Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
21Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Readiness to Adopt Children with Special Needs

Readiness to Adopt Children with Special Needs

Ratings:

3.0

(1)
|Views: 13,338|Likes:
Published by Jane Gilgun
The adoption of children with special needs requires preparation. This interview is for professionals to use when getting to know adults who are interested in adopting children with special needs. The interview is helpful in identifying strengths and areas that require more attention.
The adoption of children with special needs requires preparation. This interview is for professionals to use when getting to know adults who are interested in adopting children with special needs. The interview is helpful in identifying strengths and areas that require more attention.

More info:

Published by: Jane Gilgun on Sep 11, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See More
See less

04/15/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 
Jane F. Gilgun, Ph.D., LICSW jgilgun@umn.eduSusan Keskinen, MSWskeskinen@yahoo.com
Hennepin County Adoption ProjectUniversity of MinnesotaSchool of Social Work
 
Interview for the Readiness to Adopt Self-Survey 
 
(IRASS): A 
Guide 
 
 
Please feel free to reproduce this interview guide for your professional use.
Jane F. Gilgun, Ph.D., LICSW is professor, School of Social Work, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities,1404 Gortner Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108 USA. Phone: 612/624-3643; e-mail: jgilgun@umn.eduSusan Keskinen, MSW, is a research and evaluation consultant, 691 Portland Avenue, St. Paul. MN55104. USA Phone: 651/292-9085; e-mail: skeskinen@yahoo.com
 Jane F. Gilgun and Susan Keskinen in collaboration with an advisory group developed the IRASS. Themembers of the advisory group are Ginny Blade (National Council on Adoptable Children, St. Paul, MN)and staff of the Hennepin County, Minnesota, Human Services and Public Health Department: DanCapouch, Suzanne Douglas, Suzanne Gaines, Marcia Miller, and Mary Herek. Penny Wile, Glenn Bracht, Sheila Schmaltz, and Paula Childers made notable contributions to the development of the tools.The IRASS is one of several products resulting from a five-year collaboration between the HennepinCounty, Minnesota, Human Services and Public Health Department and the School of Social Work,University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Jane F. Gilgun, Ph.D., LICSW, principal investigator 
 
 
IRASSPage 3 of 17
Hennepin County Adoption ProjectUniversity of Minnesota School of Social Work
Interview for the Readiness to Adopt Self-Survey (IRASS): A Guide
Jane F. Gilgun, Ph.D., LICSW jgilgun@umn.eduSue Keskinenskeskinen@yahoo.com
The following is a guide to conversational interviews with prospective adoptive parents about their readiness to adopt children with special needs. Its purpose is to identify areas of strength in adoptive parents’ capacities and areas that require attention. By using this interview guide to engage prospectiveadoptive parents in in-depth conversations, adoption professionals will be positioned to help prospectiveadoptive parents recognize their strengths as well as to provide a basis for recommendations about how  prospective adoptive parents can develop additional parental capacities. Referrals to support groups,educational programs, and printed material are typical recommendations that social workers will make.The topics in this interview guide are the same as the topics in the Readiness to Adopt Self-Survey (RASS), which is also available electronically. To use this guide effectively, prospective adoptive parentsshould have reflected on these topics by filling out the items of the RASS. Some of the topics covered inthis guide encourage prospective adoptive parents to reveal personal and sensitive information. Be sureto help them stay within their zones of emotional safety. You can do this by being empathic and using active listening skills.This conversation guide is divided into six parts. Do as many or as few as suits both you and adoptive parents. Remember—this is not a test. It’s a way of exploring prospective adoptive parents’ strengthsand areas that require attention. Few prospective adoptive parents are fully prepared to parent adopted children with special needs at the outset. This guide to conversations is intended to give some directionas to how parents can prepare themselves for adoptive parenthood of children with special needs.

Activity (21)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Jane Gilgun liked this
sobia4 liked this
sobia4 liked this
Jane Gilgun liked this
cmkasasa liked this
Marija Yare liked this
Mahfudz Spdi liked this
hajduk12 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->