Oil  Pain(ngs,  Instruc(on, and  Observa(ons  about  Art  and  Living

by Stefan  Baumann

Oil  Pain(ngs,  Instruc(on, and  Observa(ons  about  Art  and  Living by Stefan  Baumann
Let  me  introduce  myself.    My  name  is  Stefan  Baumann  and  I  am  an  ar7st,  an  art   instructor,  and  the  host  of  a  PBS  television  series  called  "The  Grand  View."    This  eBook  is   an  accumula7on  of  4  years  of  daily  blog  posts  that  share  my  insights  and  observa7ons   about  nature,  art,  and  life.    I  hope  to  touch,  move,  and  inspire  ar7sts  as  well  as  non-­‐ ar7sts  with  my  pain7ngs,  and  with  some  ideas  about  how  to  be  more  crea7ve  in  your   own  unique  ways  and  live  a  passionate  life.    I  sincerely  hope  you  enjoy  this  book.    Feel   free  to  pass  it  on  to  friends  and  ar7sts.    If  you  would  like  to  contact  me,  you  can  email   me  at  stefan_baumann@yahoo.com  or  you  can  go  to  my  website  at  thegrandview.org   for  more  informa7on.

Thank  you
My  grateful  apprecia/on  to  Kris  Baxter  for  her  invaluable  contribu/ons  to  the  blog  and  this  revised   eBook,  which  I  could  not  have  wri>en    without  her  crea/ve  edi/ng  and  support.    My  thanks  to  Gita   Hazra/  (gitahazra/@gmail.com)  for  all  her  help  with  my  website  and  uploading  changes  through  the   years,    and  to  Hannah  West  for  beau/fully  finalizing  the  design  and  format  of  this  eBook (webmistress@hannahwestdesign.com) I  also  want  to  thank,  you,  the  readers,  for  all  your  gracious  comments  that  warm  my  heart,  make  me   smile,  and  inspire  me  to  con/nue  offering  my  experiences  and  views  of  the  world  of  art  through  this   blog  and  eBook. Revised  June  2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS
"First  Snow"  -­‐  Introduc7on...........................................................................................1 "Morning  Snow"  -­‐  Enjoy  the  Moment..........................................................................2 "The  Crea7ve  Path"...................................................................................................... 3 "Winter  Orange"  -­‐  Touch,  Move  and  Inspire................................................................ 4 "Mt.  Shasta  Nocturne,  Opus  1"  -­‐  Rules........................................................................ 5 "Winter  Dogwood"  -­‐  Als  Ik  Kan.................................................................................... 6 "The  Grand  View  Ranch"  -­‐  Paint  Every  Day.................................................................. 7 "Principles  of  Design"...................................................................................................8 "Winter  Color"  -­‐  S7ll  Life  Pain7ng................................................................................ 9 "A]er  the  Storm"  -­‐  Sharing  Yourself  through  Art........................................................10 "Shasta  Sunrise"  -­‐  Overcoming  Obstacles...................................................................11 "Lady  Shasta"  -­‐  Just  Leap!...........................................................................................12 "Hammond  Ranch  Oak"  -­‐  Pain7ng  Snow....................................................................13 "Begonias  S7ll  Life"  -­‐  Art  is  Crea7ng,  Not  Perfec7ng..................................................14 "Tulips  S7ll  Life"  -­‐  Pain7ng  Tips.................................................................................. 15 "Brushstrokes"............................................................................................................16 "Shasta  Sunset"  -­‐  Paint  What  You  See........................................................................17 "Old  Stage  Road  Barn"  -­‐  Successful  Pain7ng  on  Loca7on.......................................... 18 "Mt.  Shasta  Barn,  Opus  1"  -­‐  How  Do  I  Paint  That?.....................................................19 "Taking  on  Great  Challenges".....................................................................................21 "Valen7ne's  Flowers"  -­‐  Share  Your  View  of  Life......................................................... 22 "Mt.  Shasta  Barn,  Opus  2"  -­‐  Crea7ng  Your  Own  Magic..............................................23 "Road  to  the  Foothills"  -­‐  Communicate  Your  Message  Clearly...................................24 "A  Single  Rose"  -­‐  Learning  to  See...............................................................................25 "Greatness  in  Art"......................................................................................................26 "Spring  Lit  Meadow"  -­‐  Crea7ng  the  Effect  of  Light.................................................... 27 "Shasta  Valley,  Opus  1"  -­‐  A  Sense  of  Space................................................................28 "The  Old  Bunkhouse"  -­‐  Crea7ng  Mood......................................................................29 "Shasta  Barn,  Opus  3,  Hoy  Barn"  -­‐  Challenges  of  Pain7ng  Outdoors.........................30 "Basalt  Cliffs  North  of  Mt.  Shasta"  -­‐  Crea7ng  Drama  with  Color................................31 "What  ‘It’  Is".............................................................................................................. 32

TABLE OF CONTENTS
"Grand  View  Burn,  Opus  1"  -­‐  Pain7ng  Fire................................................................34 "Spring  Runoff"  -­‐  Pain7ng  Trees  with  Personality......................................................35 "Hedge  Creek  Falls,  Opus  1"  -­‐  Tapping  in  to  Our  Inner  Source..................................36 "Mossbrae  Falls,  Opus  1"  -­‐  Pain7ng  with  a  Limited  Palehe.......................................37 "The  View  from  My  Studio"  -­‐  Create  and  Excel.........................................................38 "Ar7st's  Tools"...........................................................................................................39 "McCloud  Middle  Falls,  Opus  1"  -­‐  The  First  Impression  Counts................................ 40 "McCloud  Middle  Falls,  Opus  2"  -­‐  Pain7ng  an  Effect.................................................41 "View  from  the  Grand  View,  Opus  1"  -­‐  Self-­‐Doubt  and  Cri7cism..............................43 "Faery  Falls"  -­‐  Sfumato..............................................................................................44 "Shoshone  Falls"........................................................................................................45 "The  Fine  Art  of  Seeing  Color"  -­‐  Perfec7onism  Leads  to  Paralysis............................46 "Mt.  Shasta's  Smoky  Veil"  -­‐  What  Colors  Do  I  See?...................................................47 "Size  Does  Maher"  -­‐  Canvas  Size...............................................................................48 "Grand  View  Buherfly"  -­‐  Rhythm  and  Movement....................................................50 "The  Fallen  Totem"  -­‐  Points  of  Interest.....................................................................51 "A  Smoky  Day  in  Mt.  Shasta"  -­‐  Crea7ng  Atmosphere...............................................52 "Another  Smoky  Day  at  the  Ranch"  -­‐  Keying  the  Values...........................................54 "A  Barn  in  Gazelle"  -­‐  Sky  and  Harmony.....................................................................57 "Farmhouse  in  Mt.  Shasta"  -­‐  Ar7st  Block..................................................................58 "Sunday  Morning  on  the  Cliffs"  -­‐  Drawing  from  Life.................................................60 "Moose,  Opus  1"  -­‐  Finding  your  Ar7s7c  Muse......................................................... 61 "Summering  Buck"  -­‐  Ar7s7c  Frustra7on...................................................................63 "Grand  Buck  of  the  Siskiyou"  -­‐  Art  Marke7ng,  Part  1............................................... 64 "Trees  of  Castle  Crag  Lake"  -­‐  Ahributes  of  a  Tree..................................................... 66 "Seven  Steps  for  a  Great  Pain7ng"............................................................................68 "Last  of  the  Herd"  -­‐  Inspira7on.................................................................................70 "Times  Gone  By"  -­‐  Adding  Details.............................................................................72 "Crossroads  in  Weed"  -­‐  Finding  Your  Voice.............................................................. 73 "Winter  Dogwood"  -­‐  Memory  Exercise....................................................................74 "Birthday  Orchid"  -­‐  Pain7ng  in  the  Moment............................................................76

TABLE OF CONTENTS
"Last  of  the  Spring  Blooms"  -­‐  Lighten  or  Darken  a  Color?.........................................78 "View  from  Louie  Road  Bridge"  -­‐  Just  as  I  See  It........................................................79 "Last  of  the  Rhododendron  Bloom"  -­‐  Taking  Art  to  Next  Level..................................80 "Mt.  Shasta  A]ernoon"  -­‐  Atmospheric  Perspec7ve.................................................. 81 "Shasta  Sweet  Peas"  -­‐  Crea7ng  Great  Art..................................................................83 "Silence  at  Siskiyou  Lake"  -­‐  Persevering.....................................................................85 "View  of  Inspira7on  Point"  -­‐  Imagina7on  and  Originality..........................................87 "Hall  of  the  Mountain  King".......................................................................................88 "Teton  Splendor"  -­‐  Plein  Air  When  Traveling.............................................................90 "Capturing  Animals  on  Loca7on"  -­‐  Trials  and  Frustra7ons........................................91 "Placing  Animals  in  Pain7ngs"  -­‐  Animals  on  Loca7on................................................92 "Curious  Bear"  -­‐  Sketchbooks  are  Essen7al...............................................................94 "Shasta  Winter  Splendor"  -­‐  Mood.............................................................................96 "Winter  Wonderland"  -­‐  Pain7ng  Trees  &  Snow.........................................................97 "Hornbrook  Barn,  Opus  1"  -­‐  Pain7ng  with  Inten7on.................................................98 "Pansies"  -­‐  Taking  Time  to  Paint................................................................................99 "Ashland  Barn"  -­‐  Be  Prepared.................................................................................100 "Grand  Old  Lady"  -­‐  Pleasing  Composi7on...............................................................101 "Hornbrook  Barn,  Opus  2"  -­‐  Best  Prac7ces  for  Ar7sts............................................ 103 "Hanley  Farm  House"  -­‐  5  Key  Ques7ons.................................................................104 "Winters  Cutoff"  -­‐  Expressing  Feelings....................................................................106 "Old  Pump  House"  -­‐  Significance  of  the  Moment...................................................108 "Lilies  and  Pansies"  -­‐  Skep7cism............................................................................. 109 "Mt.  Shasta  and  Roman7c  Luminism"  -­‐  American  Art  Style................................... 110 "Strawberry  Valley  Inn"  -­‐  Pain7ng  from  Life............................................................111 "Old  Stage  Cabin"  -­‐  Pain7ng  from  Inside  Out......................................................... 112 "Tulip  Tree  Branch"  -­‐  Connec7ng  with  your  Art......................................................113 "Mt.  Shasta  In  Moonlight"  -­‐  Pain7ng  at  Night........................................................ 114 "Slushy  Streets"  -­‐  Paint  What  You  Love...................................................................115 "Ashland  Orchard"  -­‐  Technique,  Style,  and  Vision..................................................116 "The  Sullaway  House"  -­‐  Pathway  to  Excellence......................................................117

“First  Snow”  -­‐  Introduc(on
I  painted  this  view  of  Mt.  Shasta  today  from  my  studio  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch.    The  pain7ng  tells  the  story  of   first  snow  of  the  season  lightly  gracing  its  summit.    Mornings  in  Mt.  Shasta  are  breathtaking.    A]er  spending  the   last  week  digging  out  of  5  feet  of  snow  le]  by  a  recent  major  storm,  I  finally  have  some  7me  to  paint.    The  vision   of  the  new  snow  and  the  morning  light  on  Mt  Shasta  created  an  intense  desire  in  me  to  paint  the  brilliance  of   the  mountain. This  is  my  first  pain7ng  to  appear  in  my  blog.    Every  pain7ng  that  I  post  will  be  a  part  of  my  personal  journey  as  I   discover  the  many  places  of  beauty  in  Mount  Shasta,  located  in  Northern  California.    I  have  traveled  to  some  of   the  most  beau7ful  places  in  America  hos7ng  The  Grand  View  PBS  show,  but  no  place  is  quite  like  this.    Every   moment  of  the  day  and  evening,  light  reveals  a  new  vision  of  spectacular  beauty.    I  hope  you  feel  inspired  to  see   the  beauty  that  surrounds  you  wherever  you  live  though  my  pain7ngs  and  wrihen  blog  entries.    I  invite  you   share  this  journey  with  me.

1

“Morning  Snow”  -­‐  Enjoy  the  Moment
I  awoke  to  see  a  wondrous  winter  delight  this  morning.  During  the  night,  the  wind  began  to  howl,  and  by  dawn,   big,  luscious  snowflakes  were  falling  quietly  to  the  ground.  The  world  seemed  to  move  in  slow  mo7on.     Everything  was  s7ll,  and  it  was  silent  on  our  side  of  the  mountain. The  morning  sun  created  an  amazing  orange-­‐gray  glow  as  it  broke  through  the  clouds. I  knew  this  magic  moment  would  not  last  long.    I  watched  in  wonder  as  the  so],  slow  rhythm  of  nature  unfolded   and  the  brushes  in  my  hands  kept  the  gentle  tempo  as  they  captured  the  moment  on  canvas  for  you.

2

The  Crea(ve  Path
So,  you  want  to  be  an  ar7st. What  does  that  mean? Pain7ng  full-­‐7me  to  earn  a  living  as  an  ar7st  requires  discipline.    Ar7sts  are  always  on  a  quest  to  reinvent  their   art,  and  are  always  searching  for  ways  to  bring  meaning  to  it.    O]en  this  self-­‐examina7on  and  reevalua7on  is   exhaus7ng,  and  ar7sts  lose  the  fun  and  passion  that  they  first  had  for  crea7ng  art.    The  excitement  and  thrill  that   we  once  had  for  our  cra]  can  be  lost,  and  the  inspira7on  and  interest  for  new  ideas  can  leave  us  when  we  are   trying  to  make  a  career  of  it. I  suggest  that  the  solu7on  to  renew  enthusiasm  is  to  visualize  new  and  different  possibili7es,  and  to  create  with   a  fresh  and  imagina7ve  perspec7ve. How  can  we  do  this?    We  can  all  learn  from  actors  who  are  able  to  change  their  personali7es  and  “become”  the   characters  that  they  wish  to  portray.    I  recently  had  a  discussion  with  one  of  my  students  about  a  PBS  series  that   she  saw  called  The  Impressionists.    She  was  inspired  by  how  Monet,  Renoir,  and  Brazille  were  so  exuberant  about   pain7ng  scenes  of  light  reflec7ng  in  nature  that  they  rushed  off  the  train  when  they  reached  their  des7na7on  in   the  country  to  paint.    She  envisioned  herself  with  that  power  and  enthusiasm  at  her  finger7ps.    As  she  painted  in   her  studio,  she  imagined  that  she  was  pain7ng  with  Monet  on  loca7on  in  France.    She  saw  herself  dressed  in  a   white  sundress  spor7ng  a  sun  umbrella  and  paint  box.    As  she  painted,  her  brush  moved  with  excitement  and   freedom,  and  colors  flew  off  her  brush.    She  had  confidence  and  knowledge  that  whatever  she  needed  to  know   to  create,  she  knew.    Voilà!  She  painted  a  stunning  impression  of  light  reflec7ng  across  the  water  on  a  pond.     Awesome! If  you  want  to  be  an  ar7st,  act  like  one.  Get  a  beret,  a  large  wooden  palehe,  and  pretend  that  you  are  an  ar7st.     Be  eager  to  see  the  light  as  it  sparkles  and  reflects  off  trees  and  mountains  in  the  morning  light.    Be  playful,  and   don’t  try  too  hard  to  be  original,  because  that  will  come  with  prac7ce.    Imagine  that  you  already  know   everything  that  you  need  to  know  about  pain7ng,  and  that  it  is  easy. Here  are  some  other  ideas  that  can  move  you  along  the  crea7ve  path  as  an  ar7st.    Always  have  an  ambi7ous  or   complicated  work  that  you  are  pain7ng  in  your  studio,  and  make  at  least  one  study  or  sketch  of  an  idea  for  a  new   pain7ng  every  day.    If  you  work  in  paint,  get  a  lump  of  clay  and  sculpt  your  ideas,  and  if  you  are  a  sculptor,  paint.     Nothing  will  change  your  perspec7ve  faster  than  experimen7ng  with  a  different  medium.    Above  all,  be  grateful   that  you  have  art  in  your  life  because  gra7tude  will  inspire  you  to  love  whatever  you  are  doing.

3

“Winter  Orange”  -­‐  Touch,  Move  and  Inspire
My  goal  with  this  blog  to  touch,  move,  and  inspire  you,  and  other  ar7sts  and  collectors,  by  wri7ng  about  and   pain7ng  the  beauty  that  surrounds  us  every  day.    I  also  wish  to  offer  daily  insights  and  observa7ons  about   pain7ng  that  add  value  to  you  and  the  art  world. Today  it  was  very  cold  outside  and  that  made  me  yearn  for  the  cozy  comfort  of  pain7ng  a  s7ll  life  indoors.    I   no7ced  a  beau7ful  orange  tangerine  on  the  counter  and  the  warmth  of  the  orange  color,  contras7ng  with  the   freezing  weather  outside,  made  it  a  welcome  subject  to  paint. Whether  pain7ng  landscape  or  s7ll  life,  I  always  exercise  PMII  -­‐  my  acronym  for  “Put  More  In  to  It.”    This  means   applying  as  much  skill  and  ability  as  we  can  when  we  paint  our  pain7ngs.  This  includes  prac7cing  great   technique,  composi7on,  skill  with  paint  and  brushstrokes,  knowledge  of  color,  highlights  and  shadows,  as  well  as   including  our  own  feelings  and  personal  style  into  the  pain7ng.    The  world  does  not  need  another  realis7c   pain7ng  of  an  orange.    The  world  needs  to  experience  the  way  you  see  an  orange.    Many  ar7sts  worry  that  they   have  nothing  to  contribute  to  the  art  world,  but  they  do.    It  is  the  way  that  you  see  and  paint  your  subject  that   makes  your  art  original  and  valuable.

4

“Mt.  Shasta  Nocturne,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Rules  Are  Made  to  be  Broken
Yesterday  the  weather  was  too  dark  and  stormy  to  paint  outdoors,  so  I  painted  an  orange  in  my  studio.    At  about   ten  o’clock  in  the  evening,  I  went  out  to  get  some  wood  for  my  fireplace  and  realized  the  storm  had  ended.    The   sky  was  clear  and  the  air  was  ice  cold.    The  moon  shone  on  the  hillside  with  such  an  intense  bright  light  that  it   looked  like  daylight.    I  could  see  details  very  clearly.    Inspired  by  the  moonlight,  I  quickly  painted  a  sketch  to   capture  this  pain7ng  called  “Shasta  in  Moonlight,  Opus  1.” When  we  share  our  personal  thoughts  and  the  secrets  of  our  heart  in  our  artwork,  we  shine  light  on  the  shadows   that  exist  in  ourselves  and  in  others.    When  our  art  honestly  reflects  our  vulnerabili7es  and  experiences,  the   work  we  create  is  expressive  and  may  even  break  some  of  the  rules  of  “proper  art.”    Observers  who  feel   uncomfortable  about  the  “shadows”  that  they  see  in  such  pain7ngs  may  protect  themselves  by  cri7cally  judging   the  work  saying,  “it  wasn't  done  correctly.”    At  these  7mes,  we  must  trust  our  own  authen7city  and  stay  true  to   our  message.    Historically,  we  do  not  remember  those  ar7sts  who  followed  the  rules  more  diligently  than  anyone   else  did.    We  remember  those  who  made  art  come  alive  when  the  “RULES”  were  not  followed.

5

“Winter  Dogwood”  -­‐  Als  Ik  Kan
I  woke  up  this  morning  to  a  foot  of  new  snow.    The  dogwood  tree  outside  my  studio  completely  fascinated  me  as   its  branches  bowed  down  from  the  weight  of  the  frozen  snow.    I  painted  this  beau7ful  tree  to  share  with  you.  I  began  by  sketching  the  tree  using  oil  paint  thinned  with  turpen7ne  and  then  painted  the  tree  as  fast  and   spontaneously  as  possible.    As  I  was  pain7ng,  I  heard  the  phrase  “Als  ik  Kan”  repeat  in  my  head.    It  comes  from  a   quote  by  Flemish  painter  Jan  Van  Eyck  and  it  means  to  inten7onally  ahempt  do  everything  “to  the  best  of  my   ability.”    Whether  I  paint  a  sketch  for  my  blog  or  a  pain7ng  ready  for  a  gallery,  my  inten7on  is  to  do  it  to  the  best   of  my  ability.    The  next  7me  you  work  crea7vely,  whether  it  is  cooking,  wri7ng  or  pain7ng,  try  to  do  it   inten7onally,  “Als  ik  Kan.” I  was  delighted  that  I  painted  this  sketch  quickly  because  as  I  laid  the  final  strokes  down  on  my  pain7ng,  the   snow  turned  to  rain,  the  dogwood  branches  gave  up  its  frozen  gi],  and  all  the  snow  from  the  night  before   became  slush.

6

“The  Grand  View  Ranch”  -­‐  Paint  Every  Day
A]er  a  night  of  snow  and  rain,  the  morning  air  was  s7ll,  cold  and  misty.    The  beauty  of  our  ranch  house  covered   with  snow  was  breath  taking,  and  I  painted  it  for  you.    Mt.  Shasta  is  a  wonderful  place  to  live.    I  have  included  a   systema7c  demonstra7on  of  how  I  created  this  pain7ng. Being  an  ar7st  involves  observing  life,  seeing  the  world  through  an  ar7st's  eyes,  and  taking  the  7me  to  create   artwork.    The  crea7ve  process  begins  by  being  in  the  moment,  enjoying  your  life,  taking  7me  to  be  with  yourself,   and  spending  7me  to  see  the  world  around  you.    Discover  what  moves  and  inspires  you,  what  you  truly   understand  about  life,  who  you  are,  and  what  this  great  experience  of  being  alive  means  to  you.    If  you  have   problems  crea7ng,  find  inspira7on  in  feeling  gra7tude.    Be  grateful  for  the  extraordinary  privilege  of  being  an   ar7st,  and  paint  that  on  your  canvas. Ar7sts  some7mes  feel  that  they  are  being  selfish  when  they  take  7me  to  paint.    This  is  not  true.    Ar7sts  who  do   not  paint  every  day  are  in  truth  being  selfish  by  not  crea7ng  artwork  to  share  with  others.    Being  an  ar7st  is  a  gi]   that  provides  a  way  you  can  give  to  others.

7

Principles  of  Design
The  goal  of  an  ar7st  is  to  create  a  powerful  composi7on  that  ahracts  the  viewer’s  ahen7on.    The  use  of  ar7s7c   elements  of  design  helps  the  ar7st  to  communicate  his  message  and  to  create  a  dynamic  pain7ng.    I  used  many   of  the  following  principles  of  design  to  create  my  vision  and  affect  the  viewer  in  “Sunday  Morning  on  the  Cliffs.”

1. Harmony:  Harmony  results  when  all  elements  come  together  in  a  unified  whole,  and  each  part  of  the  
composi7on  works  to  express  the  idea  behind  the  overall  composi7on.

2. Balance:  Balance  has  two  forms,  Sta7c  and  Dynamic.    Sta7c  balance  occurs  when  similar  elements  are  
placed  on  either  side  of  a  pain7ng,  and  Dynamic  balance  may  be  achieved  by  contras7ng  a  large  dark   area  on  one  side  of  a  canvas  with  several  brightly  colored  objects  on  the  other  side. harmony  in  a  pain7ng.  An  example  of  this  would  be  repea7ng  cloud  forma7ons  over  a  horizon  line  of   trees.

3. Repe77on:  Repea7ng  elements  of  lines  and  forms  in  a  composi7on  can  create  the  feeling  of  peace  and  

4. Contrast:  A  few  examples  of  contrasts  which  ar7sts  have  in  their  arsenal  when  crea7ng  a  pain7ng  are  

Light  and  Dark,  Bright  and  Dull,  and  Smooth  and  Rough.    Too  lihle  contrast  in  a  pain7ng  can  be  boring,   and  too  much  can  appear  contrived  and  can  overwhelm  the  message. viewer’s  ahen7on.    Selec7ng  one  central  idea  that  clearly  communicates  your  objec7ve  will  create  a   powerful  composi7on. prevails.    A  pain7ng  which  “hangs  together”  will  stand  out  from  other  pain7ngs  which  have  freeform   ideas  that  are  composed  haphazardly.

5. Dominance:  Choosing  one  dominant  element  to  emphasize  your  message  in  a  pain7ng  focuses  the  

6. Unity:  When  every  part  of  a  pain7ng  relates  to  all  the  elements  in  the  composi7on,  a  sense  of  unity  

8

“Winter  Color”  -­‐  S(ll  Life  Pain(ng
Let  me  start  by  saying  that  I  am  overwhelmed  and  grateful  by  your  response  to  this  daily  forum.    I  never  thought   that  so  many  ar7sts  would  respond  with  so  many  compliments,  support,  and  gra7tude.    Thank  you  for  this   opportunity.    Together  we  will  explore  and  discover  the  secrets  of  crea7ng  art.    I  am  inspired! Today  I  thought  you  might  like  to  enjoy  a  lihle  color.    I  painted  this  vase  full  of  flowers,  rich  with  color  and  light  to   brighten  these  winter  days.    Pain7ng  living  objects  such  as  flowers,  faces  and  figures  requires  some  prepara7on.     A  prepared  staging  area  that  allows  the  ar7st  to  control  the  light  is  essen7al  to  create  the  best  ligh7ng  effects;   these  effects  are  necessary  for  producing  adequate  and  interes7ng  highlights  and  shadows  on  the  subject. My  studio  has  many  ahrac7ve  objects  which  I  can  paint  at  a  moments  no7ce.    I  have  a  “s7ll  life”  stage  that  I   made  from  a  box  that  I  cut  in  half.  I  painted  the  inside  back  of  the  box  a  dark  color,  and  then  placed  a  light  that   serves  as  the  light  source  on  a  stand  near  the  stage  and  the  s7ll  life.    When  I  feel  inspired  to  paint  s7ll  life  in  my   studio,  I  am  ready  to  go. Crea7ng  art  is  not  difficult,  but  it  can  be  frustra7ng.    O]en  the  work  we  struggle  to  complete  seems  more  real  in   our  minds  than  the  pieces  we  have  painted  successfully.    Most  ar7sts  live  with  doubt  and  uncertainty,  worrying  if   there  will  be  an  audience  or  posi7ve  outcome.    Ar7sts  need  to  begin  to  create  with  a  secure  grounding.    You   must  set  aside  your  doubts  and  fears,  push  though  your  own  nega7ve  beliefs  and  then  you  will  be  able  to  create   the  art  you  want  and  nourish  yourself  within  your  art.   Great  art  is  not  the  product  of  genius  or  produced  by  people  with  greater  talent.    It  is  what  you  see,  and  how  you   paint  what  you  see  and  feel,  that  makes  your  art  great.
9

“AIer  the  Storm,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Sharing  Yourself  through  Art
A  fresh  veil  of  snow  blanketed  our  side  of  the  mountain  last  night.    I  was  born  in  South  Lake  Tahoe  and  I  always   thought  I  had  seen  every  kind  of  snow.    However,  the  incredible  new  varie7es  and  forms  of  snow  in  the   mountains  in  Mt.  Shasta  have  amazed  me.    This  pain7ng,  “A]er  the  Storm,  Opus  1,”  shows  a  view  from  the  back   of  the  Grand  View  ranch  house  of  the  Eddys,  a  mountain  range  that  seems  dwarfed  by  the  size  and  scale  of  Mt.   Shasta.    These  magical  mountains  that  are  constantly  changing  with  clouds,  snow,  and  light.    Cap7vated  by  the   paherns  of  the  sunlight  on  the  foreground  snow,  I  wanted  to  paint  these  effects  for  you. Pain7ng  involves  learning  teachable  skills.    They  are  not  a  magical  gi]s  bestowed  by  the  gods  to  some  people   and  not  to  others.    It  is  true  that  Mozart  had  unique  talents.    However,  talent  is  trumped  by  perseverance,   tenacity,  and  hours  of  hard  work.    Even  with  all  his  talent,  it  would  be  a  boring  world  if  Mozart  were  the  only   person  able  to  create  human  experiences  and  emo7ons  through  his  music.    Fortunately,  others  can  help  you   nurture  and  develop  the  skills  needed  to  paint  successfully.    Even  Tiger  Woods  and  Celine  Dion  have  coaches   who  offer  direc7on  and  encouragement.    I  recommend  finding  a  good  coach  and  listen  to  what  they  suggest. When  crea7ng  art,  you  must  learn  to  hear  your  own  voice.  Your  voice  is  unique  and  this  is  what  makes  your  art   dis7nc7ve  and  your  own.    With  the  help  of  a  good  instructor  or  coach,  you  will  be  able  to  hear  your  voice  within   your  heartbeat  and  paint  it  beau7fully. The  ears  of  the  world  are  wai7ng  to  hear  what  you  have  to  say.

10

“Shasta  Sunrise,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Overcoming  Obstacles
Last  night,  four  feet  of  snow  fell  on  our  ranch  house.    This  morning,  just  for  a  moment,  the  sky  opened  and  I  saw   Mt.  Shasta  donning  her  new  winter  coat.    She  looked  spectacular!    I  quickly  captured  Mt.  Shasta  in  her  glory  just   for  you.    As  I  painted  the  final  strokes,  the  clouds  reappeared  and  it  started  to  snow  again. Being  an  ar7st  teaches  us  how  to  overcome  obstacles.    Pain7ng  constantly  challenges  us  to  set  new  heights  and   discover  new  ideas.    It  gives  us  a  clear  opportunity  to  strive  for  the  best  that  we  can  do,  and  then  challenges  us   to  do  more.    This  drive  keeps  us  returning  to  the  studio.    Think  about  the  7mes  that  you  have  learned  a  cra]  and   once  you  achieved  the  skills  of  that  cra],  you  felt  bored.    Pain7ng  is  more  than  a  cra]  because  of  the  crea7ve   interac7on  that  happens  with  the  ar7st,  the  paint,  and  the  canvas.    Pain7ng  has  had  this  allure  for  human  beings   over  the  centuries To  the  viewer,  what  mahers  most  is  the  finished  pain7ng.    For  you,  the  ar7st,  what  mahers  most  is  the  process,   the  experience  of  shaping  a  pain7ng  from  your  crea7ve  self.    The  viewer  does  not  o]en  concern  himself  with  the   techniques.    He  wants  the  finished  pain7ng  to  inspire  and  move  him.    However,  you  must  feel  moved  and   inspired  before  you  can  move  or  inspire  others.    The  best  way  create  a  masterpiece  is  to  care  about  the  subject   and  paint  from  your  heart. Be  moved  and  the  viewer  will  be,  too.

11

“Lady  Shasta”  -­‐  Just  Leap!
This  pain7ng  will  introduce  you  to  the  “lady”  of  the  ranch,  our  8  month-­‐old  Border  collie  named  Shasta.    If  you   know  anything  about  Border  collies,  you  know  they  do  not  sit  s7ll.    Yesterday,  however,  when  Shasta  was  playing   outdoors,  there  was  one  moment  that  she  sat  s7ll,  mesmerized,  listening  to  a  mouse  moving  under  the  snow,   and  I  sketched  her.    She  sat  s7ll  just  long  enough  for  me  to  capture  her  pose. One  of  the  most  difficult  moments  of  pain7ng  is  applying  the  first  brushstroke.    This  week  a  student  wanted  to   paint  a  landscape.    I  recommended  that  she  paint  it  on  a  large  canvas.    She  spent  a  significant  amount  of  7me   looking  at  the  canvas  and  then  at  the  photo  of  the  landscape.    I  could  tell  that  she  was  stuck  in  “the  hardest   moment.”    I  took  the  photo  from  her  and  placed  it  upside  down,  and  told  her,  “Paint  from  your  imagina7on,  not   from  the  photo.”    “Leap  and  the  parachute  will  open,”  I  assured  her. The  first  few  brushstrokes  on  a  blank  canvas  are  the  most  in7mida7ng.    In  the  beginning,  painters  have  endless   possibili7es.    As  the  imagined  vision  develops  into  an  actual  pain7ng,  there  is  a  progression  of  decreasing   possibili7es  which  makes  the  final  touches  less  difficult  to  paint.    Her  finished  pain7ng  was  magnificent. Ar7sts  who  have  problems  beginning  their  pain7ngs  must  learn  how  to  take  hold  of  the  moment,  trust   themselves,  and  leap.    With  an  idea  or  view  in  mind  of  something  that  has  inspired  you,  let  your  imagina7on   guide  you  as  you  begin.    There  is  not  much  to  lose  if  you  begin  this  way,  just  an  inexpensive  canvas  or  paper  and   a  few  pennies  of  paint  or  ink.    Allow  yourself  to  schedule  a  block  of  7me  when  you  can  create  art,  or  you  may   never  find  7me  in  the  day  to  paint.    Finally,  worry  less  what  people  think  or  say  about  your  efforts,  because   people  will  always  have  their  opinions. Remember,  the  things  we  regret  most  are  the  chances  we  did  not  take.

