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RFIDRFID- Radio Frequency Identification

Chrisan Machado Jessica Anthony Linnet Dsouza Priyanka Harne Roshil Lobo Mrinal sandbhor

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MMS-1 Div A
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Flow of presentation 
     
Introduction History and background - RFID Working of RFID RFID Tags Applications Benefits and Challenges Conclusion

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Introduction
‡ First used over sixty years ago by Britain
to identify aircraft in World War II ‡ In 1960s RFID was first considered as a solution for the commercial world ‡ RFID ensuring up-to-date information ‡ Tags contain a unique identification number called an Electronic Product Code (EPC)

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‡ All information stored on RFID tags accompanies items as
‡ Most RFID tags contain at least two parts.

they travel through a supply chain or other business process. 

One is an integrated circuit for storing and processing information  The other is an antenna for receiving and transmitting the signal

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‡ Three types of RFID tags: 
Passive RFID tags  Active RFID tags  Battery assisted passive (BAP) RFID tags

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History
‡ In 1915 the British developed a system called IFF (Identification: Friend or Foe) ‡ The first modern predecessor of the RFID was something that Mario Cardullo demonstrated to the New York Port Authority in 1971. ‡ Steven Depp, Alfred Koelle, and Robert Freyman demonstrated a system in 1974 which used RFID tags.
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‡ Charles Walton was granted the first patent to use the acronym RFID in 1983. ‡ In 1945 Léon Theremin invented for the Soviet Union which retransmitted incident radio waves with audio information ‡ The IFF transponder invented in the United Kingdom in 1915, was used by the allies in World War II to identify aircraft as friend or foe
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‡ Mario Cardullo's device in 1973 was the first true ancestor of modern RFID, as it was a passive radio transponder with memory ‡ The largest deployment of active RFID is the US Department of Defense ‡ The largest passive RFID deployment is the Defense Logistics Agency
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Working Of RFID

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Components of RFID System
‡ Antenna ‡ A Transponder or Tag ‡ A Transceiver

RFID Chip

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Working of RFID

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What are RFID Tags?
‡ Passive Tags ‡ Semi-Passive Tags ‡ Active Tags

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RFID tags
‡Tags can be attached to almost anything: ± Items, cases or pallets of products, high value goods ± vehicles, assets, livestock or personnel ‡Passive Tags ± Do not require power ± Draws from Interrogator Field ± Lower storage capacities (few bits to 1 KB) ± Shorter read ranges (4 inches to 15 feet) ± Usually Write-Once-Read-Many/Read-Only tags ± Cost around 25 cents to few dollars ‡Active Tags ± Battery powered ± Higher storage capacities (512 KB) ± Longer read range (300 feet) ± Typically can be re-written by RF Interrogators ± Cost around 50 to 250 dollars

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RFID tags: Smart labels
A paper label with RFID inside

an antenna, printed, etched or stamped ... « and a chip attached to it « on a substrate e.g. a plastic foil ...

Source: www.rfidprivacy.org

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Some RFID tags

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RFID tag memory
‡ Read-only tags
± Tag ID is assigned at the factory during manufacturing ‡ Can never be changed ‡ No additional data can be assigned to the tag

‡ Write once, read many (WORM) tags
± Data written once, e.g., during packing or manufacturing ‡ Tag is locked once data is written ‡ Similar to a compact disc or DVD

‡ Read/Write
± Tag data can be changed over time ‡ Part or all of the data section can be locked

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APPLICATIONS
‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ Material tracking Warehousing Production Logistics Pharmaceutical Healthcare Event management Cashless payment system Library, Video store Hospitality Retail
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‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

Security Transportation management Hospitality Inmate tracking Animal Tracking Arts and Entertainment Military Transportation management
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Material Tracking

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Portal Applications

Bill of Lading Material Tracking

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Conveyor / Assembly Line

Read / Write Operations Higher Accuracy than Bar Code

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Warehousing

TO IDENTIFY ITEMS

TO CHECK IF GOODS ARE STORED CORRECTLY
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Production

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Logistics

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PHARMACEUTICAL

HEALTH CARE

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Event management
CHILDREN WEARING RFID BANDS

RFID WRIST BAND

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Library

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SECURITY

PRISON INMATE TRACKING

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RFID USED IN TRANSPORT MANAGEMENT

ROADWAYS

RAILWAYS

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RFID USED IN MILITARY AND SPORTS

RFID USED IN STADIUM

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BENEFITS OF RFID
Reduce warehouse and distribution labour costs Reduce point-of-sale labour costs Reduce inventory Reduce theft Reduce out-of stock conditions Improve customer experience

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CHALLENGES
‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ Forced Changes in Business Process Data Flooding Security Concerns Cost of Tags Tags Standards Tags Placement

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IMPLANTABLE RFID CHIPS

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CONCLUSION

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