Offense 2005

A. Our offense will continue to be OPTION based, both triple (2 reads) and double (1 read). 1. We want to spread the field by formation. a. This reduces the defensive front and limits the number of box defenders. b. Limits the number of coverages. c. Becomes easier to identify pass coverages. B. There are several areas that we must continue to improve upon.

1. We must get better at throwing the ball. a. Improving our pass offense does not neccessarily mean throwing it more. b. We need to be consistent. Routes, drops, throws, protection, must be executed correctly every time. c. We must avoid "must pass" situations. Success will come when we pass and the defense is expecting run. d. We need to be prepared to throw vs. a straight man defense; 8 or 9 men in the box (like Oz 2003). e. Play Action- Need to throw option passes seven or eight times a game. -We need to improve the mechanics of the play fake. -This will force the secondary to stay deep, keep them from supporting the run game. -We must develop the ability to take advantage of the FS filling the alley on run support. -We need to generate big plays with the play action pass. f. We need to develop our ability to covert on 3rd and other obvious passing situations. -Need to develop "go to" plays when we need 10-15 yards for the first down. -Need to develop "go to" receivers and be able to get them the ball. g. We should complete 50% or more of our passing attempts. h. Score at least one touchdown a game with the pass. Should have a 2-1 TD to INT ratio. i. Utilize the quick pass to take advantage of weak or outmatched cornerbacks. j. We will utilize more pass plays involving backs out of the backfield. 2. We must be prepared for, develop, and execute situational offense. a. Back on track after a penalty(1st and 15/20) b. 2nd and short (waste down) c. 3rd Down Pass d. Sudden change (after an opponent turns it over) e. Backed up against our goalline f. Short Yardage g. Goal Line (To include a NO TIMEOUT call) h. 4 Minute Offense i. 2 Minute Offense (Hurry-Up offense; with or without TIMEOUTS) j. Red Zone k. 4th Down Calls l. Final 3 plays (Hail Mary & Beyond Hail Mary Distance) m. 2 Point plays n. Ahead late in the game (Slow-down offense) 3. We must improve the overall execution of our offense. a. Our O-line must know and execute their assignments. We cannot rely on our backs to "make plays". b. We must get more first downs. This will keep our defense off of the field and shorten the game. c. We must improve our ability to run "power" plays and get tough yardage. d. We need to improve our ability to counter and run misdirection to take advantage of flowing LBs. e. We need to be more consistent in our mesh point and dive path in our option game. f. Our Midline mechanics must improve. 4. Our offensive line must continue to develop a GATA mentality: "Get After Their Ass". -While our offensive line play has improved, we lack consistency. -Anything less than 100% intensity on EVERY play is acceptable. not -Assignment or execution errors can be corrected. Lack of effort means you don't want to win.

Offensive Goals for 2005
1. Score five offensive touchdowns, five extra points. 2. 300 yards total offense. 3. Have a positive turnover ratio. 4. Cross the 50 yard line on every possession. 5. Score 100% from the 10 yard line and in; 90% from the 20 yard line and in; 80% from the 30 yard line and in. HOW MANY OF OUR OFFENSIVE GOALS DO WE HAVE TO REACH? 5 of 5 = WIN 4 of 5 = SHOULD WIN 3 of 5 = WE ARE GIVING THEM A CHANCE 2 of 5 = WE MIGHT GET LUCKY 1 of 5 = HIGHLY UNLIKELY 0 of 5 = WON'T WIN

Why Option Football
1. Allows us to be able to run the fullback against any and every defense we play. 2. The Option makes the defense play assignment FB, taking away some of their aggressiveness. 3. Our pass offense will improve as our Option game improves. a. Play action and drop back pass are good versus defenses designed to defend the option. b. Defenses good against the option are not good at stopping the pass. 4. Option football allows us to put the ball in the quarterback's hands. 5. Option FB enables us to move the ball with aggressive linemen, even against bigger and stronger D-linemen. 6. We will be the "stranger in town". Few teams will run the option as their primary offensive weapon.

