Using VCD/DVD and LCD/DLP Projector- - - - - - - - - - - 90 Performance Checklist No. 6.2.2 – Facilitating Training Using VCD/DVD and LCD/DLP Projector- - -91 Information Sheet No. 6.2.3 – Using Overhead Projector in Training - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --92-95 Job Sheet No. 6.2.3 – Facilitating Training Using Overhead Projector - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 96 Procedural Checklist No. 6.2.4 – Facilitating Training Using Overhead Projector - - - - - - - - - - - - - 97-98 Information Sheet(Connecting and operating the microphone and mixer amplifier)---------------99-100 Task Sheet-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------101 Equipment Checklist ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------102-104 Learning Outcome Summary--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------105-106 LO3 Learning Experiences - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 107 Information Sheet No. 6.3.1 – Maintenance Activity for a Personal Computer - - - - - - - - - - - - 108-112 Task Sheet No. 6.3.1 – Preventive Maintenance Schedule for a Personal Computer - - - - - - - - -113 Preventive Maintenance Schedule for a Personal Computer - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -114 Information Sheet No. 6.3.2 – Maintenance Activity for an LCD/DLP Projector- - - - - - - - - - - - - 115-116 Task Sheet No. 6.3.2 – Preventive Maintenance Schedule for an LCD/DLP Projector- - - - - - - - - 117
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Preventive Maintenance Schedule for an LCD/DLP Projector- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -118 Information Sheet No. 6.3.3 – Maintenance Activity for a VCD/DVD Player - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 119 Task Sheet No. 6.3.3 – Preventive Maintenance Schedule for a VCD/DVD Player - - - - - - - - - - - -120 Preventive Maintenance Schedule for a VCD/DVD Player- - - - - - - - -- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - -121 Information Sheet No. 6.3.4 - Maintenance Activity for an Overhead Projector- - - - - - - - - - - - --122 Task Sheet No.6.3.4- Preventive Maintenance Schedule for an Overhead Projector------------------ 123 Preventive Maintenance Schedule for an Overhead Projector-- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 124 Information Sheet No. 6.3.5(Maintenance Activity for a mixer Amplifier and microphone)----------125 Task Sheet No. 6.3.5----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------126 Preventive Schedule----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------127

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HOW TO USE THIS COMPETENCY BASED LEARNING MATERIAL

Welcome to the module in Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training. This module contains training materials and activities for you to complete. The unit of competency "Utilize Electronic Media in Facilitating Training" contains knowledge, skills and attitudes required for a trainers course. It is one of the specialized modules at Training Methodology level I (TAM I). You are required to go through a series of learning activities in order to complete each learning outcome of the module. In each learning outcome are Information Sheets and Resources Sheets (Reference Materials for further reading to help you better understand the required activities). Follow these activities on your own and answer the self-check at the end of each learning outcome. You may remove a blank answer sheet at the end of each module (or get one from your facilitator/trainer) to write your answers for each self-check. If you have questions, don’t hesitate to ask your facilitator for assistance. Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) You may already have some or most of the knowledge and skills covered in this learner's guide because you have: • • been working for some time already completed training in this area.

If you can demonstrate to your trainer that you are competent in a particular skill or skills, talk to him/her about having them formally recognized so you don't have to do the same training again. If you have a qualification or Certificate of Competency from previous trainings, show it to your trainer. If the skills you acquired are still current and relevant to the unit/s of competency they may become part of the evidence you can present for RPL. If you are not sure about the currency of your skills, discuss this with your trainer.

This module was prepared to help you achieve the required competency, in Utilize Electronic Media in Facilitating Training. This will be the source of
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information for you to acquire knowledge and skills in this particular trade independently and at your own pace, with minimum supervision or help from your instructor.

• Talk to your trainer and agree on how you will both organize the Training of this unit. Read through the module carefully. It is divided into sections, which cover all the skills, and knowledge you need to successfully complete this module. • Work through all the information and complete the activities in each section. Read information sheets and complete the self-check. Suggested references are included to supplement the materials provided in this module. • Most probably your trainer will also be your supervisor or manager. He/she is there to support you and show you the correct way to do things. • Your trainer will tell you about the important things you need to consider when you are completing activities and it is important that you listen and take notes. • You will be given plenty of opportunity to ask questions and practice on the job. Make sure you practice your new skills during regular work shifts. This way you will improve both your speed and memory and also your confidence. • Talk to more experience workmates and ask for their guidance. • Use the self-check questions at the end of each section to test your own progress. • When you are ready, ask your trainer to watch you perform the activities outlined in this module. • As you work through the activities, ask for written feedback on your progress. Your trainer keeps feedback/ pre-assessment reports for this reason. When you have successfully completed each element, ask your trainer to mark on the reports that you are ready for assessment. • When you have completed this module (or several modules), and feel confident that you have had sufficient practice, your trainer will arrange an appointment with registered assessor to assess you. The results of your assessment will be recorded in your competency Achievement Record.

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Program/Course

Training Methodology I

Unit of Utilize Electronic Media in Facilitating Training Competency Module Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training

INTRODUCTION:
This module covers the skills and knowledge and attitude required in advance training environment using electronic media in facilitating training, including operation and maintenance of the equipment.

LEARNING OUTCOMES Upon completion of this module you should be able to: 1. Inspect electronic media equipment. 2. Operate electronic media equipment to deliver a lesson 3. Maintain electronic media equipment PERFORMANCE CRITERIA 4. Electronic media equipment are inspected according to specified checklist. 5. Abnormalities are identified and problem areas are anticipated. 6. Health and safety hazards are identified 7. Equipment is set-up in accordance with health and safety standards. 8. Electronic media equipment are operated in accordance to user’s manual. 9. Equipment are used for optimum performance based on its capacity 10. Preventive maintenance procedure, diagnostic tools and system check are applied periodically. 11. Checklist are maintained as per Standard Operating Procedures.
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12. AV/multimedia equipment are stored to safe rack/cabinet PREREQUISITES None

LEARNING OUTCOME SUMMARY

Learning Outcome # 1

Inspect electronic media equipment

Contents: Health and safety hazards for electronic media equipment Personal Computer LCD Projector DLP Projector VCD/DVD Player Overhead Projector Sound Mixer Microphone
Assessment Criteria:

1. Electronic media equipment are inspected according to specified checklist. 2. Abnormalities are identified and problem areas are anticipated. 3. Health and safety hazards are identified.

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Conditions: Trainees must be provided with following:

1. Practical work area 2. Equipment:
LCD Projector DLP Projector VCD/DVD Player Overhead Projector Sound Mixer Microphone 3. Training materials:

Information sheet Self checks Model answers Task sheets Inspection checklist

Assessment Method: Written Test Performance Test

LEARNING EXPERIENCES
Learning Outcome #1: Inspect Electronic Media Equipment Learning Activities Read Information Sheet LO. 6.111:Health and Safety Hazards for Electronic Media Equipment. Answer Self-Check LO 6.1-1 Check your answer using the Answer Key LO. 6.1.1 Read Information Sheet LO 6.1-.2 Personal Computer Answer Self-Check LO 6.1-2 Check your answer using the Answer Key LO. 6.1.2. Perform Task Sheet LO 6.1-2 Inspecting Personal Computer Read Information Sheet LO 6.1-3 LCD Projector Answer Self Check LO 6.1-3 Check your answer using the Answer Key LO 6.1-3 Read Information Sheet LO 6.-.4 DLP Projector Perform Task Sheet 6.1-4 Inspecting LCD/DLP Projectors Ask your trainer for you to have an access to an LCD or DLP projector that you will inspect for this activity. Ask your trainer for you to have an access to a personal computer. Special Instructions

Learning Outcome #1: Inspect Electronic Media Equipment Learning Activities Read Information Sheet LO 6.1-5: VCD/DVD Player Special Instructions

Perform Task Sheet LO 6.1-5 Inspecting VCD/DVD Player

Ask your trainer for you to have an access to a VCD/DVD player that you will inspect for this activity.

Read Information Sheet LO 6.1-6 Overhead Projector Answer Self Check LO 6.1-6 Check your answer using the Answer Key LO 6.1-6 Perform Task Sheet LO 6.1-6 Inspecting an Overhead Projector Ask your trainer for you to have an access to an overhead projector that you will inspect for this activity Additional instruction

Read Information Sheet LO 6.1-7 Mixer Amplifier Answer Self Check LO 6.1-7 Check your answer using the Answer Key LO 6.1-7 Perform Task Sheet LO 6.1-7 Inspecting a Mixer Amplifier

Ask your trainer for you to have an access to a sound mixer that you will inspect for this activity

Read Information Sheet LO 6.1-8 Microphone Answer Self Check LO 6.1-8 Check your answer using the Answer Key LO 6.1-8 Perform Task Sheet LO 6.1-8, Inspecting a microphone Ask your trainer to have an access to a microphone that you will inspect for this activity.(special instruction)

INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6.1-1
Health and Safety Hazards for Electronic Media Equipment Objective Identify the different health and safety hazard of electronic media equipment.

Health and safety is everybody’s concern.

1. General Safety Procedure All electronic products are considered to have risk of electric shock. To avoid this risk do the following: • Read user’s manufacturer’s manual before using the equipment. • • • • • • • • Keep the user’s manual for future reference Follow all instructions as stated in the manual. Install all equipment in accordance to manufacturer’s manual. Clean all equipment with dry cloth. Only use accessories specified by the manufacturer. Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. Do not let object and liquids enter to the equipment. See equipment covers for safety related markings.

2. Electrical Outlets • Wall socket must be securely fixed and free from damage.

3. Power Cables • Cables must be free from kinks, cuts, fraying and damage along their whole lengths.

• Supply lead must be firmly secured at both ends by its sheath with no internal cores showing. • • • Plug must be free from cracks, damage and signs of overheating. Plug cover must be firmly held with the correct number of screws. Plug pins must be firmly held and free from damage?

4. Battery Pack • • Do not short circuit, disassemble or modify battery pack Keep batteries away from children.

• When disposing battery pack, insulate the electrical contacts with tapes to avoid contact to metallic objects. This will prevent fire or explosion. • If the battery packs changes color, deforms or emits smoke or fumes, remove it immediately. Be careful not to get burned in the process. • Prevent any battery leakage to get in contact with eyes, skin or clothing. It can cause blindness and skin problems. • Before storing battery operated equipment or accessories, remove the battery. 5. Flash • • Do not fire flash at someone driving a car. It may cause accident. Do not fires flash near a person’s eye. It may impair the person’s vision.

6. Projectors • Do not look into the projector’s lens when the lamp is on. The bright light may hurt or damage your eyes. • Do not use lens cap when projector is in operation. • When switching the projector off, ensure that cooling cycle of the projector is completed before disconnecting.

SELF-CHECK LO. 6.1-1

1. List down the general safety procedure to be followed.

2. List down safety rules in handling battery packs.

3.

List down safety rules for projectors

ANSWER KEY 6.1-1

1. Read user’s manual before using the equipment. a. Keep the user’s manual for future reference b. Follow all instructions as stated in the manual. c. Install all equipment in accordance to manufacturer’s manual. d. Clean all equipment with dry cloth. e. Only use attachments/accessories specified by the manufacturer. f. Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. g. Do not let object or liquids to enter the equipment. h. See equipment enclosure for safety related markings.

2. List down safety rules in handling battery packs. a. Do not short circuit, disassemble or modify battery pack b. Keep batteries away from children. c. When disposing battery pack, insulate the electrical contacts with tapes to avoid contact to metallic objects. This will prevent fire or explosion. d. If the battery packs changes color, deforms or emits smoke or fumes, remove it immediately. Be careful not to get burned in the process. e. Prevent any battery leakage to get in contact with eyes, skin or clothing. It can cause blindness and skin problems. f. Before storing battery operated equipment or accessories, remove the battery.

3. List down safety rules for projectors a. Do not look into the projector’s lens when the lamp is on. The bright light may hurt or damage your eyes. b. Do not use lens cap when projector is in operation. c. When switching the projector off, please ensure the projector completes its cooling cycles before disconnecting.

INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6.1.2
Personal Computer Objectives: 1. Describe a personal computer 2. Identify the different types of personal computer 3. Identify the input, output and storage devices A personal computer (PC) is any general-purpose computer whose size, capabilities, and original sales price make it useful for individuals, and which is intended to be operated directly by an end user, with no intervening computer operator. Types of Personal Computer A personal computer may be a desktop computer, a laptop, a tablet PC, or a handheld PC (also called a palmtop).

