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Spring 2018

ADD A FISHING TRIP TO
YOUR SPRING OUTINGS
By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist, Idaho Fish and Game
Robinson Pond: (Kamiah) This 4-acre pond is at about 1,400 feet elevation so it’s ready for
early season angling. It’s located near Lawyer Creek west of Kamiah on Lawyer Creek Road.
It’s stocked with rainbow trout.
Mann Lake: (Lapwai) Mann Lake tends to be the region’s warmest lake due to its low
Photo by: MIke Demick, IDFG
elevation, so it’s often among the first places where anglers can find good fishing for warm
water fish, such as largemouth bass and crappie. Fishing can be at its prime
toward the end of March. There’s a fishing dock and a boat.
Kiwanis Park Pond: (Lewiston) Aka Lewiston Levy Pond or Snake River Levy
Pond, this 4.4-acre pond is right next to the Snake River and provides easily
accessible trout fishing near the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater
rivers. There’s also a playground and picnic shelters nearby. Trout are stocked
during spring. The Snake River also has smallmouth bass.
Hordemann Pond: (Moscow) This .7-acre pond is located in a park within
Moscow and is stocked with trout during spring. The pond is encircled by a trail
that allows people to see fish, frogs, ducks, geese, turtles and other wildlife. It
also has a playground, open play areas, and a picnic shelter.
TIPS FOR EARLY SEASON FISHING:
Watch the weather: Fishing is typically better when temperatures are warming
and the barometer is stable. A temperature drop or a storm typically slows
fishing.
Take it slow: Fish can be sluggish in cold water. Air temperature warms much
faster than water, so even on a warm, spring day, the water is probably chilly.
Bait is a good option, and if you’re using lures or flies, a slow retrieve usually
catches more fish.
Don’t overlook warm water fish: They become active sooner than you might
think, but expect subtle strikes, and the fish to be in different places than
where you found them last summer. Bass fishing can be good. Catch rates tend
to be lower in early spring than other times of year when fish are more active,
but the biggest fish are often the first
to become active.
Think small: Smaller, shallower waters
typically warm faster than larger
bodies of water. Ponds, small lakes
and reservoirs are good places to
start. Same goes for shallow coves,
bays and flats in larger lakes and
reservoirs.
Fish locally: If the forecast looks iffy,
you don’t want to drive a long ways
and then find poor weather and water
conditions. Spring is a good time to
explore local ponds and reservoirs
that you may have overlooked in the
past.
Make it a kid-
friendly outing:
If the fish aren’t
biting, find other
things to keep
youngsters
amused. If you’re
in a city, maybe
pick a pond in,
or near, a park.
If you’re in a
rural area, take
a hike around
the pond and
look for wildlife,
which often
congregates GUYS OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT
304 THAIN
near water. Bring LEWISTON, ID
snacks and a dry
set of clothes in
case kids get wet.
Make it a fun trip GUYS OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT
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60-month term at a 5.99% APR rate: $19.33 per $1,000 financed. An example of a monthly payment with $0 down, no rebate, an APR of 2.99% APR for 36 months at a MSRP of $12,299
is $357.62/mo. total cost of borrowing of $575.16 with a total obligation of $12,874.16. Down payment may be required. Other financing offers may be available. See your local dealer for
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license, and registration are separate and may not be financed. Promotion may be modified or discontinued without notice at any time in Polaris' sole discretion. WARNING: Polaris
off-road vehicles can be hazardous to operate and are not intended for on-road use. Driver must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver's license to operate. Passengers, if permitted,
must be at least 12 years old. All riders should always wear helmets, eye protection, and protective clothing. Always use seat belts and cab nets or doors (as equipped). Never engage in
stunt driving, and avoid excessive speeds and sharp turns. Riding and alcohol/drugs don't mix. All riders should take a safety training course. Call 800-342-3764 for additional
information. Check local laws before riding on trails. ©2018 Polaris Industries Inc.

*Offers vary by model. Rebate and finance offers valid on select 2014–2018 new and unregistered models purchased between 3/1/18–4/30/18. See your authorized dealer for complete
details. **Rates as low as 2.99% APR for 36 months. Examples of monthly payments required over a 36-month term at a 2.99% APR rate: $29.08 per $1,000 financed; and with a
60-month term at a 5.99% APR rate: $19.33 per $1,000 financed. An example of a monthly payment with $0 down, no rebate, an APR of 2.99% APR for 36 months at a MSRP of $12,299
is $357.62/mo. total cost of borrowing of $575.16 with a total obligation of $12,874.16. Down payment may be required. Other financing offers may be available. See your local dealer for
details. Minimum Amount Financed $1,500; Maximum Amount Financed $50,000. Other qualifications and restrictions may apply. Financing promotions void where prohibited. Tax, title,
2 — MONEYSAVER Outdoors — Spring 2018