12

“Hammond  Ranch  Oak  in  the  Snow”  -­‐  Pain(ng  Snow
What  a  treat.    The  snow  is  s7ll  coming  down  and  I  am  amazed  at  how  our  ranch  changes  from  moment  to   moment.    Along  with  the  beau7ful  scenery,  the  world  becomes  calm  and  quiet  when  the  snow  falls.     Experiencing  this  peacefulness  can  truly  change  your  life.    This  pain7ng  is  a  view  from  The  Grand  View  Ranch.    I   am  very  fortunate!    There  are  hundreds  of  spectacular  views  like  this  one  and  the  biggest  problem  I  have  is   choosing  which  one  to  paint! When  pain7ng  a  snow  scene,  knowledge  of  values  will  determine  how  successful  the  painted  snow  will  look,   because  pain7ng  snow  is  an  exercise  in  pain7ng  light  to  dark  values.    The  best  way  to  see  values  is  by  par7ally   closing  your  eyes  or  squin7ng.    Squin7ng  so]ens  the  specific  details  of  the  subject  and  allows  the  eyes  to  focus   on  the  light  and  dark  contrast  found  in  the  scene.    Believe  what  you  see  when  you  squint  as  you  look  at  the   subject. To  place  values  in  a  pain7ng,  iden7fy  4-­‐5  areas  in  the  landscape  that  have  lighter  and  darker  values.    These  areas   are  value  planes  or  chunks,  and  each  plane  has  the  same  value  throughout  the  area.    Paint  the  areas  having   similar  values  before  pain7ng  specific  shapes.    Dark  values  are  essen7al  in  a  great  pain7ng  (even  more  than   highlights)  because  they  provide  contrast  and  depth. Place  highlights  where  you  want  the  viewer  to  focus.    Choose  one  highlight  area  that  is  brighter  than  all  other   areas.    When  you  paint  a  highlight,  especially  on  snow,  never  use  white  paint  by  itself.    Look  at  the  color  within   the  white,  remembering  that  in  life,  white  contains  7nts  of  red,  yellow,  and  blue  combina7ons.    To  make  sure   your  highlight  color  is  similar  to  the  one  you  see  in  nature,  mix  white  paint  with  combina7ons  of  red,  yellow,  and   blue,  and  see  which  combina7ons  on  your  palehe  are  similar  to  what  you  see  on  the  snow.    Pain7ng  values  that   seem  too  light  or  too  dark  happens  when  you  ques7on  yourself  or  guess  instead  of  pain7ng  what  you  see  when   you  squint.
13

“Begonias  SPll  Life”  -­‐  Art  is  Crea(ng,  Not  Perfec(ng
Today  the  town  of  Mt  Shasta  is  enjoying  a  winter  warming.    The  snow  is  slowly  mel7ng  but  Mt.  Shasta  is  bright   and  white  with  her  new  winter  coat.    This  morning  I  ventured  into  the  local  flower  shop,  and  a]er  seeing  so   much  white  for  the  past  month,  I  was  dazzled  by  all  the  colors  of  flowers.    Inspired,  I  grabbed  a  99-­‐cent  Begonia   plant  and  raced  home  to  paint  it  for  you. Ar7sts  o]en  find  that  the  piece  they  imagined  in  their  mind  is  more  impressive  than  what  they  actually  create.     In  fact,  ar7sts  spend  2  percent  of  their  7me  developing  the  design  and  concept  of  their  work  of  art  and  the   remaining  98  percent  of  the  7me  working  to  hold  on  to  what  they  first  imagined.    The  masterpiece  in  your  head   is  always  perfect.    It  always  has  great  perspec7ve,  great  color,  and  composi7on.    However,  once  you  complete   the  actual  artwork,  you  may  step  back  and  decide  that  you  are  not  sa7sfied  with  the  final  piece.    The  truth  is  that   ar7sts  are  never  sa7sfied  with  what  they  create.    At  the  same  7me  ar7sts  are  working  to  complete  a  pain7ng,   their  knowledge  of  art  grows;  new  insights,  possibili7es,  and  ideas  open  up  and  a  new  vision  appears.    I   recommend  at  this  point  that  you  move  on  and  save  the  new  idea  for  a  new  work. The  secret  of  learning  to  create  art  is  not  to  work  on  one  perfect  piece  every  year,  but  to  create  360  masterworks   a  year  and  then  step  back  and  ask  yourself,  “Am  I  sa7sfied?”

14

“Tulips  SPll  Life”  -­‐  Pain(ng  Tips
Yesterday  I  men7oned  that  I  went  into  a  flower  shop  and  bought  a  Begonia  to  paint  for  you.    What  I  failed  to   men7on  is  that  I  also  bought  tulips.    Pain7ng  flowers  uses  all  the  skills  you  possess  as  an  ar7st.    Since  flowers  are   living  things,  they  change  every  minute.    If  you  want  to  hone  your  outdoor  pain7ng  skills,  pain7ng  fresh  flowers   is  a  great  prac7ce.    I  recommend  that  when  you  paint  flowers  from  life  for  the  first  7me,  avoid  choosing  flowers   that  are  pure  primary  colors  (red,  yellow,  and  blue)  and  look  for  one  with  a  so]er  hue. I  would  like  to  share  some  of  my  pain7ng  7ps  with  you.    When  I  paint,  I  mix  most  of  my  paint  directly  on  the   canvas  instead  of  on  the  palehe  as  this  method  achieves  a  fresh  looking  color  effect.    If  you  mix  on  a  palehe,  do   not  over  mix  your  paint  by  using  your  brush  rather  than  a  palehe  knife.    Colors  that  are  mixed  too  thoroughly   lack  the  brilliance  of  paint  that  is  just  slightly  mixed.    Lightly  mixed  colors  will  appear  broken  within  each  stroke,   which  adds  more  variety  and  interest.    Paint  as  though  you  are  a  millionaire,  with  big  squirts  of  colored  paint  on   your  palehe.    Keep  your  palehe  clean,  rinse  your  brushes  in  clean  turpen7ne  frequently,  and  thoroughly  clean   your  brushes  a]er  every  use.

15

Brushstrokes
The  first  step  in  learning  how  to  paint  begins  with  understanding  how  to  use  a  brush  and  how  to  apply   brushstrokes  effec7vely.    Holding  the  brush  and  moving  it  correctly  is  very  important  to  pain7ng  successfully.    It   is  not  something  that  ar7sts  can  do  willy-­‐nilly  and  think  that  they  are  crea7ng  great  artwork.    Although   recrea7ng  a  subject  is  the  inten7on  of  every  ar7st,  rendering  or  drawing  with  the  brush  is  physically  different   from  pain7ng  with  a  brush.    Rendering  is  done  with  the  fingers  and  wrist;  pain7ng  is  done  from  the  shoulder   with  the  whole  arm  moving  as  one  unit.    The  fingers  and  wrist  do  not  move  when  pain7ng.    When  pain7ng,  hold   the  brush  at  the  back  of  the  brush,  away  from  the  hair.    The  brush  rests  on  the  side  of  the  middle  finger,  held  in   place  by  the  pressure  of  the  thumb. Each  brushstroke  has  a  beginning  and  an  ending.    Once  the  brush  is  applied  to  the  canvas,  the  brush  is  not  li]ed   un7l  the  stroke  is  completed.    Every  swipe  of  the  brush  has  meaning,  purpose,  and  direc7on.    Each  stroke  must   have  within  it  the  correct  value  and  color  and  be  applied  with  a  hard  or  so]  edge.    The  pressure  should  be   consistent  throughout  the  pain7ng  and  every  stroke  sensi7vely  caresses  the  paint  to  stay  on  top  of  the  surface.     In  addi7on,  the  overall  consistency  of  paint  should  be  apparent  from  one  edge  of  the  canvas  to  the  other.    In   pain7ng,  the  focus  of  the  ar7st  is  to  join  with  the  brush  and  paint,  placing  each  brushstroke  one  a]er  the  other   on  the  canvas,  crea7ng  the  ar7st’s  interpreta7on  of  the  subject  with  his  personal  signature  within  each   brushstroke  on  the  pain7ng. The  next  7me  you  want  to  paint,  do  more  than  render  the  subject  with  the  brush.    Paint  it!    Fall  in  love  with  the   act  of  placing  paint  on  your  canvas,  feeling  the  buhery  consistency  of  the  paint  as  it  moves  with  your  brush,  and   become  aware  of  every  brushstroke  as  you  paint.

16

“Shasta  Sunset,  Opus  2”  -­‐  Paint  What  You  See
It  is  hard  to  imagine  that  we  live  so  close  to  Mt  Shasta.    The  summit  is  only  10  miles  (as  the  crow  flies)  from  my   studio  window.    I  marvel  at  the  spectacular  beauty  surrounding  us  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch.    The  view  of  the   mountain  changes  every  second.    At  7mes  I  wonder,  if  I  painted  the  light  on  the  mountain  as  I  see  it,  would   anyone  believe  that  it  looks  that  amazing? One  of  the  ar7sts  who  influenced  me  most  when  I  was  a  young  ar7st  was  a  95-­‐year-­‐old  ar7st  named  Miss   Gugolinsky.    She  painted  magnificently.    I  admired  her  pain7ngs  and  wanted  to  learn  her  secrets  of  pain7ng.    She   told  me  that  when  she  was  young,  she  was  one  of  the  first  women  ar7sts  to  study  in  Paris  at  the  Academy.    She   told  me  about  the  famous  impressionist  painters  she  knew  personally.    A]er  several  mee7ngs  with  her,  she  told   me  the  secret  of  pain7ng  is  simply  to  “paint  what  you  see.” I  share  her  secret  of  pain7ng  in  all  of  my  workshops  and  classes.    The  answer  to  every  ques7on  about  the  subject   of  pain7ng  is  right  in  front  of  you:  color,  perspec7ve,  value,  shape,  temperature,  etc.    The  method  of  direct   pain7ng  asks  the  ar7st  to  depict  faithfully  what  he  sees,  not  to  demonstrate  his  cleverness  with  a  brush.    The   secret  of  pain7ng  great  works  of  art  depends  upon  how  well  the  ar7st  cri7cally  observes  the  subject  and  paints   what  is  there.

17

“Old  Stage  Road  Barn”  -­‐  Successful  Pain(ng  on  Loca(on
Weed  is  a  small,  old  wood-­‐milling  town  about  two  miles  from  The  Grand  View  Ranch.    The  history  of  the  area  is   rich  and  diverse,  and  the  landscape  is  dohed  with  older,  small  farms.    This  barn  is  located  off  Old  Stage  Road.    I   have  been  pa7ently  wai7ng  for  the  snow  to  melt  to  paint  some  local  landscapes  like  this  one.    I  am  cap7vated   with  the  character  of  this  old  barn.    When  I  was  out  pain7ng  this  loca7on,  many  residents  of  the  area  were   curious  to  see  a  painter  in  the  field  and  stopped  to  chat  with  me.    Although  I  hear  that  there  are  many  ar7sts  in   this  area,  I  have  not  met  many  pain7ng  on  loca7on. When  you  paint  on  loca7on,  begin  by  choosing  the  central  point  of  interest  for  the  pain7ng.    For  this  pain7ng  I   chose  the  barn.    Carefully  sketch  the  focal  point  or  the  area  that  you  most  want  the  viewer  to  no7ce  first.    Take   your  7me.    If  you  get  this  part  accurate,  you  can  leave  the  rest  of  the  pain7ng  to  chance.    Begin  by  pain7ng  this   center  of  interest  first,  then  move  on  to  paint  the  sky.    When  pain7ng  the  sky,  apply  the  color  with  short  ver7cal   and  cross  strokes,  and  avoid  using  horizontal  strokes.    Then,  apply  the  green  and  brown  tones  for  the  trees  and   foreground,  and  use  as  many  different  strokes  as  you  can.    No7ce  that  the  sharp  edges  and  strong  colors  are  on   the  barn  (the  focal  point),  and  the  rest  of  the  pain7ng  is  what  I  would  call  a  “strong  brush”  pain7ng. Each  7me  you  go  out  to  paint,  challenge  yourself  to  paint  something  different,  because  crea7ng  art  is  in  the   prac7ce,  not  the  result.    When  a  performer  prac7ces  his  cra],  he  may  make  many  mistakes,  and  the  public   generally  does  not  see  these  mishaps.    Great  ar7sts  have  pain7ngs  that  did  not  work.    Mozart  and  Beethoven   both  composed  uninspiring  music.    Every  one  knows  of  Barry  Bond's  home  run  records,  but  few  remember  how   many  7mes  he  struck  out.    When  you  begin  your  next  pain7ng,  focus  on  your  poten7al  success,  op7mis7cally   approach  your  subject  and  chances  are  that  you  will  hit  more  home  runs  and  have  a  great  7me  pain7ng.

18

“Mt.  Shasta  Barn,  Opus  1”  -­‐  How  Do  I  Paint  That?
I  spent  another  day  pain7ng  landscapes  on  Old  Stage  Road  in  Mt  Shasta  and  I  con7nue  to  feel  inspired  by  the  old   barns  in  this  area.    This  barn  is  a  short  distance  from  the  one  I  painted  yesterday.    I  am  pain7ng  it  about  the  same   7me  of  day.    I  have  included  a  systema7c  study  of  this  one  so  ar7sts  can  see  how  it  was  painted. The  ques7on  that  students  ask  most  in  my  classes  is  “How  do  I  paint  that?”    The  individual  way  that  any  ar7st   paints  belongs  to  that  ar7st  alone.    Though  you  may  find  it  interes7ng  to  know  exactly  how  I  painted  this   pain7ng,  you  will  not  be  able  to  create  art  in  the  same  way.    However,  over  7me,  you  will  develop  your  own  way   of  seeing  and  pain7ng,  and  this  is  what  makes  crea7ng  art  so  rewarding. It  helps  to  try  other  ar7st’s  different  approaches  to  pain7ng  and  to  explore  different  ways  of  thinking  and   pain7ng  by  viewing  other  ar7st’s  methods.    It  is  a  great  way  to  grow  as  an  ar7st  because  it  may  help  you  think   differently.    Try  not  to  look  for  a  “how-­‐to”  formula  when  you  start  a  pain7ng.    The  joy  of  crea7ng  art  is   discovering  your  own  way  of  expressing  what  you  see.    So,  jump  right  in  and  you  will  find  that  you  have  the   answers  to  your  own  ques7ons  as  you  go.    You  will  come  to  understand  that  every  ar7st  has  struggled  with  the   same  ques7on,  “How  do  I  paint  that?”    You  are  not  alone! My  approach  to  crea7ng  my  artwork  begins  like  this:      

1. First,  I  lay  in  the  overall  concept  of  my  pain7ng

using  a  big  brush.    At  this  moment,  I  try  to  visualize the  finished  pain7ng.    Many  great  pain7ngs  are lost  because  the  ar7st  has  no  vision  before  he  starts.

19

2. Then  I  sketch  the  easy  shapes  and  try  to  make  every   stroke  correct.    I  make  correc7ons  as  I  go  instead  of   wai7ng  un7l  the  end  to  get  it  accurate.    I  start  with  the   chosen  center  of  interest  and  work  out  from  there.

     

3. Next,  I  lay  in  the  sky  and  I  do  not  make  it  complicated. I  use  plenty  of  paint  and  apply  the  strokes  in  different   paherns.    Then  I  “chunk”  in  the  values  with  no  more than  4  to  5  value  panes.

         

4. The  completed  pain7ng  should  have  so]  and  hard edges,  good  values,  and  a  strong  focal  point.    I  use  the   knife  to  scratch  in  many  of  the  s7cks  and  branches.     Many  ar7sts  also  scratch  in  their  name  when  they  finish   so  that  they  can  indicate  to  other  ar7sts  that  they   completed  the  pain7ng  on  loca7on.

Even  though  we  are  interested  in  learning  from  other  ar7sts,  it  is  interes7ng  that  crea7ng  art  is  such  a  solitary   process.    Most  ar7sts  throughout  the  world  spend  endless  hours  in  their  studios  crea7ng  art  by  themselves.    It  is   only  in  the  moments  when  we  are  working  on  our  own  art  that  we  experience  the  universal  crea7ve  inspira7on   we  share  with  all  makers  of  art,  and  it  helps  to  remember  that  there  are  other  ar7sts  connected  by  inspired   hearts  doing  the  same  thing  that  we  are  doing.

20

Taking  on  Great  Challenges
When  I  was  first  doing  research  for  my  PBS  Television  Series  -­‐  “ The  Grand  View,  America’s  Na7onal  Parks  through   the  Eyes  of  an  Ar7st,”  I  remember  reading  a  clip  from  an  interview  with  Marty  Stouffer,  a  filmmaker  for  Wild   America,  saying,  “ The  secret  of  great  photography  is  to  create  great  moments  from  common  things.”    This  is  a   great  quote  and  one  that  I  use  when  I  teach.    However,  a]er  years  of  teaching  and  presen7ng  hours  of  lectures   and  workshops,  I  have  refined  it  to  say,  “Paint  the  ordinary,  extraordinarily.”    Unfortunately,  plein  air  painters  are   o]en  busy  trying  to  recreate  the  view  that  is  in  front  of  them.    Some  painters  start  a  pain7ng  without  even   thinking  about  crea7ng  art.    Remember  that  extraordinary  art  comes  from  personally  expressing  your  experience   of  life,  not  just  duplica7ng  the  landscape  or  subject  (that’s  what  cameras  are  for). Pain7ng  a  great  pain7ng  does  not  require  an  expensive  trip  to  Europe.    The  fact  is  pain7ng  in  Europe  is  highly   overrated.    America  has  everything  that  a  landscape  painter  would  ever  need  to  paint  without  using  a  passport.     It  has  been  my  experience  that  some  of  the  best  landscape  pain7ngs  were  painted  right  here.    John  Singer   Sergeant  thought  pain7ng  in  America  was  inspiring.    By  pain7ng  outdoors,  you  can  observe  how  nature’s   elements  work  together  and  enjoy  fresh  insights  about  pain7ng.    You  can  learn  and  prac7ce  drawing,   composi7on,  color,  and  values  -­‐  all  vital  skills  if  you  want  to  excel  in  pain7ng.    Once  you  have  acquired  these   skills,  you  do  not  need  to  venture  outdoors  again.    One  of  the  best  secrets  that  great  ar7sts  have  kept  to   themselves  is  that  a  great  pain7ng  doesn’t  have  to  be  painted  at  a  specific  place  at  all.    Thomas  Moran,  a  famous   American  landscape  ar7st,  painted  his  greatest  works  at  the  end  of  his  life  in  his  studio  from  memory,   communica7ng  successfully  and  powerfully  the  sum  of  his  experiences  to  the  viewer  through  his  pain7ngs. If  you  want  to  experience  this  feeling  of  expressing  yourself,  do  a  series  of  pain7ngs  and  call  it  “Great  Pain7ngs  of   Ordinary  Things.”    You  might  receive  your  inspira7on  from  many  sources.    If  a  photograph  inspires  you,  evaluate   its  good  and  bad  quali7es,  and  use  the  feelings  that  you  experience  from  seeing  the  photo  to  guide  you  as  you   paint.    You  might  create  a  roman7c,  awe-­‐inspiring  mood-­‐based  pain7ng  from  a  memory  that  has  personal   significance.    For  example,  you  might  create  a  mood  or  sense  of  place  by  pain7ng  a  warm  light  looming  over  a   cold  fog  bank  crea7ng  a  dark  atmosphere.    You  might  imagine  your  pain7ng  as  if  it  were  finished  (as  you  might   imagine  a  perfect  dream  house,  with  intricate  details  and  thoughxul  placement  of  design,  structures,  colors,  and   sa7sfying  finishing  touches)  and  then  paint  it  from  your  imagina7on.    You  could  imagine  it  being  a  large  pain7ng,   and  then  imagine  it  as  an  in7mate  study.    Visualize  what  the  scene  would  look  like  in  the  most  extraordinary   moments.    Go  beyond  your  capabili7es  and  stray  into  the  unknown.    Ask  yourself  what  would  the  scene  look  like   if  it  were  darker,  and  the  source  of  light,  lighter.    What  if  you  removed  the  sun  altogether  and  saw  what  you  are   looking  at  in  moonlight.    Close  your  eyes  and  open  your  mind  to  the  possibili7es.    Remember  that  ordinary   scenes  are  a  dim  dozen;  but  imagina7ve  and  emo7onally  evoca7ve  pain7ngs  are  rare  and  precious.

21

“ValenPne’s  Flowers”  -­‐  Share  Your  View  of  Life  
Returning  home  from  teaching  my  classes  in  San  Jose,  I  did  what  many  American  men  do  on  Valen7ne’s  Day.    I   stopped  by  a  Walmart  store  to  buy  some  red  roses  for  my  sweetheart  before  going  home.    I  guess  I  am  a   roman7c.    Walking  by  all  those  beau7ful,  colorful  flowers  inspired  me.    I  picked  out  the  most  beau7ful  rose  and   some  carna7ons,  and  rushed  home  to  give  the  flowers  to  my  love.    I  dedicate  this  pain7ng,  “Valen7ne  Flowers,”   to  all  the  women  who  did  not  receive  any  flowers  on  Valen7ne’s  Day. When  you  create  art  (whether  music,  wri7ng  or  pain7ng),  you  are  declaring  what  is  deeply  important  to  you.    An   ar7st  shows  the  world  what  it  takes  for  granted  by  invi7ng  the  viewer  to  have  a  new  way  of  seeing  the  ar7st's   percep7on.    For  example,  when  seeing  Van  Gogh’s  “Sunflowers”  for  the  first  7me,  some  people  love  them  and   some  people  do  not.    Some  people  do  not  have  an  opinion  either  way.    However,  once  you  have  seen  Van  Gogh’s   “Sunflowers,”  you  will  never  look  at  a  sunflower  the  same  way  again.    As  an  ar7st  you  possess  this  power  as  you   share  your  view  of  the  world  with  others.

22

“Mt.  Shasta  Barn,  Opus  2”  -­‐  Crea(ng  Your  Own  Magic
"Mt.  Shasta  Barn,  Opus  2"  is  the  second  barn  in  a  series  of  six  pain7ngs  that  depicts  the  unique  barns  near  Mt.   Shasta.    As  exci7ng  as  it  might  be  for  collectors  to  be  able  collect  a  series  of  pain7ngs,  it  can  be  very  challenging   for  the  ar7st  to  paint  one.    In  my  7tle,  I  use  the  reference  “Opus”  as  homage  to  my  love  of  music.    Composers   indicate  the  sequence  of  works  in  a  musical  score  by  using  the  word  Opus  followed  by  a  number.    I  use  it  to   indicate  the  sequence  of  the  works  in  a  series  of  pain7ngs. There  is  no  magic  when  ar7sts  create  a  pain7ng.    What  magic  other  ar7sts  have  in  their  work  is  something  they   create.    Your  challenge  is  to  discover  what  you  need  to  do  in  your  own  pain7ngs.    Pain7ng  is  a  process  of  lessons   learned.    Learning  to  paint  happens  systema7cally,  pain7ng  by  pain7ng,  by  slowly  avoiding  the  mistakes  you   made  in  your  last  pain7ng  and  repea7ng  your  triumphs  on  your  next  pain7ng.    With  7me,  you  will  start  to   develop  a  consistent  pahern.    This  becomes  your  style,  and  that  is  your  magic. If  you  learn  to  paint  by  using  someone  else's  method  of  pain7ng  or  their  color  recipes  that  generate  a  consistent   outcome,  you  will  find  that  you  will  be  able  to  repeat  the  method,  but  your  pain7ngs  will  lack  magic  and  pain7ng   them  will  become  boring.

23

“Road  to  the  Foothills”  -­‐  Communicate  Your  Message  Clearly
Mt.  Shasta  has  many  different  sides  to  her  beauty.    To  the  South,  thickly  wooded  forests  and  wonderful  rivers   flank  her  foothills.    To  the  East,  there  is  high  mountain  terrain.    To  the  West,  where  we  live,  large  meadows  with   willows,  dogwood,  and  oak  trees  make  the  landscape  interes7ng.    To  the  North,  an  arid  high  desert  spreads  over   miles  of  land  where  pinion  and  sagebrush  find  their  home,  and  this  is  where  I  painted  “Road  to  the  Foothills.” While  scou7ng  loca7ons  for  my  upcoming  workshop  this  spring,  I  traveled  off-­‐road  to  discover  hidden  vistas.    I   love  to  paint  in  the  morning  or  in  the  evening  when  the  ligh7ng  is  drama7c.    When  I  arrived  at  my  chosen   loca7on  early  this  morning,  I  set  up  my  easel,  umbrella,  palehe,  and  other  equipment.    I  reached  for  my  brushes   and  realized  that  I  le]  them  at  home.    I  repacked  everything,  raced  home,  then  drove  back  to  the  loca7on.    The   light  had  moved  to  midday,  but  the  vista  s7ll  waited  to  be  painted.    Always  make  sure  that  you  check  your  supply   list  before  you  leave  home  to  make  sure  you  have  remembered  to  pack  all  your  equipment.   The  best  art  can  challenge  the  ar7st  and  the  viewer  as  well.    To  effec7vely  move  or  inspire  someone,  an  ar7st   must  have  a  clear  message  to  communicate  in  the  first  place.    Before  you  start  a  pain7ng,  ask  yourself  two   ques7ons: “Is  it  worth  doing?”    Set  out  to  push  yourself  beyond  what  you  think  you  can  do  and  strive  to  create  artwork  that   is  spectacularly  yours.    We  remember  those  ar7sts  who  set  a  high  standard  of  excellence  for  themselves  as  well   as  other  ar7sts.    Mediocrity  is  seldom  rewarded  because  so  many  can  achieve  it. “What  do  you  want  to  say?”    Remember,  as  human  beings,  we  are  alike  in  many  ways.    In  order  for  us  to   communicate,  we  must  have  something  to  say  that  unifies  our  understanding.    We  enjoy  seeing  a  sunset  or  a   flower  in  part  because  of  how  it  looks,  but  it  is  the  emo7onal  response  we  experience  that  makes  us  want  to  say,   “Wow,  look  at  that,”  to  someone  else.    When  you  paint,  tune  in  to  your  emo7onal  self  and  whisper  to  the  viewer   though  your  art,  “Look  at  this.”

24

“A  Single  Rose”  -­‐  Learning  to  See
This  morning  in  my  studio,  I  was  thinking  about  today’s  pain7ng  when  the  rose  that  I  painted  for  Valen7ne’s  Day   caught  my  eye.    In  contrast  to  the  stormy  white  landscape  outside  my  studio  window,  I  marveled  at  the  so]   pinkish  petals  of  the  rose  and  the  wonderful  wil7ng,  green  leaves.  I  wanted  to  capture  that  sense  of  fragility  on   canvas  for  you. The  most  important  7me  spent  on  a  pain7ng  is  in  the  first  ten  minutes,  when  you  choose  what  you  want  to  paint   and  what  message  you  want  to  share  with  the  viewer.    When  beginning  a  pain7ng,  it  is  important  that  you  have  a   clear  vision  of  the  completed  piece  before  you  start.    Thinking  through  the  finished  details  of  the  pain7ng,   including  how  the  piece  is  framed  and  how  it  will  look  hanging  on  the  wall,  will  help  you  form  a  strong  mental   picture  of  what  you  wish  to  see  on  canvas.    Once  you  have  a  vivid  mental  picture  of  the  completed  pain7ng,  you   will  be  able  to  capture  the  image  more  accurately. One  of  the  best  ways  to  prac7ce  is  to  paint  from  life  as  I  did  with  “A  Single  Rose.”    Choose  one  object  in  your   studio,  place  it  in  your  s7ll  life  stage,  and  create  a  pleasing  composi7on  using  light  and  shadow,  contrast  and   color.    Take  10  minutes  to  imagine  the  pain7ng  as  a  finished  piece  and  then  begin  to  paint.    Once  you  have   prac7ced  your  observa7on  skills  indoors,  you  will  be  more  prepared  to  paint  outdoors. When  you  begin  pain7ng  on  loca7on,  carry  your  paints  and  canvases  into  the  fields  and  woods.    If  you  can,  set   up  near  a  stream  and  see  for  yourself  the  kaleidoscope  of  color  and  light.    Sit  quietly  for  ten  minutes  before   star7ng  to  paint.    Study  the  scene  as  an  ar7st  would,  no7cing  the  value  and  the  color,  the  details  in  the  shadows,   and  the  warm  and  cool  colors  that  make  up  the  light.    Look  at  nature  with  a  painter’s  eye  and  not  merely  as  a   tourist.    A]er  siyng  s7ll,  you  are  ready  to  begin  pain7ng.    Once  you  have  completed  your  pain7ng,  return  to  the   studio  with  the  completed  piece  for  quiet  study,  and  then  you  will  begin  to  understand  the  things  you  used  to   look  at  and  not  see.
25

Greatness  in  Art
Learning  how  to  paint  is  invaluable  but,  by  itself,  knowing  how  to  paint  is  nothing.    An  ar7st  who  has  learned   how  to  represent  an  object  faithfully  has  only  learned  the  language  by  which  percep7ons  are  rendered. An  ar7st  creates  great  art  when  he  is  able  to  infuse  what  he  feels  about  what  he  sees  into  his  work.  Then  the   pain7ng  becomes  more  than  a  detailed  re-­‐crea7on  of  a  subject.    To  achieve  this,  an  ar7st  must  explore  the   depths  of  emo7ons  and  experiences  within  himself  to  know  what  he  feels.    Great  art  reflects  the  ar7st’s  inner   portrait  and  view  of  the  world;  it  is  a  manifesta7on  of  his  understanding  of  the  cra]  combined  with  his  sensibility   about  being  human.    Every  factor,  even  the  choice  of  a  frame,  is  important  to  the  successful  communica7on   between  the  ar7st,  the  canvas,  and  the  viewer.    An  ar7st’s  ability  to  express  his  feelings,  coupled  with  a  skilled   interpreta7on  of  the  subject  maher,  elicits  responses  in  the  viewer  and  effec7vely  deepens  their  conversa7on. Like  a  great  piece  of  literature,  great  art  is  created  with  discipline  and  designed  to  have  an  impact  on  the  viewer,   offering  an  invita7on  to  see  the  very  soul  of  the  ar7st  revealed  in  the  pain7ng.

26

“Spring  Lit  Meadow”  -­‐  Crea(ng  the  Effect  of  Light
From  my  studio  in  Mt.  Shasta,  winter  is  retrea7ng  and  the  spring  air  is  mel7ng  the  snow  on  our  side  of  the   mountain.    The  Grand  View  Ranch  is  awakening  with  ar7s7c  subjects  galore.    Water  from  the  snow  melt  seems   to  flow  from  everywhere,  crea7ng  creeks  and  waterfalls  in  places  where  there  were  none  in  the  fall.    A  radia7ng   and  enveloping  light  now  illuminates  the  landscape.    The  fresh  clear  atmosphere  transforms  our  everyday  world   into  a  lively  and  beau7ful  place.    I  feel  the  omnipresent  light  satura7ng  everything,  crea7ng  a  sense  of  unity.     Now  I  understand  the  true  meaning  of  “tonality.” Light  is  an  en7ty  apart  from  color  and  form;  it  is  the  creator  of  both.    In  every  light  source,  the  complete   spectrum  of  color  with  red,  yellow,  and  blue  is  present.    The  quali7es  of  an  object  that  either  absorb  or  reflect   color  determine  the  color  we  see. We  do  not  create  light  with  oil  paints;  we  ahempt  to  create  the  illusion  or  impression  of  light  by  using  values  and   temperature.    It  is  the  contrast  of  values  (the  range  of  white  to  black)  and  the  use  of  warm  and  cool  colors  that   creates  an  effect  of  light.    When  pain7ng  shadows,  using  darker  values  of  either  warm  or  cool  colors  adds  a  deep   contrast  to  the  highlights  in  a  pain7ng.    If  a  highlight  is  a  reflec7on  of  light  from  a  light  source  and  light  contains   all  colors  in  the  spectrum  (red,  yellow,  and  blue),  it  makes  sense  that  a  highlight  would  have  all  three  colors   present  to  suggest  the  effect  of  light.    Try  this  on  your  next  winter  pain7ng  to  highlight  the  snow;  combine   Titanium  white  with  just  a  dash  of  Cadmium  orange,  Lemon  yellow,  and  Cobalt  blue  to  paint  the  highlights.    Use   gray  violet  and  gray  blue  shades  in  the  shadows.    I  used  these  color  combina7ons  when  pain7ng  “Spring  Lit   Meadow.”

27

“Shasta  Valley,  Opus  1”  -­‐  A  Sense  of  Space
While  exploring  some  of  the  country  roads  that  crisscross  the  landscape  in  Shasta  Valley,  I  discovered  thousands   of  landscapes  wai7ng  to  be  painted.    Hay  and  alfalfa  farmers  along  with  their  livestock  made  this  fer7le  valley   their  home.    The  grand  landscapes  and  the  ever-­‐present  shadow  of  Mt  Shasta  in  the  background  dwarf  the  lihle   farms  and  rancheros.    The  landscapes  whispered  to  me  “come  here  and  paint  me.”    It  is  difficult  to  paint  every   subject  that  you  see.    There  is  a  moment  when  you  must  just  stop  the  car  and  say,  “ This  is  it.”    I  set  up  my   supplies,  stood  with  my  brush  poised,  took  a  breath,  and  allowed  my  thoughts  to  focus  on  the  result  I  wished  to   capture.    Once  the  image  was  clear,  I  started  pain7ng. There  are  scien7fic  principles  that  help  to  create  a  sense  of  space  or  the  feeling  of  air  on  a  two-­‐dimensional   canvas.    One  principle  that  governs  color  grada7ons  is  that  all  colors,  except  white,  become  cooler  as  they  recede   from  the  eye.    Colors  that  recede  into  the  distance  have  blue  added  to  them.    Likewise,  objects  in  the  foreground   are  warmer,  with  yellow  or  red  added  to  the  hue.    Orange  is  the  warmest  color  of  all.    Addi7onally,  yellow  fades   as  the  landscape  recedes,  meaning  that  the  green  in  the  foreground  will  have  lots  of  yellow  present,  but  in  the   middle  ground  you  will  find  the  yellow  gradually  diminishes  and  becomes  a  greenish  blue.    In  the  background,   the  yellow  will  fade  altogether,  becoming  a  bluish  color. Another  principle  that  helps  to  create  aerial  perspec7ve  is  that  all  things  get  lighter  in  value  the  further  they   recede  into  the  distance.    By  adding  white  to  a  color  that  is  receding,  it  becomes  lighter  in  value  and  appears  to   be  distant.    Be  sure  to  squint  and  observe  the  landscape  before  pain7ng  any  color  because  to  create  depth,  the   value  must  be  correct.    No7ce  that  the  colors  and  values  change  and  become  cooler  and  lighter  as  they  recede   into  the  distance  in  the  newest  pain7ng,  “Shasta  Valley,  Opus  1.”