Desktop PC

Laptop

Tablet PC

Handheld PC (PDA)

A PC may be used at home, or may be found in an office. Personal computers can be connected to a local area network (LAN) either by a cable or a wireless connection. The Components of a Personal Computer The four basic tasks of a computer are to: receive information; process information; store information and send out information. By information we mean text, numbers, pictures, sounds, even electrical voltages. It is the combination of these four tasks with the aid of programs which allow computers to be so versatile.

Input Devices Input devices are any electronic devices connected to a computer that produce input signals. 1. Keyboard - The keyboard is used to input letters or numbers into different applications or programs. A keyboard also has special keys that help operate the computer. 2. Mouse - The mouse is used to open and close files, navigate web sites, and click on a lot of commands (to tell the computer what to do) when using different applications. It is considered as a pointing device. 3. Camera – a camera installed in the computer is used during live conversations. The camera transmits a picture from one computer to another, or can be used to record a short video. 4. Drawing Tablet – A drawing tablet is a device similar to a white board, except that a special pen is used for designing and it is connected to the computer. Words and images drawn in the drawing table can be saved in the computer. 5. Digital Camera - A digital camera can be used to take pictures. It can be hooked up to a computer to transfer the pictures from the camera to the computer. Some digital cameras hold a floppy disk, and the floppy disk can be taken out of the camera and put directly into the computer. Output Devices A display device is an output device that visually conveys texts, graphics and video information. 1. A monitor is an example of an output device that can be used to display text. It can also display graphics and video. It is similar to a television set that accepts video signals from a computer and displays information on its screen. 2. A Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) projector uses its own light source to project what is displayed on the computer on a projection screen or wall. A digital light processing (DLP) projector uses tiny mirrors to reflect light which can be seen clearly in a well-lit room. 3. A printer is an output device that prints text and graphics on a physical medium such as paper or transparency film. 4. An audio output device produces music, speech, or other sounds.

Types of audio output device: a. Speaker - is an audio output device that generates sound. b. Headphone - is a pair of small speakers placed over the ears and plugged into a port on the sound card. c. Woofer or subwoofer - is used to boost the low bass sound and is connected to the port on the sound card. Storage devices Information and documents are stored in computer storage so that it can be retrieved whenever they are needed. Computer storage is the storing of data in an electromagnetic form to be accessed by a computer processor. Types of Computer Storage Primary Storage Primary storage is the main memory in a computer. It stores data and programs that can be accessed directly by the processor. Types Of Primary Storage There are two types of primary storage which are RAM and ROM. RAM ROM

RAM is an acronym for RandomAccess Memory. The data and program in RAM can be read and written. RAM stores data during and after processing. RAM is also known as a working memory The data in RAM can be read (retrieved) or written (stored).

ROM is an acronym for ReadOnly Memory. The data or program in ROM can only be read but cannot be written at all ROM is another type of memory permanently stored inside the computer. All the contents in ROM can be accessed and read but cannot be changed.

RAM RAM is volatile which means the programs and data in RAM are lost when the computer is powered off. A computer uses RAM to hold temporary instructions and data needed to complete tasks. This enables the CPU (Central Processing Unit) to access instructions and data stored in the memory very quickly Secondary Storage

ROM ROM is non-volatile. It holds the programs and data when the computer is powered off. Programs in ROM have been pre-recorded. It can only be stored by the manufacturer once and it cannot be changed.

Secondary storage is another alternative storage to save your work and documents. It is very useful to store programs and data for future use. It is non-volatile, which means that it does not need power to maintain the information stored in it. It will store the information until it is erased. Types of Secondary Storage 1. Magnetic such as floppy disk 2. Optical such as CD-ROM 3. Flash memory such as the pen drive, memory card and the memory stick

Floppy disk

CD - ROM

Memory Stick

Hard Disk Drive (Local Drive)

SELF-CHECK LO. 6.1.2

Multiple Choice Directions: Read each statement or question; select the correct answer listed below. Write your answer on the space provider before each number.

1. An input device used to open and close files, navigate web sites, and click on a lot of commands (to tell the computer what to do) when using different applications. A. Camera C. Keyboard B. Drawing tablet D. Mouse

2. An input device used to input letters or numbers into different applications or programs. A. Camera C. Keyboard B. Drawing tablet D. Mouse A. 3. An output device that can be used to display text. It can also display graphics and video A. Liquid crystal display C. Printer B. Monitor D. Speaker

4. A primary storage that stores data during and after processing. It is also known as a working memory. A._CD-ROM C._RAM B._Memory stick D._ROM

5.

An optical secondary storage. B._Memory stick D._ROM

A._CD-ROM C._RAM

ANSWER KEY NO. 6.1.2
1. D 2. C 3. B 4. C 5. A

TASK SHEET LO. 6.1-2
Inspecting a Personal Computer Objective:

Inspect a personal computer Equipment: 1. Personal Computer Procedure: 1. Go to the computer laboratory, and inspect a personal computer (desktop or laptop. 2. Plug and switch ON the personal computer. 3. Using the checklist for this activity inspect and record your findings. 4. Shut down the personal computer after inspecting it.

PERSONAL COMPUTER INSPECTION CHECKLIST LO 6.1-2
Brand Name: _______________________________________ Model: _____________________________________________ Operating System: __________________________________ Check Point Inspection Results YES NO YES NO Comments

Desktop Is the unit physically in tact?

Notebook Are there any cracks in the case?

With the power off, are there any visible scratches in the CLD

YES NO

Is there any LCD discoloration?

YES NO

Does the unit boot up on battery power?

YES NO

Does the unit power-on without hardware error?

YES NO

Indicate in the presence, absence and condition of the following components:

Y or N

Comments

Check Point

Inspection Results Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N

Comments

CD-ROM Drive

Floppy Disk Drive

Hard Disk Drive

Modem

Network Card

Keyboard

Mouse

Power Cord

Equipment Inspection Summary: If not approving equipment for use, then include any corrective actions that need to be satisfied before it can be used.

Inspection Date:

Inspector Name: Inspector Signature:

INFORMATION SHEET NO. 6.1-3
LCD Projector

Objectives: 1. Describe an LCD projector 2. Identify the different features of an LCD projector 3. Explain the advantages and limitation of an LCD 4. Describe keystone effect

LCD projector (Liquid Crystal Display) refers to a kind of video projector that is used to display or “project” an image, video, and computer data on a flat exterior or simply a screen. LCD projectors work by using three liquid crystal panels, a lamp, a prism, and filters to create the image on the screen. The lamp provides white light that passes through a polarizing filter. Polarizing works by accepting light that is traveling on the same plane. All other light will be blocked. From the polarizing filter the light is then passed through a series of dichroic mirrors. Dichroic mirrors work by only allowing certain colors in the light spectrum to be reflected, while others pass through. The dichroic mirrors in LCD projectors separate the light into the three primary colors, green, red, and blue. These three colors are then sent to a separate LCD panel; remember there are three of them. From there the LCD panels send the light through the dichroic prism which recombines the light and sends it out the main lens in the LCD projector to the surface against which it is projected. Each LCD is only capable of controlling one color. So if you were to see a picture of a red plane against a blue sky, the green LCD would block the light from passing to the dichroic prism and out the lens.

LCD panels in LCD projectors work by allowing the polarized light to travel through a pane of glass into the liquid crystal inside the display. The liquid crystals bend the light, and it is traveling on a different plane then

when it entered through the polarizing filter. If you apply an electrical current to the liquid crystal they will align, allowing the light to pass through on the same plane as when it entered. If you add a second polarizing filter at the other end of the liquid crystal you can then effectively block all light from passing through. Each LCD panel has a separate system to control the electrical current that passes through the liquid crystal, allowing each to be controlled individually. Features of an LCD Projector 1. Projector Resolution Resolution refers to the number of dots of light that appear on a screen or a projected image. Even though some projectors may be able to work with several resolutions, there is one "native" resolution at which it works best. To get the best image, match the resolution of your projector with the resolution of your computer. Most of the latest model of projectors have higher resolutions to match most current laptop computers. The most common resolution today is XGA (1,024 x 768). For higher resolutions, such as SXGA (1,280 x 1,024), you'll pay a higher price for the projector. Projector Resolution Options

Resolutio n

Description
SVGA projectors are advisable for those who have a tight budget. They are good for PowerPoint presentations and those that use clip art or line drawings. They're good for black and white, showing documents, etc. They are not good for presentations that require a lot of detail. Most computers still output in native XGA, so matching an XGA projector to your computer ensures you won't lose any detail. These are commonly used resolution for projectors. SXGA projectors have high resolution, and are more expensive than XGA. These products are targeted for high end personal computer users and low end workstation users. SXGA+ projectors are becoming more popular, and there are several offerings available in both budget and high-end configurations. These are very good for detailed photography and graphics.

SVGA 800 x 600

* XGA 1,024 x 768

SXGA 1,280 x 1,024

SXGA+ 1,400 x 1,050

Resolutio n
UXGA 1,600 x 1,200

Description
UXGA is for very high end high resolution workstation applications that require exacting detail. These are expensive projectors that support a broad range of computer equipment.

* The most popular projector resolution

NOTE: For best results, match the resolution of your computer with the native resolution of the projector.

2. Image Quality There are four factors that affects the quality of image. They are contrast, color, brightness, and how even the illumination is across the picture. The best way to get the highest quality image is to match the resolution of your projector with that of your computer. Every year, computers are sold with higher and higher resolutions with the most popular today being the XGA 1024 x 768 sold in the 4:3 aspect ratio. 3. Contrast Ratio Contrast is the difference between the brightest (white) and darkest (black) parts of the screen. Contrast helps to define the depth of an image, and is important when projecting video images. A good projector have a contrast ratio of at least 250:1 or more. The higher the contrast ratio, the better the projected image with the best quality projectors having a contrast ratio of 2,000:1.

4.

Color

The more colors your projector can support, the better it will be able to project high quality images and video. Color helps to define the depth of an image, by adding shades to the objects displayed. Projectors should display 16 million colors or more which is adequate for computer screens and video. 5. Brightness The larger the number of audience and the bigger the room that you have, the bigger and brighter the image must be. The brightness level of a projector depends on the use and circumstances. Will you be in a small classroom, a conference room, or a large lecture hall or auditorium? Will the room be lit or darkened? These are some of the factors you must consider when purchasing a LCD projector. Trade show floors, for example, and other lighted environments require brighter images, while darkened rooms need less brightness. Typically, you should have at least 1,000 lumens to project effectively in a lighted room. For very large installations, 10,000 lumens is required. 6. Illumination Uniformity As you compare projectors, notice how the projector fills the screen. Is it even from side to side and top to bottom. You should avoid dark corners of the image and bright centers. Illumination uniformity refers to the percentage of brightness that is carried across your screen from edge to edge and top to bottom. A higher uniformity rating means a more uniform image brightness across your screen. You want uniformity at a level of 85% or better. 7. Projector Lenses Zoom lenses are almost standard on today's projectors. The zoom lens lets you project a larger or smaller image on your screen depending on the distance between your projector and the screen. The best lenses are manufactured with glass, but some models are using plastic lenses to cut down on weight. Glass will give you a clearer, sharper image. Some projectors are also available with interchangeable lenses. The f-number of the lens is a measure of how much light gets through the lens to the screen. 8. Projector Lamps Projector lamps are one of the hidden costs of a projector. It's like toner cartridges for printers. Over the life of the printer, you'll probably pay more for the toner cartridges than you originally paid for the printer. The same is true for projectors. The lamp is the most expensive part of the projector. The lamp type is related to the image brightness. The most common types of projector lamp are the following: • UHP - Ultra High Performance

• •

UHE - Ultra High Efficiency Some projectors also use metal halide lamps.

Lamp life is rated in hours. The typical lamp life for a projector is between 1,000 and 4,000 hours and depending on how much the projector is used, can add to the total cost of operating a projector over a given period of time. Replacement bulbs run anywhere from P 15,000 to P 30,000. A lower watt lamp will stay cooler and last longer than a higher watt bulb. Since it uses less power, it will also cost less to operate. Other Features of a Projector Today's LCD projectors are very easy to use. They are plug-n-play and require only a few minutes to set up. Some projectors come with additional features that can be very convenient and are ones that you should consider in your purchase decision. • Some LCD projectors are wireless for easy set-up and no cables to mess with. • Networked connections so that projector can be controlled from a remote location • Component video inputs for higher quality video. This is the preferred input for projecting video. • Digital Keystone Correction for adjusting the rectangular shape on the screen when the projector cannot be positioned perpendicular to the screen. • Wireless mouse control for freedom to move around while you are presenting. • Dual computer inputs for hooking up to more than one computer.