Option Philosophy
1. We want to make the defense constrict on the FB and convice the defense that they will get beat by the FB. 2. We want the ball on the perimeter as much as possible. 3. We'll use formations and motion to find the softest flank and make the defense defend the whole field. 4. We will run inside vs. 5 or 6 in the box (3 deep with 2 inverts). Vs. no invert, we want the ball in the alley. 4. We will use play action pass 7 or 8 times a game to put DBs in a run/pass bind. to score, run to win. Pass 5. We run an offense, based on certain concepts, not a bunch of unrelated plays. 6. We will utilize multiple options, both triple and double. 7. We want to decide who we want to carry the ball, not let the defense dictate to our offense.

Why the "I"
1. Simplicity in learning: The FB is always the dive back, the TB is always the pitch man. More repetition. 2. More consistant mesh point. The dive back hits the same speed everytime since it is the same player. 3. Two backs means three receivers are available to spread the defense horizontally. 4. The "I" backfield allows every play we have to be run either left or right with no difference in technique. 5. The "I" back can hit the Iso play in a north-south manner. 6. The "I" back can see the plays develop, read cutbacks, from his two point stance.

Offensive Breakdown
Our offense is broken down into three areas:
1. Base Offense This is 60% of our offensive attack. If we run 60 offensive plays in a normal game, 36 should be from this list. We will run these base plays against every defense, every week. We will utilize only a few formations to run our base plays (Twins, Pro, Overload, Trips, and Doubles) but we will use various schemes so teams cannot keep us from running these plays. a) Inside Veer (double read) -"Give" is a predetermined give to the FB: no read. -"Option" is a predetermined pull by the QB: single read of the pitch key b) Midline Variations -Midline (double read) -Freeze (single read: QB keeps or pitches) -Midline Follow (single: QB gives to FB or keeps) c) Speed Option d) Outside Veer (double read toward the TE or Overload side. e) Iso f) Gut g) Gut Option h) Trap i) Counter GT j) Play Action Pass- Every run play will have at least one complementary pass play. Some (like Veer and Iso) will have more than one. k) 30 Pass (Quick Pass Game)- Hitch, Fade, Slant, Out, Stop, Stop & Go l) Sprint Pass 2. Supplemental Offense- This is 25% of our offensive attack. Out of 60 offensive plays in a normal game, 15 would be from this list. We will run these plays in response to certain defensive reactions to our Base Offense, or against certain defensive looks. a) Midline Dive b) Midline Trap c) Counter Option d) Toss e) FB Toss f) Double Dive g) Joker h) Counter Iso i) Stampede j) Rumble k) Power l) GUN offense l) Play Action Pass- Most of the supplemental run plays have complementary pass plays. 3. Specials and Weekly Gameplan-This is 15% of our offense. In a normal game, out of 60 offensive plays, 9 should be from this list. It includes our Hurry Up offense, Specials (like Reverses, Convoys, and Screens), and any weekly gameplan additions. Special formations may be used. a) b) c) d) e) 50 Pass (Shoot, Exxon, Flood, DC, Everybody GO) Reverses Draw Screens Convoys

Formations and Adjustments
1. Twins - This is our base formation and the starting point for our offense. All of our Base offense can be run from our Twins formation. Note the "tight" alignment of the TE (Y). FS C SS W E
-If "strong" is called, the FB will line up behind the Guard to the side of the formation's strength. -If "weak" is called, the FB will align behind the weakside Guard.
Y Z F

C M N T E
X

T

T

-The TE's alignment can vary. If "flex" is called, Y will widen his split to 4 yards. If "open" is called, the TE will take a 12 yard split from the tackle.

2. Pro- This formation puts the TE and the Z receiver on the same side. FS C SS W E
X

C M N T
Y Z F T

T

E

-In this diagram, the TB is aligned in the "On" alignment. "Off" would have the TB in a halfback position on the weakside of the formation.

3. Overload- This formation is unbalanced. It gives us an extra blocker to the strong side, but the threat of the weakside attack puts additional pressure on the defense. FS C C E
Y Z F T

W T

M N T E

SS

X

-The Slot base alignment puts him halfway between the Tackle and the WR. He should adjust his split appropriately in order to execute his assignment, but in general he should never align closer than 6 yards to X.

4. Trips Open- This formations gives the defense another look to prepare for, but creates minimal changes for our offense. FS C SS W E
Y T Z

C M N T E
X

T

F

4. Trips - Leaving the TE in a tight alignment is another variation of our Trips formation. FS C SS W E
Y T Z

C M N T E
X

T

F

5. Doubles - Doubles allows us to run much of our offense in both directions. It also forces teams into a 6 man box. FS C SS E T
Y T Z

C W N M T E
X

F

6. Double Tight - When the X receiver in our Pro formation gets in a tight alignment, we have created a Double Tight look. FS C C W E
X

SS M N T E
Y Z

T

The additional TE really stretches a 7 man front (4-3 or 5-2). It also gives the defense another gap to have to defend.