28

“The  Old  Bunkhouse”  -­‐  Crea(ng  Mood  in  a  Pain(ng
This  a]ernoon  I  discovered  a  wonderful  old  ranch  just  outside  the  town  of  Edgewood  at  the  foot  of  Mount   Shasta  that  a  family  built  in  1854.    Jackson  Ranch  is  a  2000-­‐acre  ranch  that  a  prospector  homesteaded  a]er   making  a  fortune  gold  mining  in  Yreka.    As  I  began  pain7ng,  an  old  man  came  out  of  the  forest  with  a  rifle  flung   over  his  right  shoulder.    He  had  a  kind  and  welcoming  smile.    He  no7ced  that  I  was  pain7ng  and  wandered  over   to  see  what  I  was  doing.    He  told  me  that  the  structure  I  was  pain7ng  was  the  old  bunkhouse  that  his  great-­‐great   grandfather  built  it  in  1856. The  great  thing  about  pain7ng  on  loca7on  is  that  pain7ng  invites  conversa7on.    It  is  not  like  jumping  out  of  a  car   and  snapping  a  photo.    People  stop  to  talk  with  you,  and  have  nothing  but  praises  to  say  about  what  you  are   doing.    Most  people  admire  the  fact  that  you  have  the  ability  and  interest  to  do  what  you  are  doing,  and  wish   that  they  could  do  it,  too.    It  is  very  intriguing  to  see  a  painter  in  a  field  with  an  easel  and  umbrella,  and  the  old   hunter’s  curiosity  led  him  to  approach  me  when  he  saw  me  pain7ng  “ The  Old  Bunkhouse.” O]en  I  “paint  what  I  see”  as  an  exercise  in  capturing  the  mood  of  a  place  in  the  moment.    Today,  the  light  was   defused  by  clouds  and  offered  lihle  highlight,  but  the  so]  light  intensified  the  feeling  of  history  as  I  painted  the   old  structure.    The  mood  of  a  pain7ng  conveys  the  ar7st’s  emo7onal  response  to  the  place,  object,  or  person   that  is  being  painted.    Mood  is  the  prime  differen7a7ng  quality  between  a  pain7ng  done  on  loca7on  and  one   painted  from  a  photo  in  the  studio.    The  more  you  sketch  on  loca7on,  the  more  you  store  feelings  and   observa7ons  to  use  in  future  expressions  on  canvas.    Great  pain7ngs  are  mostly  studio  pain7ngs  that  originated   from  a  personal  experience,  recalled  later  in  the  studio,  and  expressed  through  the  ar7st’s  brush  from  memory.

29

“Shasta  Barn,  Opus  3,  Hoy  Ranch”  -­‐  Challenges  of  Pain(ng  Outdoors
Pain7ng  expands  our  intelligence  and  develops  sensi7vity  to  all  things  in  the  world.    It  awakens  our  curiosity   about  everything.    Pain7ng  enhances  every  day  experiences  when  we  explore  the  world  around  us  to  share  it   with  others  on  canvas.    Pain7ng  can  also  create  a  record  of  our  life,  similar  to  wri7ng  a  journal  or  diary,  only  with   sketches. Just  down  the  road  from  the  Grand  View  Ranch  is  the  Hoy  Ranch.    This  2,000-­‐acre  farm  has  an  extraordinary   view  of  Mt.  Shasta.    I  painted  this  fabulous  barn  on  the  Hoy  ranch  to  add  to  my  “ The  Barns  of  Mt.  Shasta”  series.     This  spring  we  will  paint  this  awesome  loca7on  at  my  loca7on  pain7ng  workshops  in  Mt.  Shasta. The  ar7st  is  a  juggler  trying  to  keep  many  balls  in  the  air.    This  is  especially  true  on  loca7on  when  every  moment   is  part  of  the  experience  and  the  pain7ng.    There  is  a  vast  amount  of  informa7on  about  the  subject  maher  to  see   and  sense  when  you  are  pain7ng.    One’s  senses  fill  with  smells,  noise,  wind,  bugs,  tourists,  exhaust,  warm   sunrays,  and  cold  feet.    It  is  a  wonder  that  we  can  keep  our  wits  about  us  to  accomplish  the  task  at  hand. When  you  begin  pain7ng  on  loca7on,  focus  on  imaging  the  concept  of  what  you  want  your  message  to  convey   before  applying  your  first  brush  stroke  on  the  canvas.    Then,  with  eyes  wide  open,  look  at  the  subject  before  you,   and  see  color,  composi7on,  light,  shadows,  form,  dimension,  atmosphere,  prospec7ve,  values,  weight,   movement,  balance,  rhythm,  and  the  subject  itself.    Then,  it  is  7me  to  make  important  choices  about  what  the   pain7ng  will  include  and  exclude,  the  7me  of  day,  where  the  focal  point  will  be,  and  so  on.    Choosing  is  a  very   powerful  and  essen7al  part  of  successfully  developing  and  portraying  what  you  feel  about  the  subject  or  place.     This  is  where  all  great  works  of  art  begin.
30

“Basalt  Cliffs  North  of  Shasta”  -­‐  Crea(ng  Drama  with  Color
To  the  north  of  Mt.  Shasta,  the  climate  is  dryer  and  the  landscape  is  high  desert.    Throughout  the  region,  there   are  dirt  roads  that  lead  explorers  to  amazing  vistas  that  few  people  ever  venture  to  see.    This  part  of  California   resembles  the  way  America  appeared  years  ago  when  there  was  a  limited  popula7on,  and  had  seemingly  endless   numbers  of  seldom-­‐traveled  roads. The  spot  that  I  painted  today  is  one  of  those  places.    The  incoming  storm  provided  drama7c  ligh7ng,  turning  this   rocky  basalt  range  into  a  glorious  ever-­‐changing  kaleidoscope  of  color.    I  will  explore  more  of  this  mountain  range   in  future  blog  pain7ngs,  so  stay  tuned.

31

What  “It”  Is
All  people  have  the  talent  and  ability  to  create.    We  are  born  with  “it.”    You  need  only  to  look  at  a  young  child   siyng  on  the  floor  with  a  box  of  crayons  busily  drawing  on  sheets  of  white  paper.    Humans  come  into  the  world   with  an  amazing  desire  to  create.    We  o]en  spend  our  life7me  trying  to  reclaim  the  passion  and  freedom  that   we  experienced  as  a  child.    Throughout  my  career  as  an  ar7st  and  art  instructor,  I  have  searched  for  the  answers   to  the  ques7on,  “Why  do  we  lose  the  ability  to  express  our  inner  selves,  and  how  do  we  turn  ‘it’  on  again?” I  have  been  teaching  people  the  art  of  pain7ng  for  over  35  years  and  offer  workshops  that  help  ar7sts  learn  how   to  paint  and  overcome  barriers  that  stop  them  from  crea7ng.   When  I  designed  my  workshop,  I  knew  I  did  not  want  to  present  the  standard  weekend  workshop  where  the   instructor  dazzles  the  par7cipants  with  a  few  fancy  recipes.    I  wanted  to  offer  some  experiences  that  can  help   ar7sts  paint  freely,  powerfully,  and  passionately.  I  hoped  to  explore  the  answers  to  ques7ons  such  as  why  do   people  stop  crea7ng  art?    Why  do  some  people  dare  to  create  and  others  do  not?    What  is  art  and  why  is  it   important  to  human  beings?    How  can  ar7sts  unleash  their  passion  to  create  and  enjoy  making  art  again? In  my  weekend  workshop,  we  talk  about  these  ques7ons  and  explore  many  of  the  secrets  of  pain7ng  outdoors.     During  the  three  days,  we  take  one  evening  to  discuss  what  “It”  is,  and  how  to  get  “It.”    This  new  approach  is   instrumental  in  taking  each  par7cipant’s  art  to  the  next  level.     These  ques7ons  and  ideas  may  help  you  break  through  the  barriers  that  stop  your  crea7vity  and  help  you  to   begin  crea7ng  art  in  exci7ng  new  ways.

1. What  if  you  could  paint  fearlessly?    Fear  is  a  real  emo7on,  and  many  ar7sts  paint  what  they  think  is  
acceptable.    To  break  through  this  limi7ng  belief,  you  must  paint  as  if  you  have  no  fear.

2. What  alternate  medium  would  you  create  with  if  you  used  one  different  from  your  favorite  medium?    
Many  ar7sts  stay  with  what  they  know.    If  you  usually  paint  with  oils,  try  pain7ng  with  watercolors  or   pastel.    The  world  offers  a  grand  buffet  of  possibili7es,  so  try  something  new. my  crea7vity.    What  classes  would  I  take?    Where  would  I  go?    What  would  I  want  to  learn?”

3. Make  a  list  and  ask  yourself  “What  would  I  do  if  I  had  unlimited  amounts  of  7me  and  money  to  devote  to   4. Make  a  list  of  5  crea7ve  ac7vi7es  that  you  can  begin  this  week:  sign  up  for  a  class  or  workshop,  or  teach  
a  class,  or  take  a  trip  to  a  museum,  call  your  local  art  group  to  volunteer,  paint  a  pain7ng,  or  offer  to   donate  your  art  to  a  cause  or  charity.

5. What  kind  of  art  do  you  desire?    If  money  were  no  object,  which  ar7st’s  work  would  you  collect  and  

hang  in  your  studio  to  see  every  day?    Ask  yourself,  “How  did  this  ar7st  see  the  world,  and  try  to  imagine   seeing  it  as  they  did.” or  work  too  hard  to  get  it  right.    Pain7ng  whatever  you  see  can  result  in  a  great  work  of  art  if  the  viewer   is  able  to  see    it  through  your  eyes.    Ask  yourself,  “What  if  art  is  easier  to  do  than  I  think  it  is?” in  front  of  you.

6. Paint  the  first  thing  that  you  see  right  now:  an  egg,  a  lamp,  a  cup  of  coffee,  a  flower.    Try  not  to  analyze  it  

7. Keep  a  journal.    Draw  every  day.    Don’t  look  for  the  perfect  thing  to  draw.    Just  sit  and  draw  what  is  right   8. Keep  your  camera  at  home.    Too  many  ar7sts  travel  and  rely  more  on  photos,  and  less  and  less  on  
memory.    Memory  is  a  skill  that  you  can  develop  through  prac7ce.

32

9. Paint  something  from  your  past.    Imagine  a  7me  when  you  felt  inspired  seeing  a  beau7ful  sunset  or  a  
beam  of  light  coming  through  a  cloud.    Get  in  touch  with  your  emo7ons,  and  don't  just  look  at  the   subject.    See  if  you  are  able  to  remember  the  feelings  that  inspired  you  when  you  paint.

10. Paint  bold  and  thick,  and  paint  as  if  your  supplies  were  free  and  endless.    Try  pain7ng  with  a  knife  or  use  

your  fingers.    Give  yourself  permission  to  be  free  with  your  paint.    Paint  as  though  you  were  a  child  again   and  express  yourself.

33

“Grand  View  Burn,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Pain(ng  Fire
Recently  we  have  been  preparing  The  Grand  View  Ranch  for  upcoming  workshops  in  April,  May,  and  June,  and   have  spent  many  days  clearing  dead  trees  and  fallen  limbs  le]  by  the  winter  storms.    Because  the  property  is   cluhered  with  70  years  of  growth,  we  are  clearing  it  branch  by  branch,  and  this  takes  many  days  of  hauling  and   burning.    One  of  my  favorite  ac7vi7es  is  “ The  Burn.”    We  drag  40  to  60  lbs  of  tree  trunks  lying  over  an  acre  of   land  to  a  burn  pile,  and  then  we  hoist  them  onto  the  burning  flame.    "Grand  View  Burn,  Opus  1"  is  a  pain7ng   that  captures  energy  of  this  ac7vity. When  pain7ng  fire  or  anything  that  would  be  an  eye-­‐catching  subject,  it  is  important  to  make  good  color  choices.     A  pain7ng  is  most  effec7ve  when  the  color  rela7onships  and  transi7ons  are  well  synchronized  so  they   themselves  express  the  idea  of  the  picture.    Good  color  rela7onship  is  more  than  pain7ng  "preyness,"  or   splashing  color  all  over  a  canvas.    It  is  about  using  color  to  make  a  powerful  statement  by  reserving  it  for  the   punch  or  climax  on  the  central  focal  point.    By  turning  the  pain7ng  upside  down  and  viewing  the  pain7ng  as  an   abstract,  it  is  possible  to  see  if  the  color  rela7onships  and  transi7ons  are  effec7ve  or  if  anything  stands  out  and   seems  to  be  out  of  place. Blog  readers  have  asked  about  my  goals  for  The  Grand  View  Ranch.    It  is  my  dream  to  create  an  idyllic  ar7st   retreat,  where  ar7sts  can  par7cipate  in  loca7on  pain7ng  workshops  that  nurture  the  ar7st  in  a  place  of   unparalleled  beauty  and  inspira7on.    I  am  interested  in  offering  an  experience  that  reflects  the  philosophy  of  one   of  my  mentors,  John  Ruskin,  author  of  “Modern  Painters.”    Ruskin  rejected  the  dehumanizing  effects  of  the   Industrial  Revolu7on,  similar  to  what  we  are  going  through  right  now  with  mass  produced  imports  from  other   countries  and  very  few  items  made  with  ar7st’s  hands,  mind,  and  heart.    I  hope  to  work  with  other  like-­‐minded   ar7sts  to  make  a  difference,  and  to  provide  a  loca7on  for  human  connec7on  and  ar7s7c  expression  to  grow.    This   type  of  project  takes  a  bahalion  of  helpful  colleagues  to  make  it  work,  and  many  ar7sts  have  contributed  to  this   dream.    I  thank  them  with  all  my  heart.

34

“Spring  Runoff”  -­‐  Pain(ng  Trees  with  Personality
The  spring  melt  has  begun  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch  and  the  many  of  the  creeks  that  surround  our  ranch  are   burs7ng  with  water.    The  oak  trees  that  flank  the  creek  banks  are  like  islands  surrounded  by  rushing  water.  They   look  like  they  are  about  to  be  swept  away  and  are  struggling  to  hold  on  7ght  and  remain  upright. The  forest  is  a  place  of  peace,  a  sanctuary,  a  wonderfully  balanced  ecosystem. When  I  enter  a  forest,  I  am  aware  of  an  eloquent  silence  with  a  myriad  of  pleasant  sounds  that  seem  to  float  in   the  air.    The  mighty  old  oak  trees  with  their  rugged  moss-­‐laden  trunks  and  twisted  branches  are  the  stalwart   guardians  of  the  forest.    They  welcome  me  into  their  home,  with  branches  reaching  high  above  mee7ng  in  a   cathedral-­‐style  arch  overhead.    As  the  morning  light  shines  down  through  the  trees  the  leaves  reflect  the  glow,   causing  millions  of  dancing  shadows  and  golden-­‐flecked  spots  of  light  to  fall  upon  the  thickly  covered  forest  floor.     Hundreds  of  7ny  eyes  gleam  7midly  from  their  refuges;  they  sit  mo7onless,  their  small  ears  alert  to  determine   the  inten7on  of  an  intruder. Every  tree  has  a  personality,  yet  it  is  common  for  a  painter  to  take  them  for  granted.    Beginning  painters  paint   trees  and  the  forest  as  a  heterogeneous  mul7tude  of  ver7cal  s7cks  with  some  horizontal  green  strokes  to   simulate  branches.    Trees  and  forests  are  more  than  objects  to  paint  just  to  fill  up  a  canvas,  or  to  be  painted  in  a   flip,  blasé  manner  that  detracts  from  a  viewer’s  serious  apprecia7on  of  their  beauty.    Pain7ng  trees  involves   more  than  merely  slap-­‐s7cking  a  #2  fan  brush  across  a  ver7cal  line  and  hoping  that  the  viewer  will  get  the   message.    Trees  must  be  studied  on  loca7on,  and  the  best  way  to  do  this  is  to  take  pencil  to  paper  and  draw   them.    One  good  pencil  drawing  detailing  every  branch  of  the  tree  will  teach  you  everything  that  you  need  to   know  about  pain7ng  trees.
35

“Hedge  Creek  Falls,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Tapping  into  Our  Inner  Source
During  the  past  week,  we  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch  had  our  first  on  loca7on  workshop.    The  par7cipants  and  I   had  an  incredible  weekend  pain7ng  the  stunning  vistas  of  Mt.  Shasta  and  the  surrounding  countryside.    Everyone   was  highly  sa7sfied  with  the  workshop  experience.    A]er  the  success  of  this  weekend  I  can  truly  say,  “You  do  not   want  to  miss  the  opportunity  to  paint  on  loca7on  in  Mt.  Shasta!” One  of  the  loca7ons  that  we  painted  on  Saturday  required  a  gentle  hike  deeper  down  into  a  canyon  lined  with   moss-­‐laden  rocks  and  oak  totems  guarding  the  trail  from  intruders.    We  heard  the  loud  sound  of  water  but  could   not  see  where  the  noise  was  coming  from.    The  sounds  beckoned  us  to  venture  deeper  down  the  trail  and  so,   with  our  easels  and  pain7ng  supplies  in  our  arms,  we  con7nued  our  descent.    The  air  was  moist,  the  rocks   became  weher,  and  then  we  saw  the  majes7c  source  of  the  canyon's  hidden  secret,  Hedge  Creek  Falls. When  we  create,  we  draw  from  our  inner  source.  If  we  do  not  take  7me  to  regularly  revitalize  and  nourish   ourselves,  our  source  will  become  stagnant  or  blocked.    One  of  the  ways  ar7sts  replenish  their  ar7s7c  selves  is  to   paint  real  life,  with  sunlit  and  shadowed  objects  and  scenes.    When  pain7ng  from  photos,  it  is  easy  to  paint   things  instead  of  pain7ng  feelings  of  what  you  see  and  are  experiencing.    Our  brains  require  us  to  view  real  life   images  to  aid  the  process  of  reconnec7ng  with  reality  when  we  want  to  bring  life  and  feeling  to  a  pain7ng,   especially  when  we  are  using  a  one-­‐dimensional  photograph  as  our  source.    The  world  is  not  wai7ng  for  another   pain7ng  of  a  thing  or  a  photo;  what  it  hungers  for  is  your  personal  view  of  the  subject.    A  mechanical  device  like   a  camera  can  never  capture  this  personal  conversa7on  with  nature.

36

“Mossbrae  Falls,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Pain(ng  with  a  Limited  PaleWe
Following  the  railroad  tracks,  I  trusted  my  internal  compass  as  I  searched  for  a  waterfall  that  visitors  to  Mt.   Shasta  seldom  see.    Local  residents  told  me  about  a  breathtaking  view  of  a  wall  of  water  that  cascades  into  the   Sacramento  River.    The  arduous  climb  on  the  railroad  tracks  reminded  me  of  the  hard  work  men  must  have   endured  in  1901  when  building  this  winding  metal  trail  that  flows  like  a  river  itself  through  the  mighty  Cascade   Mountains.    I  con7nued  following  the  Sacramento  River  far  below  me,  at  7mes  stopping  and  looking  in  awe  at   the  canyon  and  the  roaring  waters  that  created  it.    Then,  the  unmistakable  sound  of  water  falling  directed  my   eye  and  I  saw  for  myself  what  only  locals  have  experienced...Mossbrae  Falls. Mossbrae  Falls  is  a  unique  waterfall.    It  is  only  about  50  feet  high,  but  it  is  150  feet  wide.    The  water  cascades   from  springs  that  flow  down  a  moss-­‐covered  canyon  wall  into  the  Sacramento  River,  crea7ng  a  spectacular  wall   of  water. When  you  pack  your  supplies  to  paint  on  loca7on,  keep  your  palehe  simple,  containing  the  fewest  colors   necessary  for  the  way  you  paint.    The  less  you  travel  with,  the  more  produc7ve  you  will  become.    When  pain7ng   on  loca7on,  I  prefer  to  use  three  colors,  Cobalt  Blue,  Alizarin  Crimson  and  Cadmium  Yellow,  as  well  as  white,  and   an  earth  color  such  as  Asphaltum  or  Burnt  Sienna.    These  five  colors  work  best  for  most  effects.    Any  easel  that   works  for  you  is  the  best  one.    The  key  to  pain7ng  and  choosing  your  supplies  on  loca7on  is  to  pack  light  and  “Go   for  it!”

37

“The  View  from  My  Studio  Window”  -­‐  Desire  to  Create  and  Excel
Today  I  gazed  out  of  my  studio  window  watching  Mt.  Shasta  and  the  seasons  passing  from  winter  to  spring.    We   are  preparing  The  Grand  View  Ranch  for  our  second  pain7ng  workshop,  and  because  I  watch  the  constantly   changing  mood  and  light  on  this  majes7c  peak,  it  is  hard  for  me  to  get  any  work  done.    It  is  challenging  to   capture  the  mood  of  the  a]ernoon  sun  on  Mt.  Shasta.    The  mountain  appears  rela7vely  flat  and  this  is  the  least   drama7c  7me  of  day  to  paint. As  I  faced  my  own  challenges  with  my  pain7ng  today,  I  thought  about  what  causes  some  people  to  achieve   excellence,  while  others  sehle  into  a  mediocre  complacency.    What  would  you  have  to  do  to  take  your  art  to  the   next  level? The  most  important  quality  you  can  bring  to  your  pain7ng  is  desire.    Desire  has  conquered  na7ons,  brought   lovers  together,  and  is  the  key  for  anyone  one  who  wants  to  paint  inspiring  works.    Many  ar7sts  do  not  trust  their   own  voice  that  speaks  about  what  is  important  and  ahrac7ve  to  them.    It  is  important  to  trust  in  your   uniqueness  because  when  you  create  art,  it  is  a  reflec7on  of  you.    If  the  work  pleases  you,  there  is  a  good  chance   it  will  please  others.    It  is  important  to  excel  in  your  effort  every  7me  you  begin  a  new  canvas. A  good  way  to  step  up  a  level  in  your  art  is  to  imagine  yourself  at  your  own  one-­‐person  exhibi7on  and  see  it  as   others  might.    Imagine  yourself  walking  through  the  gallery  and  seeing  your  pain7ngs  on  the  wall  with  the   ligh7ng  and  framing  just  perfect.    Ask  yourself  these  two  ques7ons:  “Are  these  pain7ngs  your  visual  response  to   the  world?”  and  “Are  the  works  on  the  wall  an  extension  of  yourself?”    Try  to  listen  to  the  conversa7ons  that   others  are  whispering  about  your  pain7ngs  and  you.    If  you  can  imagine  what  others  might  feel  and  experience,   then  paint  what  you  see  and  feel  for  them.

38

Ar(st’s  Tools
While  shopping  in  a  local  art  supply  store,  I  became  aware  of  the  many  different  types  of  new  products  available   to  the  ar7st.    With  all  the  new  technology  and  convenience  of  paint  and  mediums,  it  would  seem  possible  that   ar7sts  would  have  had  more  breakthroughs  in  the  ar7s7c  world.    For  example,  there  are  new  products  that  mix   with  water  instead  of  turpen7ne  that  allow  ar7sts  to  paint  in  a  closed  environment.    Have  these  new  products   really  changed  the  ways  ar7sts  create  their  artwork? In  the  1870s  when  manufacturers  began  sealing  oil  colors  in  collapsible  metal-­‐foil  tubes,  ar7sts  who  painted  with   oils  were  able  to  travel  away  from  the  studio  and  paint  au  plein  air  for  the  first  7me.    Ar7sts  like  Corot,  Monet,   and  Renoir  were  some  of  the  pioneers  who  first  used  this  new  technology  by  bringing  their  paint  in  sealed  tubes   to  the  countryside  to  paint  on  loca7on.    They  began  to  capture  their  impressions  of  light  and  nature  outdoors.     This  change  in  technology  resulted  in  the  ar7s7c  movement  referred  to  as  Impressionism. Every  ar7st  must  repeatedly  decide  when  to  s7ck  with  familiar  tools  and  materials  and  when  to  reach  out  and   embrace  those  that  offer  new  possibili7es.    Some  ar7sts  experiment  with  new  paints  and  mediums  with  the  idea   that  they  can  enhance  their  style  by  using  a  product  that  will  dis7nguish  them  from  their  contemporaries.     Others  are  content  to  create  art  in  familiar  ways.  The  tools  ar7sts  use  have  lihle  to  do  with  the  greatness  of  the   art  created  with  them.    It  is  the  7me  an  ar7st  spends  in  explora7on  and  prac7ce  that  develops  his  personal   signature.    When  ar7sts  convey  their  thoughts  without  words  to  the  viewer  by  crea7ng  ar7s7c  works,  they  share   their  insights  and  inspira7on;  how  ar7sts  accomplish  this  has  lihle  to  do  with  trickery  or  products  and  everything   to  do  with  skill  and  dedica7on. So,  how  do  you  create  inspiring  art?    The  most  essen7al  part  of  being  a  produc7ve  ar7st  is  to  live  in  such  a  way   that  your  ar7s7c  work  has  priority  and  importance  in  your  daily  life.    By  having  regular  and  effec7ve  work  habits,   and  insuring  that  there  is  ample  7me  to  work  on  your  projects,  you  increase  the  possibility  that  an  assortment  of   finished  pieces  will  con7nue  to  materialize.    It  is  helpful  to  have  a  dedicated  7me  of  day  to  work  on  your  art  just   like  going  to  a  job.    Ahending  weekly  art  classes  insures  that  both  the  instructor  and  other  students  will   s7mulate  your  ar7s7c  focus.    Classes  are  a  great  way  to  have  a  consistent  block  of  7me  to  create  art  as  well  as   enjoying  a  suppor7ve  network  of  like-­‐minded  friends  who  love  art.  If  classes  are  not  possible,  working  with  an   art  coach  who  can  review  your  goals  and  your  work  regularly  is  very  important  for  mo7va7on,  accountability,   and  ar7s7c  improvement.    Over  7me,  your  life  as  a  produc7ve  ar7st  becomes  powerful  as  you  apply  yourself  to   crea7ng,  and  you  discover  that  the  par7culars  of  any  new  products  or  tools  that  you  use  do  not  really  maher   very  much  at  all.

39

“McCloud  Middle  Falls,  Opus  1”  -­‐  The  First  Impression  Counts
In  our  weekend  workshop  at  Mt.  Shasta,  we  paint  some  of  the  most  extraordinarily  beau7ful  landscapes  in   America.    Most  loca7ons  are  accessible  by  car.    Par7cipants  who  have  never  painted  on  loca7on  before  find  that   plein  air  pain7ng  is  very  rewarding.    O]en  the  loca7ons  where  we  paint  are  close  to  where  we  park  and  ar7sts   can  focus  completely  on  the  task  and  begin  pain7ng  from  life  without  hiking. On  the  East  side  of  Mt.  Shasta,  deep  in  the  woods,  there  is  an  amazing  place  to  paint  that  is  so  awe-­‐inspiring,   breathtaking,  and  grand...and  only  accessible  by  hiking  to  it.    The  McCloud  Middle  falls  are  so  beau7ful  that  I  was   inspired  to  add  a  “hike  and  paint”  loca7on  to  our  i7nerary  for  the  workshop. One  key  to  successfully  pain7ng  on  loca7on  is  to  capture  your  first  impression  on  canvas  as  fast  as  you  can.    The   effects  and  feelings  change  every  moment,  and  a  skilled  painter  must  be  able  to  remember  the  scene  that  called   out,  "Paint  me"  in  the  first  place.    The  act  of  pain7ng  is  a  series  of  memory  exercises  that  requires  the   development  of  your  ability  to  see  and  remember  your  first  impressions  of  the  scene.    Most  ar7sts  do  not   capture  the  feeling  of  a  pain7ng  simply  because  they  are  not  able  to  remember  what  ini7ally  grabbed  their   ahen7on.    Instead  of  pain7ng  the  view  they  loved,  they  spend  most  of  their  7me  chasing  the  light  and  changing   what  they  are  pain7ng,  moment  by  moment,  as  the  light  changes  before  them.    When  you  find  a  subject  that   engages  you,  look  at  your  subject  and  ask  yourself,  “Why  do  I  want  to  paint  this?”    Then  freeze  that  image  in   your  mind  and  stay  focused  on  the  first  impression  you  had  of  the  subject. Pain7ng  from  life  will  help  you  develop  somewhat  of  a  photographic  memory,  and  your  memory  will  support   your  ability  to  create  landscapes  that  are  more  convincing  and  cap7va7ng,  both  on  site  and  in  the  studio.

40

“McCloud  Middle  Falls,  Opus  2”  -­‐  Pain(ng  a  Powerful  Effect
The  Grand  View  Ranch  is  just  a  few  miles  from  McCloud,  a  historic  town  on  the  East  side  of  Mt.  Shasta.    In  1829,   a  party  of  Hudson  Bay  Company  trappers  and  explorers  led  by  Alexander  Roderick  McLeod  were  the  first  white   men  to  travel  through  the  valley  where  McCloud  now  stands.    George  W.  Scoh  and  William  Van  Arsdale,   founders  of  the  McCloud  River  Railroad  Company  and  the  railroad  made  it  economically  feasible  to  transport   lumber  to  more  populated  areas  and  began  the  lumber  company  town  of  McCloud. Near  the  town  of  McCloud,  the  McCloud  River  runs  swi]ly  year  round.    Some  people  boast  that  this  river  has  the   best  fishing  in  America.    I  think  the  McCloud  River  has  the  most  beau7ful  waterfalls,  and  I  think  the  “Middle   Falls”  is  the  most  spectacular  waterfall  of  the  three  on  the  river. When  I  went  to  the  Middle  Falls  to  paint  today,  I  decided  that  I  would  paint  the  very  first  effect  that  caught  my   eye,  and  only  paint  that.    I  believe  that  pain7ng  an  effect  is  more  powerful  than  pain7ng  a  thing.    What  caught   my  eye  first  was  the  brilliant  mist  of  the  waterfall  in  contrast  to  the  so]  backligh7ng  on  the  green  moss.    It  gave   the  feeling  of  being  by  a  waterfall  without  pain7ng  a  waterfall.    Pain7ng  the  mist  hovering  near  the  falls  was  a   challenge,  not  because  of  the  skill  needed,  but  because  of  the  concentra7on  required.    When  you  find  a  drama7c   seyng  like  this,  it  is  temp7ng  to  paint  a  postcard  shot,  including  all  the  falls,  part  of  the  river,  and  the  trees  and   rocks  that  make  up  the  loca7on.    I  had  to  remind  myself  that  my  inten7on  was  to  capture  the  effect  of  light  so  I   would  not  be  distracted  by  the  other  beau7ful  objects  of  nature  that  begged  to  be  included. Choosing  to  become  an  ar7st  is  one  of  the  hardest  decisions  one  can  make,  in  part  because  of  the  experiences  in   our  past  when  we  were  young.    I  remember  when  I  was  younger  and  told  people  that  I  wanted  to  be  an  ar7st,   they  would  laugh  and  say,  “No,  you  need  to  have  a  real  job.”    However,  to  be  an  ar7st  of  any  kind  is  the  noblest  
41

decision  that  a  person  can  make.    If  you  choose  to  be  an  ar7st,  you  must  have  faith:  faith  in  yourself,  in  your   ideas,  and  in  your  abili7es.    You  must  take  leaps  of  faith;  some  as  simple  as  choosing  a  medium,  and  some  that   require  you  to  move  to  other  communi7es  so  you  can  pursue  your  art.    You  must  follow  your  own  dreams,  and   conquer  the  fears  that  try  to  stop  you.    As  each  nega7ve  thought  says,  “You  can’t,”  you  must  for7fy  yourself  by   asser7ng  the  truths  of  “I  can  and  I  will,”  and  set  a  course  for  a  crea7ve  journey  that  results  in  the  extraordinary   experience  of  being  an  ar7st.