Projector Aspect Ratios Aspect ratios refer to the number of units wide to the number of units high of your LCD projector display. For years, the standard was 4:3, but with the popularity of wide screens, the new option is 16 x 9. A 4 x 3 display is more square than the rectangular shaped 16 x 9.

Screen/Display Aspect Ratios Standard Screen 4 x 3

Wide Screen 16 x 9

Keystone Effect The keystone effect is caused by attempting to project an image onto a surface at an angle, as with a projector not quite centered onto the screen it is projecting on. It is a distortion of the image dimensions, making it look like a trapezoid, the shape of an architectural keystone; hence the name of the feature. In the typical case of a projector sitting on a table, and looking upwards to the screen, the image is larger at the top than on the bottom. Some areas of the screen may not be focused correctly as the projector lens is focused at the average distance only. Two types of keystone effects 1. Vertical keystone effects – This usually occurs when the projector is above or below the centerline of the screen. 2. Horizontal keystone effects – This happens when the projector is to the left or right of the screen.

Vertical keystone effects

Horizontal keystone effects

The Advantages Of The LCD Projector 1. What makes the LCD projector very practical is that it is compact, since the LCD chip is very small. 2. Other advantages of the LCD projector are its high contrast and brightness capability, as well as lower power consumption. These combinations of factors make the LCD projector very portable for multimedia use, such as training presentations (even in partially lit rooms). Limitations Of The LCD Projector 1. LCD projector can often times exhibit what is called "the screen door effect". Since the screen is made up of individual pixels, the pixels can be visible on a large screen, thus giving the appearance of viewing the image through a "screen door". Since an LCD chip is made up of a panel of individual pixels, if one pixel burns out it displays an annoying black or white dot on the projected image. Individual pixels cannot be repaired, if one or more pixels burn out, the entire chip has to be replaced. 2. Since LCD chips have a finite number of pixels, signal inputs that have higher resolutions must be scaled to fit the pixel field count of the particular LCD chip. For example, a typical HDTV input format of 1080i needs a native display of 1920x1080 pixels for a one-to-one display of the HDTV image. However, if your LCD chip only has a pixel field of 1024x768, the original HDTV signal must be scaled to fit the 1024x768 pixel count on the LCD chip (in addition the image will also have to be letterboxed to reproduce the correct widescreen aspect ratio). 3. As mentioned earlier, the LCD light source (bulb) in an LCD projector must be replaced periodically, depending on the projector, about every 2,000 to 3,000 hours, at a cost of several thousand pesos. On the positive side of this, a new lamp basically gives you a new LCD projector, as your original brightness and contrast are restored, and most bulbs can be self-installed by the consume

SELF-CHECK LO. 6.1-3

Multiple Choice Directions: Read each statement or question carefully. Select the correct answer on the space provided before each number. 1. A projector resolution that fits to a 4X3 projection screen. A. SVGA (800x600) C. SXGA (1,280x1,024) B. XGA (1,024x768) D. SXGA+ (1,400x1,050)

2. The dichroic mirrors in LCD projectors separate the light into the three primary colors. What are these primary colors? A. Blue, Green and Yellow C. Green, Red and Blue 3. B. Green, Red and Yellow D. Red, Yellow and Blue

A very expensive replaceable parts of the LCD projector A. Dichroic panel C. Projection lamp B. LCD Panel D. Projection lens

4. This LCD projector feature which let you project a larger or smaller image on your screen depending on the distance between your projector and the screen. A. Dichroic panel C. Projection lamp B. LCD Panel D. Projection lens

Enumerate two advantages of LCD Projectors 1. 2.

ANSWER KEY NO. 6.1-3

A. Multiple Choice 1. B 2. C 3. D 4. C 5. D

B. Enumeration 1. LCD is very compact 2. LCD projector has high contrast and brightness capability

INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6.1-4
DLP Projector Objectives: 1. Describe a DLP projector 2. Explain the advantages and limitation of a DLP projector

The DLP Projector (Digital Light Processing) The fastest growing type of video projector (in terms of sales) in use today is the DLP (Digital Light Processing) projector. Like LCD, the actual image is displayed on a chip, however, the chip used in a DLP projector is different. The chip in a DLP projector is referred to as a DMD (Digital Micromirror Device). In essence, every pixel on a DMD chip is a reflective mirror. The video image is displayed on the DMD chip. The micromirrors on the chip (remember: each micromirror represents one pixel) then tilt very rapidly as the image changes. This process produces the grayscale foundation for the image. Then, color is added as light passes through a high-speed color wheel and is reflected off of the micromirrors on the DLP chip as they rapidly tilt towards or away from the light source. The degree of tilt of each micromirror coupled with the rapidly spinning color wheel determines the color structure of the projected image. As the amplified light bounces off the micromirrors, it is sent through the lens and can be projected on a large screen. For further technical explanations, click on the DLP projector resource links on the upper right sidebar of this page. Advantages Of The DLP Projector 1. The advantages of this system make the DLP projector suitable for not only business and home theater application, but DLP technology is also in use in some movie theaters for feature film projection. Basically the films are digitally converted and stored to either to a hard drive or optical disc (similar to DVD - only in High Definition), then fed into the DLP projector and projected onto the movie screen. The high resolution DLP chips made for this application render an image that is almost as good as 35 or 70mm film, without all those film scratches! 2. Other advantages of the DLP projector include excellent color accuracy, no "screen door" effect(as with LCD), due to its micro-mirror construction, compactness, low power consumption, and high contrast and brightness (although typically not as bright as LCD types but much "smoother" looking).

Limitations of The DLP Projector 1. The same with LCD, each DLP chip has a finite number of pixels. 2. Although a DLP projector doesn't exhibit the "screen door" effect of many LCD units, a DLP projector can exhibit what is referred to as "the rainbow effect". Basically, the "rainbow effect" is exhibited by a brief flash of colors (like a small rainbow) when the viewer rapidly looks from side to side on the screen or looks rapidly from the screen to side of the room. Fortunately, this does not occur frequently and many people do not have sensitivity to this effect at all. 3. Just as in LCD projectors, the light source typically must be changed every 2,000 to 3,000 hours.

TASK SHEET LO. 6.1-4
Inspecting LCD/DLP Projector Objective: 1. Inspect an LCD/DLP projector 2. Identify abnormalities 3. Identify solutions to abnormalities Materials, Tools and Equipment 1. LCD/DLP projector Procedure: 1. Get an LCD/DLP projector from your trainer. 2. Inspect the projector using the given Checklist. 3. Connect the power cable onto the projector and plug it to power outlet. Check power requirement before plugging to a wall outlet. 4. Switch “ON” the power of the projector

LCD/DLP PROJECTOR INSPECTION CHECKLIST LO 6.1-4

Model Name: ________________________ Model No. : __________________________ Date Inspected: ______________________ Type of Projector: ______________________________
Physical Condition Operator not exposed to any hazard Adequate shock protection (components well secured) Controls labels readable Power Source – cord and plug Proper voltage and capacity for plug and cord Grounding conductor included Not frayed or damage Proper wiring of plug Damage relief on cord Power supplies and equipment Connected to facility power with appropriate adapters Correct voltage, frequency and phasing Marking requirements Power requirements (voltage, current, frequency) Restrictions and limitations of use Make, model and serial number Hazards, including stored energy Requirements for access (authorized repair person, stored energy, PPE) Approve N/A Approve N/A Approve N/A

Test performed Line continuity Polarization of cord and plug Functional tests Documentation Documentation adequate Operating procedures/manual

Approve

N/A

Approve

N/A

Equipment Inspection Summary: If not approving equipment for use, then include any corrective actions that need to be satisfied before it can be used.

Inspector’s Name: Signature:

Inspector’s

INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6.1-5
VCD/DVD Player

Objectives: 1. Describe a VCD/DVD player. 2. Identify the different component parts of a VCD/DVD player

A CD/DVD player is a device that plays discs produced under both the DVD-Video and DVD-Audio technical standards, two different and incompatible standards. Additionally, most DVD players allow users to play audio CDs and Video CDs (VCD). A few include a home cinema decoder (i.e. Dolby Digital, Digital Theater Systems (DTS)). Some newer devices also play videos in the MPEG-4 ASP video compression format (such as DivX) popular in the Internet. Components of a CD/DVD Player The components of a DVD machine are typically manufactured by separate companies and then assembled by the DVD manufacturer. The production of the component parts is a highly specialized process, and only a few companies are equipped to supply the entire industry. The main components include the optical system assembly, internal electronic circuit board and the disk drive mechanism.

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A DVD player is composed of sophisticated electronics, including a disc drive mechanism, a printed circuit board, and an optical system assembly. It consists of a spindle that holds the disc and a motor that spins it. The circuit board contains all of the electronic components, which help convert the data being read into a usable format. The optical system assembly is the part of the DVD that reads the data from the disc and transmits it to be converted into binary code.

Optical system
The optical system is made up of a laser, photodetector, prism, mirrors, and lenses. The laser and photodetector are installed on a plastic housing, and the other components are placed in specific places. Great care is taken in the positioning of each of these pieces because without proper alignment, the system will not perform properly. Electrical connections are attached and the optical system is then ready to be attached to the disc drive mechanism.

Disk drive mechanism
The optical system is attached to the motor that will drive it. This in turn is connected to the other principle parts of the disc drive including the loading tray (if present) and the spindle motor. Other gears and belts are attached and the entire assembly is placed in the main body.

Internal electronics
The electronic components of the DVD machine are sophisticated and use the latest in electronic processing technology. The circuit board is produced much like that of other electronic equipment.

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TASK SHEET LO. 6.1-5
Inspecting VCD/DVD Players Objective: 1. Inspect the physical condition of the video player. 2. Inspect the video cables. 3. Inspect the serviceability of the video player. Tools, Materials and Equipment: 1. Video player (VCD/DVD player) 2. RCA connector 3. Inspection checklist Procedure: 1. Get a video player and the corresponding cables of a video player. 2. Inspect the physical condition of the video player. 3. Plug the video player power chord to the outlet, and turn on the power. 4. Using a multi-tester check the line continuity of the RCA cables. 5. Plug the video player power chord to the outlet, and turn on the power Note: 1. Check the video player power requirement before plugging to power outlet. 2. In case audio and video cables doesn’t work, replace with new one or ask for a new one, refer to qualified technician 6. Record all the findings using the checklist.

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VIDEO PLAYER INSPECTION CHECKLIST LO 6.1-5

Model Name: ________________________ Model No. : __________________________ Date Inspected: ______________________ Type of Video Player: ______________________________ Enclosure Operator not exposed to any hazard Not damaged Protects contents from operating environment Adequate shock protection (components well secured) Power Source - cord and plug Proper voltage and ampacity for plug and cord Grounding conductor included Not frayed or damaged Proper wiring of plug Damage relief on cord Foreign power supplies and equipment Connected to facility power with appropriate adapters Correct voltage, frequency and phasing Marking requirements Power requirements (voltage, current, frequency) Approve N/A Approve N/A Approve N/A Approve N/A

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Restrictions and limitations of use Hazards, including stored energy Requirements for access (authorized repair person, stored energy, PPE) Test performed RCA Cables Functionality Polarization of cord and plug Functional tests Other issues Proper management of conductors All cables included free from damage Proper cooling Switches and controls readily accessible Any safety issues with access and maintenance Documentation Documentation adequate Operating procedures/manual Equipment Inspection Summary: If not approving equipment for use, then include any corrective actions that need to be satisfied before it can be used. Approve N/A Approve N/A Approve N/A

Inspection Date:

Inspector Name: Inspector Signature:

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INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6.1-6
Overhead Projector

Objectives: 1. Describe an overhead projector 2. Identify the different parts of an overhead projector 3. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of an overhead projector An overhead projector is capable of projecting enlarged images of written or pictorial material onto a screen or wall from a transparency placed horizontally below the projector and lighted from underneath.

