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The Oredigger Issue 12 - February 7, 2007

The Oredigger Issue 12 - February 7, 2007

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Published by The Oredigger
The Oredigger Volume 87, Issue 12
The Oredigger Volume 87, Issue 12

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Published by: The Oredigger on Sep 12, 2009
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Volume 87, Issue 12March 28, 2007
Inside thisIssue of 
T
HE
O
REDIGGER
HE 
OICE 
 
OF 
 
THE 
OLORADO 
CHOOL
 
OF 
INES 
,
 A
 
SUPERIOR 
 
EDUCATION 
 
IN 
 
 APPLIED
 
SCIENCE 
 
 AND
 
ENGINEERING 
 
E-DaysEvents
pg. 9-11 
www.oredigger.net 
 News -
2
Features -
Entertainment -
Sports -
14 
Editorials -
16 
Fool’s Gold -
18
Mike Stone
Staff Writer 
The Colorado School of Mines band played the school fight songand a breeze blew across the crowdof nearly 200 spectators.Governor Bill Ritter finished histour of the Colorado School of Minesand gave a speechto the students, par-ents, and communitymembers.The address fo-cused around Colo-rado’s Energy Bud-get and the nation’sneed to expand morequickly into renew-able energies.Gov. Ritter started by offering memoriesof a national Gov-ernor’s meeting heattended a short whileago.“We determined that the worldeconomy, in the future, will need greatminds in science and mathematics.The Colorado School of Mines is a perfect example of how we can leadthe world by following this path.”Throughout the speech, Ritter voiced gratitude to schools like CSM because they are leading the futureindustries with new discoveries ev-ery day.Ritter expanded on the subject,saying: “The Energy Budget is botha National Security issue and an Eco-nomic Security issue. Colorado can become a leader in changing our de- pendency on car- bon by setting anexample for other states. It is botha national and astate issue.”Efforts havealready been putinto process. Rit-ter announced that“a bill is on itsway to my desk that has already passed the Colo-rado house…thatwill make 20% of all Colorado utili-ties be renewable by 2020.”After the speech, a forum wasopened to the Governor and threequestions were raised.First, Ritter was asked if Minescould help in any way with Colorado’sEnergy Budget.
Governor Visit Mandates Role For Mines
Ritter responded: “By being a lead-ing energy research facility as Minesis. It is important to keep up goodrelations between these facilities andstate offices.”Ritter also responded to a raise inhigher education funding question putforth by Casey Morse, Student BodyPresident.“If Colorado were to put forth allthe money necessary for every studentseeking higher education this year, itwould cost 850 million dollars andfrankly, we just don’t have the money.Believe me, we want to, but there’s noway to achieve it right now.”Finally, Ritter was asked howMines is to get a higher graduationrate, as it is currently graduating 65-70% of incoming students.“There is a bill underway to helpsuch efforts that will get students bet-ter acquainted with college starting inhigh school and even lower. This waywe can ensure our future.”The forum went smoothly and waswell received. As a closing, Ritter wasgiven a Mines sweatshirt and blueMining Hard Hat.“I was very pleased with his visit,”said Harold Cheuvront, Vice Presidentand Dean of Students. “He made thetime to come out here within the
Courtesy Mike Stone/OREDIGGER
Colorado Governor Bill Ritter spoke to Mines students, staff, faculty,and interested public on Tuesday, March 20. Ritter talked about en-ergy and the role of CSM in the development of renewable energyresources. He also answered questions from the crowd during thehour-long talk.
“We determined that the world economy, inthe future, will need  great minds in sci-ence and mathematics.The Colorado School of Mines is a perfect example of how wecan lead the world by following this path.”
first six months of his term, he wasgenuinely attentive and interested,and he made us feel as if his beinghere was the most important thing tohim at that point in time. Certainly,his focus on working with CSM onthe State’s energy economy is impor-tant to the School and to the State of Colorado.”There is an ongoing invitation for the Governor to return anytime hewishes to visit.As seniors prepare to say their final farewell to the Colorado Schoolof Mines, many loose ends need to betied up, much paperwork is required,and those last goodbyes must be said.One of the loose ends is the senior gift:seniors are asked to donate money toon-campus causes, such as the Arthur Lakes Library, or the Mines Fund.Few people know that costs listedon the tuition bill they receive onlycover a portion of their educationalexperience. The rest of the moneycomes from generous donations fromalumni, and the money that comesfrom the Mines Fund.“We hope that by encouragingseniors to donate money to benefitMines, we are teaching them to begood alumni” says Senior Gift Pub-licity Chair, Regina Hutchings. Bydonating money, students are helpingsupport other students through schol-arships, internships, and study-abroadopportunities.Seniors are not the only donors;President Bill Scoggins will be match-ing the donations, up to a value of onethousand dollars.Aside from this worthy cause,seniors will be creating a mural: mak-ing handprints on a canvas, which will be displayed in an undetermined spoton campus. The theme for this year’sSenior Gift is “Make Your Mark” soseniors can leave their mark in a physi-cal, as well as conceptual, sense.Students who contribute at a “lead-ership level” will also be rewarded,with gifts from Book & Brew, theMines Bookstore, and Blue CanyonBar & Grill. Make your donation atthe Student Activities Office, throughthe mail, or online at http://www.oia.mines.edu/seniorgift.
Lily Giddings
Staff Reporter 
To Give, Not Forget
CSM Seniors Contribute To
Their Soon-To-Be Alma Mater 
And Tradition With Senior Gift
CourtesyMarsha Williams
Governor Ritter took a tour of the CSM campus, met Marvin the Min-er, and walked away with some Mines gear of his own, including a hard hat.
E-DaysSchedule
pg. 12 
 