42

“View  from  The  Grand  View,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Self-­‐Doubts  and  Cri(cism
Spring  weather  has  arrived  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch,  and  with  spring's  beauty  there  are  incredible  composi7ons   to  paint.    I  painted  today's  pain7ng  of  the  beau7ful  effect  of  the  evening  sunset.    No7ce  the  seyng  sun  behind   the  trees  in  “View  from  The  Grand  View  Opus  1”  and  how  it  provides  an  interes7ng  effect  as  the  light  comes   through  the  spaces  in  the  tree.    The  secret  to  pain7ng  trees  is  not  to  paint  the  sky  first  and  lay  a  tree  on  top  of  it   because  the  effect  will  look  flat  and  not  real.    Instead,  paint  the  trees  first,  and  then  paint  the  sky  and  the  sky   holes  into  the  tree.    Every  sky  hole  can  be  a  different  color  and  value  because  the  holes  vary  in  value  according  to   their  size  and  the  amount  of  light  admiyng  through  them.    The  smaller  holes  are  darker  or  grayer  than  the  larger   sky  holes  which  are  a  lighter  value,  similar  to  the  sky  color  and  value  around  the  trees.    Pain7ng  trees  in  this  way   helps  them  look  realis7c  and  eye-­‐catching. With  each  workshop,  I  learn  more  about  why  ar7sts  feel  in7midated  when  they  create  art.    Let  us  examine  the   enemy  within  ourselves  that  creates  doubts  and  fears  about  our  ability  to  be  a  successful  ar7st. Where  does  this  self-­‐doubt  come  from,  and  why  do  we  have  it?    Most  of  our  self-­‐doubts  and  cri7cism  originate   from  experiences  that  happened  in  our  childhood,  especially  if  we  come  to  believe  that  it  means  something   important  about  ourselves.    For  example,  when  you  were  five  and  you  drew  a  horse,  and  your  mom  said,  “ That’s   a  funny  drawing  of  a  dog,”  you  might  have  believed  that  what  you  create  won't  be  good  enough  and  decided   that  you  will  never  let  that  happen  to  you  again.    If  we  listen  to  the  nega7ve  internal  story  we  created  about  the   world  and  ourselves  when  we  were  five,  we  succumb  to  the  self-­‐doubts  that  are  real,  powerful,  and  that  s7fle   our  crea7vity  today.    It  is  important  to  recognize  where  the  story  came  from,  evaluate  if  we  are  s7ll  living  the   story,  and  strive  to  change  it  into  a  new  one,  told  by  the  courageous,  crea7ve  person  we  are  today.

43

“Faery  Falls”  -­‐  Sfumato
Just  south  of  The  Grand  View  Ranch  is  an  isolated  forest  that  contains  an  incredible  tapestry  of  canyons  and   waterfalls.    Many  of  these  des7na7ons  are  unmarked  and  without  visitors.    When  I  heard  there  was  place  like   this  nearby,  I  knew  I  had  to  explore  it.    In  the  spring  the  water  in  Ney  Springs  Creek  powerfully  rushes  to  form  a   lovely  60-­‐foot  high,  fan-­‐shaped  waterfall  that  crashes  into  a  deep,  clear  blue-­‐green  pool  of  water  below,  and   buherflies  dance  around  the  edges  of  the  cascading  waters  like  lihle  fairies.    Faery  Falls  is  excep7onally  beau7ful.     Because  of  the  huge  amount  of  spray  and  mist  at  the  base  of  the  falls,  the  one  difficulty  I  had  was  finding  a  dry   spot  to  stand  so  that  I  could  paint  without  geyng  wet. The  key  to  unlocking  the  mystery  of  pain7ng  waterfalls  is  to  paint  them  as  if  they  are  dry.    Start  by  pain7ng  the   rocks  in  cool,  dark  colors  and  sculpt  them  first.    Novice  painters  usually  paint  the  white  of  the  waterfalls  first,   leaving  the  rocks  flat  without  depth.    To  obtain  the  best  water  effects,  use  shadows  and  light,  and  paint  the  water   with  various  shapes  and  forms.    No7ce  also  that  the  highlight  on  the  water  is  not  white  but  a  light,  warm  color  by   using  Cad  lemon  yellow  and  Cad  orange  with  white  to  paint  the  bright,  shimmering  sunlight  that  dances  over  the   falls. Successfully  capturing  the  feeling  of  the  water  free  falling  to  the  earth  below  is  what  dis7nguishes  the  master   ar7st  from  the  Sunday  painter.    Leonardo  da  Vinci  would  call  the  ability  to  paint  subtle  feelings  into  a  pain7ng   “Sfumato.”    This  refers  to  a  technique  where  translucent  glaze  overlays  color  to  create  percep7ons  of  depth,   volume,  and  form  which  requires  a  delicate  approach,  as  though  one  was  trying  to  grasp  at,  and  hold  smoke   (fume).    Pain7ng  is  personal  expression,  and  most  ar7sts  learn  to  paint  objects.    However,  when  an  ar7st   challenges  himself  to  paint  the  elusive  quali7es  of  his  own  response  to  objects  in  life,  he  becomes  a  great  ar7st.
44

“Shoshone  Falls”  -­‐  2003
May  15,  2003 On  my  road  trip  to  Montana,  I  visited  what  is  now  the  ghost  of  the  Shoshone  Falls.    The  falls  were  an  impressive   feature  of  the  Snake  River  and  were  called  the  "Niagara  Falls  of  the  West,"  falling  a  drama7c  212  feet  to  the   ground.    Early  explorers  and  landscape  painters  who  discovered  the  falls  during  the  late  nineteenth  century  were   awestruck  by  the  view. In  1905,  plans  were  in  place  to  preserve  Shoshone  Falls  as  a  tourist  des7na7on,  but  the  need  for  water  took   precedence  and  regional  farmers  soon  won  the  rights  to  the  River.    They  built  a  dam  to  harness  the  water,  and   the  vista  changed  forever.    As  soon  as  the  gates  of  Milner  Dam  closed  to  hold  the  water,  the  Snake  River  and   Shoshone  Falls  dried  to  a  dribble.    I  always  dreamed  of  experiencing  the  vista  100  years  ago  when  Thomas  Moran   captured  the  intensity  of  the  robust  and  roaring  waterfall.    On  my  last  visit,  I  was  disappointed  to  see  the  falls   without  water.  On  this  trip,  I  felt  obligated  to  see  my  fading  friend  again. As  I  approached  the  falls  that  day,  I  could  not  believe  my  eyes.    The  recent  warm  rains  caused  flooding  in  Idaho   (an  event  meteorologists  call  the  "100  year  flood")  and  Milner  Dam  had  to  be  opened  for  the  first  7me  in  92   years.    For  a  brief  moment,  the  Snake  River  was  a  vibrant  running  river  again,  and  I  was  able  to  witness  what  very   few  ar7sts  have  ever  seen.    The  Falls  roared  with  intensity,  reclaiming  their  once  phenomenal  glory.    I  stored   snapshot  a]er  snapshot  of  the  falls  in  my  mind,  feeling  the  mist,  absorbing  the  sound  because  I  knew  I  would   never  be  able  to  experience  this  vision  again.    I  sketched  furiously  in  watercolors  and  oil,  knowing  this  moment   would  be  brief. It  took  me  a  long  7me  to  say  goodbye;  only  darkness  forced  my  departure.    I  knew  that  by  dawn  the  mighty   Shoshone  Falls  would  dwindle  to  a  mere  trickle,  and  that  seemed  almost  unbearable  to  imagine.    I  was   comforted  by  the  fact  that  for  one  majes7c  moment,  nature  forced  the  hand  of  a  modern  world,  and  the  falls   roared  once  again.    I  did  not  go  back  the  next  morning.    I  feared  the  loss  of  my  fading  friend  would  have  made   me  cry.

45

“The  Fine  Art  of  Seeing  Color”  -­‐  Perfec(on  Leads  to  Paralysis
I  have  never  lived  in  a  place  with  so  many  amazing  loca7ons  to  paint  so  close  to  each  other.    On  the  way  from   town  to  The  Grand  View  Ranch  there  is  a  beau7ful,  peaceful  place  called  Shasta  meadow.    This  is  just  one  of   hundreds  of  meadows  that  dot  the  countryside  here  at  Mt.  Shasta,  and  though  it  is  called  Shasta  meadow,  the   view  that  I  painted  for  you  today  highlights  the  meadow  with  the  Eddys  in  the  background. There  is  no  special  way  to  mix  color  and  no  special  way  to  apply  it  on  the  canvas.    Just  like  a  musician’s  ear,   frequent  prac7ce  sharpens  the  art  of  seeing  color.    Every  ar7st  sees  and  paints  color  differently,  and  a]er   teaching  thousands  of  ar7sts  how  to  master  pain7ng  on  loca7on,  I  can  say  that  color  is  just  so  unique  to  the   individual  that  choosing  to  mix  your  palehe  your  way  is  the  beginning  of  developing  your  own  style.    I  teach   many  secrets  of  mixing  color  in  my  workshops,  and  all  of  my  students  begin  using  iden7cal  colors.    However,   each  ar7st’s  personal  vision  and  use  of  color  is  so  individual  that  by  the  end  of  the  day,  I  can  iden7fy  the  creator   of  each  pain7ng  by  the  dis7nct  color  palehe  the  ar7st  used  in  his  pain7ngs. The  nerves  of  the  eye  become  more  sensi7ve  to  color  the  more  you  use  them.    Pain7ng  on  loca7on  rather  than   using  photographs  to  paint  from  is  the  first  step  to  mastering  the  art  of  seeing  color.    The  second  step  is  to  paint   in  both  the  lightest  and  darkest  values  first,  and  then  compare  every  color  that  you  apply  a]er  that  to  these   values.    The  third  step  is  to  choose  a  color  scheme.    Ask  yourself,  “What  am  I  looking  at?    Are  the  colors  that  I  see   predominately  blue,  or  red,  or  yellow,  and  are  they  warm  or  cool?”    Just  asking  some  of  these  ques7ons  will  start   you  on  the  right  track  to  mastering  the  fine  art  of  color  before  you  even  lay  the  first  brush  stroke  on  your  canvas. Remember,  perfec7on  leads  to  paralysis.    You  must  begin  crea7ng  and  taking  risks  with  your  pain7ng  even  if  you   think  that  you  do  not  know  something  or  you  will  not  be  successful  as  an  ar7st.    Ansel  Adams  stated,  “If  I  waited   for  everything  in  a  scene  to  be  exactly  right,  I’d  probably  never  take  a  photograph.”    The  secret  in  fine  art,  as  in  all   of  life,  is  “Just  do  it.”

46

“Mt.  Shasta’s  Smoky  Veil”  -­‐  What  Colors  Do  I  See?
California  has  over  1,400  forest  fires  that  are  burning  throughout  the  central  and  southern  parts  of  the  state;   however,  the  smoke  from  these  fires  significantly  affects  the  air  quality  in  Mt.  Shasta.    This  morning  I  followed  a   road  that  connects  the  northern  route  of  Mt.  Shasta  with  the  quaint  town  of  McCloud  and  the  eastern  slopes  of   the  foothills.    I  painted  this  northern  view  of  Mt.  Shasta  with  the  visible  haze  that  shrouds  the  mountain  in  a   smoky  veil. When  ar7sts  see  a  mass  such  as  a  distant  mountain  like  Mt.  Shasta,  they  see  values  and  know  that  these  values   are  varia7ons  of  gray.    Trained  ar7sts  not  only  see  values,  but  also  see  colors  that  they  can  ahribute  to  the   values.    These  colors  are  o]en  subtle  but  are  very  important  to  include.    To  see  the  color  of  a  value,  it  is  useful  to   visualize  a  color  wheel  and  ask,  “What  colors  do  I  see?”    Look  for  hints  of  red,  yellow,  or  blue  in  the  gray.    If  you   cannot  confirm  a  color,  assign  one.    Just  make  it  up.    Ar7sts  o]en  paint  beau7ful  color  harmonies  and  transi7ons   by  focusing  on  their  feelings  of  being  there  -­‐  with  their  eyes  closed,  using  their  imagina7on  to  guide  their  color   choices. Like  a  great  mystery  plot  in  a  movie,  these  subtle  colors  are  present,  but  the  ar7st  must  collect  the  clues  to  solve   the  underlying  puzzle,  “How  can  I  reflect  the  subtle  changes  in  values  and  colors  to  enhance  the  expression  of   my  experiences  as  I  paint  what  inspires  me?”

47

“Size  Does  MaWer”  -­‐  Choosing  Your  Canvas  Size
The  fires  in  California  are  s7ll  burning  out  of  control,  and  for  the  past  few  days  Mt.  Shasta  has  been  hiding  behind   a  veil  of  smoke.    Today  the  winds  changed  and  revealed  a  glorious  sunset.    I  painted  this  lihle  view  from  my   studio  window  on  an  8x10  canvas. Most  sketches  that  I  paint  on  loca7on  are  8x12.    I  usually  do  not  paint  these  lihle  jewels  of  my  observa7ons  of   nature  on  a  standard  size  canvas.    Some  ar7sts  have  asked  me  why  I  do  not  paint  on  canvases  standard  size   canvases  like  6x8  or  8x10  that  are  cheaper  to  buy  and  less  costly  to  frame.    I  prefer  to  paint  on  canvases  with  the   tradi7onal  two  by  three  ra7os  that  fine  ar7sts  have  used  throughout  history  because  the  propor7ons  are  more   pleasing  to  me,  fit  my  tastes,  and  I  enjoy  pain7ng  my  personal  impressions  without  the  ar7ficial  limits  that   standard  size  canvases  impose.    Why  do  ar7sts  limit  themselves  to  pain7ng  on  a  standard  size  canvas,  anyway?     Art  is  a  personal  expression  and  the  size  of  the  pain7ng  by  which  you  wish  to  express  this  experience  should  not   be  limited  by  standard  sizes  that  are  convenient  to  buy  or  cheaper  to  frame. Comple7ng  a  pain7ng  on  loca7on  that  recreates  the  experience  of  a  7me  of  day  and  the  sense  of  place  in  nature   usually  takes  a  skilled  ar7st  about  two  hours  of  consistent  work.    It  is  important  to  paint  small  if  you  want  to   capture  the  moment  and  complete  a  pain7ng  in  under  two  hours.    However,  many  ar7sts  paint  larger  on  loca7on   by  using  bolder  strokes  and  larger  brushes.    The  reason  you  want  to  complete  a  pain7ng  in  a  short  amount  of   7me  is  that  a]er  two  hours,  the  light  has  changed  so  dras7cally  that  the  scene  you  are  pain7ng  is  no  longer  the   same  as  when  you  began  pain7ng. The  first  painters  credited  with  pain7ng  en  plein  air  were  the  ar7sts  of  the  Bar7zan  School,  a  small  group  of   Parisian  ar7sts  of  the  1830s  who  communed  with  nature  and  recorded  their  experiences  by  pain7ng  outdoors  on   loca7on.    Their  mission  was  to  capture  the  essence  of  the  “true  light”  found  in  nature.    Most  of  these  ar7sts  used   these  sketches  of  “light,”  which  were  small  and  painted  for  convenience  and  portability,  as  examples  for  larger   works  that  were  finished  in  the  studio  and  hung  in  salons.
48

The  next  7me  you  start  a  pain7ng,  I  invite  you  to  ask  yourself,  “Should  I  paint  on  a  standard  size  canvas,  or  could   my  experience  be  more  accurately  recreated  by  pain7ng  on  an  8x12  or  9x13.5  canvas?”    You  may  be  surprised   how  your  composi7ons  will  thrive  if  you  are  open  to  using  canvases  that  fit  your  ar7s7c  expression  instead  of   having  your  artwork  fit  the  canvas.

49

“Grand  View  BuWerfly,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Rhythm  and  Movement
Today  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch,  we  enjoyed  the  most  beau7ful  flurry  of  buherflies  I  have  ever  seen.    At  one   7me,  the  hillside  felt  alive  with  a  mul7tude  of  fluhering  bits  of  colored  confey  of  the  most  brilliant  kind.    This   buherfly  caught  my  eye  as  it  stopped  to  sip  nectar  from  our  Buddleia  tree.    The  shapes  and  movement  of  the   leaves  of  the  plant,  the  purple  flowers  repea7ng  colors,  and  the  applica7on  of  textured  paint  (impasto)  gives  this   pain7ng  rhythm  and  movement  and  prevents  it  from  being  sta7c.    Try  to  iden7fy  the  rhythmical  invita7ons  that   lead  your  eyes  to  move  from  the  buherfly  to  other  areas  of  the  pain7ng  and  back  to  the  buherfly. Rhythm  is  a  composi7onal  element  that  an  ar7st  employs  to  help  the  viewer’s  eyes  move  around  the  canvas   from  the  focal  point  to  other  objects,  drawing  ahen7on  to  repea7ng  colors,  and  moving  from  foreground  to   background,  then  back  to  the  focal  point.    Rhythm  can  give  your  pain7ngs  a  s7mula7ng  visual  flow  and  creates   an  overall  sense  of  balance.    Repe77on  of  brushstrokes,  colors,  objects,  edges,  dark  and  light  values,  direc7on,   and  forms  create  this  movement  in  a  pain7ng.    Pain7ngs  that  display  rhythm  and  movement  stand  out,  vibrant   with  interes7ng  and  some7mes  subliminal  paherns  that  are  rich  and  sa7sfying  to  the  viewer  experiencing  the   work.    There  is  no  formula  for  crea7ng  rhythm  in  a  pain7ng,  just  the  ar7st’s  keen  awareness  that  rhythmical   arrangement  is  a  powerful  element  to  include  in  every  pain7ng.

50

“The  Fallen  Totem”  -­‐  Choosing  a  Point  of  Interest
Many  of  the  views  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch  are  breathtaking  and  inspiring,  however,  we  find  many  in7mate   corners  hidden  in  the  woods.    Although  they  are  not  as  breathtaking,  they  are  worthy  of  closer  observa7on.    As  I   traveled  deep  into  the  woods  today,  I  discovered  this  fallen  Totem,  its  ancient  wood  slowly  decaying  over   decades  as  the  forest  reclaims  it  to  make  room  for  a  new  tree  to  grow  in  its  place.    The  old  moss  on  the  tree   cap7vated  me  and  I  wondered  how  old  the  giant  tree  was,  what  made  it  fall,  and  when  did  it  happen?    I  chose   this  tree  to  be  the  point  of  interest  for  this  newest  pain7ng  called  “ The  Fallen  Totem.” An  ar7st’s  interests,  beliefs,  and  personal  connec7ons  to  life  influence  his  choices  of  the  point  of  interest  in  a   pain7ng.    It  is  a  thoughxul  and  intui7ve  process.    The  methods  used  for  selec7ng  the  subject  or  object  of  the   pain7ng  will  change  with  each  pain7ng  and  every  loca7on.    Some7mes  ar7sts  invest  too  lihle  7me  thinking   about  their  connec7on  to  point  of  interest  in  a  pain7ng  before  they  start  to  paint.    O]en  painters  fail  to   remember  simple  things  like  the  fact  that  the  viewer  can  see  only  a  limited  number  of  objects  clearly  at  a  glance,   and  that  one  object  can  catch  the  eye  more  quickly  than  two  or  more.    Ar7sts  must  use  all  their  skills  and   techniques  to  bring  their  main  message  or  inten7on  of  the  pain7ng  to  the  viewer. A]er  choosing  the  point  of  interest,  I  recommend  that  ar7sts  draw  at  least  four  small  sketches  of  the  subject  in   pencil.    This  allows  the  ar7st  to  experiment  with  composi7onal  elements,  and  to  make  changes  rapidly  un7l  you   find  a  pleasing  combina7on.    Next,  select  your  preferred  sketch,  and  simply  transfer  the  composi7on  onto  a   small  canvas  with  a  brush  and  paints  thinned  with  Odorless  Turpen7ne.    Voilà!    The  canvas  is  ready  and  pain7ng   can  begin. Some  techniques  that  ar7sts  use  to  focus  the  ahen7on  of  the  viewer  on  the  point  of  interest  are  intensity  of   tone,  contras7ng  values,  direc7onal  focus,  linear  movement,  and  the  size  of  the  objects.    Emphasizing  the   darkest  or  the  lightest  spot  on  the  canvas  and  using  direc7onal  lines  or  eye  magnets  will  lead  the  viewer  to  the   point  of  interest  in  the  composi7on  as  well.    Crea7ng  small  field  studies  allows  the  ar7st  to  sample  many  of   these  techniques  and  to  make  changes  efficiently  and  easily  un7l  discovering  the  desired  effects  that  make  the   point  of  interest  pop.

51

“Smoky  Day  in  Mt.  Shasta”  -­‐  Crea(ng  Atmosphere
California  is  experiencing  a  record  number  of  forest  fires,  and  the  smoke  from  these  fires  affects  Mt.  Shasta.     Although  the  devasta7on  caused  by  the  fires  is  heartbreaking,  because  of  the  smoke  in  the  air,  the  effects  of  light   are  drama7c.    Early  this  morning,  I  traveled  deep  into  the  woods  behind  The  Grand  View  Ranch.    As  I  descended   into  the  brush,  I  discovered  an  old  Indian  path  that  led  me  to  this  secret  place.    Many  early  Na7ve  Americans   made  their  home  near  Mt.  Shasta  and  their  presence  is  s7ll  felt  everywhere.    I’m  sure  that  many  of  those  early   explorers  were  as  impressed  by  the  grand  vistas  of  Mt.  Shasta  as  I  am.    Inspired  by  the  luminous  glowing  effects   of  the  sun  filtered  by  the  smoky  air,  I  quickly  painted  “Smoky  Day  in  Mt  Shasta”  before  the  mood  and  the  value   changed. A  great  landscape  painter  includes  his  own  emo7onal  experiences  for  the  viewer  to  iden7fy  with  and  relate  to  in   a  pain7ng.    Many  ar7sts  use  the  subject  maher  to  tell  a  story.    However,  when  ar7sts  paint  a  landscape,  they   essen7ally  convey  the  personal  experience  of  what  they  see  and  feel  by  pain7ng  the  wondrous  effects  of  the   light  on  objects,  and  communicate  the  mood  of  their  story  on  canvas  painted  with  beau7ful  colors  on  their   brushes.    Ar7sts  can  express  themselves  by  using  7me  of  day,  sunlight,  heat,  humidity,  par7cles  in  the  air,  and   even  weather  to  influence  the  feeling  of  their  pain7ng  to  open  a  dialog  with  the  viewer. Successful  ar7sts  carefully  choose  their  tools  of  expression  before  beginning  the  pain7ng.    For  example,  you   might  include  what  kind  of  light  (warm  or  cool)  is  present,  and  what  7me  of  day  it  is.    Also,  see  if  you  can   determine  what  angle  or  direc7on  the  light  is  coming  from.    Observe  the  light  to  see  if  it  unifies  or  divides  the   values  in  the  scene,  and  then  choose  the  value  and  color  key  that  enhances  the  mood  of  the  pain7ng;  a  light  and   bright  key  for  an  upbeat  mood,  and  a  dark  key  for  a  more  heavy  or  subdued  mood.
52

In  this  example,  “Smoky  Day  in  Mt.  Shasta,”  I  chose  to  paint  with  a  middle  range  of  value  or  a  middle  color  “key”   that  gives  the  pain7ng  a  tranquil  effect.    The  smoke  in  the  atmosphere  affects  all  the  colors  and  objects  so  the   light  is  consistent  throughout  the  pain7ng.    The  sun  has  the  highest  value  and  is  the  lightest  color  key  in  the   pain7ng.    If  the  overall  tonality  or  key  in  this  pain7ng  were  too  light  or  too  dark,  the  message  of  tranquility  would   be  lost. If  you  would  like  to  experiment  with  these  tools,  begin  by  pain7ng  using  a  few  colors  to  create  an  atmospheric   hue  (cool  blue-­‐grey  or  warm  orange-­‐yellow)  and  paint  the  en7re  pain7ng  in  that  color.    Then,  use  a  varia7on  of   dark  values  and  highlights  in  the  same  color  key  to  form  objects  such  as  trees,  rocks,  and  mountains,  and  see   what  develops.

53

“Another  Smoky  Day  at  the  Ranch”  -­‐  Keying  the  Values
We  are  gradually  clearing  out  most  of  the  old  dead  growth  and  are  making  trails  behind  The  Grand  View  Ranch   so  that  guests  visi7ng  the  ranch  can  wander  around  and  see  the  beau7ful  vistas.    I  painted  “Another  Smoky  Day   at  the  Ranch”  while  viewing  one  of  these  vistas.    I  imagined  this  as  an  intensely  lit  scene  to  illustrate  a  High  Key   pain7ng  with  a  value  scheme  having  intense  colors  and  values,  crea7ng  a  pain7ng  that  will  POP  off  the  wall.     Light  is  frequently  the  main  ahrac7on  in  a  pain7ng,  and  establishing  the  mood  by  using  appropriate  light  and   color  is  o]en  the  first  decision  an  ar7st  must  make.  I  selected  a  High  Key  and  I  chose  predominantly  dark  values   that  contrast  with  the  faded  appearance  of  the  misty,  smoky  atmosphere,  and  then  combined  them  with  a   strong,  warm  color  theme  to  create  a  harmonious  composi7on. An  ar7st’s  job  is  to  push  his  or  her  cra]  to  the  limit  without  feeling  trapped  by  experiencing  “perfec7onism  that   leads  to  paralysis.”    All  ar7sts  secretly  desire  freedom  of  expression,  but  the  reality  is  that  great  ar7sts  must   know  their  cra]  and  subject  maher  first.    Learning  how  to  paint  is  just  the  beginning.    Spending  7me  pain7ng  on   loca7on  is  the  ul7mate  teacher  for  the  landscape  painter.    When  you  learn  to  paint  on  loca7on,  you  will  discover   the  freedom  and  ease  of  capturing  nature  on  canvas,  and  you  will  be  amazed  at  the  effect  this  will  have  on  your   artwork. As  ar7sts,  we  are  not  ahemp7ng  to  reproduce  nature.    When  we  experience  the  amazing  impact  of  the  whole   grand  effect  of  nature’s  beauty  within  ourselves,  we  yearn  to  paint  our  interpreta7on  of  what  we  see  and  feel  to   share  with  others.    Ask  yourself  two  important  ques7ons  before  you  paint.    First,  what  do  I  want  the  viewer  to   feel?    Second,  is  the  value  range  consistent  with  the  mood  I  want  to  portray?

54

I  used  these  steps  to  paint  “Another  Smoky  Day  at  the  Ranch”:

         

I  painted  this  pain7ng  on  loca7on  using  a  12x8-­‐canvas   board  that  was  primed  with  gesso.    I  quickly  composed   and  sketched-­‐in  the  view  that  I  found  cap7va7ng  with   Asphaltum  and  turpen7ne.    I  used  a  #  8  Flat  bristle   brush  so  that  I  could  sketch  my  ideas  quickly.

     

Next  ,  I  placed  the  darkest  and  lightest  values  on  the   canvas  early  on  so  that  I  could  judge  all  my  values   against  these  original  values.

           

Then,  I  painted  the  value  and  colors  of  the  smoky  sky, and  covered  my  original  sketch  of  the  trees  as  I   painted  in  the  ground  values  of  the  forest.  I  worked   with  contrasts,  and  gauged  every  color  and  value   against  the  light  and  dark  values  that  I  originally   established  in  the  pain7ng.

55

     

I  so]ened  all  the  edges  and  blurred  the  values  into   the  sky.    I  wanted  to  create  a  very  mysterious  seyng   by  using  values  to  establish  the  shapes.

                     

I  painted  the  sun  using  very  thick  paint.    Remember,   the  thicker  you  paint,  the  brighter  it  will  appear  on  the   canvas.    This  has  to  do  with  how  the  light  reflects  on   the  surface.    I  began  pain7ng  in  the  trees  using  dark   brown  and  a  lot  of  turpen7ne.    If  you  want  to  paint   wet  into  wet,  it  is  necessary  to  mix  more  turpen7ne into  the  top  layer  so  that  it  does  not  pull  the  paint  away   from  the  layer  underneath.    Finally,  I  painted  the  rocks   and  details  in  the  foreground  using  pure,  saturated   colors  to  enhance  the  High  Key  effect  of  the  pain7ng.     I  painted  this  vista  in  about  2  hours.

56

“A  Barn  in  Gazelle”  -­‐  Sky  &  Harmony
Just  north  of  The  Grand  View  Ranch  is  the  small  farming  town  of  Gazelle.    This  lihle  old  town  on  Highway  99  was   once  a  bustling  town  but  it  has  shrunk  in  size,  just  like  so  many  other  rural  communi7es  in  America  that  have   disappeared  because  of  commercialism  and  the  popularity  of  box  stores.    I  found  this  barn  as  I  was  searching  for   new  loca7ons  for  my  workshops  in  Mt.  Shasta.    The  morning  light  was  just  breaking  over  the  mountain,  so  I   quickly  set  up  my  pochade  box  and  sketched  it  before  the  light  changed. Sky  and  sunlight  together  harmonizes  a  landscape,  because  the  color  of  the  light  source  (sunlight)  shining   through  the  atmosphere  fills  the  scene  with  harmonious  colors.    However,  how  do  you  harmonize  your  pain7ng?     I  have  heard  that  some  ar7sts  mix  a  mother  color  (a  color  that  is  made  of  red,  yellow,  and  blue)  on  their  palehe,   and  once  they  have  mixed  a  tone  that  is  close  to  a  color  in  the  scene,  they  add  it  to  all  the  colors.    Other  ar7sts   have  a  blue  or  red  glass  that  they  look  through  to  see  the  changing  values  and  color  temperatures.    Other  ar7sts   tone  their  canvas  purple  or  brown.    Although  these  methods  work  for  some  ar7sts,  I  feel  that  if  you  paint  all  your   pain7ngs  with  the  same  approach  or  method,  your  work  will  look  the  same  and  can  become  boring.    I   recommend  that  you  paint  what  you  see.    Nature  harmonizes  everything  and  always  provides  the  best  example:   so  if  you  paint  what  is  there,  the  colors  will  be  harmonious.    Whether  you  paint  from  s7ll-­‐life  setups,  figure   studies,  by  looking  out  your  window  or  pain7ng  outdoors,  pain7ng  from  life  provides  the  most  realis7c,  original,   and  true  to  life  color,  allowing  you  to  create  your  own  view  of  the  world  as  it  appears  to  you. Pain7ng  outdoors  is  not  an  easy  task.    You  must  have  everything  at  your  disposal  for  it  to  go  smoothly.    It   requires  even  more  discipline  than  pain7ng  from  s7ll  life  or  a  live  model.    If  you  learn  to  paint  outdoors,  you  will   acquire  the  ability  to  see  color  and  analyze  values  in  a  very  exci7ng  manner  that  will  inspire  you  forever.    If  you   want  to  grasp  the  secret  of  pain7ng,  just  paint  from  life.    With  prac7ce  and  experience  gained  by  pain7ng   outdoors,  you  may  not  want  to  paint  any  other  way,  and  in  a  very  short  7me,  you  will  have  the  power  to  paint   anything  that  you  desire.

57

“Farmhouse  in  Mt.  Shasta”  -­‐  Ar(st’s  Block
My  parents  came  to  stay  with  us  over  the  summer,  and  my  father  loved  working  on  the  ranch,  clearing  the   property,  and  making  trails  for  visitors  to  explore.    A]er  my  father  re7red,  he  took  my  advice  and  started   pain7ng.    Over  the  years,  I  have  seen  his  focus  and  drive  increase,  and  the  quality  of  his  work  improve.    Recently   we  painted  together  in  Mt.  Shasta,  and  although  he  is  new  to  pain7ng  outdoors,  he  is  discovering  the   importance  of  being  able  to  paint  on  loca7on.    This  lihle  pain7ng  is  the  result  of  a  grand  morning  when  I  painted   with  my  father. Ar7sts  o]en  create  with  passion  and  drive,  and  some  of  the  7me  are  inspired  and  determined  to  express   themselves  with  no  limita7ons.    Occasionally  they  find  that  they  fall  into  what  ar7sts  call  an  "ar7st's  block."    This   is  very  common  among  ar7sts,  and  this  term  is  widely  used  by  painters,  writers,  musicians,  and  poets.    It  is  when   the  fear  of  not  being  able  to  create  makes  an  ar7st  ques7on  what  talents  they  have,  and  they  worry  that  their   passion  and  inspira7on  might  not  return.    Your  ego,  wan7ng  to  look  good  to  others  and  having  the  fear  of  failing,   will  block  your  crea7vity.    This  state  of  mind  can  go  on  for  years,  and  it  is  the  reason  that  people  stop  crea7ng   forever.    That  is  why  it  is  very  important  to  do  something  about  it. To  break  out  of  an  ar7s7c  block,  it  is  important  to  encourage  yourself  to  set  new  goals,  change  your  thinking   from  "I  can't"  to  "I  can  do  this,"  and  stop  focusing  nega7vely  on  yourself  and  your  feelings  of  being  a  failure.    Try   to  remember  that  you  are  not  alone.    Everybody  has  had  a  7me  when  he  has  failed  to  meet  his  own   expecta7ons.    It  is  how  we  pick  ourselves  up  and  move  on  that  is  most  important.   Other  ways  to  help  yourself  with  an  ar7st  block  is  to  consider  how  you  would  feel  if  you  completed  a  book  or  a   pain7ng  successfully,  or  if  you  could  change  the  life  of  another  person  with  one  of  your  pain7ngs?    These   ques7ons  are  more  than  dreams.    They  are  magnificent  possibili7es  about  what  your  art  can  be.    Art  is  a   conversa7on  that  you  have  with  another  person,  and  others  want  to  share  a  moment  with  you  and  experience   your  personal  insights  through  your  pain7ngs  or  wri7ngs.    Think  about  what  you  have  to  share  that  could  inspire   another  person,  or  let  him  or  her  know  that  he  or  she  is  not  alone.