Objective Lens System

Focus Knob

Glass Flatten or Stage Fresnel Lens Fan On/Off Switch Lamp Reflector

Because of its many virtues, the overhead projection system has advanced rapidly in the past several decades to become the most widely used audiovisual device in classroom and training sites. The typical overhead projector is a very simple device. Basically, it is a box with a large aperture or “stage” on the top surface. Light from a powerful lamp inside the box is condensed by a special type of lens, known as Fresnel lens, and passes through a transparency (approximately 8 by 10 inches) placed on the stage. A lens-and-mirror system mounted on a bracket above the box turns the light beam 90 degrees and projects the image back over the shoulder of the presenter.
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Because of the widespread familiarity of overhead projection, the general term transparency has taken on, in the instructional setting, the specific meaning of the large-format 8-by-10-inch film used with the overhead projector. Transparencies may be composed of photographic film, clear acetate, or any of number of other transparent materials capable of being imprinted with an image by means of chemical or heat processes. Transparencies maybe used individually or maybe made into a series of images consisting of a base visual with one or more overlays attached to the base with hinges. Complex topics can be explained step-by-step by flipping on a series of overlays one at a time that add additional features to a diagram. Advantages The overhead projection system has a number of unique features that give it the tremendous versatility for which it is acclaimed by so many instructors. 1. Its bright lamp is efficient optical system generate so much light on the screen that the overhead can be used in normal room lighting. 2. The projector is operated from the front of the room with the presenter facing the audience, allowing direct eye contact to be maintained. Most overhead projectors are lightweight and easily portable. All are simple to operate. 3. A variety of materials can be projected, including cutout silhouettes, small opaque objects, and many types of transparencies. Projected materials can be manipulated by the presenter. You can point to important items, highlight them with colored pens, add details during the lesson (notes, diagrams, etc.) by marking the transparency with a marking pen or cover part of a message and progressively reveal information. As noted previously, complex visuals can be presented in a series of overlays. Commercially produced transparencies are available covering a broad range of curriculum areas. 4. Trainers can easily prepare their own transparencies. Information that might otherwise have to be placed on a chalkboard during a class session (lesson outlines, for example) maybe prepared in advance for presentation at a proper time. Research indicates that retention of main points improves significantly when visual outlines are presented. More individuals decided to act on the recommendations of presenters who used overheads than on recommendations of presenters who did not. 5. Another study suggests that trainers who use the overhead projector tend to be more organized than teacher who rely on notes or printed outlines. Students in this study participated more frequently in discussions in the classes where the overhead was used.
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Limitations 1. The effectiveness of overhead projection presentations is heavily dependent on the presenter. The overhead projector cannot be programmed to display visual sequences by itself, nor is an audio accompaniment provided. 2. The overhead system does not lend itself to independent study. The projection system is designed for large-group presentation. Of course, an individual student could look at a transparency by holding it up to the light or by laying it on a light table; but because captions or audio tracks are not a part of this format, the material would ordinarily not be self-instructional. 3. Printed materials and other non transparent items, such as magazine illustrations, cannot be projected immediately, as is possible with the opaque projector. To use the overhead system such materials have to be made into transparencies by means of some production process. 4. Distortion of images is more prevalent with the overhead than with other projection systems. The projector is commonly placed at desktop level to facilitate the instructor’s writing on transparencies. The screen, on the other hand, needs to be placed on a higher level for unobstructed audience sight lines. This discrepancy in levels causes a distortion referred to as the “keystone effect.”

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SELF-CHECK LO. 6.1-6

A. Identify the different parts of the Overhead Projector. Write you answer

on the space provided after each number.

1

2 3 4 6 5 7 8

1 . 2 . 3 . 4 .

5 . 6 . 7 . 8 .

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B._List down the advantages of using OHP in training

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ANSWER KEY LO. 6.1-6 A.
1. Objective Lens System 2. Focus Knob 3. Glass Flatten or Stage 4. Fresnel Lens 5. ON/OFF Switch 6. Fan 7. Lamp 8. Reflector B. Advantages of OHP 1. Its bright lamp is efficient optical system generate so much light on the screen that the overhead can be used in normal room lighting. 2. The projector is operated from the front of the room with the presenter facing the audience, allowing direct eye contact to be maintained. 3. A variety of materials can be projected, including cutout silhouettes, small opaque objects, and many types of transparencies. 4. Trainers can easily prepare their own transparencies. 5. Another study suggests that trainers who use the overhead projector tend to be more organized than teacher who rely on notes or printed outlines.

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TASK SHEET LO. 6.1-6
Inspecting an Overhead Projector Objective: 1. Inspect an over head projector Procedure: 1. Place the overhead projector in a stable flat surface. 2. Plug the power chord to a power outlet. 3. Switch ON the overhead projector. 4. Inspect the overhead projector using the inspection checklist for this activity. 5. Turn OFF the overhead projector after performing the inspection. 6. Let the overhead projector cool down before returning the overhead it to its proper location.

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INSPECTION CHECKLIST FOR OVERHEAD PROJECTOR LO 6.1-6
Brand Name: ________________________ Model: _______________________________ Criteria 1. Objective lens system screw is not loose. 2. Objective lens system mirror and lens is free of dirt 3. Focus knob present and working 4. ON/OFF switch functioning 5. Glass flatten is present and fix at the top box opening 6. Fresnel lens is free of dirt 7. Fan is working 8. Lamp is working 9. Power cable not damage Equipment Inspection Summary: If not approving equipment for use, then include any corrective actions that need to be satisfied before this can be used. Inspection Date: Inspector’s Name: Inspector’s Signature: YES NO

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INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6. 1-7
Mixer Audio Amplifier Mixer When most users think of a sound system, they think of the visible endpoints: microphone or the loudspeaker. But neither of these passive components can create any sound without active components between them. Microphone signals require a preamp, signal processing, and amplification before the loudspeaker can do its job. For small sound system requirements, there's nothing more convenient than combining some of these tasks into a single component, and that's where the mixer/amplifier (or powered mixer) really shines. Mixer/amps are most commonly used for smaller venues such as clubs, coffee houses, and even schoolmultipurpose rooms. But they are equally useful in any building where a sound system might be temporarily set up in different rooms (or outdoors) on different days. In some cases, portable mixer/amps are even permanently installed, despite their ultra-portable nature. Advantages 1. Mixer/amplifiers usually combine a mixer, equalizer, and amplifier all into one unit. 2. They typically range from six to 20 inputs, and up to 1,200 watts total power output. 3. For portable applications, the advantages are obvious. Most manufacturers provide units with built-in carrying handles to take full advantage of the compact size and feature combination. Since all three components are included, there is only one box to carry instead of three. There is also less set up required, since you don't need to interconnect the components. Disadvantages 1. High-quality mixer/amp can cost as much or more than its separate components. 2. If one part of the mixer/amp fails, you need to replace the entire unit in order to get your sound system up and running.

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3. Since the equalizer is always exposed (as opposed to being in a separately located rack somewhere), it is susceptible to tampering by unqualified (or curious) hands. Some of the more sophisticated features that are available on separate mixers may not available on mixer/amps (such as mute, subgroups, more than two or three auxiliary sends). Common features of a Mixer Amplifier 1. Microphone/Line/Instrument input 2. This feature lets you connect different inputs such as microphones, audio players and instruments which is present in every channel.

Input Level Control

Input Toggle Selector

Input Jack (6.5 mm Jack)

3. Equalization The equalization feature can control the low, medium and high frequency of an audio input in each channel.

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4. Onboard Effects Some small mixer/amps include impressive built in digital effects like delay and reverb as well as echo effects.

5. Monitor outs An essential feature of this mixer amp is the separate monitor outputs for each channel. It's also useful for sending signal to outboard amplifiers for control over multiple loudspeaker zones.

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6. Master Output Control Another feature of this mixer amp is the master output control that lets you control all channels output volume and effects.

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HOW TO CHOOSE A MIXER/AMP Here are some of the more popular features, and the decision you need to make before choosing the right one for your application. • Mic/line/instrument inputs: How many microphones will you be using? Don't forget to include direct inputs from DVD players or musical instruments. And keep future expansion in mind. • Equalization: This can range from simple treble, mid, bass control to multi-band graphic or parametric equalizers. It depends on how much control over tone shaping or feedback you think you'll need. • Direct Outs/Inserts: If you'll be using external sound effect devices or other signal processing, you'll want input/output access to individual channels. • Mono or stereo: Stereo amplifiers are important for high-quality music, but it's also useful for sending different output levels to each loudspeaker. • Monitor outs: For musicians, separate monitor outputs can be essential. But it's also useful for sending signal to outboard amplifiers for control over multiple loudspeaker zones.

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SELF CHECK LO 6. 1.-7
Multiple Choice Directions: Read each statement or question; select the correct answer listed below: Write your answer on the space provided before each number.

_______1. An input connector usually used for microphones A. 3.25 jack B. 6.5 mm jack C. RCA D. XLR

_______2. A control that adjusts all the channels output volume and effects. A. mic volume C. input level control

B. master output control D. echo volume ________3. A feature of a mixer amplifier that controls the high and low frequencies.

________4. A control that adjust individual input such as microphone, audio players and other instruments.

A. B.

input level control output level control

C. equalization D. input gain

________5. A selector that connects a specific audio program source such as microphone, audio players,etc. A. B. input control output control C. output selector D. input selector

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ANSWER KEY 6.1-7
1. B 2. B 3. C 4. A 5. D

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TASK SHEET 6.1-7
Inspecting Amplifier Mixer Objectives: 1. Inspect mixer amplifier using the given checklist 2. Identify abnormalities abnormalities. and give recommendations to correct

3. Identify health and safety hazards in accordance to user’s manual. Materials, Tools and Equipment 1. Mixer Amplifier 2. Inspection checklist Procedures: 1. Get the required equipments for this activity from your trainer. 2. Inspect the equipment using the given checklist, check the appropriate box. 3. Make necessary recommendations using the result of your inspection.

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EQUIPMENT INSPECTION CHECKLIST LO 6.1-7

Equipment Name:

Manufacturer:

Equipment Owner:

Model Number:

Divisio n:

Serial Number:

pment tion:

ed for fixed equipment

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Enclosure Operator not exposed to any hazard Not damaged Protects contents from operating environment Adequate shock protection (components well secured)

Approve

N/ A

Power Source - cord and plug Proper voltage and ampacity for plug and cord Grounding conductor included Not damaged plug Proper wiring of plug Damage on cord

Approve

N/ A

Foreign power supplies and equipment Connected to facility power with appropriate adapters Correct voltage, frequency and phasing

Approve

N/ A

Marking requirements Power requirements (voltage, current, frequency) Restrictions and limitations of use Make, model and serial number Hazards, including stored energy

Approve

N/ A

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Requirements for access (authorized repair person, stored energy, PPE) N/ A

Test performed Line continuity Polarization of cord and plug Functional tests

Approve

Other issues Proper management of conductors Free from sharp edges Proper cooling Switches and controls readily accessible Any safety issues with access and maintenance

Approve

N/ A

Documentation Documentation adequate Operating procedures/manual

Approve

N/ A

Equipment Inspection Summary: If not approving equipment for use, then include any corrective actions that need to be satisfied before this can be used.