Page 2March 28, 2007
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$1.50 16oz Domestic Drafts
$1.50 Thin Cheese Slices
$1.75 16oz Import Drafts
$3.95 10 Piece Wings
10% Off With Student I.D. *Not Valid With Any Other Special*
 i r E  v e ng g eP i  e ec e& H  u gSs
 
See the Fool’s GoldSection For ASatirical View OfMines
Pg. 18
Shaemus Gleason
Editor in Chief 
The scandal that has been referred to as “At-torneygate” took an in-teresting turn on Mondaywith the revelation thatMonica Goodling, a jus-tice department officialintimately involved inthe firing of the eight USattorneys in question will plead the fifth (protectionagainst self incrimina-tion) during her sworntestimony in front of thesenate judiciary commit-tee March 29th.Mrs. Goodling by nomeans is the only or mostsenior Bush administra-tion official implicatedin this widening scandal.Others publicly eyed bythe judiciary committeeto testify are AttorneyGeneral Alberto Gon-zales, Deputy AttorneyGeneral Paul McNulty,Deputy White House Chief of Staff Karl Rove and WhiteHouse Counsel Harriet Miers.Much of the controversy re-volves around e-mails obtained by different news outlets detail-ing exchanges between WhiteHouse officials and officials atthe Department of Justice. Theycarried political overtones as tothe motives for the firing, notlimited to a White house counseldescribing some of the US attor-neys as “loyal Bushies” and sug-gestions for removal of US at-torneys who had “chafed againstadministration initiatives,” by
Goodling to Take Fifth
“Attorneygate” Scandal Grips DC
Chief of Staff to theAttorney General KyleSampson.The Bush adminis-tration has claimed thatMiers and Rove do nothave to testify becausethey are protected byexecutive privilege.But Bush has offered tosend them over to havea conversation with theJudiciary Committeein a closed room, withno transcript.The eight former US attorneys in ques-tions are H.E. Cum-mins III from the East-ern District of Kansas,Kevin V. Ryan fromthe Northern Districtof California, DanielBogden from the Dis-trict of Nevada, CarolLam From the SouthernDistrict of California,David Inglesias fromthe District of New Mexico,Paul K. Charlton of the Districtof Arizona, John McKay fromthe Western District of Wash-ington and Margaret Chiarafrom the Western District of Michigan.
White House Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove
Courtesy Wikipedia
Y
OUR
W
ORLD
 
IN
B
RIEF
IRAN captured15 British sailorsduring a routine pa-trol along the Iraniancoast. The Britishgovernment main-tains they were notin Iranian waters. Northern IRELANDformed a joint ad-ministration betweenthe DemocraticUnionist Party andSinn Fein, represent-ing the Protestantsand Roman Cath-olics respectively.SURINAME’s Trans- portation, Commu-nication, and TourismMinister Alice Amaforesigned after it came tolight that she used ap- proximately $15,000 of government money tofinance her 30th birth-day party. Party favorsincluded whisky, rum,food, and decorations.CHINA’s President HuJintao and RUSSIA’s Presi-dent Vladimir Putin, ina rebuke of Washington,expressed their unwilling-ness to support the USin military action againstIran or North Korea.
 