58

Take  a  trip  somewhere  that  you  have  never  considered  going  before,  even  if  it  is  only  to  another  town  you  have   never  explored.    Always  take  a  sketchbook,  a  notebook,  a  journal,  or  a  thumb  box  everywhere  you  go.    Commit   to  write,  draw,  or  paint  your  observa7ons  every  day,  as  grand  or  silly  as  they  might  be. If  this  does  not  work,  look  for  a  coach  or  a  class,  or  someone  you  can  talk  to  because  you  might  just  need  a   mentor  to  give  you  a  new  perspec7ve  or  to  change  your  view  of  something  that  you  may  take  for  granted.     Remember,  you  are  unique  and  significant  in  the  world,  and  few  people  possess  the  talent  that  you  have  right   now.

59

“Sunday  Morning  on  the  Cliffs”  -­‐  The  Importance  of  Drawing  from  Life
As  I  go  through  my  sketchbook  from  my  travels  in  the  Na7onal  Parks  when  I  filmed  my  PBS  Television  series,  The   Grand  View,  I  came  upon  several  sketches  that  I  made  in  Glacier  Na7onal  Park.    This  big  boy,  not  at  all  startled  by   my  presence,  sat  s7ll  for  hours  leyng  me  draw  him  from  many  different  angles.    If  you  learn  to  draw  and  paint   on  loca7on,  you  will  experience  many  exci7ng  opportuni7es  to  capture  the  wonders  of  nature  in  your   sketchbook  or  on  your  canvas. Sketching  on  loca7on  is  one  of  the  most  important  ac7vi7es  one  can  do  as  an  ar7st.    The  impulse  to  draw  is  as   natural  as  the  desire  to  talk.    Learning  to  draw  is  a  rewarding  and  important  exercise  that  allows  ar7sts  to  be   capable  and  free  to  express  themselves  when  they  want  to  paint  what  they  see  flawlessly.    I  recommend  that   every  ar7st  take  a  figure  drawing  class  and  prac7ce  drawing  every  day.    Drawing  is  a  skill  that  is  learned,  but   drawing  accurately  requires  prac7ce  and  tenacity.    The  best  way  to  learn  to  draw  is  to  use  all  of  your  senses  to   observe,  then  record  the  impressions  of  life  that  catch  your  ahen7on  in  the  world  around  you  in  a  sketchbook,   and  build  your  collec7on  of  “I’ve  drawn  that”  images  that  is  stored  in  your  imagina7on  for  your  use  as  you  begin   your  pain7ng  on  loca7on.

60

“Moose,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Finding  Your  Ar(s(c  Muse
Those  who  know  me  know  that  pain7ng  landscapes  on  loca7on  in  nature  is  one  of  my  greatest  passions.    The   Grand  View  television  show  features  my  experiences  on  loca7on  in  the  na7onal  parks.    What  many  people  do   not  know  about  me  is  that  I  also  have  a  deep  passion  for  pain7ng  wildlife.    I  have  returned  from  7me  to  7me  to   visit  my  ar7s7c  muse  as  I  paint  animals,  and  this  week,  sketches  that  I  made  when  I  hiked  and  painted  in  the   Teton  Na7onal  Park  inspired  me.    As  I  searched  through  my  sketchbooks,  my  senses  filled  with  the  memories  of   that  trip,  and  I  recalled  the  feelings  of  awe  that  I  felt  when  I  personally  encountered  so  many  magnificent   animals  that  exist  in  America.    Those  memories  served  as  my  source  of  inspira7on  as  I  painted  “Moose,  Opus  1.” Finding  one’s  muse  refers  to  the  uninten7onal  and  unplanned  burst  of  inspira7on  that  beckons  us  to  create.     Many  ar7sts  say  the  experience  of  finding  their  muse  moves  through  them  like  the  “breath  of  god.”    They  do  not   feel  in  control  the  process,  but  they  feel  compelled  to  “go  with  it”  while  they  are  transported  beyond  their  own   abili7es  to  see  and  express  their  experience  on  canvas,  paper,  sound,  or  movement.    The  muse  seems  to  be  the   connec7on  between  the  inner  soul  and  the  unconscious  mind  of  the  ar7st  who  creates  with  paints,  pens,   musical  instruments,  or  dance. When  you  cannot  find  your  muse,  it  feels  like  you  cannot  seem  to  get  started  with  your  work  or  that  you  just   cannot  get  it  right.    You  can  work  on  a  project  for  hours,  then  wipe  it  all  off  or  toss  it  into  a  pile  of  pain7ngs  in   your  garage.    You  know  you  want  to  create,  but  you  cannot  imagine  what  to  paint.    There  can  be  a  great  sense  of   frustra7on  and  unhappiness  as  an  ar7st  struggles  to  find  his  way  back  to  being  inspired  again.    O]en  ar7sts  will   look  for  inspira7on  by  searching  outside  of  themselves  and  will  look  through  pictures  in  books  and  magazines.     Musicians  spend  hours  exercising  their  connec7on  with  the  keyboard  hoping  to  hear  a  pahern,  beat,  or  melody   that  inspires  their  crea7vity.    The  following  ideas  may  help  you  to  connect  crea7vely  within  yourself  in   prepara7on  for  your  muse’s  return. #1:  Ask  yourself,  “Why  did  I  want  to  be  in  ar7st  in  the  first  place?”    When  you  create,  you choose  many  paths,  and  occasionally  you  may  find  yourself  feeling  lost.    Being  in  touch  with why  you  first  began  crea7ng  art  is  the  first  step  in  finding  the  way  to  your  ar7s7c  muse.

61

#2:  Take  a  long  and  relaxing  walk.    Do  something  that  is  physically  ac7ve  to  clear  your  mind. It  will  calm  any  frustra7ons,  and  give  you  7me  to  have  fresh  ideas  or  new  approaches  that may  come  to  mind  when  you  are  away  from  your  studio. #3:  Do  not  do  anything  at  all!    Do  not  even  look  or  think  about  your  pain7ng,  inspira7on  will come  to  you  when  the  7me  is  right.    Instead  watch  TV,  go  out  with  friends,  or  go  to  bed.    Just do  something  to  separate  yourself  from  your  art.    Enjoy  being  crea7ve  in  other  ways. #4:  Think  of  a  book  or  movie  that  moves  you  to  feel  your  emo7ons  and  paint  a  picture  about something  in  the  story  that  touches  you.    Every  great  work  of  art  is  inspired  by  connec7ng  to life  in  some  way. #5:  Listen  to  some  inspira7onal  or  unusual  music.    I  prefer  tribal  music,  Classical  music  or  movie   soundtracks.    Few  things  are  as  ar7s7cally  s7mula7ng  as  a  great  symphony  by  Beethoven.    Let the  music  guide  your  art.    Allow  yourself  to  let  loose  and  go  with  the  sounds.    Leonardo  da  Vinci felt  that  he  painted  beher  when  he  listened  to  music. #6:  And  go  outside  of  yourself  for  ideas  and  inspira7on.    Browse  through  books  to  see  and experience  other  ar7sts’  work.    Some7mes  we  are  so  concerned  that  all  of  our  work  has  to  be original,  and  we  forget  that  other  ar7sts  have  had  huge  breakthroughs  a]er  losing  their  muses, too.    Visit  a  museum  or  surf  the  internet  to  see  what  other  ar7sts  are  crea7ng  because  it  can  be   insighxul,  inspiring,  and  can  connect  us  with  the  difficul7es  experienced  by  others  in  our  special group  called  ar(sts.

62

“Summering  Buck  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch”  -­‐  Ar(s(c  Frustra(on
Before  we  moved  to  The  Grand  View  Ranch,  a  young  buck  made  a  home  for  himself  beneath  the  elevated  deck   off  the  back  of  the  house.    He  stayed  there  all  summer  un7l  the  fall  when  he  had  grown  a  magnificent  rack  of   antlers.    Every  7me  we  went  onto  the  deck  the  startled  buck  would  scurry  out  from  beneath  us  with  his  antlers   scraping  the  bohom  of  the  cedar  deck.    He  would  sit  nearby  and  observe  us,  the  new  tenants  in  his  old  domain.     I  could  just  imagine  that  he  was  thinking,  “Well,  there  goes  the  neighborhood.”    I  created  this  pain7ng  from   sketches  that  I  made  last  summer  from  the  back  deck  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch. As  many  new  ar7sts  begin  to  paint,  they  feel  amazed  by  what  unfolds  beneath  their  brushes.    Smoothly  their   ar7s7c  focus  emerges  stroke  by  stroke  on  their  canvases  as  the  unsuspec7ng  ar7sts  passionately  pursue  their   cra],  loving  every  moment  and  savoring  their  experiences  as  they  learn  to  create  and  find  their  place  in  the   world  of  art.    Then  one  day,  they  create  a  pain7ng  they  hate.    “F*1@!”  and  “S@$%!”  are  some  of  the  words  used   in  these  moments  of  ar7s7c  frustra7on.    It  is  an  especially  good  idea  to  have  a  separate  studio  from  the  rest  of   the  house,  not  because  ar7sts  need  a  quiet  place  to  paint,  but  because  of  the  outbursts  ar7sts  experience  when   they  verbally  express  their  annoyance  and  despair  with  the  crea7ve  process.    When  an  ar7st  is  confronted  by  his   disappoin7ng  efforts,  he  somehow  wants  to  disown  his  work.    This  experience  is  des7ned  to  occur  to  all  ar7sts.     When  it  happens  to  you,  I  recommend  that  you  seek  encouragement  from  other  ar7sts  who  have  gone  through   the  same  experience. At  these  7mes,  I  love  to  read  the  insights  of  John  Ruskin  who  wrote  a  series  of  books  at  the  turn  of  the   nineteenth  century  called  Modern  Painters.    He  puts  it  all  into  perspec7ve  when  he  said,  “When  we  paint,  let  us   think  that  we  paint  forever.    Let  it  not  be  for  present  delight  or  for  present  use  alone.    Let  it  be  such  work  as  our   descendants  will  thank  us  for;  and  let  us  think,  as  we  lay  stroke  by  stroke,  that  a  7me  is  to  come  when  those   pain7ngs  will  be  held  sacred  because  our  hands  have  touched  them,  and  that  men  will  say  as  they  look  upon  the   labor  and  wrought  substance  of  them,  “See!    This  our  father  did  for  us.”  –  John  Ruskin
63

“Grand  Buck  of  the  Siskiyou”  -­‐  Breaking  into  the  Art  Market:  Part  One
Earlier  this  week  I  met  an  old  7mer  who  used  to  track  wild  life  in  the  Mt.  Shasta  area  who  lives  near  The  Grand   View  Ranch.    He  told  me  about  a  small  herd  of  elk  who  live  on  the  East  side  of  the  mountain  in  the  summer,  and   that  if  I  hurried,  I  might  be  able  to  find  them  and  to  sketch  them.    I  hiked  deep  into  the  woods  with  my  thumb   box  in  my  backpack  and  my  camera  ready  to  capture  anything  that  moved  in  the  bushes.    A]er  hours  of   wandering  through  the  hillsides  and  rivers  in  this  desolate  area,  I  found  them.    It  was  a  small  herd  with  six  cows   and  one  buck.    They  were  unaware  of  my  presence  and  I  quickly  made  some  sketches.    This  sketch  called  “Grand   Buck  of  the  Siskiyou”  is  one  of  many  sketches  that  I  began  on  this  “hun7ng  trip.” Every  year  10,000  ar7sts  graduate  from  art  schools  across  the  country.    Most  of  these  ar7sts  will  go  into  other   occupa7ons  within  a  few  years.    A  lot  of  hard  work  and  a  lihle  luck  are  important  to  becoming  a  successful   professional  ar7st.    Some  7ps  to  accomplish  this  are: Take  ini7a7ve  and  network!    Ar7sts  must  believe  in  their  work  and  imagine  that  it  has  a  place  in  the  art  world.    It   takes  7me  to  develop  a  recognizable  name,  and  to  do  this,  you  must  create  a  loyal  customer  base  at  a  local  level.     Be  willing  to  show  your  art  in  many  different  venues.    Begin  by  placing  your  art  in  cafés  and  local  restaurants.     Contact  your  local  art  group  to  find  out  about  opportuni7es  for  showing  your  art  in  their  art  shows.    Have  an   open  studio  and  paint  while  poten7al  customers  enjoy  your  finished,  framed  pieces.    Start  now  to  develop  a   name  for  yourself.    Networking  to  promote  your  art  is  not  a  one  or  two  year  plan.    It  may  take  5  to  10  years  to   become  well  known.    We  o]en  look  for  the  “one  piece  of  the  puzzle”  that  will  open  the  doors  to  success,  but  this   is  not  a  realis7c  approach  to  becoming  successful  in  the  art  world.    It  takes  many  pieces  and  many  ahempts  to   put  the  whole  puzzle  together  and  have  your  art  in  public  view.
64

Represent  yourself!    The  only  person  that  really  cares  about  your  art  and  your  success  is  you.    Few  new  ar7sts   understand  this  when  they  are  beginning  to  show  their  work.    Galleries  are  most  interested  in  keeping  their   doors  open  and  will  seldom  spend  any  of  their  commissions  to  adver7se  your  work  or  sponsor  a  show.    Few   galleries  have  the  integrity  to  share  with  you  the  names  of  clients  who  collect  your  work.    However,  they  are  the   first  to  ask  for  your  client  list.    Galleries  and  charity  events  are  good  exposure  opportuni7es  and  should  be  part   of  your  marke7ng  plan;  however,  they  are  not  the  only  ways  to  have  your  art  be  seen  by  the  public. Keep  Crea7ng!    It  takes  a  life7me  to  be  an  overnight  success  as  an  ar7st.    Keep  pain7ng  and  perfec7ng  your  cra]   and  your  message.    Ar7sts  have  to  be  prolific  and  proac7ve  in  producing  and  promo7ng  their  work.    Once  a  door   opens  to  show  your  work,  you  must  have  some  pain7ngs  available  for  sale.    Success  may  be  a  long  7me  in   coming,  so  keep  in  mind  that  pain7ng  is  a  cra],  and  every  pain7ng  is  a  learning  opportunity  for  the  next  pain7ng   to  be  a  masterpiece.    Always  be  inten7onal  about  yourself  as  an  ar7st  and  create  your  own  success  by  pain7ng   those  moments  in  life  that  you  want  others  to  experience  through  your  art.

65

“The  Trees  of  Castle  Crag  Lake”  -­‐  AWributes  of  a  Tree
Because  we  are  experiencing  unusually  mild  weather  here  in  Mt.  Shasta,  we  have  been  able  to  venture  into   some  of  the  most  beau7ful  landscapes  in  America.    One  of  the  jewels  in  the  crown  is  Castle  Crag  Lake,  a  high   mountain  lake  located  just  west  of  the  town  of  Mt.  Shasta.    Students  ahending  my  workshops  especially  enjoy   pain7ng  at  this  loca7on  because  of  the  excep7onal  beauty  of  this  alpine  lake,  and  its  convenient  loca7on  for   ar7sts  to  drive  and  park  near  her  shore,  set  up  their  easels,  and  begin  pain7ng.    On  the  day  that  we  came  to  the   lake,  the  midday  sun  backlit  the  trees,  crea7ng  an  unusual  effect  against  the  cool  wash  of  the  background  wall  of   rocks.    This  effect  of  light  caught  my  eye  and  I  knew  that  I  wanted  to  capture  it  in  this  lihle  pain7ng. When  pain7ng  trees  in  nature  it  is  more  important  to  capture  the  essence  of  the  trees  than  just  the  texture  of   the  foliage.    In  many  plein  air  pain7ngs,  I  no7ce  that  ar7sts  place  too  much  ahen7on  on  the  amount  of  paint  that   they  apply  rather  than  how  they  apply  their  paint.    It  is  more  important  in  pain7ng  landscapes  is  to  capture credibly  the  nature  of  how  trees  and  plants  grow  and  appear  in  their  environment. For  example,  carefully  examine  the  ahributes  of  a  tree.    When  looking  at  a  tree,  no7ce  its  energy  and  how  it   shoots  up  out  of  the  ground,  how  the  branches  reach  outward  to  the  sky,  and  how  the  limbs  pull  down  to  the   earth  as  they  flow  away  from  the  tree.    No7ce  how  elas7c  the  limbs  are,  because  elas7city  in  the  limbs  indicates   the  tree’s  strength,  its  growth,  and  how  it  lives  in  its  environment.    Observe  the  tops  of  the  trees  and  no7ce  how   the  sprays  stretch  high  towards  the  heavens;  observe  the  mo7on  and  the  energy  of  the  wind  and  atmosphere   that  exists  high  in  the  trees. These  details  tell  the  story  of  the  tree,  its  history,  and  its  place  in  a  landscape.    Pain7ng  just  the  texture  of  a  tree   does  not  tell  the  viewer  how  it  looks  right  now.  It  is  like  pain7ng  a  portrait  of  an  old  woman  without  wrinkles.    It  
66

may  be  painted  to  look  prehy,  but  the  result  may  not  be  interes7ng  or  revealing.    It  is  the  lines  and  wrinkles  in   her  face  that  tells  the  story  of  how  she  lived,  laughed,  and  loved.    I  believe  that  these  details  are  missing  in  many   plein  air  pain7ngs  today.    In  the  background  of  my  pain7ng,  I  have  included  subtle  details  embedded  in  the  sheer   cliffs,  and  you  can  see  lines  in  the  crags  that  mark  its  stra7fica7on.    You  can  also  see  how  it  has  been  washed  and   rounded  by  glaciers  and  weather,  and  that  it  is  not  just  a  wall  of  rock.    The  main  reason  that  ar7sts  first  moved   from  the  studio  into  the  wilderness  was  to  be  able  to  carefully  observe  and  record  nature  with  their  own  eyes,   because  without  close  observa7on  and  the  use  of  details,  pain7ng  can  become  mechanical  and  oversimplified.

67

Seven  Steps  to  Crea(ng  a  Great  Pain(ng

Step  1.    The  first  10  minutes  is  the  most  important                            part  of  any  pain7ng.    You  must  have  a                            completed  concept  in  your  head  before                            star7ng.    Start  with  a  neutral  color  and  lay                            in  your  sketch.

Step  2.    Establish  your  light  source  and  lay  in  your                              value  chunks  (no  more  than  4  to  5  values).                              A  large  value  area  should  have  many                              grada7ons.

68

Step  3.    So]en  your  edges  as  you  go.    It  is                            important  that  you  keep  your  work  loose                            and  flowing.

Step  4.    Begin  pain7ng  in  the  central  focal  point.                            In  this  pain7ng,  it  is  the  house.    Keep  it                            simple  and  avoid  detail  at  this  point.

Step  5.    Start  your  light  story.    Remember,  pain7ng                            the  effect  of  light  on  the  object  that  is  more                            important  than  the  thing  itself.

Step  6.    Bring  in  more  light  and  complete  more                            of  the  detail  all  over  the  picture,  and                            not  in  just  one  place.

Step  7.    Complete  the  pain7ng,  making  sure  that  it  has  a  central  focal  point  that  is  the  lightest                            with  sharp  edges,  and  so]en  other  edges  in  the  pain7ng.                                                          Then  sign  the  pain7ng.

69

“The  Last  of  the  Herd”  -­‐  Inspira(on
The  days  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch  are  growing  shorter  now,  and  we  have  experienced  the  chill  of  the  winter   snows.    Before  the  snow  completely  covers  the  landscape,  we  are  taking  advantage  of  the  sunny,  crisp  days  and   are  burning  fallen  oaks  and  shrubs.    This  is  the  last  opportunity  that  we  will  have  to  prepare  the  ranch  for   winter’s  frozen  gi]s.    The  deer  have  migrated  to  lower  pastures  in  Shasta  Valley,  and  the  bear  have  found  their   dens  where  they  hibernate  through  the  long  winter  nights.    Except  for  a  few  squirrels,  all  the  wildlife  have   disappeared  from  the  ranch,  and  Shasta,  our  Border  collie,  is  bored. In  today’s  pain7ng  “ The  Last  of  the  Herd,”  I  have  painted  a  deer  from  one  of  my  sketchbooks.    I  focused  on  the   expression  of  the  deer’s  head  and  the  human  quali7es  found  in  the  eyes.    So  many  gardeners  hate  deer,  but  I  like   seeing  deer  in  a  field  or  forest  because  they  make  the  landscape  seem  tranquil  and  peaceful. Winter  shadows  and  long,  dark  nights,  the  end  of  the  holiday  rush,  and  colds  and  flu  with  miserable  symptoms   affect  our  energy  and  mood  and  create  a  type  of  hiberna7on  in  our  spirit.    At  7mes  like  this,  our  passion  is   subdued  and  an  interrup7on  in  the  interest  to  create  art  can  result.    If  you  do  not  feel  inspired  to  create,  you   must  rely  on  your  commitment  to  prac7ce  ar7s7c  skills  by  staying  in7mately  involved  with  your  brushes,  paints,   and  canvas.    Act  as  though  you  are  eager  to  express  yourself  through  your  pain7ng,  even  when  you  feel  like  you   have  nothing  to  say.    An  ar7st’s  commitment  to  take  ac7on  can  evoke  and  s7mulate  passion,  and  passion  can   carry  both  the  art  and  the  ar7st  to  the  next  spurt  of  inspira7on.
70

This  cycle  is  similar  to  those  found  in  nature;  winter’s  season  rests  the  earth,  so  in  spring  the  warming  earth  can   bring  forth  new  inspira7on  and  new  life,  allowing  passion  to  create  plen7ful  summer  fruits  that  are  harvested  in   the  fall  as  the  earth  prepares  to  share  its  bounty  with  thanksgiving.    Humans  share  similar  paherns  of  life:   paherns  of  s7llness,  inspira7on,  rebirth,  and  crea7on  which  are  vital  in  renewing  and  reinven7ng  ourselves  as   ar7sts.    Whether  you  are  feeling  s7ll  and  subdued,  or  you  feel  excited  and  love  what  you  are  pain7ng,  the  canvas   reflects  your  emo7ons.    Start  pain7ng  and  keep  pain7ng,  and  once  you  put  your  brush  to  canvas,  your  inspira7on   just  may  follow.

71

“Times  Gone  By”  -­‐  Adding  Details
The  weather  in  Mt.  Shasta  is  amazing!    Warm  temperatures,  clear  weather,  and  very  lihle  snow  on  the  ground   makes  it  feel  more  like  spring  than  the  dead  of  winter.    It  is  hard  to  pass  up  the  opportunity  to  work  outside   clearing  brush  and  burning  the  dead  wood  at  the  Grand  View  Ranch;  but  my  ar7s7c  muse  calls  me  to  capture  the   beauty  that  surrounds  me  on  canvas. Last  year  during  our  workshops,  we  visited  eight  loca7ons  and  of  all  the  spectacular  places  that  we  painted,  this   is  one  of  my  favorites.    It  is  at  the  end  of  Louis  Road,  just  west  of  Yreka  at  the  base  of  Mt.  Shasta.    Compared  to   the  way  it  must  have  been  over  a  hundred  years  ago,  this  place  is  quiet  now,  and  except  for  a  few  eagles  that   screech,  the  earth  is  silent  and  s7ll.    One  can  really  concentrate  on  pain7ng  the  landscape. I  painted  this  pain7ng  7tled  “ Times  Gone  By”  en7rely  on  loca7on.    At  first  glance,  the  viewer’s  eye  sees  the   abandoned  farmhouse  in  the  background  and  vigorous,  overgrown  foliage  along  the  bank  of  the  river  that  is   reminiscent  of  a  7me  gone  by.    Then,  a  lightly  traveled  road  comes  into  focus  at  the  bohom  of  the  pain7ng,   drawing  the  viewer  into  the  pain7ng,  to  the  river  where  the  viewer  sees  the  reflec7ve  colors  of  the  sky  on  the   water.    The  journey  con7nues  along  the  river,  around  the  bend,  and  ends  where  it  began  at  the  distant,   neglected  farmhouse.    The  trunk  of  the  old  weathered  cohonwood  tree  represents  the  end  of  the  journey  and   sense  of  7me  passing. Oil  pain7ngs  are  visually  ahrac7ve  because  of  the  rich,  textured  details  and  brushstrokes.    Students  o]en  create   juicy,  luxurious  strokes  especially  with  light  colors.    However,  most  beginning  painters  use  too  lihle  paint  when   pain7ng  dark  colors.    Be  bold.    Experiment  with  your  paint  by  pain7ng  thick  and  thin  brushstrokes  as  you  go. Details  are  the  final  addi7ons  when  your  pain7ng  is  nearly  complete.  Add  details  where  you  want  the  viewer’s   eye  to  linger.    All  other  lines  in  the  composi7on  should  have  so]  edges.    I  use  a  squirrel-­‐hair  brush  and  lightly   so]en  all  edges  in  the  pain7ng  and  then,  with  precision,  I  take  a  detail  brush  and  I  place  the  final  details  within   my  central  focal  point.    The  key  is  not  to  add  too  many.    If  you  have  constructed  your  pain7ng  successfully,  you   will  need  very  lihle  added  detail  to  have  an  impact  on  the  viewer.    Make  every  brush  stroke  count,  and   remember  that  less  is  more.
72

“Crossroads  in  Weed”  -­‐  Finding  Your  Voice
As  I  laid  the  final  brushstroke  on  this  pain7ng,  “Crossroads  in  Weed,”  the  snow  started  to  cover  the  countryside.     This  view  is  located  in  the  heart  of  the  lihle  lumber  town  of  Weed.    It  is  at  the  crossroad  of  one  of  the  main   streets  in  town  and  the  freeway.    Although  this  is  a  charming  seyng  for  a  pain7ng,  very  few  tourists  would  stop   to  admire  this  loca7on,  yet  I  have  found  it  interes7ng  every  7me  I  drive  by.    I  wanted  to  capture  its  charm  on   canvas.    O]en  we  don’t  choose  the  subject,  the  subject  chooses  us. As  an  ar7st,  I  am  aware  of  the  beauty  all  around  me,  and  I  am  always  looking  for  composi7ons  in  the  ordinary   corners  of  life.    As  a  plein  air  painter,  I  might  find  myself  pain7ng  in  the  heart  of  town,  hanging  over  a  bridge,  or   just  off  a  freeway.    The  unique  and  individual  reward  an  ar7st  receives  when  pain7ng  his  impression  of  an   inspiring  place  belongs  to  that  ar7st  alone;  the  joy  experienced  in  the  process  of  crea7on  is  non–transferable   and  of  lihle  use  to  others.    The  pain7ng  is  just  the  byproduct,  and  it  is  a  bonus  if  the  public  gets  to  view  it  at  all. An  ar7st  recreates  a  personal  experience  and  sings  it  for  others.    To  do  this,  you  must  first  learn  that  when  you   sing,  the  only  voice  you  need  is  the  voice  you  already  have  and  everything  that  you  need  to  create  joyfully  is   already  within  you.    As  a  coach,  I  don’t  teach  students  how  I  paint.    I  help  students  iden7fy  their  unique  voice   and  give  them  the  tools  to  use  it.    The  actual  pain7ng  process  of  applying  a  brush  and  paint  to  canvas  is  ordinary   work,  but  it  takes  courage  to  embrace  that  work  and  wisdom  to  be  good  at  it.    Art  does  not  arrive  miraculously   from  the  darkness  to  your  hands;  knowledge,  skills,  and  prac7ce  blend  with  the  heart  and  soul  of  the  ar7st  and   flow  onto  the  canvas.    You  must  learn  to  trust  yourself  and  proceed  with  the  belief  that  you  will  succeed,  or  you   may  miss  the  possibility  of  experiencing  the  ecstasy  of  crea7vity. It  becomes  a  choice  between  certainty  and  uncertainty,  and  curiously,  uncertainty  in  the  face  of  paralysis  is  a   comfor7ng  choice.

73

“Winter  Dogwood”  -­‐  Pain(ng  is  a  Memory  Exercise
As  a  steady  snowfall  covers  The  Grand  View  ranch,  winter,  though  late  in  arriving,  is  finally  here.    Dogwood   boughs,  heavily  laden  with  snow,  bend  downwards  towards  the  earth.    Oak  trees  struggle  to  stand  upright   against  the  howling,  gusty  winds.    Between  the  storms,  the  forest  is  silent  as  the  deep  snow  deadens  all  sounds   in  the  woods.    As  the  season’s  storms  cross  in  waves  over  the  great  Cascade  Range,  Mt.  Shasta  appears  in  her   majes7c  winter  coat  beaming  through  the  dark  clouds  like  a  glistening  jewel  in  a  royal  crown.    I  am  inside,   pain7ng  what  is  outside  my  studio  window,  but  really  I  am  wai7ng  for  a  moment  between  storms  to  put  my   paintbrush  down  and  hurry  outside  to  shovel  snow  and  free  us  from  the  frozen  hillside. This  pain7ng,  “Winter  Dogwood,”  is  of  a  view  from  my  studio  that  I  have  painted  many  7mes  in  all  seasons;  but   winter  is  one  of  my  favorites.    Earlier  today,  the  storm  broke  and  the  morning  light  beamed  across  the  freshly   fallen  snow.    I  painted  quickly  before  the  warmth  of  the  light  melted  the  winter’s  frozen  coat. Most  pain7ngs  are  in  some  way  created  from  our  memory,  and  if  we  paint  on  loca7on,  what  we  are  really  doing   is  pain7ng  what  we  remember.    If  we  could  control  the  environment,  we  would  have  lihle  problem  recrea7ng   our  experiences;  but  the  subject  is  con7nually  changing  every  moment  while  we  are  applying  paint  to  canvas.     Light  and  shadows  change,  and  the  subjects  reveal  new  and  different  insights  and  appearances  as  the  minutes   pass  by. We  must  observe  what  is  transforming  before  our  eyes  without  ahaching  too  firmly  to  each  changing  aspect  of   what  we  see.    An  ar7st  must  rely  on  their  memory  of  what  the  loca7on  looked  like  in  the  moment  that  he  or  she   started  pain7ng  it,  rather  than  paint  what  it  becomes.    For  example,  when  I  started  “Winter  Dogwood,”  the   storm  had  just  li]ed.    For  an  instant,  a  ray  of  sun  light  beamed  through  the  clouds  crossing  the  forest  and  
74

catching  the  edges  of  the  freshly  fallen  snow.    Most  of  the  branches  were  hidden  from  view  by  the  snow  itself   and  the  background  trees  were  black  against  the  white  snow.    This  pain7ng  took  about  two  hours  to  paint  and   during  that  7me,  the  snow  melted  off  the  branches  and  the  dogwood  trunks  bounced  back  to  their  ver7cal   posi7on.    I  wanted  to  capture  the  moment  when  winter  had  just  blanketed  the  forest,  and  I  had  to  rely  on  my   memory  to  recall  what  it  looked  like  at  that  moment  when  I  started  pain7ng.    I  painted  the  layout  of  the   landscape  during  the  original  moments  of  inspira7on,  as  well  as  the  color  references  that  I  noted  and  commihed   to  memory.    As  I  went  along  crea7ng  this  work  of  art,  the  overall  impression  came  from  the  memory  of  what  it   first  looked  and  felt  like  to  me.

75

“Birthday  Orchid”  -­‐  Pain(ng  in  the  Moment
Every  year  on  my  birthday  one  of  my  students  brings  me  an  orchid.    I  love  to  paint  orchids  because  they  are  so   delicate  and  pa7ent.  Unlike  most  flowers,  orchids  will  pose  for  days,  where  roses  will  change  their  pose  minute   to  minute.    These  flowers  bloomed  in  my  studio  today,  and  although  I  had  other  things  to  do,  I  stopped   everything  to  paint  them.    It  always  surprises  me  that  I  can  somehow  find  7me  to  complete  everything  that  I   think  I  must  do  right  now,  even  when  I  take  the  7me  to  paint!    If  you  feel  you  just  do  not  have  7me  to  paint,  I   encourage  you  to  priori7ze  your  crea7ve  self,  and  paint  something  amazing.    It  is  the  most  important  thing  that   you  can  do  for  yourself  today.    The  trash  and  laundry  can  wait  un7l  later. Orchid  Pain(ng  One:  Pain(ng  Alla  Prima,  a  step-­‐by-­‐step  demonstra(on Alla  Prima  pain7ng  is  a  pain7ng  that  is  finished  in  one  siyng,  painted  wet  on  wet,  and  from  one  central  point  out   to  the  edges  un7l  the  pain7ng  is  complete. First:  Paint  the  canvas  using  Asphaltum  with  a  large  brush  and  applying  direct  brush  strokes   with  lots  of  energy.    At  this  point,  it  is  important  to  imagine  where  to  place  the  center  of  interest  on  the  canvas.    Begin  forming  the  shapes  of  the  flowers  with  the  brush  and  Asphaltum,  and   indica7ng  the  areas  of  dark  and  light. Second:  Using  a  white  and  grey  mixture,  paint  the  founda7on  of  the  flowers  where  the  center   of  interest  is  located.    Paint  the  shapes  and  forms  of  the  orchid  by  following  the  contour  of  the   flowers,  and  con7nue  indica7ng  dominant  areas  of  shadows  and  highlights  to  create  a  sense  of  mass.
76

Third:  Add  more  details,  more  highlights,  and  dark  shadows  to  the  flowers,  orchid  plant,  and  in  the  areas  surrounding  the  plant. Fourth:  Paint  the  leaves,  and  complete  the  background.    When  pain7ng  alla  prima,  7me  is  of  the   essence.    Complete  the  main  focal  point  first,  and  then  work  on  the  background  with  the  remainder   of  the  7me  allowed  for  the  piece.    Remember,  you  do  not  have  to  paint  every  square  inch,  just  the   main  subject.