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Inspection Date:

Inspector Name: Signature:

Inspector

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INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6.1-8
Microphone Objectives:

1. Describe a microphone 2. Identify the different types of advantages and disadvantages microphones and explain their

Microphone A microphone is an electromechanical device that uses vibration to create an electrical signal proportional to the vibration, which is usually an air pressure wave. 1. Dynamic microphone Dynamic microphones are one of the simplest and most rugged of microphone designs. The pickup diaphragm is connected to a coil/magnet assembly - similarly to a loudspeaker cone, but in reverse. Vibration of the diaphragm, caused by sound pressure waves, in turn moves the coil relative to the magnet and produces an electrical signal. The dynamic microphone produces current mechanically, and therefore does not require a power source. Common uses : Microphones for live performance, or requiring the ability to handle high volumes and/or particular frequency bands Small, inexpensive, rugged and relatively moistureresistant Uneven frequency response

Advantages

:

Disadvantages:

Shure SM58 dynamic microphone

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2. Condenser microphone Condensers are generally acknowledged to be the best microphones for recording speech, acoustic instruments, and indeed all sources where subjective sound quality and musicality are paramount. Their cost, delicacy and sensitivity, however, make them unsuitable for some acoustic environments. They use a small sealed capsule - usually up to one inch in diameter one side of which is a very thin membrane pickup. Using either an external current (phantom power) or a electrostatic magnet to provide a difference in electrical charge between the two sides of the capsule, the variation in distance between the two, caused by sound waves, is output as a continuous signal. Moisture or condensation trapped in the capsule of a condenser microphone can permanently damage it, so use caution in positioning and storage [see Microphone care] 3. Lavaliere microphone The term “lavalier” refers to a miniature and usually body-worn microphone. Lavaliers can be of condenser or dynamic types, and often come paired with a beltpack to transmit the signal wirelessly [see wireless systems]. Their small size allows them to be clipped to clothing or worn on a lanyard, and in combination with a radio system give the speaker complete freedom of movement. Though many provide excellent sound quality, their size and design mean that they do not equal larger microphones in quality of output and frequency response, and their signal-to-noise ratio is generally somewhat lower. However, in an environment where a mobile speaker requires a discrete mic with good clarity, where absolute sound quality is not a priority, they are an ideal choice. Common uses : Advantages : Television interviews, lectures, seminars etc Small size, clip-on. Combined with radio beltpack give complete freedom of movement Limited frequency response, self-noise

Disadvantages:

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Lavalier microphone 4. Radio microphone Wireless radio microphones transmit the microphone signal from a battery powered mobile transmitter to a matching receiver, attached to the camera/recorder/laptop etc. This allows a degree of freedom to the subject which is not available with a conventional wired mic. Wireless microphones fall into two broad categories : 4.1 Handheld transmitter The familiar handheld radio mic, incorporating a radio transmitter and batteries into the body of the microphone. Can also be used in combination with a microphone boom. 4.2 Beltpack transmitter Used in combination with a miniature clip-on lavalier (see above) or a headband worn mic, the beltpack transmitter is worn by the subject, and attached by a short cable to the mic itself, and again contains batteries and radio transmitter Radio microphones will use one of a set of allowed frequencies - either switchable on mic and receiver, or fixed by the manufacturers. If multiple mics are to be used in the same venue, then they must all be set to different frequencies, to avoid interference. Fixed frequency mics can therefore usually be ordered in a range of different frequencies. It is advisable to use fresh batteries in the radio mic transmitter for each event. Common uses : Advantages : Lectures, broadcast, live performance No wires! Freedom of movement, unobtrusive More complex setup, reliance on batteries, lower signal-to-noise ratio

Disadvantages:

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Radio system components (clockwise from top left): clip-on Lavalier microphone, beltpack transmitter, headworn mic, handheld transmitters, diversity receiver

5. Piezoelectric microphone Certain chemical compounds will, when pressure is applied to them, generate an electrical impulse. In a piezo-electric microphone, sound waves apply varying pressure to the pickup, which contains this type of substance (often a crystalline material) and produce the output signal. Common uses : Advantages : Contact microphones/pickups for guitars, drums and acoustic instruments No exposed moving parts, so can be used in extreme conditions where a conventional microphone is unsuitable (underwater, for example) Limited frequency response

Disadvantages:

Directional Properties Every microphone has a property known as directionality. This describes the microphone's sensitivity to sound from various directions. Some microphones pick up sound equally from all directions; others pick up sound only from one direction or a particular combination of directions. The types of directionality are divided into three main categories: 1. Omnidirectional Picks up sound evenly from all directions (omni means "all" or "every"). 2. Unidirectional Picks up sound predominantly from one direction. This includes cardioid and hypercardioid microphones. 3. Bidirectional Picks up sound from two opposite directions.
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SELF-CHECK LO 6.1-8

Multiple Choice: Directions: Read each statement or question carefully. Select the correct answer on the space provided before each number.

_____1. A microphone that comes in small size, clip-on and it is combined with radio belt pack that gives the user a complete freedom to move. A._Dynamic microphone C. Radio Microphone B._Lavalier D._USB microphone

_____2. A microphone that has its pickup diaphragm connected to a coil/magnet assembly - similarly to a loudspeaker cone, but in reverse. A._Dynamic microphone C. Radio Microphone B._Lavalier D._USB microphone

_____3. A microphone directional properties that picks up sound evenly from all directions A._Bidirectional
C. Omnidirectional

B._Hypercardiod D._unidirectional

_____4. A microphone directional properties that Picks up sound from two opposite directions. A._Bidirectional
C. Omnidirectional B._ Hypercardioid _

D._unidirectional

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_____5. A microphone polar properties for most single-diaphragm directional microphones A._Bi-directional C. Omni-directional B._Cardioid D._supercardioid

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ANSWER KEY LO. 6.1-8

1. A 2. B 3. C 4. D 5. B

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TASK SHEET NO. 6.1-8
Inspecting a Microphone Objective: 1. Check physical condition of the microphone 2. Check the audio output of the microphone

You will need the following in inspecting a microphone: 1. Microphone 2. Inspection checklist

A microphone can greatly affect the delivery of a trainer to a big group of trainees; the basic knowledge of what to check before using it would be of great help to you.

Procedures: 1. Insert the microphone to the input jack of the amplifier. 2. Switch on the microphone. 3. Test for functionality.

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CHECKLIST FOR INSPECTING MICROPHONES LO. 6. 1-8

Model Name: ________________________ Model No. : __________________________ Date Inspected: ______________________ Type of Microphone: ______________________________ Direction: Select by checking the appropriate box in each criteria if the condition is present as perceived by your eyes and ears.

Problems No Sound

Ye s

No

What to do Be sure everything is plugged into AC power and turned on. Be sure that all cables are connected to their proper equipment inputs and outputs Put fresh batteries in wireless microphones Check for signal presence in each component by looking at the meters or indicator lights Check all switch positions of the microphone, audio mixer and amplifier.

Distortion

If distortion can be heard on every sound source, make sure that the power amplifier is not turned up so high that it is clipping Make sure that the mixer meters do not reach above 0 except occasionally. A stray wire in a connector might be causing a short circuit which can create distortion. Check inside each connector for stray wires and cut them off. Clean connectors with contact cleaner

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Problems

Ye s

No

What to do If only one microphone is distorting, locate its input trim (gain or atten) control on the mixer. Turn the control down just to the point where the distortion stops, then a bit more to allow some headroom. If the input trim is set correctly and you still hear distortion, switch in the pad in the mic, or substitute another microphone. Also, replace the batteries in battery-powered microphones. There might not have enough phantom voltage for a condenser mic. Most of these mics need 18V or more. If several condenser mics are plugged in, the phantom voltage might drop too low. Consider using an external phantom supply.

Noise (Hiss)

Be sure that mixer meters are reaching 0 on the loudest parts of the program. If this is too loud, turn down the power amplifier, not the mixer.

Check that the mixer master faders and submaster faders (if any) are at or near design center Replace the batteries in battery-powered microphones and transmitters.

Noise (Crackles)

If a pot crackles when turned, try to clean it by rotating it rapidly. Eventually it should be cleaned internally by a service technician. If a mic cable crackles when moved, replace it with a new cable or a higher-quality cable. Also check the solder connections inside each cable connector.

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LEARNING OUTCOME SUMMARY

Learning Out come # 2

Operate Electronic Media Equipment to deliver a lesson

Contents:

1. Facilitating training using LCD/DLP projector and a personal computer. 2. Facilitating training using LCD/DLP projector and a VCD/DVD player. 3. Facilitating training using Overhead projector

Assessment Criteria:

1. Equipment are set up in accordance with health and safety standard.. 2. Electronic media equipment arte operated in accordance to user’s manual. 3. Equipment are used for optimum performance based on its capacity.

Conditions: Trainees must be provided with following:

1. Practical work area 2. Equipment:
LCD Projector DLP Projector VCD/DVD Player Overhead Projector Sound Mixer Microphone

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3. Tools ,accessories and supplies VGA Cable RCA Cable Transparencies 4. Training materials: Information sheet Self checks Model answers Task sheets Inspection checklist

Assessment Method: Written Test Performance Test

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LEARNING EXPERIENCES

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Learning Outcome #2: Operate Electronic Media Equipment to Deliver a Lesson

Learning Activities

Special Instructions

Perform Task Sheet LO 6.2-1A Connecting LCD Projector to Personal Computer

Ask you trainer for the AV equipment that you will use for this activity

Read Information Sheet LO 6.2-1 LCD Projector Presentation Skills

Perform Job Sheet 6.2.1. Facilitating Training Using Personal Computer and LCD/DLP Projector To check your skills, knowledge and attitude in facilitating training using personal computer and LCD/DLP projector, you will present a 10 minute information lesson using the above mentioned AV equipment.

Arrange with your trainer for the schedule of this activity, and at the same time ask for a personal computer and LCD/DLP projector for this activity.

Perform Task Sheet 6.2-1B Connecting LCD/DVD projector and VCD/DVD player

Ask you trainer for the AV equipment that you will use for this activity

Read Information Sheet LO 6.2-2 Using Videos in Training

Answer Self Check LO 6.2-2
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Check your answer using Answer key Lo 6.2-2 Perform Job Sheet LO 6.2-2 Facilitating Training Using VCD/DVD and LCD/DLP Projector Ask your trainer for a VCD/DVD and LCD/DLP Projector.

Read Information Sheet LO 6.2-3 Using Overhead Projectors in Training

Perform Job Sheet LO 6.2-3 Facilitating Training Using Overhead Projector

Arrange with your trainer for the schedule of this activity, and at the same time ask for an overhead projector for this activity.

Read Information Sheet LO 6.2-4 Connecting and Operating the Microphone and Mixer Amplifier

Perform Task Sheet LO 6.2-4 Connecting and operating the microphone and mixer amplifier

Arrange with your trainer for the schedule of this activity, and at the same time ask for a microphone and mixer amplifier

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TASK SHEET LO. 6.2.1A
Connecting LCD Projector to Personal Computer Objective: 1. Connect LCD projector to personal computer. 2. Display computer images from LCD projectors Materials, Tools and Equipment 1. Personal Computer(Laptop) 2. LCD Projector 3. VGA cable Procedure: 1. Place LCD/DVD Projector and Laptop on stable flat surface. 2. Locate the VGA connector on Laptop. The VGA output connector/port is usually located at the back or side of laptop. This is the same port which allows you to connect an external monitor/projector to the Computer (CPU).

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3. Locate the VGA connector on LCD projector.

4. Use a VGA cable (usually a 15-pin male to male) to connect your computer to the LCD projector. Insert one end of the cable into the VGA connector (sometimes this connector is blue) in the back of your computer and do the same in the back of your LCD projector. If the LCD projector has more than one VGA connector, choose the one that says something like "line in" or "in from computer.

5. Power on your laptop. Turn on the LCD projector. It may take a couple of minutes to warm up. Open the computer file or document you wish to display. When you are ready to project your image, press "Function" (Fn) plus "F4." This combination of keys sends your computer's display to the LCD projector.

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6. If the above step didn’t work try pressing the source button on your LCD projector. Select RGB source to activate the projector.

7. Know some other features of your LCD projector. Most have a focus knob to make the picture clearer. If your image appears distorted (wider on one side than the other or small at the top, big at the bottom) you must adjust the keystone setting, which helps to project a rectangular image. You can fix keystone distortion manually by moving the LCD projector to position it near the center of the screen at which it is aiming or correct it using the menu command or and accessing keystone.

8. Once finished with your presentation. Turn off your LCD projector properly. Usually you must press the "off" button once, and a dialog box pops up asking if you are sure you want to turn it off. Press the "off" button again, and the machine powers down. Leave the machine plugged in until the cooling fan stops. Be careful when disconnecting VGA cables from the back of the projector and laptop, as the pins at the end of the cable are delicate.