F T

Triple Option Veer
The Veer is the base play in our offense, and we will run it more than any other play. It is play in our the offense, the one we will hang our hat on. It is also the basis for most of our play action pass plays, so we will need to be profficient at it. Since of all the options, it is the most difficult to perfect, we will start with the Veer and practice it more than any other play. Since this is a "triple option" play, it is actually three plays in one. It can be a dive, keep, or pitch, all depending on the reactions of the defense. Since it is a triple option, there are 2 defenders that are "read" by the QB to determine who gets the ball.

FS

SS

C E T

B N

B T E

C

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Mesh Point Sequence: Nothing is more important to running the Veer successfully than a consistant meshpoint between the FB and the QB. This sequence is practiced over and over until all three parts (QB, FB, and RB) are perfectly in tune. Even then, the mesh drill is performed at least twice a week. To facilitate a consistant mesh point, the drill is done using the following diagram (called Option Tracks) which is painted onto the grass of our practice field. The QB pretends he is standing in the center of a clock, facing 12 o'clock with the FB directly behind at 6 o'clock. His first step is either to 4 or 8 as he reaches the ball back to the FB.
Midline Veer Veer

The FB should straddle the path as he attacks the LOS. He should get vertical as soon as he is at the linemen's feet.

8

4

6 feet from the QB's feet 7 yards from the ball

FB's hand TB's feet

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Running the Veer requires precision in the sequence of steps from the QB, FB, and TB. A. Mesh Point Sequence 1. Taking the SnapIt is the first and most vital part of every play we run.

2. First StepThe first step is taken with the playside foot to either 4 o'clock or 8 o'clock in the direction of the play. Rather than "seating" the ball by pulling it into the stomach, the QB will open the ball to the FB and allow him to run over the ball. The ball is not slammed into the stomach of the FB, just reached back. The QB should have his hips and toes pointed toward the sideline, not into the backfield, on both the first and second step. This will help the QB focus his attention on his dive read without having to strain his head and neck back to the inside. The QB's focus must be on the dive key immediately. He does not have time to look back at the FB, then find the dive key. 3. Second StepThe second step, or "J" step, is basically a balance step as the QB steps down the LOS. The second step is not a big step, and at most, the heel of the back foot should be even with the toes of the playside foot. If the QB overstrides, he is not in a good position to continue downhill, and will have to step back and around the mesh or collision point. Overstriding will also push the FB off of his dive path. Most importantly, by the time the QB has planted his second step, he must have decided whether it is a give or pull. Don't ride the FB past the front hip. GIVE: If the QB reads "give", the ball is handed off to the FB by sliding the inside hand (the hand in contact to the FB's stomach) off of the ball and giving pressure with the outside hand. Do NOT watch the FB into the LOS. Get your eyes on the pitch and attack him. The greatest fake in the world is to sprint without the ball. PULL: If the QB reads "pull", there should be no pressure on the FB's stomach, and the ball should be snapped into the heart (mid-sternum). The QB should find the pitch key, and attack his inside shoulder but read the outside shoulder. If the outside shoulder of the pitch key turns toward the QB, he will pitch the ball, heart to heart. From his heart, right to the heart of the TB.

B N T
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PULL!

B N T
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GIVE!

B. QB Thought Process
In addition to the physical steps involved in running the Veer, there are a number of mental "checks" and things for the QB to consider. 1. The QB should strive to be efficient in his reads, not perfect. Even if you guess, you'll be right half of the time. 2. We want a quick read; Know by the time the second foot is down whether it is give or pull. "Better wrong then Long" 3. We want the ball on the perimeter as often as possible, because perimeter = points. 4. When is doubt, give the ball. 5. "Never pitch under stress, or pitch into a mess." Pitching with someone all over you or the pitch back will result in a fumble or bad pitch. 6. Know and understand the strategy behind the offense. This will be discussed in detail later, but the QB must understand and be able to recognize defensive fronts and alignments, which in turn enable us to flip the play to the best side or audible to another play if need be.