ANGLERS CAN EXPECT BIG
SMALLMOUNT BASS AT DWORSHAK
RESEVOIR, BUT BELOW-AVERAGE
NUMBERS OF KOKANEE
By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Conservation Educator, Idaho and dam operators have been forced to spill more water than
Department of Fish and Game normal to make room for the impending run off. This scenario
often leads to high entrainment. In response, Fish and Game has
With spring well underway and weather improving, many anglers already opened a salvage fishery in the North Fork and mainstem
are heading to Dworshak Reservoir, and Fish and Game’s fisheries Clearwater Rivers below the dam. This doesn’t mean a lot of fish
managers have offered their forecast for the upcoming months. are being entrained, but allows angers the opportunity to salvage
fish if and when they are. High entrainment could mean even lower
Kokanee
numbers of kokanee in the reservoir.
The one constant with reservoir’s kokanee population is that it is
On the bright side, fewer fish in the reservoir means that the
constantly changing from year to year. Kokanee numbers declined
average size should be bigger than normal. In a typical year, 2 year
from a record high in 2015 to a typical number last year (around
old kokanee average 10 inches by July. Anglers I’ve talked to early
210,000 fish). This year, we expect the number of kokanee to
this year have been consistently catching 10 ½ inch fish, and fish
decline again, to about 150,000 catchable fish. This is lower than
up to 13 inches are not uncommon. So, if bigger kokanee are more
typical, but it isn’t uncommon to have fewer than 100,000 fish.
important to you than more kokanee, this should be one of your
As always, the wildcard is entrainment, or the loss of fish through years.
the dam. High-elevation snowpack is higher than normal this year,
Smallmouth
If you’re a bass fisherman, you’ve either been fishing Dworshak
the last two years, or you’ve been missing out. The smallmouth
population has been very healthy and growth of the larger fish
has been incredible, particularly during years of high kokanee
abundance.
However, with declines in kokanee abundance, we expect the
growth of bass to slow. As the big ones that were produced in
recent years die off from natural causes, the number of larger fish
may go down, as the ones taking their place didn’t have the benefit
of feeding in years of high kokanee abundance. But, take heart,
kokanee numbers should be expected to go back up again. When
they do, expect the bass to grow like crazy.
There are still plenty of bass to catch, including some big ones.
Concentrate your fishing effort near creek mouths early in the
season. The bigger fish will move into shallow water to spawn by
the time the water is 50 degrees. As the water continues to warm,
the larger fish will move back out into deeper water, and smaller fish
will move up along the banks. As this happens, catch rates will pick
up, but average size will go down.
MONEYSAVER Outdoors — Spring 2018 — 3

ATV RIDING SEASON IS HERE! just plain stupidity, don’t ride beyond your ability or perform stunts and
Whether you’re getting the ‘ole quad ready for the weekend or
thinking about joining this most popular sport, keep in mind that tricks you have no business doing.
ATV riding, while fun, can be dangerous. It can be easy to think of
riding an ATV as little more than driving a car. It’s not. If you’re new The tips above are obvious and obvious for a reason. Most, if not
to quad riding knowing universally accepted safety tips is invaluable all, are practically unwritten rules in ATV world. Safety is always a
to keeping you on four wheels and welcomed by other riders. Now, priority and most rules factor in safety for you and others. Also, it’s a
if you’re a veteran of the trail, little is more valuable than a refresher good idea to keep in mind the “house rules” when riding a track or
course in common sense quad riding. designated ATV trails and knowing state rules like spark arrestors.

Here are 10 Quick Safety Tips for ATV Trail Riding as a way to remind https://www.motosport.com/blog/10-quick-safety-tips-for-atv-trail-riding
and educate you when you’re blazing around on your quad. Some are
obvious and straightforward. Others you might think, that’s bendable,
but somewhere at some time it took an accident for common sense to
prevail.
1. Wear Gear. Always wear safety gear. Helmets, goggles, boots,
gloves - the works. There are no seatbelts on an ATV and flipping over
is a lot easier than you might think. Be prepared and go home intact.
2. Inspection. Do a pre-ride inspection every time. Check the tires for
wear and rims for damage. Look over your controls and make sure
connections and cables are intact. Check the chain for worn links and
sprockets for broken teeth and ensure there’s enough lubrication.
3. Don’t ride Alone. Participating in any sport or activity where
accidents can and do happen, it’s never a good idea to do it alone.
Always have a riding buddy and better - have two. Running out of gas,
getting lost or crashing is never any fun but it’s worse and can be life
threatening if you’re alone. Besides, who wants to ride by themselves?
Grab some friends and make a day of it.
4. No Drinking and Riding. Duh. It’s not safe in a car and it’s not safe
on an ATV. It’s no secret - alcohol and drugs impair your judgment and
your ability to ride safely. Don’t put yourself in jeopardy and don’t put
others at risk for your risky behavior. Leave the beers for the evening
when the gear is packed away.
5. Tired? Stop Riding. ATV riding is actually a great way to exercise. It
demands strength and mental acuity. Overtime however, those bumps,
jumps and tight corners wear down even the strongest dudes. If you
can feel fatigue setting in, stop riding and take a break. Even if you
don’t feel tired, if you’ve been riding all day, take a break, rehydrate
and fuel up with some lunch.
6. One Rider Only. Don’t be a goon. Unless you’re riding an ATV
equipped for two-people, in which case you’re probably on a UTV and
not screaming through trails, only one person on a quad at any time.
No piggy-backing or side riding.
7. Ride on Designated Trails. Don’t ride your ATV anywhere but a
designated riding area. Not only is this for the safety of others and
prevents unnecessary wear and tear
to your machine, but it’s also being a
good steward of the sport. Ride where
it’s legal.
8. Ride the Right ATV. What’s the right
ATV? As a general rule, only 90cc and
larger engines for those 16 years and
older. Don’t pop your 10 year old on a
250cc ATV.
9. Be Aware. Know your surroundings.
Since you’ve taken
Tip #3 to heart,
know where your
riding partners
are. Look ahead
just like driving
a car so you
can see what’s
coming. Bumps
are fun but when
you hit one
unexpectedly you
can get bounced
right off your
ride. Look out for
critters jumping
out in front of your
riding path and be
cognizant of other
riding parties.
10. No Goon
Riding. Probably
one of the top
reason riders get
hurt. Whether it’s
showing off, trying
to see what their
quad can do or