77

“The  Last  of  the  Spring  Blooms”  -­‐  To  Lighten  or  To  Darken  a  Color
The  Grand  View  Ranch  is  located  on  a  hillside  that  locals  refer  to  as  Dogwood  Hill.    The  ranch  is  home  to   hundreds  of  trees  that  have  beau7ful  white  blossoms  in  the  spring.    Dogwood  blossoms  have  always  been  my   mother’s  favorite  flower,  and  she  talked  about  visi7ng  The  Grand  View  Ranch  this  spring  to  see  the  splendid   dogwood  bloom.    This  year  we  had  the  most  amazing  bloom  ever.    The  blooms  were  the  size  of  saucers  and  the   en7re  hillside  was  burs7ng  with  bright,  white  blooms.    Sadly,  my  mother  passed  away  this  spring  before  she   could  see  this  breathtaking  sight.    Today,  I  gathered  the  last  of  the  blooms  and  brought  them  back  to  my  studio   to  paint  them.    I  am  dedica7ng  this  pain7ng  to  her. For  oil  painters,  there  are  a  number  of  ways  to  lighten  or  darken  a  color.    One  way  to  darken  a  color  is  to  add  a   complementary  color.    The  complement  of  a  color  is  the  color  that  is  directly  opposite  that  color  on  the  color   wheel:  the  complement  of  yellow  is  purple,  the  complement  of  red  is  green,  and  the  complementary  color  of   blue  is  orange.    Either  of  the  two  colors  may  be  the  focal  color  with  the  complementary  color  added  into  it.    For   example,  when  red  is  added  in  small  amounts  to  green  (the  focal  color),  the  green  will  become  cooler  and  darker,   and  when  green  is  added  in  small  amounts  to  red,  the  red  will  become  cooler  and  darker. I  seldom  recommend  using  black  from  a  tube  to  darken  a  pain7ng.    Instead,  I  suggest  making  a  neutral  black  by   using  a  dark  brown  like  Asphaltum  and  Cobalt  Blue,  which  is  what  I  mixed  to  paint  the  background  in  today's   pain7ng,  “ The  Last  of  the  Spring  Blooms.”    Two  other  op7ons  for  making  a  good  neutral  dark  color  are  Cobalt   Blue,  Alizarin  Red  and  Cad  Yellow,  or  Pthalo  Green  with  Alizarin  Crimson  to  make  a  very  dark  black. I  added  white  to  lighten  the  colors  that  I  used  to  paint  the  dogwood  flowers.    When  pain7ng  something  white,   especially  highlights,  I  never  use  white  out  of  the  tube.    White,  by  itself,  is  not  a  good  highlight  color  because  it   has  a  cool  tone,  and  highlights,  because  they  originate  from  the  sun  or  light,  are  essen7ally  warm  in  tone.    My   secret  to  making  the  highlights  in  my  pain7ngs  glow  is  to  add  a  7ny  amount  of  yellow  or  red  to  the  white  so  that   the  natural  effect  of  light  reflects  brilliantly,  as  it  does  on  the  dogwood  blossoms.

78

“View  from  Louie  Road  Bridge”  -­‐  Just  As  I  See  It
When  I  paint  outdoors,  in  the  10  minutes  before  I  choose  a  subject,  I  ask  myself,  “What  about  this  landscape   interests  me?    Why  am  I  pain7ng  this  and  what  do  I  want  to  paint  that  will  convey  my  feelings  about  what  I  see?"     During  the  first  10  minutes,  I  stop  and  think  as  I  keep  my  focus,  both  visual  and  mental,  on  what  first  ahracted   me  to  the  subject.    Then  I  include  only  elements  in  the  sketch  that  enhance  the  subject  and  leave  out  anything   what  will  detract  from  the  message  I  want  to  send  to  the  viewer.    The  pain7ng  should  contain  one  idea.    In  this   pain7ng,  it  is  about  the  amazing  endurance  of  the  old  cohonwood  tree  in  the  “View  from  Louie  Road  Bridge.”     The  creek  in  the  foreground  serves  as  an  eye  magnet  to  draw  the  viewer  to  the  focal  point,  and  the  strongest   darks  and  lights  are  on  the  tree. Many  people  spend  much  of  their  lives  walking  around  in  a  trance  of  retrospec7on,  regret,  and  distrac7on,  idling   their  days  away  with  a  wide  range  of  addic7ons  from  TV  to  drugs  that  keep  them  from  seeing  the  beauty  in  the   world  around  them.    What  is  the  secret  that  can  bridge  the  chasm  of  living  a  life  that  is  empty  and  meaningless   to  one  that  is  worth  living?    For  many  people,  the  path  to  feeling  fully  alive  is  ar7s7c  crea7vity,  and  through  art,   we  can  discover  and  live  a  sa7sfying,  fulfilling,  and  meaningful  life.    These  enlightened  people  seem  to  deal  with   life  in  posi7ve  and  powerful  manner. Auguste  Renoir  was  crippled  by  arthri7s  most  of  his  life.    One  of  his  students  asked  him,  “How  do  you  paint  with   your  hands  so  crippled?”    He  replied,  “Pain  passes,  but  the  beauty  remains  forever.”    Our  twenty-­‐first  century   lives  are  filled  with  fast  food,  fast  entertainment,  fast  cars,  and  fast  pleasure.    We  seldom  witness  other  people   crea7ng  and  doing  what  we  try  to  do  as  ar7sts.    You  are  an  ar7st  among  us  whose  life  stands  as  proof  of  this   transforma7onal  power.    Your  strength  and  talent  is  precious,  and  this  power  is  available  to  anyone  willing  to   learn.

79

“Last  of  the  Rhododendron  Bloom”  -­‐  Taking  Your  Art  to  the  Next  Level
Working  and  maintaining  a  ranch  is  7me  consuming  and  hard  work.    As  I  am  doing  my  daily  chores,  I  see   hundreds  of  ideas  for  pain7ngs,  like  the  wildflowers  that  call  to  me  wan7ng  to  be  painted,  along  with  those   commissions  that  are  due  to  collectors.    I  o]en  have  to  just  stop  and  take  note  of  the  fantas7c  abundance  that  I   have  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch.    Today  was  the  last  of  the  Rhododendron  bloom,  and  with  this  in  mind,  I  put   aside  the  tasks  at  the  ranch  to  paint  these  magnificent  blossoms. For  some  people,  art  has  been  a  part  of  their  life  since  an  early  age  and  these  ar7sts  are  lucky,  because  for  them,   art  is  a  way  of  life.    Many  people  gravitate  toward  becoming  an  ar7st  later  in  their  lives  because  they  are  looking   for  an  ac7vity  to  bring  relaxa7on  and  meaning  into  their  hec7c  lives.    Others  are  looking  for  something  to  do   during  re7rement.    Most  people  become  ar7sts  because  they  enjoy  the  crea7ve  freedom  to  paint  what  inspires   them,  and  find  that  they  are  encouraged  to  express  their  deepest  ideas,  visions,  and  desires  as  well.    Some  ar7sts   want  to  create  something  from  their  own  experience  to  share  with  others,  with  their  family,  and  with  the  world.     They  may  have  a  moment  when  they  see  an  amazing,  morning  sunrise  and  say,  “Look  at  that!    It’s  beau7ful.    I   wish  someone  could  see  how  breathtaking  it  is.”    If  they  take  their  7me  to  paint  what  they  see  and  feel,  and   share  it  with  others,  they  discover  the  magical  ingredient  that  compels  ar7sts  to  create  art  -­‐  the  connec7on  of   sharing  one’s  self  with  others  -­‐  which  becomes  the  power  that  can  take  your  art  to  the  next  level. I  painted  this  pain7ng  of  the  Rhododendrons  for  you  because  I  wanted  to  share  the  moment  when  I  discovered   these  beau7ful  and  delicately  colored  flowers  as  they  gave  their  best  in  the  last  days  of  their  blooming  season. If  you  wish  to  accomplish  anything  extraordinary  in  art,  you  must  do  everything  necessary  to  paint  effec7vely  by   including  some  simple  elements  such  as  a  central  focal  point,  subtle  values,  and  accurate  drawing  in  the  pain7ng.     To  be  successful,  you  must  grab  the  viewer’s  ahen7on  and  be  able  to  hold  it.    An  ar7st  is  like  a  great  conductor   or  director  who  knows  how  to  focus  the  ahen7on  of  his  or  her  audience  on  the  art  at  hand.    By  contras7ng  light   and  dark  colors,  the  ar7st  captures  the  viewers’  eyes  and  leads  them  around  the  canvas  from  hard  to  so]  edges,   from  detailed  to  loose  brushstrokes,  and  with  the  addi7on  of  counterbalanced  values,  gives  the  finale  that  wows   them  with  a  crescendo  of  light.    Crea7ng  great  art  is  no  accident;  it  is  as  deliberate  as  an  Agatha  Chris7e  mystery   novel.    It  takes  knowledge,  hard  work,  concentra7on,  and  dedica7on  to  create  a  masterpiece  that  looks  free  and   feels  expressive.    When  choosing  your  subject,  let  the  subject  come  from  within  you  and  let  your  pain7ng  be  a   simple  act  of  sharing.    It  does  not  have  to  be  complicated  or  heroic,  or  have  some  great  meaning  or  message.     Great  art  touches  us  deeply  in  a  way  we  cannot  forget.
80

“Mt.  Shasta  AIernoon”  -­‐  Atmospheric  Perspec(ve
As  summer  days  lengthen,  we  have  many  hot  days  and  warm  nights  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch  in  Mt.  Shasta,  and   my  focus  turns  to  the  stunning  effects  of  light  on  the  mountain.    Mt.  Shasta  is  one  of  the  seven  most  spiritual   places  in  the  world,  and  her  volcanic  peak  is  visible  hundreds  of  miles  away  in  many  direc7ons  in  Northern   California.    Every  year,  thousands  of  people  and  ar7sts  visit  Mt  Shasta  to  heal,  be  inspired,  to  camp,  and  to  paint. Just  pain7ng  her  majes7c  slopes  and  grand  cliffs  is  difficult  for  any  ar7st,  but  capturing  the  effect  of  sunlight  on   the  mountain  that  creates  a  sense  of  the  7me  of  day  is  almost  an  overwhelming  challenge.    By  using  a  few   ar7s7c  principles  such  as  color  mixing  to  make  warm,  bright  light  to  contrast  with  cool,  dark  shadows,  and  by   including  atmospheric  perspec7ve  (which  results  when  the  moisture  and  par7culate  maher  in  the  atmosphere   makes  distant  objects  look  so]er,  cooler,  and  lighter),  success  can  be  just  a  pain7ng  away! In  this  pain7ng,  "Mt.  Shasta  A]ernoon,"  I  wanted  to  create  the  late  a]ernoon  light  just  as  the  sun  disappears  on   the  horizon.    Because  light  changes  quickly,  I  took  several  minutes  to  memorize  the  scene  so  that  I  could   remember  where  the  areas  of  light  and  dark,  warm  and  cool,  and  the  brightest  focal  points  are  located.    Then  I   quickly  painted  in  the  basic  shapes  and  values  with  contras7ng  light  and  dark  areas. To  create  a  sense  of  warm  light  on  the  mountain,  I  painted  the  areas  illuminated  by  sunlight  with  warmer  colors   and  lighter  tonal  values.    Using  warm  colors  like  yellow  and  red  gives  the  effect  of  warmth  to  any  pain7ng,  and  by   lightening  up  the  value  by  adding  white  to  the  yellow  or  red,  the  effect  of  light  will  appear  even  brighter.    I  made   the  effect  to  be  greater  in  the  center  of  the  pain7ng  (the  central  focal  point)  by  emphasizing  the  middle  rock  in   the  foreground.    I  did  this  by  making  the  contrast  even  stronger  and  warmer  by  applying  almost  pure  white  with   a  lihle  yellow  added  in  to  paint  the  atmosphere  silhoueyng  the  rock.
81

Next,  I  wanted  to  add  even  more  contrast  in  the  foreground  by  using  darkened  values  of  brown,  green,  and   cooler  colors  for  a  more  drama7c  statement  against  the  lighted  areas.    No7ce  how  the  warm  light  comes  from   the  upper  le]  and  is  consistent  on  the  background  hillsides  and  the  mid-­‐ground  trees.    The  areas  that  are  not  in   light  are  cooler,  darker,  and  less  intense. If  you  want  to  create  a  strong  sense  of  the  7me  of  day  in  your  pain7ng,  be  consistent  with  your  treatment  of  the   contrast  between  the  light  and  shadow  areas  throughout  your  pain7ng.    In  addi7on,  by  contras7ng  the   foreground  areas  (with  their  sharp  detail,  strong  value,  and  temperature  differences)  with  the  distant  objects   (which  have  less  detail,  cooler  colors,  and  so]er  contrast)  you  can  successfully  intensify  the  sense  of  depth  and   realism  in  your  landscape  pain7ngs.

82

“Shasta  Sweet  Peas”  -­‐  Crea(ng  Great  Art
Mt.  Shasta  is  renowned  for  the  splendid  displays  of  wildflowers  that  cover  the  foothills  every  summer.    Because   of  the  high  al7tude  and  mild  climate,  abundant  varie7es  of  flowers,  including  some  that  grow  only  around  Mt.   Shasta,  burst  with  color  all  summer  and  well  into  the  fall.    The  wildflowers  that  are  best  known  and  loved  are   the  wild  sweet  peas  that  blanket  the  meadows  of  the  Mt.  Shasta  region.    Today's  pain7ng  captures  some  of  the   magnificent  lihle  blooms  that  I  found  growing  on  the  Grand  View  Ranch. When  I  coach  painters  in  my  outdoor  workshops  in  Mt.  Shasta,  a  recurring  ques7on  that  ar7sts  frequently  ask   as  they  struggle  with  their  experience  is,  “How  do  I  create  great  art?” First,  it  is  essen7al  for  you  as  an  ar7st  to  be  true  to  yourself,  to  create  art  that  reflects  what  you  care  about  and   how  you  see  the  world  as  you  develop  your  individual  style.    One  of  the  reasons  I  created  The  Grand  View  Ranch   in  Mt.  Shasta  is  that  the  landscape  speaks  to  me.    I  am  con7nually  inspired  to  paint  the  infinite  number  of  vistas,   animals,  and  flowers  that  call  to  me.    I  am  never  at  a  loss  to  come  up  with  original  ideas  for  a  pain7ng.    I  believe   that  art  is  integral  to  your  sense  of  who  you  are,  and  it  is  best  if  life  and  art  intertwine. Second,  most  ar7sts,  including  myself,  are  driven  by  their  desire  to  make  art  beau7ful  and  meaningful  for   themselves  and  their  audience  by  consistently  probing  and  expanding  their  boundaries  and  seyng  new  goals.     To  do  this,  ar7sts  must  learn  that  great  art  results  from  doing  your  cra]  frequently,  diligently,  and  passionately.     If  you  only  think  about  crea7ng  something,  very  lihle  is  accomplished.    The  fact  is  that  you  must  ac7vely  create   art  to  feel  inspired. Finally,  the  desire  to  enjoy  art  begins  at  a  very  early  age.    Give  a  young  child  paper  and  crayons  and  you  will  see   that  they  ins7nc7vely  create  original  art  that  has  a  message.    Their  works  of  art  not  only  display  passion  for  color   but  also  includes  stories  about  their  world,  family,  and  pets.    If  you  ask  them  what  their  work  is  about,  they  will   tell  you  a  story  that  goes  on  and  on. Why  do  so  many  people  lose  the  ability  to  share  themselves  openly  through  their  artwork  as  they  get  older?    I   believe  that  everyone  has  crea7vity  and  talent,  and  the  only  thing  that  stands  in  the  way  of  experiencing  their   crea7ve  self  is  fear.    Ar7sts  o]en  fear  their  art  looks  awful  or  that  they  will  fail  to  reach  expecta7ons  (of  others  
83

or  their  own)  to  appear  competent  and  have  their  art  look  masterful,  perfect,  or  beau7ful  from  the  beginning.     The  “ego”  is  the  part  of  our  selves  that  censors  our  ac7ons  and  limits  our  impulses  so  that  we  fit  into  society  and   behave  in  acceptable  ways.    However,  the  ego  can  limit  our  crea7vity  by  demanding  that  we  do  things  that  are   ordinary  so  we  will  blend  in,  instead  of  being  unique  and  extraordinary  when  expressing  ourselves.    The  fear  of   not  being  good  enough  can  discourage  ar7sts  so  profoundly  that  they  put  down  their  brushes  and  never  paint   again.    Just  think  of  the  beauty  that  would  be  lost  if  the  flowering  sweet  peas  that  I  painted  worried  if  they  were   good  enough  to  be  in  the  meadows,  or  prehy  enough  to  be  painted  by  ar7sts,  and  hid  from  view  so  that  no  one   ever  saw  them  at  all. At  our  workshops,  we  explore  and  disarm  many  of  the  limi7ng  and  judgmental  ideas  that  people  have  believed   to  be  true  since  childhood  and  introduce  new  possibili7es  for  crea7vity  and  ar7s7c  expression  through  the   excitement  of  outdoor  pain7ng.

84

“Silence  at  Siskiyou  Lake”  -­‐  Persevering
I  painted  “Silence  at  Siskiyou  Lake”  on  loca7on  during  the  May  pain7ng  workshop  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch.     This  roman7c  scene  captures  the  essence  of  Mt.  Shasta  and  the  ethereal  quality  that  surrounds  her  majes7c   slopes.    The  low  angle  of  the  light  and  the  colors  from  the  cool  haze  lightly  covering  Mt.  Shasta,  with  the  foothills   contrasted  with  the  warm  highlights  of  the  morning  sun  just  breaching  over  the  high  alpine  tree  line,  give  this   pain7ng  a  “sense  of  place.”    Crea7ng  a  sense  of  place  requires  an  understanding  of  nature  that  one  acquires  by   close  observa7on  and  sketching  what  you  see,  combined  with  the  good  sense  of  design  and  composi7on  that   one  learns  with  prac7ce  and  effec7ve  instruc7on  by  a  competent  instructor.    When  I  was  learning  these  skills,  I   read  the  works  of  early  poets  and  scholars  to  understand  the  old  methods  of  depic7ng  a  sense  of  place,  a   roman7c  vision  that  seems  lost  in  pain7ng  lately. One  such  poet  and  observer  of  nature  that  I  found  par7cularly  fascina7ng  was  John  Ruskin.    Ruskin  was  a   formidable  voice  during  the  1850s  and  1860s  when  early  ar7sts  like  Albert  Bierstadt  and  Thomas  Moran   established  the  direc7on  and  instruc7ve  influence  of  art.    Ruskin  promoted  “direct  imita7on  of  nature’s  vital   facts”  as  the  path  to  “truth.”    He  advised  students  to  begin  by  studying  a  single  leaf,  and  expanding  their  range  of   vision  gradually,  while  avoiding  any  view  that  would  make  a  “prehy”  picture.    He  recommended  that  in   prepara7on  for  study  in  the  field,  the  serious  art  student  should  select  one  photograph  of  a  natural  place  like  a   riverbank  or  a  corner  of  a  park,  then  hold  the  image  up  to  a  window  and  trace  the  outline  on  paper  as  accurately   as  possible.    He  wrote  that  by  doing  this,  it  might  improve  the  ar7st's  ability  to  simulate  nature  more  accurately.     I  recommend  it  as  an  exercise  for  beginning  students  who  want  to  create  a  realis7c  portrayal  of  nature  in  their   pain7ngs. Ar7sts  who  make  a  career  in  art  share  one  quality  that  makes  them  successful.    This  quality  separates  great   ar7sts  from  the  meek.    All  successful  ar7sts  are  able  to  persevere  and  they  do  not  quit.    Quiyng  is  contagious.     In  our  twenty-­‐first  century,  kids  are  encouraged  to  quit  when  the  going  gets  tough  or  when  they  are  bored  with   a  hobby  or  interest.    We  have  dreams  of  becoming  a  great  a  pianist,  a  writer,  a  soccer  player,  a  singer,  or  an  ar7st.     You  will  never  become  great  at  anything  if  you  quit.    Students  come  to  my  studio  with  stories  about  how  they   dreamed  of  becoming  something  but  quit  because  it  was  too  difficult,  too  risky,  or  not  ahainable.    All  ar7sts  have   thoughts  of  failure,  and  frequently  have  nega7ve  conversa7ons  in  their  heads  about  why  their  art  does  not  sell,   or  even  worse,  why  it  is  not  liked.    Ar7sts  quit  when  they  are  convinced  that  their  next  work  is  doomed  to  fail.
85

Those  who  con7nue  to  create  art  have  learned  how  to  persevere.    What  would  you  do  if  I  could  guarantee  that   you  would  not  fail,  and  that  the  next  piece  of  art  that  you  create  will  be  the  masterpiece  the  world  is  wai7ng  for?     What  if  you  already  have  all  that  you  need  to  complete  an  extraordinary  pain7ng,  and  that  all  you  need  to  do  is   to  pick  up  a  brush  and  paint  it? Unfortunately,  I  can  only  guarantee  that  if  you  do  not  create  art,  your  dream  of  pain7ng  a  masterpiece  will  never   happen.    If  you  wish  to  become  an  ar7st,  step  up,  find  a  subject  that  you  feel  excited  about  sharing,  and  paint  it.     The  world  is  wai7ng  to  see  what  you  have  to  offer.

86

“View  of  InspiraPon  Point”  -­‐  Imagina(on  and  Originality
Shasta,  from  Sus7'ka,  is  the  name  of  a  well-­‐known  Indian  tribe  who  lived  in  the  Mt.  Shasta  area  in  the  1840s.     These  na7ve  people  lived  in  three  major  groups  in  Shasta  Valley,  Scoh  Valley,  and  near  the  Klamath  River.    A   small  tribe  of  the  Shasta  clan  called  the  Okwanuchu  occupied  the  territory  southwest  of  Mt.  Shasta  where  the   headwaters  of  mighty  Sacramento  and  McCloud  rivers  converge.    Very  few  people  of  the  Okwanuchu  clan   remain,  but  I  had  the  good  fortune  to  meet  one  of  their  ancestors.    He  told  me  about  a  path  above  the  Ney  falls   that  would  take  me  to  a  breathtaking  vista  of  Mt.  Shasta  that  they  called  Inspira7on  Point.    I  wanted  to  capture   and  share  the  experience  that  I  had  when  I  visited  this  magical  place  at  sunset  when  pain7ng  "View  from   Inspira7on  Point"  for  you. Imagina7on  is  the  key  that  unlocks  originality.    The  ques7on  today  is  how  do  ar7sts  develop  their  ability  to   create  something  from  their  imagina7on  that  they  have  not  seen  before.    Before  anyone  can  be  original  in their  crea7vity,  they  must  begin  with  the  elemental  aspects  of  their  art,  and  that  means  studying,  prac7cing   and  applying  all  the  skills  needed  for  that  ar7s7c  endeavor.    If  your  goal  is  to  paint  a  scene  from  nature  that  you   originate  without  being  in  nature  or  using  a  photograph,  you  must  study  nature  to  learn  her  lines  and  shapes,   every  nuance  of  lights  and  shadows,  7mes  of  day,  weather  condi7ons,  atmosphere,  and  the  seasonal  7mes  of   year.    Next,  ar7sts  must  repeatedly  prac7ce  drawing  and  pain7ng  what  they  observe  and  feel  when  they  paint   in  nature.    Accurate  sketching,  along  with  skillful  color  choices,  and  prac7ced,  inten7onal  brush  strokes  assist   the  ar7st's  representa7on  when  pain7ng  the  scene  first  hand. The  addi7onal  lesson  that  you  as  an  ar7st  must  learn  is  to  take  7me  to  memorize  what  you  see,  feel,  hear,  and   smell  at  the  scene,  and  to  be  able  to  recall  accurately  what  you  have  experienced  later.    Then  you  are  set  free  to   imagine  everything  that  you  have  stored  in  your  memory  and  use  it  when  you  create  pain7ngs  in  the  studio   without  using  photographs.    Using  your  imagina7on  is  like  using  any  muscle  in  your  body.    By  using  your  memory   frequently  and  consistently,  you  will  see  improvement  quickly.    Pain7ng  from  your  imagina7on  is  a  skill  that  is   essen7al  for  an  ar7st  to  reach  the  next  level  of  originality  and  crea7vity. Your  growth  as  an  ar7st  will  take  a  life7me.    It  is  a  con7nuous  path  of  frustra7on  and  joyful  insight.    You  will   never  know  everything,  and  most  ar7sts  quit  before  they  discover  who  they  really  are  as  an  ar7st.    When  your   imagina7on  employs  the  rich  sensory  memory  of  all  that  you  have  experienced,  the  artwork  you  create  comes  to   life,  and  this  is  what  the  world  is  wai7ng  to  see  in  your  pain7ngs.
87

“Hall  of  the  Mountain  King”
Recently  I  found  a  sketch  that  I  painted  of  a  mountain  goat  that  I  followed  up  a  canyon  path  in  Glacier  Na7onal   Park  a  few  years  ago.    It  was  one  of  my  pain7ng  trips  where  I  was  not  burdened  with  a  produc7on  crew  for  the   television  show,  and  I  could  spend  my  7me  pain7ng  and  exploring  the  park  by  myself. During  that  visit,  I  met  a  park  ranger  who  was  very  interested  in  my  ability  to  paint  wildlife.    With  a  big  grin,  he   winked,  mo7oned  with  his  hands,  and  said,  “Come,  I’ll  show  you  something,  a  secret.”    We  walked  a  short   distance  over  some  boulders  and  up  to  a  creek.    He  stopped  by  the  foot  of  a  tree  and  we  both  knelt  down.    Just  a   few  yards  away  was  a  huge  male  mountain  goat  grazing  along  the  sides  of  the  cliffs,  his  white  coat  glistening  like   fresh  snow,  his  eyes  soulful  and  inquisi7ve,  keeping  one  eye  on  us  and  the  other  on  the  edge  of  the  cliff  as  he  ate   the  fresh  grass.    “He  is  my  secret.    He  is  always  here.    He  is  never  bothered  by  humans.  Well,  at  least  not  yet,”  the   ranger  whispered.    “We  always  play  this  lihle  game,”  the  ranger  turned  to  me  and  said.    “Slowly,  I  go  up  to  him.     He  will  walk  away,  and  then  I  follow  him  to  a  secret  place.”    The  ranger  pointed,  and  I  did  just  as  he  suggested.     The  game  had  a  child’s  simplicity,  but  for  some  reason  the  adventure  seemed  exci7ng. I  stepped  out  from  under  the  tree  and  the  goat  slowly  turned  and  walked  away,  always  keeping  an  eye  on  me.     He  led  me  upward  towards  the  waterfall  in  the  canyon.    The  canyon  was  small  and  did  not  even  have  a  formal   name.    I  was  grateful  for  that,  since  it  seemed  to  keep  the  tourists  from  this  place.

88

I  remember  that  this  par7cular  goat  seemed  to  challenge  me  to  go  higher  up  the  cliffs  with  the  churning   waterfalls  below.    I  con7nued  to  walk  for  what  seemed  like  a  mile,  making  my  way  over  boulders  and  along  paths   made  by  goats  traveling  these  walls  over  the  years.    The  very  spirit  of  this  place  was  magic.    He  followed  the   creek  up  into  the  mountains.    Suddenly,  he  stopped  and  bobbed  his  head  up  and  down  a  few  7mes  as  if  to  tell   me  to  con7nue  following  him.    As  I  came  nearer,  he  leaped  over  to  another  rock.    I  hiked  around  the  boulders   and  soon  the  sloped  banks  became  steep  rocky  walls.    The  goat  kept  going  ahead,  some7mes  taking  long  breaths   and  blowing  them  out  of  his  nose,  seemingly  frustrated  at  my  slow  pace.    The  current  of  the  river  below  was   swi]er  now.    We  came  to  a  turn  in  the  canyon  where  we  saw  a  waterfall  spilling  from  the  rock  walls.    The  sound   of  water  crashing  against  the  rocks  echoed  in  the  canyon.    It  was  unforgehable  to  come  so  close  to  the  falls,  to   feel  the  spray  on  my  face  and  the  cool  dra]  of  the  wind,  and  to  press  my  hand  against  so]  cushions  of  green   moss  that  grow  because  of  the  misty  waterfalls.    This  was  the  secret  of  the  canyon. Finally,  I  could  go  no  further.    I  stopped,  and  the  goat  turned  as  if  to  show  his  dominance  over  the  terrain.    He   seemed  to  gloat  that  he  was  the  victor  of  this  game  of  cat  and  mouse,  that  I  was  turning  around  and  returning  to   the  place  this  lihle  game  began.  Before  I  le]  him,  I  sat  quietly  and  sketched  him  as  he  watched  me  un7l,  with  a   burst  of  energy,  he  leaped  to  another  rock  and  disappeared  around  the  ledge.

89

“Teton  Splendor”  -­‐  Plein  Air  When  Traveling
It  has  been  many  years  since  I  began  pain7ng  twenty  of  America’s  Na7onal  Parks  for  the  PBS  series  “ The  Grand   View,  America's  Na7onal  Parks  through  the  Eyes  of  an  Ar7st.”    Lately,  I  have  been  yearning  to  return  to  the   wilderness  near  Yellowstone  and  paint  along  the  way.    Earlier  this  year  we  bought  a  1970  Silver  Streak  Trailer   and,  a]er  much  prepara7on,  we  hooked  it  onto  my  truck  and  began  our  exci7ng  journey.    The  next  few  blogs   come  from  observa7ons  I  wrote  in  my  daily  journal  and  pain7ngs  I  sketched  of  loca7ons  that  captured  my  eye   along  the  way.    So,  come  along  with  us  as  we  travel  through  the  northwestern  corner  of  Wyoming  on  our  road   trip  to  the  Tetons  and  Yellowstone  Na7onal  Park. September  18,  2009 As  we  approached  Jackson,  Wyoming,  we  traveled  off  the  main  road  onto  an  old  prospector’s  trail.    The  ruts   were  deep  and  it  was  hard  to  move  forward  with  the  trailer.    A]er  about  a  mile,  the  truck  could  not  go  any   further  on  this  dirt  road,  so  I  collected  my  paint  supplies  and  hiked  up  the  pass  on  foot.    Cool  breezes  and  a  few   light  showers  signaled  that  the  seasons  were  changing  and  winter  was  on  the  way.    The  aspen  trees  were  also   changing,  their  green  summer  tops  turning  to  a  more  suitable  coat  of  yellows,  oranges,  magentas,  and  browns.     Thick  layers  of  clouds  covered  the  Teton  Mountains.    From  7me  to  7me  the  clouds  cleared,  revealing  majes7c   crags  and  peaks  above  the  foothills,  so  beau7fully  sprinkled  with  aspen  trees,  with  a  thousand  gorgeous  autumn   colors  and  hues.

90

“Yellowstone  Bison”  -­‐  Capturing  Animals  on  Loca(on
Pain7ng  animals  on  loca7on  can  be  tricky.    Animals  are  usually  very  poor  models  because  they  are  unwilling  to   hold  s7ll  for  extended  lengths  of  7me.    If  you  paint  animals  that  linger  as  cows,  horses,  or  bison  do,  it  is  possible   to  compose  and  sketch  your  ini7al  pain7ng  and  capture  their  basic  outline  and  essence  on  loca7on.    The  finer   details  of  the  animal  will  come  into  focus  once  you  begin  pain7ng.    Look  very  carefully  as  you  are  pain7ng  your   sketch  and  you  will  find  that  all  the  detail  informa7on  that  you  need  is  right  in  front  of  your  eyes  even  though   the  animal’s  pose  may  change.    Start  by  pain7ng  the  animal’s  eyes  first,  and  paint  outwards  to  the  head  and  then   the  body.    If  you  enjoy  pain7ng  animals  and  want  to  paint  extraordinary  animal  studies,  it  is  important  to  learn   how  to  paint  them  accurately  by  drawing  them  frequently.    Great  portrait  painters  draw  the  human  face  and   figure  every  day  to  hone  their  skill.    The  painters  of  domes7c  or  wild  animals  must  do  the  same  if  they  want  to   excel.    However,  if  you  only  want  to  paint  an  occasional  cow,  you  can  be  successful  by  just  drawing  what  you  see. September  20,  2009 Our  journey  con7nued  north  into  Yellowstone  as  we  followed  an  old  logging  route.    We  carefully  towed  our   trailer  through  the  forest,  knowing  that  we  risked  the  chance  of  breaking  down  in  a  very  remote  part  of  the   country.    The  standing  trees  were  so  thick  that  it  seemed  impossible  to  find  a  space  wide  enough  for  the  trailer   to  squeeze  through.    We  finally  reached  the  southern  point  of  Yellowstone  Lake,  and  found  the  West  thumb  of   the  Geyser  Basin  where  we  discovered  a  herd  of  American  bison  that  were  grazing  nearby,  lingering  as  if  they   wanted  me  to  paint  them  during  our  stay.    In  my  pain7ng,  I  captured  the  oldest  male  in  the  herd  on  my  canvas.