7. Once the QB knows the direction the play is going, the first thing he must do is identify the dive key: the first down lineman past the dive path. (See diagrams below) He should also note the dive key's proximity to the dive path. Don't guess what the dive key will do, but anticipate give or pull. 8. The QB uses an "UNLESS" rule when reading the dive key. "I will hand off to the FB unless the dive key comes down and hard on the FB." Anything other than that is a give. Dive key runs up field, give. Dive key sits, give. Dive key attacks the QB, give. 9. Before the ball is snapped, the QB should also identify the pitch key, and his proximity. The pitch key is the next defender outside the dive key. (See diagrams below) The closer the pitch key, the sooner the pitch will happen. Know whether the pitch key can crash hard. 10. Once the ball is pulled, the QB again uses the "UNLESS" rule. "I will keep the ball unless the pitch key's far shoulder turns toward me." After the pull, the QB snaps the ball to his heart, and attacks the inside shoulder of the pitch key, but he reads the outside shoulder. 11. Be ready to keep the ball after the pull. If the pitch key generally attacks the pitch, get to the option alley. Hash, numbers, sideline. Don't cut back, stay away from the pursuit which comes from inside out.

Dive Key

Pitch Key

The steps of the FB and the TB are equally important in making the Veer a successful play. C. Mesh Point Sequence cont.
1. FB Steps- The FB's first step is a short step forward with his backside foot. By stepping with his backside foot first, the FB will not be as likely to go too wide on the mesh point.. The second step should be directly at the crack of the Guard's butt. On the second step, the FB should put his inside hand up, making a pocket for the ball. The back of the hand should be against the chest to keep the elbow up. If the elbow comes down, it can hit the QB's forearm and cause a fumble. Do not clamp down on the ball. There should be a "soft squeeze" until the ball is pressed into the FB's stomach. 2. TB Steps- The TB takes his first step toward the sideline with his playside foot and continues on a flat courseuntil the QB cuts upfield. He should always expect a quick pitch. Before the ball is snapped, the TB should identify the pitch key to help him anticipate how soon the ball will be pitch if the ball is pulled. The TB should be "in phase" with the QB at all times, 4 yards wide, 2-3 yards back. Once the QB cuts up field, the TB should indicate with "Ball, Ball, Ball!" that he is still there for the pitch. Once the ball is pitched, we want the TB running upfield, not laterally, as quickly as possible. He should look to get to the alley, not cut back. Hash, numbers, sideline.

B

N

T

B

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D. Interior Blocking
As is the case with every offense, the Veer and Option will not go unless the offensive line is effective in blocking every defensive front we will see. 1. Defensive Techniques: In order to better communicate the alignment of defensive players (especially for linemen), we will use the following terminolgy:

9 6 7 5 4 4i 3 2 1

0

1 2 3 4i 4 5 7 6 9

9 : Outside shoulder of the TE 6 : Heads up on the TE 7 : Inside shoulder of the TE 5 : Outside shoulder of the tackle 4 : Heads up on the tackle 4i : Inside shoulder of the tackle 3 : Outside shoulder of the guard 2 : Heads up on the guard 1 : Inside shoulder of the guard 0 : Heads up on center 2. Veer Blocking Concepts:

* Anyone lined up on either side of the center is referred to as a shaded nose.

With the Veer, the basic idea is to seal off everyone inside of the diveback's path, read the first defender outside the diveback's path, and finally option the next defender. The main task for the interior linemen is to "seal off" the playside defenders, and "cut off" the backside defenders. The inside seal creates the first of three running lanes for the backfield.

Lane 1 Lane 2 Lane 3
FS SS C E T B N B T E

C

Lane 1

Lane 2

Lane 3

3. Veer Blocking Assignments: While some defenses require special rules and techniques, there are some basics which dictate each offensive lineman's responsibility. The playside Guard and Tackle will "Rule" block (see section on offensive line play), while the Center and backside Guard and Tackle will use both Rule and "Zone" blocking principles. PST: PSG: C: BSG: BST: Combo with Guard, Linebacker On (Combo with PST or Center), Inside Rule (Zone) Rule (Zone) Rule (Zone) C

FS

SS

B T N

B T E

C

E

Veer vs. 50 Front

Playside Blocking
The playside guard and tackle are the two players that will make the most adjustments versus the defenses we will see. Their job is that of sealing the playside defenders. Playside Tackle: If the Guard calls for a combination block, the Tackle's first rule is to block accordingly . Generally, the Guard will call "Willie-Cop", but can give a "Fredo" call. The Guard can call for a combination block anytime he his covered, but especially if there is a 3 technique. There are three alignments for which the Guard is considered "covered".