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PROCEDURAL CHECKLIST LO. 6.2-1A
Connecting Personal Computer and LCD/DLP Projector Trainees Name: ________________________________ Date: ___________________ During the performance of the activity did the trainee follow the steps by step procedure? Procedure 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Place LCD/DLP projector on stable flat surface. Locate VGA port of the personal computer Locate VGA port of the LCD/DLP projector Use VGA cable to connect computer to LCD/DLP projector. Power ON laptop Power ON LCD/DLP projector Open computer file Press computer combination keys to send display to projector. Adjust focus knob to make the picture clearer. YES NO

10. Adjust keystone setting to avoid keystone distortion. 11. Switched OFF both equipments after used. 12. Unplug VGA cable carefully. 13. Unplug power cable after used. For satisfactory achievement, all items should receive a YES response. Comment: Trainers Name and Signature: ____________________________________ Date: ______________________

INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6.2-1
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LCD Projector Presentation Skills Objective: 1. Explain the guidelines in using LCD projectors. 2. Explain the guidelines in giving presentations In the growing world of technology, the popularity of computers to generate presentations is increasing. Today’s laptop computers coupled with many of the common software packages offer flexibility to the presenter. A professional looking presentation can be prepared ahead of time and displayed using this exciting technology. Here are some guidelines when using LCD projectors: 1. Read the LCD projector manual on its proper operation - Not all LCD projectors work the same and each has their own unique operating requirements. Be familiar with the projector BEFORE using it during your actual presentation is necessary. Make sure your computer can properly interfaced with the LCD projector. 2. Practice setting the equipment up several times - Spend some time to learn on how to properly set up the LCD projector with your computer and other computers. If possible, set up the LCD projector in the actual presentation environment or in the venue where you will be using it. 3. Set up well in advance – Giver yourself enough time to set up your computer and LCD projector. 4. Check the LCD projector bulb life - LCD projector bulbs do have limited life. Some bulbs have shorter lives than others. Check and make sure the bulb you will be using is not close to the end of its life. 5. Bring a spare bulb and cables! - Always carry spare bulbs with you and make sure you know how to properly change the bulb. Also, remember, "Hot" glass looks like "Cold" glass; be careful and bring a towel or glove to use when changing the bulb. Practice changing the bulb during one of your practice sessions. 6. Check your presentation color combinations - Take some time to check out the actual presentation for the color combinations you will be using. Some colors and color combinations may not have good projection.

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7. Check the font size you are using - Nothing is more frustrating to an audience than text that cannot be easily seen or read. Make sure you are using the proper text size for the distance you will be projecting your slides. 8. As with any sophisticated piece of equipment, it is critical that you familiarize yourself with the proper setup and operation of the equipment well in advance of your actual presentation. Remember, the more technology you bring to your presentation, the more care and time you need to include during your preparation stage. If everything is well planned, properly checked and you have familiarized with this new equipment, it can add a lot of excitement and life to your presentations. Guidelines in giving your presentation There are four things to remember during your presentation:
1. Presence

As you start with your presentation, make a conscious effort to stand tall, take a deep breath and look as if you're going to enjoy being there.
2. Eye contact

Make eye contact with people in your audience in a friendly way. People respond much better when they think you are talking to them. In a small room, try to make eye contact with each person in the audience; in a larger hall, make eye contact with different groups in the audience.
3. Voice
• • •

Speak slowly and clearly Speak loudly enough so everyone can hear Remember to breathe slowly and deeply

4. Move

You are allowed to move as you give your presentation, but avoid pacing up and down or fiddling with your hands, spectacles or pen. Keep your hands out of your pockets and away from your face

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JOB SHEET LO 6.2.1
Facilitating Training Using Personal Computer and LCD/DLP Projector

Objective: 1. Setup LCD/DLP projector and personal computer 2. Present an information lesson using LCD/DLP projector in 15 minutes following the guidelines in using LCD/DLP projector and guidelines in giving presentations. Equipment: 1. LCD/DLP projector 2. Personal computer (Laptop) Procedure: 1. Set-up LCD/DLP projector and personal computer 2. Present an information lesson using LCD/DLP projector Evaluation: Trainer observation, using the following criteria: 1. All steps in connecting LCD/DLP projector were completed in the correct sequence 2. All safety precautions followed. in operating LCD/DLP projector were

3. Guidelines in using LCD/DLP projector were followed 4. Guidelines in giving presentations were followed.

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PERFORMANCE CHECKLIST LO. 6.2.1
Facilitating Training Using Personal Computer and LCD/DLP Projector Trainees Name: ________________________________ Date: ___________________ During the performance of the activity did the trainee perform to the required criteria? Criteria 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Located VGA ports of LCD/DLP projector Located VGA port of the personal computer Switched ON the LCD/DLP projector and personal computer Opened files for presentation Displayed the presentation from LCD/DLP projector Adjusted focus of LCD projector Adjusted keystone effect Checked color combination of presentation Check font size of the presentation YES NO N/A

10. Maintained presence during the presentation 11. Mastered the content of the presentation 12. Maintained eye to eye contact to trainees 13. Modulated voice For satisfactory achievement, all items should receive a YES or N/A response. Comment: Trainers Name and Signature: ____________________________________ Date: ______________________

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TASK SHEET LO. 6.2-1B
Connecting LCD Projector to VCD/DVD Player Objective: 1. Connect LCD projector to VCD/DVD player. 2. Display video images from LCD projectors Equipment: 1. LCD/DLP projectors 2. CD/DVD Player 3. RCA Cable Procedure: 1. Place the LCD/DLP projector and VCD/DVD player on a stable flat surface at about 5 feet away from the projection screen. 2. Locate the “Video Out RCA” connector, and the “Video In” RCA connector of the LCD/DLP projector.

VCD Video Out

DLP Video In

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3. Connect one end of the RCA cable to the video out of the VCD/DVD player and the other end to the LCD/DLP Video In cable.

RCA Cable

RCA Cable to VCD/DVD Video OUT

RCA Cable Video IN

to

LCD/DLP

4. Switch ON the VCD/DVD player and the LCD/DLP Projector. 5. LCD projector can automatically detect VCD/DVD player. If in case the projector cannot display video, you can press the SOURCE button of the LCD/DLP projector and select video as source. 6. To include audio on your video connect an RCA-to-3.5 mm stereo audio cable’s 3.5 mm stereo miniplug into the VCD/DVD audio jack. Connect the RCA plugs to the input jacks of the speaker or PA system.

3.5 mm stereo mini plug to RCA

RCA audio connector to VCD 3.5 mm mini jack audio out connected to speaker IN

7. After the video presentation, eject VCD from the VCD player, and then turn it off.

SWITCH OFF LCD/DLP PROJECTOR; WAIT FOR THE PROJECTOR TO COOL DOWN BEFORE UNPLUGGING.
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INFORMATION SHEET LO 6.2-2
Using Videos in Training Objectives: 1. Identify the practices in training using videos 2. Identify the advantages of using videos in training 3. Identify the disadvantages of using videos in training

In the absence of field, classroom and hands on training, video becomes an important learning tool. We know from research “that people tend to remember:” • • • • 10% of what we read 20% of what we hear 30% of what we see 50% of what we hear and see.

What’s new to this research is that we will remember 70%-90% of we see, hear and experience. The experience element does not always mean hands-on because today’s visual learner get almost the same experience from a well done training or demonstration video as they from hands-on work. How and When to use Video Video can be used in a variety of ways to enhance any training topic. Here are some examples of best practices for training use. • Always preview video in advance to make it easier to connect to training objectives. • When possible, show short clips for longer programs than to introduce or reinforce discussion. • Set the learning condition for attentive viewing by giving trainees active assignments before a clip to encourage their attention and post discussion. • Use the pause button to promote interactivity between yourself, the video and the trainees.

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Where appropriate, use the pause button to freeze on specific frame of video to encourage the trainees to search for more detail. Lead-ins to video segments could include: • • • • “Listen to this term……” “Think of similar examples…..” “Watch for…..” “List the things in this video that ….”

After the video; • • • • Check for understanding Reinforce a point Connect to real examples Ask, “What did you see, etc…”

Advantages of Videos • • • • • It can easily be duplicated It is reusable and portable It can be used by the trainees at their convenience It can save the travel expenses and time It can bring productivity savings

Disadvantages of Video • Information may not be specific to the training but it must appeal to large audience • Trainees control the process of learning, which can sometimes lead to leniency on the part of trainees causing waste of resources, time, and money • Learning at homes can bring many distractions, which in turn may result that trainee can stop the video anytime for his personal work • Trainee may also fast-forward many parts, if he finds the video boring Therefore, evaluating learning becomes very important when this type of training technique is used.
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SELF CHECK LO 6.2-2
A.

Identify the practices in training using video. List down the advantages in using videos in training List down the disadvantages of videos in training

B. C.

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ANSWER KEY LO. 6.2-2
A. Identify the practices in training using video. • Always preview video in advance to make it easier to connect to training objectives. • When possible, show short clips from longer programs to either introduce or reinforce discussion. • Set the learning condition for attentive viewing by giving trainees active assignments before a clip to encourage their attention and post discussion. • Use the pause button to promote interactivity between yourself, the video and the trainees • B. • • • • • Check trainees understanding of the video presented List down the advantages in using videos in training It can easily be duplicated It is reusable and portable It can be used by the trainees at their convenience It can save the travel expenses and time It can bring productivity savings

C. List down the disadvantages of videos in training • Information may not be specific to the training but it must appeal to large audience • Trainees control the process of learning, which can sometimes lead to leniency on the part of trainees causing waste of resources, time, and money • Learning at homes can bring many distractions, which in turn may result that trainee can stop the video anytime for his personal work • Trainee may also fast-forward many parts, if he finds the video boring

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JOB SHEET LO 6.2-2
Facilitating Training Using VCD/DVD and LCD/DLP Projector

Objective: 1. Setup LCD/DLP projector and VCD/DVD player 2. Present a video using VCD/DVD and LCD/DLP projector in 15 minutes following the practices in training. Equipment: 1. LCD/DLP projector 2. VCD/DVD player Procedure: 1. Set-up LCD/DLP projector and personal computer 2. Present an information lesson using LCD/DLP projector Evaluation: Trainer observation, using the following criteria: 1. All steps in connecting LCD/DLP projector and video player were completed in the correct sequence 2. All safety precautions followed. in operating LCD/DLP projector were

3. Training practices in using video were followed

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PERFORMANCE CHECKLIST LO. 6.2-2
Facilitating Training Using VCD/DVD and LCD/DLP Projector Trainees Name: ________________________________ Date: ___________________ During the performance of the activity did the trainee perform to the required criteria? Criteria 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Placed LCD/DLP projector and VCD/DVD player on a stable flat surface Located RCA video OUT of VCD/DVD projector Located RCA video IN of LCD/DVD projector Connected RCA Video cable to VCD/DVD video OUT and LCD/DVD video IN. Switched ON the LCD/DLP projector and VCD/DVD player Selected source from LCD/DLP projector Displayed the video from LCD/DLP projector Adjusted focus and keystone of projector Used PAUSE button for interactivity. YES NO N/A

10. Checked trainees understanding of the video

For satisfactory achievement, all items should receive a YES or N/A response. Comment:

Trainers Name and Signature: ____________________________________ Date: ______________________

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INFORMATION SHEET LO 6.2-3
Using Overhead Projectors in Training Objectives: 1. Explain the guidelines in using Overhead projectors 2. Explain the operation of an overhead projector

While the current trend in the training industry is heading toward the use of the LCD Projector technology, the overhead projector is still the most popular presentation device used today. Most facilities have an overhead projector in every training room or conference room. Although it is the most widely used, it is also considered as more misuse equipment. Some presenters continue to misuse the overhead projector even though they have used them for years. Below are some basic guidelines and tips in using an overhead projector. Although some of these tips are observable but still, many presentations are not successfully done because these basic tips are not consistently applied. Here are some tips and rules to be aware of: 1. Practice giving your presentation using your visual aids to check out how well they project. This is a good time to also check for spelling errors. Have a friend sit and watch your presentation and make notes on any problems or needed improvements with your visual aids. Practice using your overhead transparencies so you will be comfortable with handling them correctly. 2. Stand off to one side of the overhead projector while you face the audience - Too many people stand between the overhead projector and the screen causing a shadow of the presenter's body. Standing to one side will allow the audience to see you as the presenter and will prevent you from blocking their view of your visual aid. 3. Do not face the "projected" image on the screen - Face your audience and not the screen. Many presenters face the screen and end up talking to the screen. 4. Cover the transparency when you are done using it-with an opaque piece of cardboard (you can usually mount a solid sheet of paper on one side of transparency frames). You may also turn off
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the projector completely, but beware; this can cause the projector bulb to burn out sooner.