March 28, 2007Page 3
M
INER
S
N
OTES
The Department of Public Safety and its memberswould like for everyone tohave a good time during E-Days 2006. Additionally,our wish is for everyoneto be safe while they areenjoying the celebrations.For the protection of everyone, Police Officersfrom the Public Safety Department will have a presence at all events.Ê We will be available toassist those in need, and to enforce the law, as well as Campus Rules and Regulations, if necessary.Ê Just a reminder, the un- derage drinking Laws and Rules cannot be suspend- ed during E-Days.Ê Weask that each of you beaware of and responsiblefor your actions and thoseof your guests. Alwaysremember to respect therights of others. Also, please know that the construction sites oncampus are the private property of the contrac- tors and it is unlawful to trespass inside their designated areas without  proper authorization fromthat contractor.Public Safety Police Of- ficers are on duty 24/7 and may be contacted by calling extension 3333,or (303) 273-3333.Ê Our offices are located at 1812 Illinois, the northwest corner of Illinois and 19thstreet.Ê Please feel free tostop by anytime.If you are going to be driv- ing to off-campus partiesand functions, remember to appoint a designated driver in advance. If youhave any questions, please contact us right away.Sincerely,Richard Boyd, Chief of Police/Director CSM Department of Public Safety 
PublicSafety Announcement
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Check out www.oredigger.net
<< translation >> 
What’s Your Beef With Mines?
ASCSM President Casey Morse Answers Your Questions
Beef 
:I hate Saturday finals!
Response
:In order to give everyonetheir finals, we absolutelyneed 5 days. In fact finals goon from 8:00 am until 9:00 pm on all 5 days. Due toclassroom space limitationsand the need for graduationon that following Friday, thefirst day of finals must starton that Saturday. The stu-dents worked very hard to getDead Day to offset the Sat-urday finals. Without DeadDay, we would still have totake finals either on Saturdayor on Dead Day.
Beef 
:Can’t add moneyto my Blaster-card onlineany-more.
Response
:The website used for man-aging your Blastercard is cur-rently not operating. Therewill be a new website soonthat you can use to manageyour accounts online.
Beef 
:Physics sucks ass
Response
:I agree. Unfortunately,it is required for ABET ac-creditation. The CAPA helpsessions are what got methrough Physics. Just fightthrough it and never look  back.
Beef 
:Why are the first two years“weed-out” classes? Whyare more people getting ac-cepted?
Response
:The first two yearsare not techni-cally “weed-out” classes.They arede-signed to ensure thestudents get a strong graspof the required core courses.They might seem like “weed-out” classes because the in-formation is not typically allthat intriguing. Hopefully,the information you learn becomes more interesting asyou progress through your curriculum, and it offsets thefact that the courses actuallyget more difficult. As far asadmissions goes, the school
Response
:In choosing this world-class engineering institution,students are typically plac-ing more emphasis on their career path than their sociallife. Fortunately, the schooldoes offer many programsthat encourage social activitythrough the Mines ActivityCouncil and our 130+ clubsand organizations. Addition-ally, we are convenientlylocated in an area of thecountry that is surrounded bymany other higher educationinstitutions. For the goodnature of all of us (malesand females alike), getout and explore beforecomplaining.
Beef 
:Why is E-Daysnot the first week-end in April thisyear? Also,why isn’t therea lacrosse or rugby gameduring E-Days thisyear?
Response
:We must makesure that E-Days doesnot conflict with Easter or the EIT’s every year. Ithas conveniently fallen thefirst weekend of April for the past several years, butthat was not possible thisyear. The lacrosse and rugbyteams do not specificallyschedule their games as E-Days events. Again, thatwas just a coincidence inthe past.has kept admissions at a con-stant for the past couple years because we don’t have thefacilities for more students.This year an addi-tional 2,000stu-dentshaveap- plied com- pared to last year, and there-fore admissions standards areactually increasing.
Beef 
:Why do the guys keepcomplaining about the ratioand the quality of girls here?It gets the girls pretty angry!They could have gone toanother school if they justwanted to pick up girls.
Correction From March 7 Issue 
There were two factual errors in the articleentitled “FE Meets Biology.” Bioengineeringclasses have been offered on campus since2000 and have been offered every semester since 2001. None of the bioengineering classesare taught at Red Rocks. The Oredigger apolo-gies for these errors.

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