N

T

N

T

N

T

1 Tech = Inside shade

2 Tech = Head Up

3 Tech = Outside Shade

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a) Obviously, with a 1 technique, the Guard will not need help in sealing the DT, so the PST can progress to his second rule: Linebacker. b) If the DT is aligned in a 2 technique, the Guard will have to decide if he can handle him alone. If there is a chance the DT will slant into the B gap, the Guard should call for the combination. c) Versus the 3 technique, the Guard will always call for the combination block. * If the Guard is not covered, as in the 50 front above, the PST is encouraged to widen his split to make the QB's read easier. If the Guard is covered by a 2 or 3 technique, however, the PST cannot widen past the point where he can still execute the combination.

Guard-Tackle Combinations: How to handle the 3 technique a) Willie-Cop: This is the basic combination call by the PSG versus a 2 or 3 technique DT. It begins as a basic double team ("Willie"), but at the last second, the Tackle will scrape off to the LB. THE EMPHASIS IS ON THE DOUBLE TEAM! The greatest combination block is to simply drive the 3 technique into the LB's lap. The Guard will use a firestep and attack the outside shoulder of the defender. Helmet placement is important, as he must be in a position to completely overtake the DT when the PST scrapes off to the LB. If the Guard's head is inside, the defender will slide off the block. The Tackle steps inside and delivers a hard punch with his inside hand, but tries to keep his shoulders square to the LOS. If the shoulders are turned, the Tackle will not be able to scrape to the LB. The key for the PST is to let the LB come to him. Don't rush the double team. The scrape portion will happen at the last second, just as the FB is breaking through the LOS.

PSG & PST

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Willie-Cop

B N T
Willie-Cop B N T Willie N B N

B

T Fredo

T Base

b) Fredo (Fold block): This is an alternative combination scheme to handle a 2 or 3 technique. It doesn't develop as quickly as the Willie-Cop, but it does allow the PST (who has an angle) to seal the DT. The PST executes a down block and collapses the DT. The Guard steps around the block of the Tackle and cuts off the LB. Essentially, the PST and PSG are exchanging assignments. c) Willie (double team): Another way for the Guard and Tackle to handle the 3 tech is to simply double team him. If the DT is particularly strong or the LB doesn't scrape well, this may be the best call. Since it is two on one, there should be movement on the defender. Get shoulder to shoulder and drive. Do not let the DT create a pile; get down and root him out d) Base: The last way to block the 3 technique is not a combination block, but can be effective. If the Guard is covered by a 2 or 3 technique, BUT DOES NOT CALL FOR A COMBINATION, the PST will go directly to the LB. (The Guard can also call "Base" to tell the PST to go right to LB.) If the Guard thinks he can reach block the 3 technique, this will ensure that the LB is sealed by the Tackle. However, the PSG must be able to handle the DT alone by not only reaching him, but getting movement as well. If the 3 technique gets penetration, it will force the FB to cut back, or worse, disrupt the mesh point and not allow the QB to properly read the dive key.

Playside Tackle cont: If the Guard is uncovered, the PST's next rule is to take the best release possible and block the playside Linebacker. While this seems like a simple rule and block, there are many things for the Tackle to consider. First, since we will utilize a Tight End position occassionally, we will see an uncovered Guard. Most teams that run a 50 defense (Odd) will reduce the front when there is no TE. However, there are times where the PSG may be uncovered in a true 50 defense, and the Tackle must know how to handle this look. Second, just as there were three alignments the DT could be in covering the Guard, the 50 front DT may align in one of three techniques.