5. Bring a spare bulb!-Nothing is more unsettling than to have your overhead projector bulb burn out during your presentation. Bring spare bulbs and a glove to change the bulb. The old bulb will be HOT! Make sure you know how to change the bulb. CAUTION: Remember HOT glass looks the same as cold glass! 6. Place the overhead to your RIGHT if you are right handed and to your LEFT if you are left handed-This will make it easier for you to face your audience and write if you need to. In either case, you want to stand in the center of the speaking area and face the audience when you speak. 7. Place your overhead projector on a table low enough so it does not block you or the screen. Have a small table next to the overhead so you can stack your transparencies before and after you use them. 8. Place your screen on a diagonal instead of directly behind you-this will assure that you do not block the view for your audience. Also, have the top of the screen tilted forward towards the overhead projector (if possible) to prevent the "keystone" effect (This is where the top of the image is larger than the bottom). 9. Tape the power chord to the floor-to protect you or someone else from tripping. As the presenter, tripping over the chord and falling, although humorous, is one large gesture you would prefer to avoid. 10. Store your overhead transparencies in a sturdy box or container so they will stay clean and protected for the next time you need them. Label the box and include a "clean" copy of your handouts in the box. This will make it easier for you the next time you give your award winning presentation again. Operating an OHP is a relative simple matter requiring little thought or preparation. Using an OHP effectively is also a relatively simple matter. But it does require more than a little thought and preparation. Below are some suggestions about what you should think about, and prepare for, to make your use of the OHP more effective. Some may appear to be obvious and fundamental - but you’d be surprised how often the ‘obvious’ is overlooked. Before the lesson Make sure that:
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• You are familiar with and know how to operate the particular OHP in the room you will be using. • The OHP is plugged in, switched on and is in working order.

• The OHP is suitably located and projects your transparencies on the screen clearly enough to be seen from all parts of the room. Check this by moving to various parts of the room to confirm that all parts of the transparency are legible. In some cases, ambient light might cause some interference and you might have to draw curtains or blinds or turn out lights. • Your transparencies are arranged in order of presentation and placed near the projector. Fumbling around for transparencies in the middle of a lesson is distracting and will upset the ‘flow’ of your presentation. During the lesson • Don’t stand or move backwards and forwards between the projector and the screen. That is, unless you are demonstrating silhouettes. This should he an obvious concern – but it happens so often. • Preferably, point to the transparency rather than to the screen when referring to a particular point of information being projected. Some people prefer referring to the screen, the two dangers in this are: (a) you might block out important information being projected, and (b) it is difficult or at least awkward to do this and maintain eye contact with the class. Referring directly to the transparency is somewhat easier and allows maintenance of eye contact. • Use a pen, pencil or a piece of coloured gel to point to or highlight particular information on the transparency. This leaves you free to move around if you wish. • Don’t reveal all of the information on the transparency at once – except where this may be inappropriate.
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Revealing a whole list or series of points or a whole diagram may be confusing to the class. Lists, series and diagrams can be ‘built up’ or developed in several ways.

The most common approach is to cover the transparency with card and to ‘reveal’ the information in a step-by-step manner or by moving the card down or along the transparency. This is particularly appropriate when referring to lists or a series of points. Using one or more overlays is a good way of building up a diagram. • Above all, don’t leave the projector lamp on if you are not projecting a transparency. A blank screen can be most distracting, so don’t be afraid to turn the projector off or cover the plate with opaque card. However, avoid turning the lamp on and off too frequently or too many times in quick succession because this may cause it to ‘blow’ (and OHP lamps are not cheap!!). Transparencies Some ‘golden rules’ to consider when designing and preparing your transparencies includes the following: • Make sure that the information presented is legible. Use large letters and diagrams, the bigger the better. • Don’t have too much information on one transparency. Too much text, too many different colours, symbols or ‘information carriers’ can be confusing. Don’t be afraid to use several transparencies or to use overlays to build up your text or diagram.

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JOB SHEET LO 6.2-3
Facilitating Training Using Overhead Projector

Objective: 1. Setup OHP projector 2. Present a lesson using overhead projector. Equipment: 1. Overhead projector Supplies: 1. Transparencies Procedure: 1. Set-up overhead projector 2. Present an information lesson using overhead projector Evaluation: Trainer observation, using the following criteria: 1. All steps in operating overhead projector were completed in the correct sequence 2. All safety precautions in operating overhead projector were followed. 3. Guidelines in using overhead projector for training were followed

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PROCEDURAL CHECKLIST LO. 6.2-3
Facilitating Training Using Overhead Projector Trainees Name: ________________________________ Date: ___________________ During the performance of the activity did the trainee perform to the required criteria. Criteria 1. 2. 3. 4. Placed overhead projector in flat stable surface. Plugged power cable and switched it ON. Checked condition of the overhead projector Located OHP and projected transparencies on the screen clearly enough to be seen from all parts of the room. Arranged transparencies in order of presentation and placed near the projector Avoided standing between OHP projector and screen Pointed to the transparency rather than to the screen when referring to a particular point of
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YES

NO

N/A

5.

6. 7.

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information being projected

8.

Used a pen, pencil to point or highlight particular information on the transparency Used revelation technique in presenting information on transparency

9.

10. Turned OFF OHP projector when not used for a long time. 11. Completely turned OFF the OHP after the presentation.

Comment:

Trainers Name and Signature:_______________________________________ Date: _____________________________________

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Information Sheet 6.2-4 Connecting and Operating the Microphone and Mixer Amplifier
• Pictorial Wiring Diagram of Speaker from the Mixer Amplifier Left Speak er Right Speaker Speaker

Speaker terminal from speaker box

+

_

+
Speaker terminal from mixer amplifier

_

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Pictorial Diagram in Connecting Microphone and other audio program sources to the input of the mixer amplifier.

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TASK SHEET LO. 6.2-4
Connecting and operating the microphone and mixer amplifier Objective: 1. 2. Connect speaker system and microphone to the mixer amplifier. Operate the mixer amplifier using microphone.

Materials, Tools and Equipment: 1. 2. 3. Speaker system Mixer Amplifier Microphone CAUTION: 1. Be sure to connect the speakers properly to the mixer amplifier. 2. All controls of the mixer amplifier must be set into minimum positions before switching on the mixer amplifier. 3. Do not point the microphone directly to the speakers, to avoid feedback. Procedures: (Refer to pictorial diagram) 1. Connect the speaker to the mixer amplifier. 2. Power on the mixer amplifier. 3. Connect the microphone to the mixer amplifier. 4. Switch on the microphone and adjust the volume control. 5. Adjust the other controls to suit the pitch.

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EQUIPMENT INSPECTION CHECKLIST

Equipment Name:

Manufactur er:

Equipment Owner:

Model Number:

Division:

Serial Number:

Equipment Location: Required for fixed only:

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Enclosure Operator not exposed to any hazard Not damaged Protects contents from operating environment Adequate shock protection (components well secured) Power Source - cord and plug Proper voltage and ampacity for plug and cord Grounding conductor included Not damaged plug Proper wiring of plug Damage on cord Foreign power supplies and equipment Connected to facility power with appropriate adapters Correct voltage, frequency and phasing Marking requirements Power requirements (voltage, current, frequency) Restrictions and limitations of use Make, model and serial number Hazards, including stored energy Requirements for access (authorized repair person, stored energy, PPE)

Approve

N/A

Approve

N/A

Approve

N/A

Approve

N/A

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Test performed Line continuity Polarization of cord and plug Functional tests Other issues Proper management of conductors Free from sharp edges Proper cooling Switches and controls readily accessible Any safety issues with access and maintenance Documentation Documentation adequate Operating procedures/manual Approve

Approve

N/A

Approve

N/A

N/A

Equipment Inspection Summary : If not approving equipment for use, then include any corrective actions that need to be satisfied before this can be used.

Inspection Date:

Inspection Name: Signature:

Inspector

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LEARNING OUTCOME SUMMARY

Maintain Electronic Media Equipment Learning Out come #3

Contents: 1. Preventive maintenance for a personal computer. 2. Preventive maintenance for an LCD/DLP projector 3. Preventive maintenance for a VCD/DVD player. 4. Preventive Maintenance for an overhead projector. Assessment Criteria: 1. Preventive maintenance procedure, diagnostic tools and system check are applied periodically 2. Checklist are maintained as per standard operating procedures. 3. AV/multimedia equipment are stored to safe rack/cabinet.

Conditions:
Trainees must be provided with following: 1. Practical work area 2. Equipment: LCD Projector DLP Projector VCD/DVD Player Overhead Projector Sound Mixer Microphone 3. Tools ,accessories and supplies
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Abrasive brush lens cloth Detergent Lens cleaner 4. Training materials: Information sheet Self checks Model answers Task sheets Preventive Maintenance Schedule

Assessment Method:
Written Test Performance Test

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Learning Outcome #3: Maintain Electronic Media Equipment Learning Activities Read Information Sheet LO 6.3-1 Maintenance Activity for Personal Computer Perform Task Sheet LO 6.3-1. Preventive Maintenance Schedule for a Personal Computer Read Information Sheet LO 6.3-2 Maintenance Activity for LCD/DLP Projector Perform Task Sheet LO 6.3-2. Preventive Maintenance Schedule for an LCD/DLP Projector Read Information Sheet LO. 6.3-3 Maintenance Activity for VCD/DVD Player Perform Task Sheet LO 6.3-3. Preventive Maintenance Schedule for a VCD/DVD player Read Information Sheet LO 6.3-4 Maintenance Activity for an Overhead Projector Perform Task Sheet LO 6.3-4 Preventive Maintenance Schedule for an Overhead Projector Read Information Sheet LO 6.3-5 Maintenance Activity for a Mixer Amplifier and Microphone Perform Task Sheet LO 6.3-4 Preventive Maintenance Schedule for mixer amplifier and microphone Ask you trainer for a mixer amplifier and microphone that you will use for this activity Ask you trainer for an overhead projector that you will use for this activity Ask you trainer for a VCD/DVD player that you will use for this activity Ask you trainer for an LCD/DLP projector that you will use for this activity Ask you trainer for a personal computer that you will use for this activity Special Instructions

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INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6.3-1
Maintenance Activity for a Personal Computer Objective: Identify the different maintenance procedures for a personal computer Isn’t it just great when you get your new computer in your training room and it is running like clockwork? However after even a few weeks of use it can become slower due to the build-up of data unnecessarily stored on the computer. This is one reason why everyone needs to follow a computer maintenance checklist that will hopefully cover all the maintenance jobs that you need to keep your computer running smoothly. Check your hard disk for bad sectors and errors This is probably the most important job on the maintenance checklist because Scandisk checks your hard drive for errors. If there is a problem with your hard drive then you are in trouble. It is the main component in your computer and stores all of your precious data and files. It is always best to perform this check before using the disk defragmenter as the disk defragmenter will not work when there are file errors or hard disk errors. Here are the steps on how to maintain your hard drive and check for bad sectors and errors: 1. Go to the Start Menu and choose My Computer 2. Right click on the drive you want to check. I always check C: drive as it is my main drive. 3. Choose Properties from the drop down menu. 4. Click on the Tools tab 5. Here you can press check now to scan your hard disc for errors. 6. A box will appear with some choices. Choose to let Windows fix errors automatically. 7. Then press start. 8. When it is finished scanning a report will appear.

Defragment your computer
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The Windows Disk defragmenter organizes files and data into areas that helps the computer run smoothly. It moves the frequently used files to an easy access area and the least used files, the opposite. It also gathers fragmented files and groups them back together. You should defrag your computer every 10-15 days. How to Defragment your computer: 1. Go to the Start Menu and choose My Computer 2. Right click on the drive you want to check. I always check C: drive as it is my main drive. 3. Choose Properties from the drop down menu. 4. Click on the Tools tab 5. Here you can click on Defragmentation to defrag your hard disc. 6. Then press defragment now. Remove unwanted and junk files Windows helps you get through your maintenance checklist by providing system tools that help you clean your computer and keep it running smoothly. There are two main ways to delete files safely with the help of Windows. • Disk Cleanup: This will remove such files as temporary files, the recycle bin, compressed old files, offline WebPages, and downloaded program files. • To get there you can go to my computer>right click on the drive you want to clean>choose properties>then choose disk cleanup. • Delete browsing history: You will be amazed on the number of files you collected when you browse the internet. Temporary internet files, cookies, history, form data, and passwords. To keep your computer running smoothly you must regularly delete all of this junk. If you are a person that likes the computer filling in your passwords you should probably leave the cookies and the passwords.
o

To get there go to Control Panel and open Internet Options> On the General tab>next to the heading browsing history>click on the delete button. This will take you to a menu like the screenshot next page. You can choose to delete all at the bottom or you can delete them individually.