91

“WapiP  Study,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Capturing  Animals  on  Loca(on,  Part  2
Fall  colors  of  the  trees  blanketed  the  hillside  with  a  palehe  of  green,  crimson,  and  amber  foliage,  signaling  the   changing  seasons.    Bursts  of  air  blew  through  the  groves  of  aspen  trees  7ckling  the  golden  yellow  leaves  making   them  quiver.    Light  breezes  started  from  the  foothills  and  briskly  floated  upwards  to  the  mountain  peaks.    In  the   distance,  I  could  hear  the  faint  whisper  of  streams  of  air  moving  through  these  beau7ful  trees.    The  leaves   trembled,  making  quaking,  rustling  sounds,  and  all  at  once  they  serenaded  me  with  a  grand  symphony  of  song.     Millions  of  leaves  let  go  of  the  safety  of  their  summer  res7ng  spot  in  the  trees  high  above  the  forest  floor  and   rained  down  upon  me  in  a  turbulent  whirlwind.    Millions  of  leaves  fell  spontaneously  like  the  confey  at  the   finale  of  a  poli7cal  conven7on,  covering  the  forest  floor  with  a  thick  carpet  of  yellow.    Against  the  background  of   blue  spruce,  massive  Douglas  fir,  and  the  white  bark  pine,  these  bright  leaves  shone  like  golden  diamonds  on  a   dark  green  velvet  backdrop.    I  was  aware  that  I  was  just  an  observer  of  a  moment  of  the  symphony  of  seasons   that  has  existed  for  thousands  of  years.    In  the  distance  I  heard  the  call  of  the  Wapi7  (Elk)  echoing  throughout   the  canyon  as  the  males  gathered  their  mates  and  began  their  rut. When  I  was  pain7ng  this  pain7ng,  “Wapi7  Study,  Opus  1,”  I  was  in  a  meadow  capturing  the  fall  colors  when  all  at   once,  a  massive  elk  came  out  of  the  aspen  trees  to  check  out  what  I  was  doing.    We  locked  eyes  for  what  seemed   like  minutes  but  probably  was  only  several  seconds,  and  a]er  he  was  sa7sfied  that  I  was  not  another  bull  elk  that   might  be  interested  in  invading  his  territory  he  retreated  into  the  woods.    When  composing  a  pain7ng  in  nature,   ar7sts  imagine  and  hope  to  have  living  creatures  included  in  their  composi7on.    Occasionally,  an  animal  will   comply  and  grant  a  brief  but  most  appreciated  opportunity  to  see  and  paint  them.    Ar7sts  who  are  interested  in   adding  wildlife  in  their  pain7ngs  spend  hours  prac7cing,  drawing,  and  pain7ng  studies  of  animals  to  use  in  future   composi7ons.    These  studies  (small  renderings  in  pen  and  ink,  pencil,  and  paint)  become  invaluable  tools  and  a   vital  resource  for  adding  animals  to  their  pain7ngs  in  the  future.    I  recommend  that  ar7sts  start  by  drawing   people  because  ar7sts  can  prac7ce  all  the  techniques  needed  to  draw  anything  when  drawing  the  human  form.     Next,  prac7ce  drawing  a  dog  or  cat.    Many  quadrupeds  have  similar  characteris7cs  to  their  counterparts  in  the   wild. “The  wonder  of  the  world,  the  beauty  and  the  power,  the  shapes  of  things,  their  colors,  lights,  and  shades;  these   I  saw.    Look  ye  also  while  life  lasts.”    This  verse  is  on  a  plaque  hanging  at  the  Moose  Visitor  Center  at  Teton  
92

Na7onal  Park  in  Wyoming.    The  original  message  was  etched  on  a  gravestone  in  Cumberland,  England.    This   humble  and  unselfish  message  describes  my  dreams  and  efforts  at  The  Grand  View,  in  my  art  classes  and   workshops,  along  with  the  na7onal  PBS  television  show  over  the  past  25  years.    I  have  devoted  my  life  to  touch,   move,  and  inspire  others  to  see  and  appreciate  the  beauty  of  art  and  its  rela7onship  to  nature.    As  we  travel   through  this  great  land  with  our  1970  Silver  Streak  trailer  following  behind  our  truck,  I  passionately  desire  to   share  the  power  and  beauty  of  nature  and  art  with  others.

93

“Curious  Bear”  -­‐  Sketchbooks  are  Essen(al
A]er  successfully  pain7ng  all  day  on  the  bank  of  the  Snake  River,  we  returned  to  camp.    Squirrels  chaher  in  the   trees  as  they  jump  from  branch  to  branch,  from  tree  to  tree,  as  if  today  is  the  last  day  to  gather  pinion  and  cedar   nuts  to  hoard  inside  old  hollow  trees  for  quick  snacks  during  the  cold  winter  months.    In  the  woods  not  far  from   us,  we  can  hear  the  unmistakable  bugling  sounds  of  Wapi7  (elk)  as  they  establish  their  territory  and  breeding   herd.    Bears,  too,  eat  con7nuously  to  store  fat  for  their  long  winter’s  nap. At  our  camp  near  Coulter  Bay,  on  the  boundary  of  the  Teton  Na7onal  Park,  lives  a  bear  whose  name  is  Number   399.    The  Na7onal  Park  Service  gives  bears  numbers  to  iden7fy  each  bear,  keep  track  of  their  ac7vity,  and  to   monitor  if  any  bears  are  interac7ng  with  park  tourists  in  an  unpleasant  manner.    Every  bear  has  its  own   personality  and  interacts  differently  with  members  of  the  human  race.    Number  399  is  a  popular  bear  at  the   campground.    Rangers  and  park  visitors  like  him  because  of  his  natural  curiosity  about  people,  and  as  a  result,   many  park  tourists  enjoy  seeing  this  beau7ful  four  year  old,  honey-­‐colored  grizzly.    He  likes  the  ahen7on  and   poses  for  pictures,  and  he  has  never  been  cited  for  unruly  bear  behavior,  although  his  natural  curiosity  makes  a   few  campers  a  lihle  uncomfortable  as  he  wanders  from  campsite  to  campsite. I  captured  my  first  glimpse  of  Number  399  as  I  enjoyed  a  cup  of  tea  just  outside  of  our  Silver  Streak  trailer.    I   grabbed  my  sketchbook  to  make  a  quick  sketch  on  paper  knowing  that  I  could  later  transfer  it  to  canvas.    The   bear  stood  for  a  few  moments  among  several  fallen  tree  trunks  before  lo]ing  away  to  another  campsite.    While   he  stood  there,  a  burst  of  wind  made  his  fur  ripple  like  waves  on  water,  back  blowing  his  thick  winter  coat.    The   following  day,  I  learned  that  a  hunter,  who  had  just  killed  an  elk,  shot  Number  399  three  7mes  and  killed  him.     The  hunter  apparently  was  worried  that  he  might  have  to  share  his  kill  with  the  bear.    This  was  a  poignant   reminder  of  the  value  of  sketching  in  the  moment  as  the  opportunity  presents  itself. Ar7sts  have  not  always  carried  their  paints  and  canvas  with  them  on  their  travels.    The  prac7ce  of  pain7ng  on   loca7on  en  plein  air  is  a  rela7vely  new  concept  in  the  history  of  pain7ng.    Many  ar7sts  prefer  the  tradi7onal   method  of  sketching  their  experiences  in  a  sketchbook.    Ar7sts  can  draw  models  or  objects  of  interest,  jot  down   notes  and  observa7ons  about  a  subject’s  shapes,  colors  and  unique  features,  or  work  on  ideas  for  upcoming   pain7ngs  in  their  sketchbooks.    In  this  pain7ng,  “Curious  Bear,”  I  worked  from  a  sketch  that  I  drew  of  the  bear   that  visited  our  campsite.    Having  only  seconds  to  jot  down  ideas,  I  worked  on  an  idea  for  a  pain7ng  from  my  
94

sketchbook  and  notes  the  following  day  a]er  I  learned  that  this  bear  had  been  shot  and  killed.    This  is  an   example  of  why  it  is  essen7al  that  an  ar7st  always  have  a  sketchbook  and  a  pencil  or  pen  ready  to  sketch  and   write  notes  and  observa7ons. I  recommend  using  a  book  that  has  about  50  sheets  of  plain  paper  with  a  spiral  spine,  and  urge  ar7sts  to  carry  it   with  them  everywhere.    Make  a  point  to  draw  at  least  three  drawings  a  day  in  it.    It  is  not  necessary  to  invest  in   expensive  journals  with  upgraded  paper  and  leather  binding  displaying  the  ar7st’s  name  in  gold  leaf.    Although   these  can  be  impressive,  the  fancy  journals  are  in7mida7ng  and  rarely,  if  ever,  used.    Don’t  think  of  your   sketchbook  as  a  holy  relic.    It  is  just  a  book  with  pieces  of  paper.    The  real  value  is  not  the  book  itself;  it  is  using   its  pages  to  prac7ce  your  sketching  and  to  journal  what  you  are  thinking  and  feeling  daily  about  the  world   around  you,  with  the  possibility  of  capturing  a  precious  moment  that  later  can  become  your  next  great  pain7ng.

95

“Mt.  Shasta's  Winter  Splendor”  -­‐  Season  and  Mood
The  past  few  days  have  been  very  windy,  a  sign  that  the  landscape  in  Mt.  Shasta  is  about  to  go  through  a   transforma7on  from  fall  to  winter.    As  the  days  grow  shorter  this  7me  of  year,  things  seem  to  move  more  slowly.     I  have  to  consolidate  my  7me  at  the  easel  because  the  natural  daylight  is  limited,  and  pain7ng  under  electric   lights  is  less  desirable.    A]er  pain7ng  all  morning  in  my  studio,  I  gathered  my  paints  to  visit  the  lihle  village  of  Mt.   Shasta.    When  I  came  outside,  a  blanket  of  new  snow  covered  The  Grand  View  landscape.    Many  of  the  colorful   leaves  had  not  yet  fallen  off  the  trees  and  the  fresh  snow  sparkled  and  glistened  like  millions  of  white  diamonds,   contras7ng  brightly  against  orange  and  yellow  oak  trees  and  the  dark,  cool  green  pine  trees. The  City  of  Mt.  Shasta  is  located  at  the  base  of  Mt.  Shasta,  a  dormant  volcano  that  ascends  14,165  feet  upward   into  the  sky.    When  traveling  from  Sacramento,  the  snow  on  top  of  Mt.  Shasta  is  visible  from  hundreds  of  miles   away.    John  Muir  thought  the  mountain  was  so  spectacular  that  he  campaigned  to  make  Mt.  Shasta  a  Na7onal   Park.    As  I  drove  into  town,  I  could  see  the  late  a]ernoon  shadow  which  Mt.  Eddy  casts  over  the  town  as  the  sun   disappears  behind  the  mountains.    Mt.  Shasta  herself  radiated  with  a  wonderful  tangerine  glow.      As  I  walked   through  town,  I  no7ced  that  the  trees  along  the  streets  twinkled  with  blue  holiday  lights.    All  the  shops  were  s7ll   open  and  their  colorful  lights  of  green  and  red  shone  from  the  windows  onto  snow  covered  sidewalks.    The  town   seems  a  lihle  empty  with  the  summer  tourists  and  campers  gone,  and  the  early  snows  kept  travelers  on  the  main   highways  and  local  residents  at  home  cuddling  with  a  book  close  to  the  fire  to  keep  warm.    I  feel  grateful  to  be   able  to  live  and  paint  in  this  very  special  place  with  Mt.  Shasta’s  glorious  display  of  colors,  clouds,  and  weather,   magnificently  presented  for  everyone  to  enjoy.

96

“Winter  Wonderland”  -­‐  Snow  Covered  Dogwood
It  feels  luxurious  to  be  nestled  in  our  cozy  ranch  house  enjoying  a  cup  of  rich  black  mocha  java  while  siyng  next   to  our  fireplace  glowing  with  warm  orange  and  red  flames.    The  latest  winter  storm  has  arrived  at  our  mountain   home.    The  wind  is  howling  through  the  trees  like  a  locomo7ve  as  it  steams  into  the  train  sta7on.    Gusts  of  wind   are  blowing  the  snow-­‐laden  branches  of  the  oak  and  dogwood  trees  at  50  miles  per  hour,  freeing  them  of  the   heavy  snow  that  entombs  them.    Snow  is  dropping  off  these  branches  and  falling  to  the  ground,  adding  to  the  6   feet  of  snow  that  has  already  fallen  over  the  past  3  days  at  the  Grand  View  Ranch.    More  of  this  fantas7c  and   needed  gi]  from  nature  is  sure  to  come.    Power  lines  burdened  with  heavy  ice  and  snow  lie  along  the  road;   several  of  the  poles  snapped  in  two  from  the  weight  of  the  snow,  and  the  electricity  has  been  off  for  days.    We   spend  our  nights  reading  by  candlelight  and  wai7ng  for  the  snow  to  stop  so  we  can  plow  our  way  out.    The   search  and  rescue  helicopters  hover  over  our  hill  searching  for  homeowners  in  trouble.    I  feel  frustrated  when  we   are  snowbound  and  unable  to  get  out  of  the  house.    However,  I  am  a  lover  of  landscapes  and  painter  of  nature,   and  I  am  present  to  the  opportuni7es  of  the  moment.    The  assets  of  this  wonderful  spectacle  inspire  me,  so  I   take  the  opportunity  to  paint  the  snow-­‐covered  dogwood  tree  from  my  studio  window.

Secrets  of  Pain(ng  Snow
Pain7ng  winter  snow  can  be  tricky  because  an  ar7st  has  so  many  values  of  white  to  work  with.    The  key  is  not  to   think  about  the  color  of  the  snow.    Instead,  think  about  the  temperature  of  the  color  (warm  or  cool)  and  the   values  in  the  snowy  landscape  (from  light  to  dark).    Temperature  and  value  are  always  important  when  pain7ng.     Snow  scenes  have  whites  with  cool  colors  added,  like  blue  green  and  violet,  that  contrast  with  whites  with  warm   colors  added,  such  as  yellow-­‐orange  and  red.    When  pain7ng  the  highlights  or  brightest  areas  of  snow,  always   add  a  lihle  orange  to  your  lightest  value.    This  will  give  the  viewer  the  feeling  of  sunlight.    The  shadow  colors  of   snow  are  always  darker  and  cooler  than  you  think,  especially  when  contrasted  with  lighter  highlights.    I  always   mix  a  neutral  grey  using  blue,  red,  and  yellow.    This  mixture  added  to  white  will  make  many  different  values  to   paint  the  shadows.    It  is  important  when  pain7ng  snow  to  use  a  lot  of  paint  to  sculpt  and  create  texture  in  both   the  highlights  and  shadows.    Paint  as  if  you  are  a  millionaire;  if  you  do,  you  may  become  one.

97

“Hornbrook  Barn,  Opus  1”  -­‐  Pain(ng  with  Inten(on
Just  north  of  The  Grand  View  Ranch  and  Mt.  Shasta,  the  quaint  and  picturesque  farming  community  of   Hornbrook  has  become  the  inspira7onal  loca7on  for  many  of  the  new  pain7ngs  I  plan  to  paint  this  year.    This   amazing  red  barn,  just  off  the  freeway  near  Hornbrook,  catches  my  eye  every  7me  I  drive  to  Medford,  Oregon  to   teach  pain7ng  classes.    In  my  pain7ng  of  the  Hornbrook  barn,  I  wanted  to  capture  the  change  of  seasons  by   contras7ng  the  fallen  dead  oaks  in  the  background  with  the  fresh  green  spring  grass  in  the  foreground.    I  find  the   ever-­‐changing  theme  of  rebirth  and  renewal  in  nature  fascina7ng.    In  my  composi7on  of  this  pain7ng,  I   posi7oned  the  main  focal  point  just  to  the  right  of  the  barn,  and  then  added  the  fence  that  darts  along  the   foreground  to  bring  the  viewer’s  eye  to  the  focal  point.    Before  I  begin  a  pain7ng,  I  think  about  why  I  am   ahracted  to  the  subject  that  I  am  choosing  to  paint,  what  the  message  or  personal  observa7on  is  that  I  want  to   share  with  the  viewer,  and  what  composi7on  will  make  my  message  clear  and  moving  to  anyone  who  sees  my   pain7ng.

Pain(ng  with  Inten(on
A  great  pain7ng  grabs  the  viewer’s  ahen7on  immediately,  and  then  holds  it  so  the  ar7st  can  communicate  his   message  on  the  canvas.    Yes,  a  message.    Many  pain7ngs  have  lihle  to  say  because  the  ar7st  did  not  take  7me  to   ask  the  most  important  ques7on,  “Why  am  I  pain7ng  this  pain7ng?”    Pain7ng  is  powerful.    It  is  the  most   expressive  ar7s7c  medium  that  there  is.    Leonardo  da  Vinci  said,  "Pain7ng  is  supreme  of  all  the  arts  because  one   does  not  have  to  read,  watch,  or  listen  for  a  long  7me  to  understand  the  ar7st’s  inten7on.    With  one  careful   placement  of  a  brush  stroke,  an  ar7st  can  create  all  kinds  of  messages  and  meanings."    However,  it  is  all  for   naught  if  the  ar7st  has  nothing  to  say. The  next  7me  you  go  on  loca7on  to  paint,  try  doing  this  before  you  begin.    Ask  yourself,  “Why  do  I  want  to  paint   this  pain7ng?”  and  “What  is  the  message  I  want  to  communicate?”    Then,  begin  your  conversa7on  with  the   future  viewers  and  reveal  your  point  of  view  by  pain7ng  it  for  them.

98

“Pansies”  -­‐  Taking  Time  to  Paint
During  this  7me  of  year  as  winter  ends  and  spring  begins  to  awaken  with  new  possibili7es  and  gi]s,  we  at  The   Grand  View  Ranch  have  to  wait  for  spring  to  visit  us  because  we  are  located  in  the  mountains  at  a  higher   al7tude.    A]er  months  inside  the  house  smothered  by  snow  as  the  trees  stand  naked,  their  leaves  stripped  by   the  winter  cold,  I  find  myself  lingering  at  the  Home  Depot  nursery  allowing  the  bright  colors  of  the  spring  flowers   to  saturate  my  eyes.    Pansies  always  make  me  smile.    Their  brilliant  colors  and  delicate  leaves  make  them  fun  to   paint.    I  enjoy  studying  their  colorful  faces  for  hours,  especially  when  the  world  is  gray  outside  my  studio   window.    When  I  was  at  the  nursery  last  week,  I  scooped  up  these  colorful  posies  to  paint  in  my  studio. Pain7ng  flowers  from  life  is  a  very  challenging  thing  to  do.    No  maher  how  fast  you  paint,  flowers  change   constantly  either  by  following  the  sun  that  is  beaming  through  the  studio  window  or  wil7ng  from  the  heat  of  the   light  bulb.    To  paint  beau7ful  flowers,  an  ar7st  needs  to  have  an  agile  hand  for  accuracy  of  brush  strokes,  an   educated  eye  that  sees  the  nuances  of  color  and  light,  and  confidence  that  the  hours  of  pain7ng  day  a]er  day   will  produce  a  pain7ng  that  sparkles  with  life. Whether  your  desired  art  form  is  music,  wri7ng,  pain7ng,  or  even  cooking,  it  is  the  most  important  thing  you  can   do  every  day.    Most  of  the  excuses  seem  silly  when  you  look  back  over  the  week  and  ask  yourself  why  you  did   not  paint  this  week.    Imagine  how  you  would  feel  if  you  had  painted  five  pain7ngs  this  week.    What  insights   would  you  have  had?    What  discoveries  would  you  have  made?    Pain7ng  is  not  just  something  that  you  do  when   it  is  convenient.    If  you  wait  un7l  you  feel  like  it  or  wait  un7l  you  are  inspired,  you  will  never  excel  in  the   discipline  of  pain7ng.    Choose  to  paint  first  and  then  find  the  7me  to  get  the  other  stuff  done.    Believe  me,  the   other  stuff  will  s7ll  be  wai7ng. The  next  7me  you  walk  past  a  flat  of  pansies  or  a  bunch  of  roses  and  think,  “Wow!    I  would  love  to  paint  those   flowers,"  stop  immediately  and  buy  them,  then  go  home,  turn  your  phone  off,  and  paint,  paint,  paint!

99

“Ashland  Barn”  -­‐  Be  Prepared  to  Paint
Last  week  I  was  traveling  in  Medford,  Oregon  with  my  brushes,  paints,  and  canvases  in  my  truck  ready  to  go   when  I  took  an  unexpected  turn  off  the  freeway  onto  a  quiet  country  road.    It  had  been  raining  and  a  magnificent   cloud  forma7on  with  impressive  effects  of  light  covered  the  sky.    I  drove  by  an  old  pear  orchard,  and  no7ced  a   beau7ful  pear  tree  covered  with  blossoms  that  had  an  old  barn  as  a  backdrop.    As  I  came  closer  to  the  tree,  the   sky  opened  and  a  beam  of  sunlight  lit  up  the  metal  roof  on  the  barn  crea7ng  a  drama7c  moment  of  contras7ng   lights  and  darks.    I  pulled  over  quickly,  gathered  my  pain7ng  supplies,  and  began  mixing  my  founda7on  color.    An   ar7st  must  always  be  ready  to  create  when  inspira7on  strikes.    A  writer  has  sharp  pencils  and  paper  in  a  shirt   pocket  to  jot  down  notes.    A  cook  always  has  a  collec7on  of  spices  in  his  kitchen  ready  to  create  the  next   extravaganza.    The  ar7st  must  have  supplies  at  hand  to  be  able  to  catch  the  moment  of  inspira7on  and  transfer  it   to  canvas.    A  travel  bag  ouxihed  with  these  basic  essen7als  will  serve  you  well  whenever  you  want  to  create:   red,  yellow,  and  blue  paint,  a  palehe,  canvas,  brushes,  turpen7ne,  and  paper  towels.    Like  a  good  scout,  it  pays  to   be  prepared  for  anything. Being  prepared  with  our  supplies  does  not  take  the  work  and  discomfort  out  of  pain7ng  on  loca7on.    If  we   remembered  all  the  obstacles  we  may  encounter  outdoors,  such  as  the  weather,  changing  light,  difficul7es  with   sketching  and  composi7on,  inhospitable  insects,  and  changing  temperatures,  we  would  probably  talk  ourselves   out  of  it  and  never  do  it  again.    If  you  boldly  go  where  so  many  would  never  go,  be  kind  to  yourself.    Have   reasonable  expecta7ons  of  what  you  can  accomplish.    Give  yourself  applause  for  venturing  outdoors  to  try  your   best  to  paint  what  you  see  and  love.    You  can  always  wipe  it  off  a]er  you  give  your  best  effort  or  you  can   remember  that  pain7ng,  as  in  any  art,  requires  learning  how  to  do  it.    Without  the  struggle,  successes  would  not   be  as  valuable  and  exci7ng. What  stops  you  from  pain7ng?    Some7mes  ar7sts  worry  about  not  pain7ng  "well  enough,"  nega7vely  compare   themselves  with  others  and  feel  inferior,  or  are  embarrassed  or  ashamed  because  they  cannot  paint  the   masterpiece  that  they  dream  of  crea7ng.    Knowledge  comes  from  prac7cing  and  making  mistakes,  as  awkward   and  frustra7ng  as  it  is,  and  ar7sts  must  be  willing  to  make  100  mistakes  on  their  canvases  before  they  can  begin   to  know  how  to  paint  well.    Try  not  to  judge  your  success  by  the  finished  piece.    The  experience  that  happens  in   your  imagina7on  as  you  paint  is  what  counts.    As  you  inten7onally  prac7ce  the  discipline  of  pain7ng,  remember   also  to  enjoy  the  pleasure  of  pain7ng  by  exploring  the  possibili7es  of  what  you  can  do  with  color,  shapes,   composi7on,  and  light.    At  the  end  of  the  day,  sharing  your  imagina7on,  feelings,  and  experiences  through  art  is   worthy  and  important  as  a  way  of  communica7ng  and  connec7ng  person  to  person.
100

“Grand  Old  Lady”  -­‐  Pleasing  Composi(on
At  the  end  of  April,  we  had  a  sudden  winter  snowstorm.    The  late  snow  offered  two  more  opportuni7es  to  paint   the  effects  of  mel7ng  snow  on  the  ground.    This  pain7ng  of  the  Mount  Shasta  Inn  is  one  of  those  pain7ngs.    On   my  way  to  the  art  class  that  I  teach  in  Mount  Shasta,  a  warm  light  on  an  old  farmhouse  contrasted  with  the   coldness  of  the  mel7ng  snow  caught  my  eye  and  I  could  not  wait  to  paint  it.    A]er  class,  I  returned  to  the  house   and  painted  this  “Grand  Old  Lady”  as  my  last  winter  pain7ng  of  the  season. The  underlying  goal  of  crea7ng  a  good  composi7on  when  you  paint  is  to  ahract  the  viewer’s  ahen7on.     Everything  is  placed  in  the  pain7ng  to  direct  the  viewer  deeper  into  the  pain7ng  and  draw  his  ahen7on  to  the   focal  point,  where  the  desire  to  linger  is  encouraged  by  the  brightest  light  or  darkest  values. Since  art  is  essen7ally  self-­‐expression,  personal  preference  is  fundamental.    Many  of  the  elements  of   composi7on  rely  on  the  simple  maher  of  personal  taste  and  interpreta7on,  making  art  a  spontaneous  crea7ve   process  that  begs  to  happen  without  rules.    However,  many  ar7sts  want  to  have  a  predictable  approach  to  create   ahrac7ve  pain7ngs  and  o]en  hope  to  find  a  step-­‐by-­‐step  method  that  they  can  use  (similar  to  recipes  that  help   with  cooking  or  kniyng).    Having  some  guidelines  in  mind  before  beginning  to  paint  helps  the  ar7st  develop  an   eye-­‐catching  composi7on  that  increases  the  possibility  of  success. Here  are  some  sugges7ons  for  composing  a  good  pain7ng: First,  ask  yourself,  “What  about  this  subject  inspires  me  so  much  that  I  want  to  paint  it?”    Answering  this   ques7on  will  help  you  compose  a  pain7ng  that  includes  elements  that  interest  you  and  captures  your  ahen7on   to  share  with  the  viewer. Second  -­‐  Keep  it  simple.    When  in  doubt,  simplify  it.    Ask  yourself,  “What  can  I  leave  out”  instead  of  “what  can  I   put  into  the  pain7ng?”    A  pain7ng  that  is  simple  and  directs  the  viewer  to  the  center  of  interest  will  transfer  the   excitement  you  felt  when  you  chose  the  subject.    It  is  especially  important  to  keep  it  simple  when  you  paint  the   side  por7ons  of  your  canvas  so  the  focal  point  is  clearly  visible. Third  -­‐  Create  Harmony.    View  the  subject  and  ask  yourself  “What  overall  unifying  device  unites  the  pain7ng?”       It  can  be  a  single  light  source,  or  the  mood  of  the  atmosphere,  or  colors  that  work  together  that  create  great  
101

unifying  effects.    When  using  color,  look  for  color-­‐related  areas  such  as  trees,  grass,  water  and  sky  and  no7ce   how  they  all  work  together  to  create  a  sense  of  harmony.    Nature  is  always  harmonious  if  you  learn  to  paint  what   you  see.    Pain7ng  the  way  we  think  things  are  frequently  leads  to  complica7ons. Remember,  a  good  composi7on  is  one  where  the  viewer  is  unaware  the  ar7st  has  purposely  composed  the   pain7ng.    There  is  no  limit  to  the  possible  arrangements  of  composi7onal  objects  within  a  pain7ng.    I  highly   recommend  that  you  take  risks.    Always  look  for  a  different  way  of  seeing  a  subject.    Try  something  new.    A]er   all,  no  one  ever  got  a  gold  medal  for  a  perfect  swan  dive  off  a  low  diving  board.    It  is  exci7ng  to  paint  from  your   own  sense  of  what  is  desirable  and  appealing.    I  have  to  say  that  my  most  successful  composi7ons  were  ones   that  I  painted  intui7vely  from  my  gut  and  had  the  most  fun  pain7ng.

102

“Hornbrook  Barn,  Opus  2”  -­‐  Facts  are  Facts
Great  art  challenges  not  only  the  viewer  but  also  the  ar7sts  who  create  it.      Most  ar7sts  paint  what  they  know   and  do  it  to  the  best  of  their  ability.    A  few  ar7sts  take  on  crea7ve  work  which  challenges  their  knowledge  and   reveals  their  inabili7es.    However,  when  they  do  overcome  this  kind  of  challenge,  they  realize  that  the  rewards   are  huge.    Ar7sts  who  need  ongoing  reassurance  that  they  are  on  the  right  track  may  miss  the  opportunity  to   reach  past  their  comfort  zone  to  experience  the  thrill  of  pleasing  themselves  with  a  pain7ng  that  shares  the  truth   of  their  view  of  the  world. Remember,  what  we  do  is  not  easy.    A  plumber  learns  his  cra]  and  does  it.    Teachers  learn  dates  and  events,  and   recall  them  o]en  by  looking  at  notes.    Lawyers  learn  the  facts  of  the  law  and  put  those  facts  to  work.    Ar7sts  are   required  to  turn  their  insides  out  and  express  their  thoughts  and  feelings  for  the  world  to  see,  and  then  the   world  judges  whether  it  is  good  or  not.    In  addi7on,  a  pain7ng  (o]en  displaying  the  ar7st’s  name)  can  be  around   forever,  either  hanging  in  a  museum  or  siyng  in  someone’s  garage,  and  everyone  who  sees  it  will  have  an   opinion  about  it.    It  can  be  in7mida7ng,  but  here  are  some  pointers. 1. Create  a  mission  statement.    Every  successful  business  creates  a  mission  statement.    Why  would  your  art   business  be  any  different?    Make  sure  that  your  mission  statement  inspires  you  and  share  it  with  everyone   who  you  know.    You  can  even  email  your  mission  statement  to  me. 2. Find  a  teacher  or  a  coach.    A  truly  great  ar7st  does  not  work  in  a  vacuum.    A  good  coach  will  request  projects   and  keep  you  on  schedule,  and  having  their  ongoing  input  will  keep  you  on  track.    Stay  in  touch  with  your   coach  and  let  him  know  about  your  successes  as  well  as  the  difficul7es  you  may  be  having  with  your  projects. 3. Find  a  community  of  ar7sts.    Most  towns  have  nonprofit  art  guilds  or  a  group  that  connects  ar7sts  with  other   ar7sts  to  share  common  interests,  as  well  as  promo7ng  art  shows,  educa7on,  and  ar7s7c  community  events. Finally,  we  do  not  remember  those  ar7sts  who  followed  the  rules  more  diligently  than  everyone  else  did,  we   remember  those  who  created  art  by  trus7ng  themselves,  o]en  becoming  the  creators  of  “rules  we  inevitably   follow.”    In  his  day,  Van  Gogh  was  not  popular  or  viewed  as  a  great  ar7st,  but  because  his  ar7s7c  expression  was   honest  and  reflected  what  he  saw,  today  we  think  of  him  as  an  ar7s7c  genius.    The  reality  is  that  he  was  no  more   a  genius  that  you  are.      He  just  painted  what  he  saw  and  he  painted  every  day.

103

“Hanley  Farm  House”  -­‐  Five  Key  Ques(ons
The  pain7ng  I  am  sharing  with  you  today  is  of  the  family  home  on  the  Hanley  Farm  located  outside  of  Medford,   Oregon.    It  is  a  place  I  recently  discovered  when  I  was  looking  for  a  loca7on  for  a  plein  air  workshop.    When  I  saw   the  Hanley  family  home,  it  spoke  to  me  about  the  feeling  of  being  le]  alone  a]er  years  of  love.    Pain7ng  a   "feeling"  is  the  highest  form  of  expression  because  it  reveals  the  heart  of  the  ar7st.    Most  pain7ngs  are  of  things   such  as  trees,  rocks,  a  vase,  a  river,  or  buildings.    An  ar7st  can  change  the  effect  of  light  or  the  composi7on  in  a   pain7ng  to  make  it  more  compelling  and  interes7ng,  but  a  "feeling"  is  what  the  great  masters  were  trying  to   capture. A  student  recently  asked  me,  "How  do  I  cri7que  my  own  pain7ng?    What  should  I  look  for,  and  what  do  you  see   when  you  cri7que  pain7ngs?"    Cri7ques  are  difficult  to  receive  and  endure  for  most  ar7sts.    Ar7sts  generally  do   not  like  to  hear  what  works  and  what  is  missing  in  their  pain7ngs.    However,  like  all  disciplines,  we  must  learn   from  others.    What  others  think  is  important  if  you  want  to  create  powerful  pain7ngs  that  speak  to  the  viewing   public. In  my  12-­‐week  Power  to  Create  course,  I  spend  3  hours  each  week  cri7quing  the  students'  artwork  painted  as   assigned  homework  for  the  week.    A]er  a  several  weeks  of  par7cipa7ng  in  the  cri7ques,  students  in  the  class   begin  to  understand  how  to  look  objec7vely  at  their  pain7ngs  and  the  pain7ngs  of  others.    Here  are  the  top  five   elements  that  I  look  for  when  I  cri7que  a  pain7ng.    As  you  read  the  informa7on  below,  look  at  one  of  your   pain7ngs  and  follow  along,  asking  yourself  these  ques7ons. 1.      Message:  The  first  thing  I  ask  is  "what  were  you  trying  to  say  with  the  pain7ng?"              to  confirm  whether  I  got  the  idea  or  not.      If  the  message  is  not  clear  to  the  ar7st,              how  will  the  viewer  be  able  to  understand  what  the  ar7st  is  trying  to              communicate?    In  addi7on,  is  the  focal  point  clearly  iden7fiable,  does  it  support              the  message,  and  does  it  draw  the  viewer  into  the  pain7ng?