B N T E N

B T E N

B T E

4i = Inside shade

4 = Head Up

5 = Outside shade

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PST Veer (inside) release

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In all cases, if the PSG is uncovered, the Tackle will be releasing directly to the LB. He is NOT blocking the DT. (Against an unreduced 50 front, the DT is the dive key, and therefore not blocked.) a) If the DT is aligned in a 4i, the PST will use a loop technique to get to the LB, swimming the inside arm over the defensive tackle, and sealing the LB. This alignment is rare; if the DT moves inside the Tackle, he will usually reduce all the way down to a 3 technique, thus covering the Guard. For the QB, a 4i technique is an automatic pull on the Inside Veer. Our preferred method of dealing with this alignment is to run Outside Veer. b) Versus a 4 or 5 DT, there are three techniques he can use. 1) He can slant or pinch hard inside. 2) He can loop outside or go upfield. 3) He can jam the Tackle's release inside. *MOST COMMON* If the DT pinches or loops, the PST must use the best release and get to the LB. If the DT is trying to jam the Tackle on the LOS, he must block through the DT to the LB. He will rip the backside arm like an upper cut through the DT's inside leg, up to the LB. He CANNOT take the path of least resistance, or allow himself to be washed down inside. If he is forced inside, or simply releases inside, the PST will lose his angle to keep the playside LB from scraping into the hole.

B N T

Dive key

E

Playside Guard: The PSG's first rule is to block any defender covering him. ("On") As discussed earlier, the Guard must recognize the various ways he can be covered: 1, 2, or 3 technique. a) If the PSG is covered by a 1 technique, the Guard will receive help from the Center, who according to his Zone blocking rules, will block any defender in his gap in the direction of the play. If the Center overtakes the DT, the PSG will scrape to the backside LB.

B N

B T E

Dive Key

Vs. 1 tech
The Center and PSG begin with a “Willie” block, But at the last minute, the Guard comes off the Block, looking for the backside LB.

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Versus double 1 techniques, the Center should, according to the Zone blocking rules, overtake the playside defender as shown above. The PSG can also single block the playside DT, allowing the Center and BSG combination block the weakside. Getting the backside LB blocked is extremely important! More often than not, he is the one to make the play. If he is flowing so quickly that he cannot be cut off, counters and cutbacks should be called.

b) If the PSG is covered by a 2 or 3 technique, he will be handled in the fashion discussed earlier, probably involving a Guard-Tackle combination block. If the Guard is uncovered, he progresses to his second rule:Inside. If the PSG is uncovered, he will block down on any defender from his inside shoulder to head up on the Center. Either an A Gap player, or the NT. When the PSG blocks down on the NT, there are two reactions he looks for: 1. If the Nose tackles hips stay (he penetrates to the strong side), the PSG and Center will essentially Willie-cop to the backside LB. Any time there are two blocking one, the emphasis is on getting movement.

B N T E N

B T E

2. If the NT's hips go away (he slants to the weakside) the PSG goes directly to the backside LB. * Regardless of the front or alignment, there will always be one offensive lineman with a good angle to cut off the backside LB pursuit.

Backside Blocking
The Center, BSG, and BST are responsible for cutting off the pursuit from the backside. Zone blocking principles, along with basic alignment rules, dictate the backside's blocking assignment. Center: Basic assignment is "Rule" or Gap, On, Over, Linebacker. the Center is covered, the Center If uses a fire step and blocks the man on him If the PSG is uncovered, he will block down on the NT . and combination block with the Center. If the Center is uncovered, the Center will scoop step and block any defender in the playside A gap. If there is no playside gap defender, the Center will block the nearest LB (Over, LB). Scoop stepping in the direction of the play will allow the Center to pick up any stunts or blitzes in the playside A gap.

B B T N T

B B B T

B N

B T

GAP

ON

B T N

B T

B B B T N

B

B T B

OVER

LINEBACKER

On the backside, any uncovered lineman will scoop step toward the playside (like with traditional zone blocking) before proceeding to his rules. This is to help protect against stunts and blitzes.

Guard: Basic assignment is "Rule" or Gap, On, Over, Linebacker. the Guard is covered, he uses a If fire step and blocks the man on him. If the Guard is uncovered, he will scoop step and block any defender in the backside A gap, preferrably by cutting him. If there is no backside gap defender, the Guard will block the nearest LB (Over, LB).

B T N

B T E

Like the PSG, when the backside Guard is uncovered, he will step toward the Center, and be prepared to help with an aggressive, slanting NT. If the NT's hips stay on his step inside, he will double team the Nose. If the NT's hips go away, (he slants strong), the BSG will go directly to the LB.

