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The Pittston Sunday Dispatch - 04-17-2011

The Pittston Sunday Dispatch - 04-17-2011

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Published by The Times Leader
The Pittston Sunday Dispatch, 04-17-2011
The Pittston Sunday Dispatch, 04-17-2011

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Published by: The Times Leader on Apr 18, 2011
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04/18/2011

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WILKES-BARRE, PA $1.00Sunday, April17, 2011
Library’s YatesAward goes toBurns, Mondlak.
>> PAGE 32, 33
Frosh Sara Rubyscores two goals insoccer victory.
>> PAGE 48
Honors for two womenRuby a gem for PA girls
COUPONSAVINGSINSIDEWORTH$591.34
PHOTO SUBMITTED
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!
 
DAILY 
DEAL
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atnepadailydeal.com
 
 
Getgreatdealseveryday!
 
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For months we’ve watched revolutions in North Africa.The past couple of weeks Iwitnessed one in a hallway atthe community college.The story begins about twoyears ago with a zebra – actual-ly a graphic representation of azebra’s head – and a studentnicknamed Kitty. Elisha is her real name. When she told meeveryone calls her Kitty sheadded she didn’t know why. Itold her maybe I did. I said itmight be because I needed aKitty in my life. A former stu-dent, a woman older than I whohad become a dear friend, had died of cancer the summer  before. Her name was Caroline but she too had gone by Kitty.The “new” Kitty pronounced she didn’t care for computers, preferring to draw with pen or  pencil. Then she produced theaforementioned zebra using a program I had just taught her. Itwas spectacular.Part two of the assignmentwas to add a message to thedesign and Kitty, after fillingthe background behind thezebra’s head with a bar code – like a zebra, a design in black and white stripes – added thewords: Remember, you’reunique. Just like everyone else.I loved it, and raved about it,and Kitty stuck it in the middleof a bulletin board near thecomputer lab where I teach and that was how it all started.Students, who at first stopped to admire the zebra, began totack up work of their own. The bulletin board hangs in a hall-way utilized by most everycreative student at the commu-nity college – graphic designmajors, advertising majors,illustration majors, broadcastmajors, journalism majors – and it seemed they had beendying for a place to expressthemselves. Almost overnight,the bulletin board explodewith creativity. It soon wasladen with drawings, designs, photographs, essays, poems.You could not walk by withoutstopping to take it in. Kidswould sit on the floor in thehallway for hours trying toabsorb everything before them.There was an unwritten ruleabout the bulletin board thatanything hung there had a rightto be there. It was the originalno-judgment-zone.That’s why I was taken aback when, while teaching recently,out of the corner of my eye Ispotted someone removingthings from the board. I ex-cused myself from class and approach him with, “What doyou think you’re doing?”“Taking everything down,” hesaid.“You have no right to dothat,” I answered. “These thingsare special.”“I know,” he said. “I’m notgoing to hurt them. But everytime I’ve hung something herethis year someone had ripped itdown, so I’m going to put all of them in this garbage bag, hangit on the bottom of the board,and put up this sign.”The sign read: If one goesdown, they all go down. It had a big arrow pointing to the bag.“I get it,” I said. “This is astatement.”He nodded as he continued towork and I told him I was glad he was going it. See, I too had noticed a growing lack of re-spect for the board. You’d see amoustache drawn on a pho-tograph or a wise crack scraw-led next to a poem. What reallyirked me was when in front of the word “art” on the board,someone scribbled an “f”.“Really?” I said to somestudents. “Flatulence humor?Does Shrek go to school here?”I went back into my class-room and told the students whatwas happening in the hallway.A young lady, who rarely says aword in class, asked if shecould be excused for a moment.I watched her approach the bulletin board. By then, nothingwas left but the garbage bag of art work and scattered push pins.She returned in a few min-utes and after class I went to the bulletin board and had to smileas I saw she had arranged all of the push pins to spell the word “respect.”Upon learning what had happened, another student, a journalist, produced a docu-ment, a manifesto, of “rules”for the bulletin board. He hungit under the push-pin “respect.”An art student read it and fash-ioned a frame for it using grey poster board.Later, a pencil sketch of aunicorn appeared. It looked hungry. You could see its ribs. Next to it, the artist wrote “Tellme something.”In less than 24 hours the bulletin board was alive again.I gathered some students infront of it and told them thewhole story. When I mentioned the push-pin word “respect,”one of them said it didn’t spell“respect” any more. I was aboutto say, “Yes, it does,” when Irealized the pins had been rear-ranged to spell “rebirth.”There’s something new hungup every day. Thursday after-noon I noticed the latest addi-tion – a zebra.
Ed Ackerman, optimist
eackerman@psdispatch.com
You say you want a revolution?
Aid for Japan....................................................3Honor for Insalacos.........................................5St. Mary’s Closing.............................................7Local Chatter....................................................8Matters of Faith...............................................10Editorial /Letters.............................................14Nutrition............................................................15Guest Column ..................................................15Dance Benefit..................................................16Peeking into the Past......................................17Town News......................................................39Sports...............................................................47Obituaries.......................................................60Weddings.................................................Social1Birthdays................................................Social 3
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VOL. 65, NO.10
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Call Karen Fiscus at 970-7291
Advertising deadline is Thursday at 3 P.M.
 