104

2.      Composi7on:  I  look  to  see  if  the  composi7on  in  the  pain7ng  ahracts  the  viewer's              ahen7on,  directs  the  viewer's  eye  to  the  important  areas  of  the  pain7ng,  and              keeps  the  viewer's  interest  involved  in  the  pain7ng.    The  composi7on  must  be              simple  regardless  of  the  size  of  pain7ng.    Composi7on  is  merely  an  element  of              the  total  effort,  and  must  remain  subordinate  to  the  representa7on  of  the              subject  and  message. 3.      Value:  I  determine  whether  there  is  an  adequate  variety  of  value  intensi7es.              The  value  is  the  degree  of  the  darkness  in  contrast  to  the  lightness  of  a  color  on  a              scale  from  white  to  black.    By  squin7ng,  I  make  sure  that  the  pain7ng  has              clear  and  iden7fiable  value  changes. 4.      Edges:  Are  there  a  variety  of  brush  strokes  and  edges  defining  the  distance  of              objects  and  content  in  the  pain7ng?    So]  edges  are  found  on  the  sides  and  in              the  background  of  the  pain7ng,  while  crisp  and  sharp  edges  are  seen  near  the              focal  point  and  on  objects  as  they  get  closer  to  the  foreground  of  a  pain7ng. 5.      Light  Source:  I  am  surprised  that  many  pain7ngs  are  missing  a  defined  light              source  that  indicates  the  direc7on  the  light  is  coming  from.      When  pain7ng              outdoors,  an  ar7st  must  choose  a  source  of  light  and  keep  it  in  place,  to  prevent              the  mistake  of  "chasing  the  light"  as  it  changes  with  7me,  causing  the  pain7ng  to              become  flat. Of  course,  there  are  many  more  key  elements,  but  these  will  help  you  to  look  more  objec7vely  at  your  pain7ngs.     We  will  discuss  these  topics  and  many  more  during  our  Fall  Workshops.    I  invite  you  to  ahend  a  weekend  in  Mt.   Shasta  that  will  inspire  you  and  change  the  way  you  paint  forever.

105

“Winters  Cutoff”  -­‐  Expressing  Feeling  in  your  Pain(ngs
I  painted  today’s  pain7ng,  “Winters  Cutoff,”  in  a  different  way  than  usual.    I  painted  it  en7rely  from  memory  in   my  studio  in  two  hours.    I  pass  this  place  on  the  freeway  every  7me  I  drive  to  San  Jose  to  teach  my  classes.    Each   7me  I  see  this  scene,  I  think  to  myself,  "How  would  I  paint  that?"    This  pain7ng  is  the  outcome  of  prac7cing  lots   of  memory  exercises. In  this  day  of  instant  gra7fica7on  with  TVs,  videos,  computer  games  and  digital  photography,  we  look  less  to  the   natural  world  for  visual  pleasure.    Many  cannot  see  the  beauty  that  is  in  front  of  their  eyes,  feel  absorbed  by  an   awesome  view,  or  even  have  an  opinion  of  it.    Since  so  much  s7mula7on  comes  at  us  so  fast,  we  learn  to  filter   out  and  edit  everything,  making  us  neutral  to  so  much.    These  filters  also  keep  us  from  feeling  our  emo7ons. When  ar7sts  first  learn  to  paint,  they  are  concerned  with  placing  paint  on  the  canvas,  mixing  colors,  and  crea7ng   a  good  composi7on.    Later,  the  rela7onship  between  the  ar7st  and  his  work  becomes  more  personal,  and  the   purpose  of  pain7ng  becomes  more  about  adding  what  the  ar7st  feels  about  the  subject  into  the  pain7ngs. No  one  can  teach  another  person  how  to  feel.    However,  it  seems  to  me  that  if  an  ar7st  feels  nothing  at  all  -­‐  not   magic  or  romance,  not  awe  or  wonder  -­‐  then  he  or  she  is  missing  the  best  of  what  art  can  be.    The  ar7s7cally   sensi7ve  individual  finds  meaning  and  purpose  in  everything.    To  these  people,  a  simple  seed  represents  life  and   a  sunbeam  can  be  the  touch  of  god.    Ar7sts  who  bring  their  experiences,  interpreta7ons,  and  feelings  into  their   art  elevate  themselves,  their  cra],  and  ul7mately  the  viewer  to  a  higher  level  of  being. When  I  paint  a  pain7ng,  I  am  in  tune  with  my  feelings  about  the  subject.    How  do  I  accomplish  that?    I  look  at  my   subject  as  if  I  was  young  child,  seeing  the  subject  for  the  first  7me.    If  you  do  this,  you  might  see  the  world  with   awe  and  wonder,  and  feel  the  connec7on  you  have  with  everything  around  you.    Feelings  come  from  seeing   what  is  in  front  of  you,  not  just  looking.    Witness  the  texture,  see  the  color,  look  for  the  light  and  shadow;  enjoy   these  simple  pleasures  of  sight  that  are  o]en  forgohen  and  ignored  nowadays.    Look  at  your  subject  with   wonder,  see  the  curves,  no7ce  the  light  -­‐  is  it  warm  or  cool?    Feel  the  subject.    Close  your  eyes,  interpret  it  in   your  mind,  enhance  it,  turn  up  the  volume  to  increase  the  brightness,  so]en  the  edges,  and  add  atmosphere.     See  it  with  your  soul,  then  paint  exactly  what  you  see  and  feel.

106

Imagine  if  this  were  the  last  7me  you  ever  would  be  able  to  see  a  subject  again  -­‐  an  apple,  a  sunset,  your   mother’s  eyes.    Choose  a  subject,  and  a]er  studying  it,  close  your  eyes  for  a  long  while  and  see  it  in  your  mind.     Now,  without  looking  at  the  subject  again,  paint  it.    Express!    Do  not  copy  it.    You  will  be  surprised  what  you  did   not  see.    The  mind  is  a  muscle  just  like  your  abs.    If  you  do  not  use  it,  you  will  lose  it.    One  has  to  work  out  a  long   7me  to  get  stronger.    If  you  do  this  memory  exercise  at  least  once  a  week,  you  will  see  that  your  ability  to  paint   what  you  remember  seeing  and  feeling  will  improve.     Now,  imagine  seeing  a  subject,  person,  place  or  thing  you  remember  from  your  past,  like  your  first  house,  pet,  or   flowers  in  a  garden.    In  your  mind,  change  the  light  effects,  your  perspec7ve,  your  mood,  and  you  will  find  that   there  are  endless  possibili7es.    Look  at  the  vision  in  your  mind  with  awe  and  wonder,  and  see  it  as  if  you  are   seeing  it  for  the  first  7me.    Call  a  friend,  a  rela7ve,  or  a  neighbor,  and  describe  it  to  them.    Write  it  down  on  a   piece  of  paper,  or  draw  it.    Be  inspired  by  new  sensa7ons,  new  possibili7es,  and  always  look  for  new  ways  of   expressing  yourself.

107

“The  Old  Pump  House”  -­‐  Significance  of  the  Moment
Successful  ar7sts  endeavor  to  master  techniques  such  as  the  applica7on  of  paint  with  brushes  and  knife.    They   must  also  have  access  to  the  tools  stored  on  the  inside  of  the  ar7st’s  heart:  his  feelings,  emo7ons,  memories,   and  values.    It  is  essen7al  to  maintain  both  areas  with  care  and  ahen7on  or  the  result  can  be  a  muddy  mess  and   a  sense  of  boredom  in  the  individual.    To  enjoy  the  art  of  crea7ng  quality  work,  it  is  necessary  to  interweave  the   heart,  be  present  to  the  significance  of  the  moment,  and  engage  in  frequent  prac7ce  to  bring  a  sense  of  richness   and  clarity  to  your  art. People  who  invest  the  depths  of  their  inner  selves  to  their  work  are  ar7sts.    Things  that  ar7sts  create  share  a   common  element:  whether  the  product  is  made  of  silver,  glass,  clay,  paint,  cloth  or  wood,  a  closer  look  will  show   that  it  also  contains  the  spirit  of  the  individual.    The  significant  difference  between  something  that  is  created  by   the  hand  of  man  and  a  produc7on-­‐line  item  is  the  presence  of  that  human  spirit.    Computers  and  assembly  lines   can  create  with  abundance,  but  only  men  and  women  working  with  their  hands,  tools,  and  love  can  create  with   feeling. The  key  to  being  successful  is  sensi7vity.    The  rela7onship  that  is  established  between  the  ar7st  and  his  work  is   personal.    Inspira7on  is  not  always  present  but  once  in  a  while  there  is  a  special  awareness  that  comes  to  the   ar7st.    All  of  a  sudden,  something  falls  into  place.    When  you  are  crea7ng  with  inspira7on,  reality  leaves  you,  you   are  unaware  of  7me,  you  do  not  have  7me  to  eat,  and  every  thing  is  present  now!    Great  art  is  created  from  this   flow.    Somehow,  the  ar7st  and  the  art  transforms.    Both  the  art  and  the  ar7st  become  more  dignified  because  of   the  percep7on  of  the  significance  of  the  moment.    When  you  open  up  to  your  work,  allow  it  to  move  you  and   change  you,  you  will  begin  to  no7ce  that  boredom  is  something  that  happens  to  other  people. Here  is  an  exercise  to  increase  your  awareness  of  the  moment.    Paint  something  right  in  front  of  you,  right  now.     Be  present.    Feel  the  paint.    See  the  color.    Don’t  worry  about  the  outcome.    Set  the  7mer  in  the  other  room  and   remove  all  distrac7ons.    Paint  for  two  hours  and  see  what  happens.

108

“Lilies  and  Pansies”  -­‐  Skep(cism
When  I  go  through  my  studio,  I  o]en  find  lihle  treasures  I  have  painted  that  have  been  lost  for  a  few  months,   and  then  found  with  much  delight.    When  I  am  stuck  on  a  pain7ng  or  I  am  not  sure  that  a  pain7ng  is  complete, I  turn  it  away  from  my  view  and  set  it  in  a  corner  for  a  few  days  or  weeks.    When  I  rediscover  the  forgohen  work,   I  can  see  the  pain7ng  with  new  eyes  and  will  no7ce  if  anything  is  missing.    This  pain7ng  called  “Lilies  and   Pansies”  is  one  I  painted  on  my  back  porch  early  last  spring.    Finding  this  jewel  refreshes  my  memory  of  spring  as   I  get  ready  for  fall. Ar7sts  constantly  ques7on  themselves:  Do  I  have  talent?      Am  I  original?      Does  my  art  have  any  feeling?    Does   my  art  have  meaning?      These  conversa7ons  create  barriers  between  who  we  are  and  what  we  create.      These   skep7cal  conversa7ons  are  deeply  rooted  in  messages  taught  to  us  at  home  and  in  school  that  ques7oned  our   own  essence  of  being  human  and  doubted  our  capabili7es  of  what  we  could  achieve.    We  can  usually  mask  these   doubts  about  our  genius  in  our  day-­‐to-­‐day  life,  but  the  doubts  intensify  and  become  real  issues  when  we   crea7vely  express  ourselves.    When  we  tap  into  the  core  inside  ourselves  and  present  it  to  the  world  in  our   pain7ngs,  we  cannot  hide.    Why  are  we  so  afraid?      It  is  possible  that  the  source  of  our  genius  and  crea7vity   comes  from  the  same  “undefended  child”  within  us  that  was  corrected,  doubted,  and  challenged  to  do  it  beher,   instead  of  being  celebrated  for  making  the  effort  to  create,  to  learn,  to  risk  being  imperfect,  and  do  new  things   anyway! Our  insights  and  feelings  are  what  make  us  human,  and  to  share  this  understanding  with  others  is  the  founda7on   of  art.    Art  is  communica7ng  to  others  without  words,  expressing  our  thoughts,  experiences,  and  emo7ons  to   others  so  they  can  understand  our  point  of  view.    Everyone  has  something  to  say,  and  what  you  have  to  say  has   as  much  value  as  anyone  else  who  has  ever  picked  up  a  paintbrush  or  wrihen  a  note  of  music.    I  invite  you  to   come  to  the  canvas  with  a  courageous  and  joyful  heart,  knowing  that  you  have  made  it  to  this  age  willing  to   create,  express,  and  share  yourself  ar7s7cally.    Those  who  are  cri7cs  cannot  stop  you,  for  they  are  not  able  to   see,  feel,  or  communicate  at  your  level  of  understanding,  and  those  who  are  ar7sts  will  love  you  for  your  bold   and  fearless  spirit.

109

“Mt.  Shasta  and  RomanPc  Luminism”  -­‐  An  American  Art  Style
Art  collectors  and  galleries  have  classified  my  work  as  Roman7c  Luminism.    This  pain7ng  style  is  a  good  example   of  American  Roman7c  Luminism  because  it  features  the  effect  of  light  in  a  landscape  using  aerial  perspec7ve   (how  atmospheric  condi7ons  influence  our  percep7on  of  objects  in  the  distance).    They  have  said  that  I  focus   light  in  my  pain7ngs  in  ways  that  captures  the  mood  and  splendor  of  the  landscape  and  draws  the  viewer  into   the  essence  of  the  pain7ng.    I  have  used  this  method  in  my  pain7ng  for  years.    I  include  a  center  of  interest  using   the  luminosity  of  sunlight  blended  with  the  so]ness  of  tone,  concealing  some  of  my  brush  strokes  to  allow  the   subtle  effects  of  light  to  infuse  the  local  color  of  the  subject. Modern  painters  ahempt  to  create  pain7ngs  that  impress  the  viewers  with  clever  uses  of  the  brush.    Most  of   these  pain7ngs  look  the  same,  with  one  stroke  here  and  a  stroke  there,  with  palehe  colors  that  define  the   pain7ng  rather  than  effec7vely  using  the  power  of  light  in  their  work.    These  ar7sts  produce  boring  work  that   lacks  inspira7on  and  the  feeling  of  life.    Remember,  it  is  not  what  you  do  but  how  well  you  do  it.    Spend  some   7me  every  day  learning  more  ways  to  bring  your  pain7ngs  to  life. If  you  want  to  create  a  luminous  effect  in  your  pain7ng,  key  the  pain7ng  to  cool  colors  and  darker  values.    The   area  of  light  is  best  posi7oned  within  the  middle  third  por7on  of  your  canvas;  it  can  be  anywhere  in  your   pain7ng  as  long  as  the  viewer  clearly  focuses  on  the  that  spot  of  light.    This  spot  should  be  warm  and  bright  with   paint  applied  thickly  but  not  overworked.    Direct  all  the  detail  and  contrast  close  to  the  light  but  try  not  to   highlight  anything  other  than  your  focal  point. This  exercise  will  help  you  to  “see”  differently.    When  you  go  for  a  walk  or  drive,  look  for  the  light  around  you,   not  the  objects.    Try  not  to  see  forms  but  focus  only  on  the  intensity  of  the  infusion  of  light  around  you.    Isolate   the  light  that  is  the  central  focal  point,  and  dull  all  other  light  by  at  least  five  values.    This  understanding  of   “seeing”  will  increase  your  ability  to  bring  an  infusion  of  light  into  your  pain7ngs.    It  may  take  some  7me  to  learn,   but  it  will  make  a  drama7c  difference  in  your  work. "Unless  you  try  to  do  something  beyond  what  you  have  already  mastered,  you  will  never  grow." –  Ralph  Waldo  Emerson

110

“Strawberry  Valley  Inn”  -­‐  Ar(s(c  Philosophy
We  are  just  digging  out  of  8  feet  of  snow  that  fell  over  the  last  4  days  at  The  Grand  View  ranch.    Wow!    What  an   ordeal!    I  respect  the  power  of  nature  and  am  amazed  at  how  one  big  storm  can  totally  change  my  world. Mt.  Shasta  may  be  a  small  community  but  the  town’s  people  have  great  respect  for  their  home  and  community.     This  lihle  inn  in  the  heart  of  Mt.  Shasta  is  a  perfect  example  of  one  of  the  treasured  landmarks  of  the   community.    These  historic  stone  homes  were  built  in  early  1900.    I  painted  this  for  you  so  you  could  enjoy  seeing   the  charm  and  uniqueness  of  these  early  homes. In  my  classes  and  workshops,  along  with  teaching  the  technical  aspects  of  pain7ng,  I  have  been  introducing   ar7s7c  philosophy.    Some  believe  that  art  is  only  about  pain7ng  the  view  that  is  in  front  of  them.    When  I  teach   the  concepts  of  ar7s7c  philosophy,  I  pa7ently  appreciate  my  students'  struggle  to  understand  how  to  create  art   consistent  with  that  philosophy.    Most  students  begin  with  preconcep7ons  about  what  art  is.    Some  think  it  is   self-­‐expression,  re-­‐crea7on,  or  just  decora7on.    My  first  task  is  to  encourage  the  student  to  shed  those  limi7ng   beliefs. Part  of  my  philosophy  is  that  art  is  a  personal  expression  of  careful  observa7on  of  the  subject  and  the  ar7st's   visceral  and  emo7onal  response  to  what  he  sees  and  experiences.    For  example,  when  we  observe  the  subject   live,  we  see  the  air  and  light  around  the  subject  and  in  the  landscape  crea7ng  the  feeling  of  being  there.    This   does  not  make  sense  to  students  if  they  have  never  painted  from  life.    Successful  ar7sts  think  visually  which   means  seeing  the  pain7ng  in  their  minds  before  they  paint  it.    Take  a  moment  to  imagine  a  finished  pain7ng  in  a   clear,  simple,  and  beau7ful  way.    Intensify  the  light;  play  with  the  shadows,  see  the  colors,  then  add  contrast   from  warm  to  cool  and  dark  to  light.    See  the  pain7ng  clearly  in  your  mind  before  you  ever  lay  your  brush  to   canvas. I  believe  that  pain7ng  enhances  intelligence  and  develops  sensi7vity;  sensi7vity  to  the  way  we  see  and  relate  to   people,  to  values  in  nature,  sensi7vity  to  seeing  color  and  the  rela7onships  of  light  and  shadow.    All  this  is  found   in  nature.    Pain7ng  our  rela7onship  to  nature  and  sharing  that  with  the  community  and  then  the  world  is  what   makes  us  ar7sts.

111

“Old  Stage  Cabin”  -­‐  Pain(ng  from  the  Inside  Out
This  is  a  pain7ng  of  the  Steward  ranch,  located  in  a  beau7ful  meadow  just  outside  of  the  town  of  Mt.  Shasta.     When  pain7ng  outdoors  it  is  important  to  capture  the  subject  first  by  drawing  it  accurately  with  details.    Many   students  hurry  this  process,  but  I  believe  that  this  step  is  essen7al  because  a  good  drawing  provides  a  founda7on   for  the  pain7ng,  and  provides  you  with  a  preview  of  how  the  pain7ng  will  fill  the  space  on  the  canvas. Begin  by  mixing  your  paints  using  an  earth  color  and  cobalt  blue  to  make  a  dark  neutral  and  begin  drawing  with   your  brush.    Include  shapes  and  shadows,  adding  more  blue  for  cool  tones  and  more  earth  color  for  warm  tones.     Place  footnotes  where  the  light  is  the  brightest  by  wiping  off  paint  with  a  paper  towel  where  you  see  highlights.     By  doing  this,  you  create  a  reference  of  the  original  tones  and  values  of  the  pain7ng  so  when  the  light  changes   throughout  the  day,  you  can  remember  the  scene  as  you  first  saw  it. Once  the  drawing  is  complete,  begin  pain7ng  the  central  focal  point  on  the  canvas.    This  means  pain7ng  from   the  inside  out.    Since  the  central  focal  point  is  usually  located  in  the  middle  third  of  the  pain7ng,  pain7ng   proceeds  from  the  middle  of  the  pain7ng  outward  to  the  edges. Use  a  flat  #6  brush  to  paint  with  opaque  paint,  choosing  correct  colors  by  paying  ahen7on  to  the  temperature   and  value  of  your  subject.    Work  slowly  and  make  sure  that  you  place  every  stroke  carefully,  one  by  one,  un7l  the   pain7ng  is  complete.    Paint  what  you  see,  do  not  add  anything  but  what  is  there,  and  stroke  by  stroke  you  will   see  the  pain7ng  come  to  life.

112

“Tulip  Tree  Branch”  -­‐  Connec(ng  with  Your  Art
With  all  the  rain  we  have  had  in  Mt.  Shasta,  I  wanted  to  paint  something  with  a  bit  more  color.    A  good  friend   found  this  tulip  tree  branch.    I  really  enjoyed  pain7ng  it. There  is  a  difference  between  pain7ng  with  inten7on  (to  do  something  with  an  agenda)  and  pain7ng  by   connec7ng  with  your  inspira7on.    Ar7sts  paint  with  an  agenda  when  they  try  to  re-­‐create  a  pain7ng  that  looks   like  a  photograph  or  a  subject  from  life.    Connec7ng  with  your  pain7ng  involves  pain7ng  what  you  know:  your   reality,  your  inspira7on,  and  how  you  see  the  world  daily. Ar7sts  paint  by  placing  strokes  of  color  on  their  canvas  to  recreate  the  subject  they  have  chosen  to  paint.    Then,   there  comes  a  moment  when  the  focus  shi]s  and  the  image  becomes  three-­‐dimensional.    This  is  when  we  are   connec7ng  with  our  art.    It  only  happens  when  the  right  side  of  the  brain  relies  on  what  it  knows,  rather  than  the   process  of  how  to  do  to  it. Try  an  experiment.    Paint  an  image  of  one  of  your  toys  that  you  had  growing  up.    Paint  it  from  your  memory.    Try   looking  at  the  pain7ng  while  you  are  pain7ng  as  if  you  are  seeing  the  toy  again,  but  then  look  at  if  as  if  you  have   never  seen  it  before.    Do  not  ask  how,  just  do  it  as  if  you  know  how.    Keep  looking  at  the  pain7ng  and  making   changes;  see  the  light  on  it,  see  the  shadows.    Before  long,  you  will  see  it  as  real  as  if  you  are  looking  at  the  real   object  or  a  photo  of  it. The  human  brain  is  very  complex  and  coopera7ve.    It  will  think  of  what  you  tell  it  to  think  about,  such  as  your   experiences,  feelings  and  images,  as  long  as  you  have  them  stored  in  your  memory  already.    If  you  want  to  paint   landscapes,  you  must  spend  lots  of  7me  pain7ng  from  nature,  storing  many  images  and  experiences  for  the   brain  to  access.    Pain7ng  outdoors  allows  you  to  become  observant  of  what  only  you  can  see  through  your  eyes.     The  reason  we  paint  outdoors  is  not  to  come  home  with  a  completed  pain7ng,  but  to  educate  the  mind  to  see   what  nature  looks  like  so  that  when  you  are  in  the  studio,  your  auto-­‐recall  can  go  into  high  gear,  connec7ng  with   your  pain7ng  like  never  before.    This  is  a  type  of  “being  in  the  zone”  that  changes  the  goal  of  pain7ng   "something"  to  simply  pain7ng  entranced  and  connected.

113

“Mt.  Shasta  in  Moonlight”  -­‐  Pain(ng  at  Night
Pain7ng  on  loca7on  is  difficult  enough,  but  pain7ng  on  loca7on  at  night  offers  a  new  set  of  issues  that  challenge   even  the  most  skilled  plein  air  ar7st.    First,  seeing  your  pain7ng  and  palehe  in  the  dark  can  be  difficult,  but  with   the  new  LED  light  that  straps  on  your  head,  you  can  see  whatever  you  look  at,  your  pain7ng,  your  palehe,  and   your  brush  strokes.    You  can  actually  see  what  you  are  doing.    Second,  many  animals  rustle  in  the  bushes   (including  bear)  who  are  hungry,  and  they  feed  at  night.    Be  careful  that  you  are  not  on  their  menu.    It  is  best  to   paint  with  a  friend  when  you  paint  outside  at  night. Whether  at  night  or  during  the  day,  begin  each  pain7ng  with  the  idea  that  the  act  of  pain7ng  can  be  effortless   and  enjoyable.    If  you  overwork  a  pain7ng,  it  can  appear  labored  and  lack  spontaneity.    First,  cover  your  canvas   with  an  Asphaltum  or  a  warm  brown  stain  using  odorless  turpen7ne  and  paint.    Then,  simply  sketch  your   composi7on  with  a  brush  using  Asphaltum  to  indicate  the  areas  of  the  greatest  dark,  and  wipe  off  the  stain  with   a  paper  towel  in  the  areas  of  greatest  light.    Pay  ahen7on  to  include  the  most  important  element,  the  effect  of   light.    Add  Alizarin  and  Cobalt  blue  to  the  Asphaltum  to  indicate  an  underlying  color.    Paint  the  details  only  a]er   the  sketch  is  complete.    The  viewer  loves  to  see  effects,  par7cularly  the  effect  of  light  dancing  on  objects  of   beauty. Pain7ng  on  loca7on  takes  prac7ce  and  tenacity,  but  the  rewards  are  endless.    If  you  have  never  painted outdoors,  go  outside  and  paint  something.    You  will  be  surprised  to  see  that  everything  you  need  to  paint  is  right in  front  of  your  eyes;  all  the  subjects,  colors,  values,  shapes,  and  inspira7on.

114

Slushy  Streets”  -­‐  Paint  What  You  Love
Even  though  it  is  winter  at  The  Grand  View  Ranch,  it  has  been  very  dry  and  everyone  is  wai7ng  with  great   an7cipa7on  for  it  to  snow.    There  is  something  about  winter  that  makes  me  want  to  put  on  my  warm  coat,  boots,   pack  a  flask  of  rum  in  my  pain7ng  box  ( just  to  take  the  chill  off  of  Old  Jack  Frost),  and  step  outside  where  it's  32   degrees  to  paint. I  painted  this  sketch  in  the  beginning  of  December  when  we  had  a  brief  and  wet  snowstorm.    I  love  to  paint  wet   slushy  streets  where  7re  marks  can  be  seen  in  the  snow.    It  tells  a  story  of  something  that  has  happened  in  a  very   brief  moment,  and  then  disappears.    It  is  important  to  learn  how  to  paint  what  you  love.    When  I  paint  wet   streets,  I  first  apply  my  paint  in  a  ver7cal  manner  using  Cobalt  blue  and  Asphaltum  in  a  thin  transparent  manner   altering  the  blue  and  brown  colors  to  create  the  interes7ng  paherns  in  the  wet  street.    Then  I  place  in  the  dabs   of  snow  by  star7ng  with  the  darker  spots  and  adding  lighter  values  as  I  sculpt  the  effect  of  the  7re  ruts.    The   color  of  the  snow  is  painted  with  the  same  colors  that  I  used  to  create  the  wet  pavement.    The  effect  of  light   behind  the  fence  creates  a  beau7ful  contrast  to  what  could  have  been  an  overall  gloomy  day. Many  students  ask  what  they  should  paint  and  I  ask  them,  “What  do  you  LOVE?”    It  is  surprising  how  many   ar7sts  paint  by  looking  at  things  and  paint  what  they  see.    Few  ar7sts  really  ask  themselves,  "What  do  I  see  that  I   love  about  this  scene?"    Do  I  love  the  summer  light  on  an  early  morning  city  street  or  the  warm  feeling  of  a   balmy  a]ernoon  sun  reflec7ng  on  a  lake?    Connec7ng  personally  and  emo7onally  with  your  subject  is  the  first   step  to  crea7ng  pain7ngs  that  communicate  your  message  to  the  viewer. When  you  paint  what  you  love,  thoughxully  consider  what  you  think  and  feel  about  the  subject  that  you  want  to   share  with  someone  as  you  create  your  pain7ng.    Do  you  love  the  light,  the  colors,  the  paherns  that  are  created,   the  shadows,  or  how  cool  or  warm  it  feels?    Is  it  the  mood  of  the  scene,  or  the  story  that  is  told?    By  focusing  on   your  response  to  what  you  love,  you  will  connect  with  your  inner  ar7st  and  develop  a  style  of  your  own.    The   next  7me  you  are  out  on  loca7on,  take  7me  to  evaluate  what  inspires  you  or  what  touches  your  heart  about  the   subject,  and  then  communicate  that  idea  or  feeling  to  the  viewer  as  you  paint.    Pain7ng  from  life  is  an  act  of   connec7ng  within  yourself  to  your  own  sense  of  wonder  and  beauty  so  that  you  can  have  something   extraordinary  to  say  to  others  through  your  pain7ngs.
115

“Ashland  Orchard”  -­‐  Style,  Technique  or  Vision
Technique  and  style  are  the  tools  of  crea7ve  expression  for  an  ar7st.    They  support  his  ability  to  communicate  his   ar7s7c  vision.    Technique  includes  the  ar7st's  ability  to  use  brushes  and  paint  to  create  a  unique  appearance   using  interes7ng  brushstrokes,  choices  of  color,  the  use  of  thick  or  thin  paint,  and  the  effect  of  light.    Techniques   punctuate  a  pain7ng  with  personal  ar7s7c  choices. Style  includes  broader  ar7s7c  choices  such  as  the  content,  composi7on,  mood,  and  the  placement  of  focal  points   as  well  as  the  ar7st's  approach:  impressionis7c,  realis7c,  or  abstract.    An  ar7st's  style  contributes  to  his  ability  to   be  recognizable  and  memorable. Having  both  technique  and  style  are  essen7al  for  an  ar7st  to  manifest  his  vision,  a  vision  that  is  so  personally   important  that  it  must  shared  with  others  to  be  realized.    This  includes  pain7ng  subjects  that  reflect  the  ar7st's   experiences  and  beliefs  about  the  world.    This  vision  comes  from  the  heart  of  the  ar7st's  experience  growing  up   and  finding  his  way  in  life;  what  made  sense,  what  felt  good,  what  or  who  sustained  him  in  the  darkest  7mes,   and  what  or  who  raised  his  spirits  in  the  best  7mes.    These  memories  and  connec7ons  create  a  deep  founda7on   of  subject  maher  that  reminds  the  ar7st  of  what  in  life  is  worth  sharing  with  others  by  crea7ng  "a  pain7ng  of   personal  importance."    In  order  to  express  a  great  message  in  a  pain7ng,  an  ar7st  must  have  a  clear  vision  of   what  he  wishes  to  say  to  the  viewer  about  his  unique  way  of  seeing  the  world. Fellow  ar7sts,  galleries,  and  collectors  admire  ar7sts  who  successfully  express  their  vision  through  their  artwork   and  have  the  power  to  change  the  viewer's  experience  of  the  world.    For  example,  Van  Gogh  showed  us  how  to   see  sunflowers  the  way  he  saw  them,  and  if  you  have  seen  his  pain7ng,  you  probably  look  at  sunflowers  in  a   whole,  new  way.    The  clarity  of  vision  separates  one  ar7st  from  another,  and  expressing  a  sensi7ve  message  to  a   viewer  that  communicates  heart-­‐to-­‐heart  requires  great  skill  and  focus. Learning  the  discipline  and  prac7ce  of  good  technique,  developing  a  good  sense  of  style,  and  having  a  focused   personal  vision  will  make  your  pursuit  of  art  more  passionate,  your  journey  more  enjoyable,  and  create  a  legacy   that  can  go  on  forever.

116

“Sullaway  House  in  Mt.  Shasta”  -­‐  A  Pathway  to  Excellence
It  has  been  snowing  for  the  past  few  days  and  when  it  stopped  I  grabbed  my  paints  and  searched  for  a  loca7on  in   town  to  paint.    It  was  a  beau7ful  day.    This  pain7ng  is  of  a  home  located  in  Mt.  Shasta  call  the  Sullaway  House.    I   have  included  some  pictures  of  the  pain7ng  in  several  stages  so  you  can  see  how  I  painted  it. It  is  impossible  for  ar7sts  to  have  all  the  answers,  or  to  paint  without  making  mistakes.    The  very  nature  of  mixing   paint  itself  is  a  trial  and  error  process.    When  you  are  mixing  colors  and  crea7ng  various  tones  and  values,  you   will  some7mes  discover  “by  accident”  combina7ons  of  color  nuances  and  brushstrokes  that  are  spectacular.     However,  what  seems  to  be  pure  chance  is  really  the  accumula7on  of  many  previous  efforts. It  goes  like  this.    The  more  you  paint,  the  more  mistakes  you  make,  and  the  more  mistakes,  the  more  you  learn   how  to  avoid  and  correct  those  mistakes,  crea7ng  more  knowledge  and  fewer  mistakes.    Despite  what  you  see  in   DVDs  and  pain7ng  shows  on  TV,  none  of  the  ar7sts  have  the  ability  to  paint  what  they  intend  to  paint  without   experimen7ng.    In  fact,  the  nature  of  pain7ng  is  one  of  constantly  correc7ng  the  stroke  you  just  placed  on  the   canvas  by  deciding  what  the  next  stroke  will  be.    How  you  repair  your  mistakes  becomes  your  technique  and   style,  and  this  process  takes  making  many  mistakes,  many  HUGE  MISTAKES. We  ar7sts  enjoy  the  experience  of  crea7ng  art,  not  just  producing  a  marketable  product.    The  truth  is  that  most   pain7ngs  are  not  masterpieces.    If  it  were  easy,  the  value  of  pain7ngs  would  decrease  because  the  supply  of   great  art  would  be  plen7ful.    With  7me  and  prac7ce,  your  pain7ngs  will  improve  to  your  own  level  of  excellence,   uniqueness,  and  greatness. "The  most  important  things  in  the  world  have  been  accomplished  by  people  who  have  kept  on  trying  when  there   seemed  to  be  no  hope  at  all."  –  Dale  Carnegie

117