B B T N T

B B SS B T

B N

B B T

ON

OVER

B T

B N T

B B T

B N

B T

B SS B

GAP

LINEBACKER

Tackle: Basic assignment is Gap, Over, Linebacker. The tackle's first priority is to cut any B gap defender (3 or 4i technique). The BSG can help set the 3 tech up by ripping his outside arm up and through the defender before going to the next level. On Veer away, the BST will never block a 4 or 5 technique, unless they slant into B gap, at which point they become a B gap defender. The backside end is controlled with bootleg action and counters

B B T N T

B B SS B T

B N

B B T

B T

B N T

B B T

B N
Cut

B T

B SS B

BSG cuts the 2 tech, and the BST and TE work up field.

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E. Perimeter Blocking
Our wide receivers must think of themselves as blockers as well as receivers, for without effective blocking on the perimeter, the play has little chance for success. 1. Idaho / Utah Rules: The job of the Twins receivers is to block the force defender and the deep third defender to the side of the option.

C B B E N

FS C B T E SS

We can account for 4 perimeter defenders: 2 are optioned 2 are blocked If a 5th defender gets involved, we are outnumbered on the perimeter.

Veer vs. 4-4

3
Blocked

1 Read

2 Read

4
Blocked

This is the potential 5th defender we can’t account for. We can choose to block him (treat him as the force defender) and not block the FS, but then the FS will be the 5th defender .

a) Identifying the Force defender: To defend the triple option, the defense must be able account for the following: 1. Dive2. QB 3. Pitch 4. Deep Third

The first down defender on or outside the PST is the Dive Read. The next defender outside of him is the Pitch Key. At this point, we need to understand which of the remaining two defenders is responsible for run support, and which is responsible for the deep third. Most defenses will assign the CB to deep third and have the safety fill the alley for run support. In this case the FS is the "force" defender and will need to be blocked by either the Slot or the WR. Whenever possible, we want to crack the force defender with the outside receiver. If the force defender is in a position where the WR feels he can block the force defender, he will call "Idaho" meaning "I got him" and the Slot receiver will answer with "Utah" meaning "you got him". If the WR feels he cannot block the force defender he will tell the Slot "Utah" (you got him) and the Slot will answer with "Idaho" (I got him).

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Deep Third

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Pitch Key

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Dive Key

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Force

* An integral part of this scheme is to force the LB to take the FB. If we allow the DE to take the FB, the LB will scrape over the top and take QB, effectively becoming the 5th defender. This will leave the SS unblocked, but without the threat of a 2 on 1 scenario. We have to condition the LB to take the dive, widen the DE to the point where he cannot effectively stop the FB, and hit a tighter landmark. All of these things will enable the PST to make his block on MLB, and once again force a decision on the DE. Either take the dive away or we will beat you up inside with the FB.

C B B E N

FS C B T E SS

In the following example, there are four perimeter defenders. The first two outside of the PST are the dive read and the pitch key. The next two defenders must be therefore blocked. Since the CB is up and in a position to immediately give run support, he is the force defender and the SS will have the deep third behind him. This is the Cov. II look. FS SS C B T B N B T B C

The outside release of the WR will help facilitate the block of the Slot. The Cov. II corner is instructed to not allow an outside release and should widen, giving the Slot a good angle.

It would be very difficult if not impossible for the WR to effectively block a rolled up corner who is coming hard for run support. So in this case, the WR will give a "Utah" call, telling the Slot he is to block the force defender, which in this case is the Corner. The Slot would answer with an "Idaho" call. BOTH RECEIVERS MUST KNOW WHICH OF THE PERIMTER DEFENDERS IS THE FORCE PLAYER! We will assume that the player closest to the LOS will be the force defender. In the Cov. II look as above, it is the CB. FS C C B B T N B T E SS

When there are only three perimeter defenders as in the above diagram, the FS will be force defender. The Utah / Idaho call thus pertains to him. As was the case against the 4-4, the playside LB must not be allowed to become the fifth defender. In the defense below, the SS has inverted and there are again four perimeter defenders. Of the two outside defenders, the SS is closest to the LOS and would be considered the force defender. If the WR feels the force defender is too far inside for him to block, he would call "Utah" and the Slot would proceed to block the SS. FS C C B E T N B T E SS

In the defense below, the DE, Sam LB, SS, and Corner must all be considered perimeter players, giving the defense four perimeter defenders. Again, when there are four perimeter players, the first two will be optioned, the next two are blocked. Since the SS is closest to the LOS he is the force defender. If we can, we want to crack him with the WR and arc release to the CB.