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O
nMarch11,a9.0magni-tude earthquake struck off the coast of Japan. Not only did the earthquakecause destruction but the tsuna-miwaves(reachingupto124feethigh)thatfollowedminuteslater,traveled up to six miles inland and ravaged the island country.After all was said and done,13,591 people died, 4,916 wereinjuredand14,497peoplearere- ported missing. Approximately4.4 million households were leftwithout electricity and 1.5 mil-lion without water.The horrible events in Japancausedfirst-yearWyomingAreagirls’ soccer coach Mike Pryor to want to help in some way. Af-ter some research, Pryor found thatanorigamicraneisasymbolof hope in Japan and 1000 of them makes a wish come true.So Pryor and his soccer playerswent to work.“They say when you make1000 origami cranes a person’swish comes true and it grantshappinessandhealthandpeace,”said Pryor.So Pryor organized an event,calling it “1000 Cranes,” duringwhich his team as well as other Wyoming Area students set outto fold origami cranes and usethem to raise money to be givento the American Red Cross toaide in the Japan relief efforts.On April12, from 5 to 9 p.m.,32 Wyoming Area students and friends got together to designand fold 1000 origami cranes tosellfor$1each.Ittookthemfouhoursbuttheyreachedtheirgoalof1000 origami cranes.Creating an origami crane on-ly requires a perfectly square piece of paper, preferably origa-mipaper,buttakesapproximate-ly 20 small steps.“Onethousandorigamicranesis a pretty complicated process,”Pryor said with a chuckle. “If you’re pretty good at it you canmake an origami crane in 3-4minutes. Needless to say, thegirls’ hands are a little bit tired  butluckilywedon’tusethemallthat much.”Pryor,whoisgettinghisMBAatWilkesUniversityandisinter-estedindevelopingprojectsforacause, is hoping that people oth-er than the Wyoming Area soc-cer team take his idea and runwith it.“Seeing the situation in Japanand how much help they need overthere,I’mtryingtostartthismovement where it doesn’t stopwith the Wyoming Area girls’soccerteam,saidPryor.“Hope-fully other teams and schoolsandorganizationsfindthisinspi-rational and organize their ownevent.”
 PHOTOS SUBMITTED
Members of the Wyoming Area soccer team show their creations which they will sell to aid earthquake/tsunami victims in Japan.
WA soccer team uses hands to aid Japan
Players and friends make1000 origami cranes to sell to assist victims
By Matt Page 
 Dispatch Correspondent 
Katie Scalzo, Kourtny Schwerdtman, and Sarah Mack work on origami cranes.

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