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Clean out your email This may be over done, however, if you delete an email in Outlook express, it then goes to the deleted folder. Then you have to delete it from there. Some programs then take that email to the recycle bin, where it has to be deleted again. I know it sounds crazy, but it does happen. Keep your programs under control • Remove any programs that you do not use or have a trial period that has expired: There is nothing worse than having a nagging message come up saying that your trial period is over. You are wasting your computer time and energy. There are two options here, delete the program or buy the full version. • Keep up to date with Windows updates: Let Windows updates do its thing because it usually keeps your computer up to date with security breaches and bug fixes. • Register your programs: Either register your programs or tick the box that says never show this window again. If you leave this unfinished it will be another process that is running in the background, slowing your computer down.
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• Don’t install too many programs: You only need one program to perform a certain task. You should not be having three different photo editing programs or 2 different video editing programs for example. The less your computer has on it the better it will run. Have an external drive for instant backup It doesn’t just have to be an external hard drive, it could also be a USB flash drive, a re-writeable DVD disc, a spare hard drive installed in your computer, or even another computer altogether. If you instantly backup you files to another device you will have less maintenance to do on your computer. You will not be clogging your computer up with files and data and if your computer crashes your files will be safe. Windows Vista and Windows Seven still have files that you need to backup, however they both have an inbuilt backup feature. If you are backing up manually then the files are just stored in different areas. For example in Windows Vista and Seven you have a username that all your files are stored under. The path to this folder is C:\users\mitz this is where you will find the Documents folder, the pictures, music, and so on. Keep your computer organized You are probably wondering why this is on a computer maintenance checklist, however it can be very important. Being organized helps you keep track of files and folders. This way you will know if you need a particular file on your computer or not? You can backup or delete un-wanted files and just store the ones you really need. Keeping your computer neat and tidy helps you with the backup process. This way you know where everything is and can copy it easily. Guard your computer from viruses • Anti virus software: Always have good antivirus software installed. The free ones do work occasionally, however you are better off paying for an antivirus that has backup support and regular updates. • Limit Downloading: Downloading from unknown sources is dangerous because it is highly likely that you will end up with a virus. If you are downloading a program it is best to make sure it comes from a reputable software manufacturer. Do your research and you will save your computer some stress. • Bad websites: Websites that offer things that are too good to be true or have XXXX content usually can give you a virus or a tracking cookie the instant you visit this site. the best way is to stay away from these sites. • Suspicious emails: If you are not sure who has sent an email and it has an attachment, do not open it, and delete it. If it really is important the person will resend it to you. I received one to my
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personal email saying ‘here are your credit card records you requested…etc etc’ I was really tempted to open it but I knew it wasn’t from my bank. I just wanted to see if they really had my credit card number, but I deleted it. They wanted me to open it.

Illegal software: If you don’t have the real deal software you are putting your computer at risk. People have tampered and altered this software to make it work illegally and who knows what they have added to it. This software can also very easily do weird things to your computer.

Check and clean your registry from errors You will probably have to buy a program for this. They automatically fix registry problems and prevent your computer from crashing or freezing due to hidden errors. One of the top programs that is Vista certified is Errorsmart or RegistrySmart Clean inside your computer case You are probably thinking ‘why do I have to do that? Well you want to clean inside your computer to remove dust and dirt from the components inside the computer. Power supplies often blow up from being clogged with dust and processors usually overheat and die. It is a very common cause of hardware failure, and therefore prevention is better than cure.

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TASK SHEET LO 6.3-1
Preventive Maintenance Schedule for the Personal Computer Objective: Maintain personal computer as per standard operating procedure. Procedure: 1. Plug in, power on personal computer 2. Check hard disk for bad sectors and errors. 3. Defrag hard disk. 4. Remove unwanted files. 5. Manage files. 6. Scan computer for viruses. 7. Fix registry problem. 8. Clean internal parts of computer. 9. Clean external parts of computer

Using the Preventive Maintenance Checklist next page, you are to maintain a personal computer.

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PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE FOR PERSONAL COMPUTER
Month ______________________ Brand Name: ______________________________________ Model: _____________________________________________ Location: __________________________________________ Activities Week1 Week 2 Week3
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 1 2 2 4 5 6 7 8 9

Week 4
17 18 19 20

1. Checking hard disk for bad sector and errors. 2. Defragging hard disk 3. Removing unwanted files 4. Managing files 5. Scanning computers for viruses 6. Fixing registry problems 7. Cleaning internal parts 8. Cleaning external parts 

                   

                   

 

                   

__________________________ Trainer
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INFORMATION SHEET LO 6.3-2
Maintenance Activity for an LCD/DLP Projector Objective: To identify the different maintenance procedures for an LCD/DLP projector

Properly caring for your projector is the easiest way to ensure that it last and performs flawlessly when you need it. Some simple steps that you can take include: Clean air-filters The primary maintenance requirement for a projector is changing or cleaning the filter. Clean filters allow the projector to stay cool, which is critical for keeping them healthy. Clean filters every 3-6 months, defending on frequency of use. Replace filters according to the schedule specified in your owner’s manual. Some manufacturers now offer “filter less” projectors which means less cleaning for you. Clean the air filters following the steps below. 1. Turn the power off and disconnect the AC power from the AC outlet. 2. Turn the projector upside down and remove air filters. 3. Clean air filters with brush or wash out the dust particles. 4. Replace air filters. Make sure that the air filters are fully inserted. CAUTION: Do not operate projector with the air filter removed. The dust may get stuck on the LCD panel and mirror, and it may affect the fine picture image. Clean the projector lens Clean the projectors lens regularly with a lens cloth. This will guarantee the best image quality and can be purchased at most camera store.

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Follow this step to clean the projection lens: 1. Apply a non abrasive camera lens cleaner to a soft dry cleaning cloth. Avoid using an excessive amount of cleaner. Abrasive cleaners, solvents or other harsh chemical might scratch the lens. 2. Lightly wipe cloth over the lens. 3. When you don’t use the projector, place the lens cover.

Clean the projector housing If you projector is particularly dirty, follow this simple way of cleaning it. 1. Soak the cloth in water with a small amount of neutral detergent in it, squeeze the cloth very well. 2. Wipe the housing. 3. After cleaning wipe the cabinet dry with a dry cloth.

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TASK SHEET LO 6.3-2
Preventive Maintenance Schedule for the LCD/DLP Projector

Objective: Maintain LCD/DLP projector as per standard operating procedure. Equipment: LCD/DLP projector Supplies: Lens cloth

Procedure: Caution : Before carrying out cleaning and maintenance, be sure to disconnect the AC power cord from the AC power outlet.

1. Clean air filters 2. Clean lens. 3. Clean housing.

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PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE FOR LCD/DLP PROJECTOR

Brand Name: ______________________________________ Model: _____________________________________________ Location: ___________________________________________

Activities J 1. Cleaning air filters 2. Cleaning projector lens 3. Cleaning projector housing     F M     A M

Months J        J A S     O N D   

__________________________ Trainer

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INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6.3-3
Maintenance Activity for an VCD/DVD Player Objective: To identify the different maintenance activity for a VCD/DVD player.

Like any other electronic appliance or computer systems, DVD players attract dirt and lint that can accumulate both inside and outside of the device's body. DVD player cleaning take the form of an ordinary feather duster, a soft fiber cloth, and a DVD disc for cleaning your DVD player's lens. Cleaning the Body of Your DVD Player Luckily for us, cleaning DVD players is similar to how we clean other electronic appliances and computer units. As DVD player construction and design is very similar to computers, pay attention to the areas where dust is most likely to build up. Look out for vent areas and when you find out the dust has accumulated, do not use an air duster or blow away the dust off as you might push it inside your DVD player. A not-so-big feather duster should do the trick, but dust if gently away from your DVD player. It is of utmost important that this vent is free from dust and lint as heat dissipating from the inside of your DVD Player might not escape, causing the DVD player to overheat. A DVD player also has a fan inside that keeps it cool. A malfunctioning fan inside your DVD Player might cause your player to break down. A good way to clean this vent is by using a can of compressed air. Softly spray into the vent to clear out the dust from building up. For other external parts of your DVD player, use a soft, moistened cloth that absorbs dust. Cleaning Your DVD Player's Lens Cleaning your DVD player's lens is as important as cleaning the external parts of your DVD player. A clean DVD player Lens ensures that your DVD disc would be read properly. Unfortunately, your DVD player's Lens accumulate as much dust and lint as the other parts of the DVD player. The good news is, there are many available DVD lens cleaner kits that you can purchase and use to clean your DVD player. What's more, these DVD lens cleaners kits won't cost you a fortune.

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TASK SHEET LO 6.3-3
Preventive Maintenance Schedule for a VCD/DVD player

Objective: Maintain personal VCD/DVD player as per standard operating procedure. Equipment: VCD/LCD projector Supplies: Lens cleaner Procedure: Caution : Before carrying out cleaning and maintenance, be sure to disconnect the AC power cord from the AC power outlet.

1. Clean lens. 2. Clean housing.

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PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE FOR VCD/DVD PLAYERS

Brand Name: ______________________________________ Model: _____________________________________________ Location: ___________________________________________

Activities J 1. Cleaning VCD/DVD player lens 2. Cleaning VCD/DVD player housing  F    M A    M

Months J    J A    S O    N D  

__________________________ Trainer

Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

Page #

125

INFORMATION SHEET LO. 6.3-4
Maintenance Activity for an Overhead Projector Objective: Identify the maintenance procedure of an overhead projector. The overhead projector must be kept as clean as possible for obvious reasons - dirt, dust, hair and other foreign objects that attach themselves to the outside lenses or optical stage will be distracting to the viewer and result in an unprofessional presentation. Cleaning of the overhead projector lenses 1. Unplug AC power chord of the overhead projector from the AC power outlet. 2. Clean the outside lenses and optical stage with an approved lens cleaner or a mild detergent solution and a clean, soft, lint-free cotton cloth. Do not use paper cloths because they may scratch these surfaces. 3. Rinse and dry all optical surfaces after cleaning them. Permanent damage can result if they are not rinsed and dried thoroughly.

Cleaning of the internal parts of the overhead projector 1. Push down on side latch to release top and flip open. 2. Use canned air to blow any dust out of the inside. Be sure to blow dust from fan OUT rather than back inside the unit. 3. Use dust free cloth to wipe mirror free from smudges and fingerprints. 4. Close lid.

Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

Page #

126

TASK SHEET LO 6.3-3
Preventive Maintenance Schedule for a Overhead Projector

Objective: Maintain personal overhead projector as per standard operating procedure. Equipment: Overhead projector Supplies: Lens cleaner Procedure: Caution : Before carrying out cleaning and maintenance, be sure to disconnect the AC power cord from the AC power outlet.

1. Clean lens. 2. Clean housing.

Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

Page #

127

PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE FOR AN OVERHEAD PROJECTOR

Brand Name: ______________________________________ Model: _____________________________________________ Location: ___________________________________________

Activities J 1. Cleaning of overhead projector lenses 2. Cleaning internal parts of the overhead projector F  M A  M

Months J  J A  S O  N D 

__________________________ Trainer

Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

Page #

128

INFORMATION SHEET LO 6.3-5
Maintenance Activity for a Mixer Amplifier and Microphone

Objective: Identify the maintenance procedures for a mixer amplifier

Mixer Amplifier must be kept as clean as possible for obvious reasons dirt, dust, hair and other foreign objects and this should also be kept to a place where it cannot be reach by rats and place to a shock proof location.

Cleaning of the mixer amplifier 1. Unplug AC power chord of the mixer amplifier from the AC power outlet. 2. Clean the casing with soft feather duster. Do not use paper cloths because they may scratch casing surfaces. 3. Do not attempt to open the mixer amplifier

Proper handling the microphone 1. Avoid dropping the microphone, it may damage the voice coil 2. Do not roll up the chord to the body of the microphone. It may damage the line chord. 3. Store the microphone on cabinets free from dust and moist

Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

Page #

129

TASK SHEET LO. 6.3-5
Preventive Maintenance Schedule for Mixer Amplifier and Microphone

Objective: Maintain Mixer Amplifier and microphone as per standard operating procedure. Equipment: Mixer amplifier and microphone Procedure: Caution : Before carrying out cleaning and maintenance, be sure to disconnect the AC power cord from the AC power outlet.

1. Clean housing of the amplifier. 2. Clean the microphone

Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

Page #

130

PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE MIXER AMPLIFIER AND MICROPHONE

Brand Name: ______________________________________ Model: _____________________________________________ Location: ___________________________________________

Activities J 1. Cleaning the external parts of the mixer amplifier 2. Cleaning external parts of the microphone  F  M  A  M 

Months J  J  A  S  O  N  D 

__________________________ Trainer

Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

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Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

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132

Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

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Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

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134

Code No.

Utilizing Electronic Media in Facilitating Training July 1, 2010

Date: Developed

Date: Revised

Page #

135

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