Another way for the WRs to understand perimeter defense is to consider the number of defenders there are OUTSIDE the pitch key. If there's only one, then the FS is the force defender. If there are two, whichever defender is closest to the LOS is the force.

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Which defender is the “force” player?

FS C C W E N M T S E SS

Even though we are blocking the force defender and the deep third defender, the FS is still in a position to run the alley to both sides. However, to do so he must vacate the deep middle third of the field.

Which defender is the “force” player? How many perimeter defenders are there? Remember, when there are 3 perimeter defenders, the FS becomes the force.

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Note the tight alignment of the alley player (#2). This player would be tough to block anyway, but since he is the first defender outside the dive key, he is the pitch key and therefore not blocked. According to the blocking rules, either the Slot or WR should go block the FS, who is the force player. If the inside LB is flying out to take the QB (he becomes #5), and the PST cannot get him blocked, we will have to block him with the Slot and take our chances with the FS.

Vs. 4 perimeter defenders, #1 and #2 are the dive read and pitch key. This leaves #3 and #4 to be blocked by our two receivers. #3 is in the better position to give run support, so he is the force defender.

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When facing a defensive adjustment like this, we would rather block #2 with our Slot, and option #3, leaving the WR to stalk block the Corner (#4). With the SS up on the LOS, this is a tough block for either receiver. Another way to attack this is to throw the ball. Remember, a defense set up to stop the option is usually weak against the pass.

Put simply, our WR must recognize whether there are 3 or 4 perimter defenders. If there are three, the FS must become the fourth defender, (remember, will can't let the LB become a perimeter defender), and is the force player, which we will block. If there are four perimeter players, the SS (alley player on the strong side) will be the force defender unless the defense is in a Cov. II which is rare against a Twins formation. b) Both receivers should be able to see the number of perimeter defenders, but the presence of an "overhang" is an indication of four perimeter players. An "overhang" means that there are 2 defenders on or outside of the PST. These are the first 2 defenders that will be read, leaving the next 2 defenders to be blocked. When the tackle recognizes this look, he can give an "I got 2" call to the Twins receivers, effectively telling them that neither can block the FS. The SS and Corner must be blocked. FS C B T B N B T B

SS C

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2. Single Receiver Rules: When we run veer to the single receiver side, we can have the WR either stalk block the CB or crack back on the FS as shown below. If the Corner has deep third responsibility, he will be slower to come up for run support. In many cases, the corner will actually run with the receiver.
FS C E T B N B SS T E C

We can account for 3 perimeter defenders on the single receiver side; 2 are optioned and one is blocked. The WR’s assignment is called “CrackRead”. As the WR runs at the Corner, he reads his reaction. If the Corner backpedals, the receiver looks for the FS filling the alley. When the FS begins to fill the alley, the WR should take the FS out. If the FS sees him coming, the WR will simply wall of the the pursuit of the FS. Obviously, we can go ahead and stalk the Corner and force the FS to fill the alley.

Many teams will try to have the FS become the 4th defender (which we cannot account for) on the weakside. We will assume that either the FS or Corner will stay back and defend the Deep third. We will block whichever defender is coming for run support.

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To run Veer weak from Trips, we would have to motion The TB into the backfield. Read #1, pitch off of #2.
Whether we stalk the corner or crack the FS will depend on which is the better tackler. Most FS are better tacklers than corners, so we can decide during scouting which defender we want to force into action, If we feel we can simply outrun the pursuit of the FS, we will stalk the CB. Once we have the Corner coming up to stop the option, the flag route will open up behind him. If the defense is in some kind of man or man, we will automatically crack the FS. The CB must run with his man, so we block two defenders with one man.

With the single receiver in tight, his assignment is to simply arc release and block the widest defender, which should be the CB. Again, if the CB gets too aggressive defending the option, he is in danger of allowing a receiver behind him.

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FS C C E B T N B SS T E

The TE side attack is not meant to a mainstay of the offense. It is used when the defense begins to overshift to the Twins side, and to keep the defense honest. Many teams will shift their FS toward the Twins side. When they do, we have a numbers advantage. One blocker plus three ball carrier options against 3 perimeter defenders.

F. Overload Principle
Using our Overload formation is our first choice against certain fronts. All of the advantages of the twins alignment are still there, but with the added benefit of having an extra blocker on the strong side.
FS C SS C E W N M T E S