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Times Leader 05-02-2011

Times Leader 05-02-2011

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The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 05-02
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 05-02

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A battered South turns tofaith as it tries to recover.
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VATICAN CITY — Some 1.5million pilgrims flooded RomeSunday to watch Pope John Paul IImove a step closer to sainthood inone of the largest Vatican Masses inhistory, an outpouring of adorationfor a beloved and historic figureafter years marred by church scan-dal. The turnout for the beatificationfar exceeded even the most optimis-tic expectation of 1 million people,the number Rome city officialspredicted. For Catholics filling St.Peter’s Square and its surrounding streets, and for those watching around the world, the beatification was a welcome hearkening back tothe days when the pope was almostuniversally beloved.“He was like a king to us, like afather,” Marynka Ulaszewska, a28-year-old from Ciechocinek, Po-land, said, weeping. “I hope theseemotions will remain with us for along time,” she said.Pope Benedict XVI praised JohnPaul for turning back the seemingly“irreversible” tide of communism with faith, courage and “thestrength of a titan, a strength whichcame to him from God.”John Paul is universally credited with helping bring down communi-
AP PHOTO
PopeBenedictXVIpassesapictureofthelateJohnPaul IIinSt. Peter’sSquareattheVatican, Sunday.
Some1.5 million watch beatification ceremony in Rome
John Paul closer to sainthood
ByNICOLEWINFIELDandVANESSAGERA 
 Associated Press
SeePOPE, Page10A
 WASHINGTON—OsamabinLadenis dead.President Barack Obama made thedramatic late-night announcementSunday from the East Room of the White House, ending the long, elusiveinternationalmanhuntfortheleaderof the al-Qaida terrorist organization re-sponsiblefortheSept.11,2001,attacks.“Justice has been done,” Obama saidin an 10-minute address shortly beforemidnight.Bin Laden, perhaps the most reviledman in the eyes of Americans, alsowassought for the 1998 bombings of U.S.embassies in east Africa.AsmallteamofU.S.operativeskilledbinLadenSundayinAbbottabad,Pakis-tan,afterafirefight,tookcustodyofhisbody and confirmed his identity, Oba-ma said. The president said a possiblelead to Obama’s whereabouts emergedlastAugust,buttook“manymonths”torun down.He determined last week that there was enough intelligence to take action,he said. Sunday’s targeted operation wentdownwithoutharmtoAmericansand without civilian casualty, he said.Celebratory crowds flocked outsidethe gates of the White House, waving Americanflagsandsingingthenationalanthem.“The United States is not and never willbeatwarwithIslam,Obamasaid.“BinLadenwasnotaMuslimleader.He was a mass murderer of Muslims. Hisdemiseshouldbewelcomedbyallwhobelieve in peace and human dignity.’’Obama said the Pakistani govern-ment had cooperated with the UnitedStates to make the operation possible.An official said the U.S. is ensuring bin Laden’s body is handled in accord-ance with Islamic tradition.
“BIN LADEN WAS NOT a Muslim leader. He was a massmurderer of Muslims. His demise should be welcomed by all who believe in peace and human dignity.’’
--President Obama
BIN LADEN DEAD
AP FILE PHOTO
OsamabinLadenisseeninOctoberatanundisclosedlocationinthistelevisionimage. ApersonfamiliarwithdevelopmentssaidSundaythatbinLadenisdeadandtheU.S. hasthebody.
U.S. missionkills leader of al-Qaida in Pakistan
Times Leader Wire Services
SeeBINLADEN, Page10A
 
K
PAGE 2A MONDAY, MAY 2, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Connors,ShirleyDavenport,WarrenHaddick,SusanKhoudary,AminLaSalle,RonaldNiznik,CeciliaSchuster,BarbaraSpak,DavidStrenfel,AngelineWeed,VelmaYurek,Seraphine
OBITUARIES
Page 6A
BUILDINGTRUST
The Times Leader strives tocorrect errors, clarify storiesand update them promptly.Corrections will appear in thisspot. If you have informationto help us correct an inaccu-racy or cover an issue morethoroughly, call the newsroomat 829-7242.
HARRISBURG – One playermatched all five winningnumbers drawn in Sunday’s“Pennsylvania Cash 5” gameso the jackpot will be worth$225,000.Lottery officials said 45players matched four num-bers and won $388.50 each;2,206 players matchedthree numbers and won $13;and 30, 275 players matchedtwo numbers and won $1each.
None of the tickets soldfor the Powerball gameSaturday evening matchedall six numbers drawn, whichwere:
06-13-15-32-41
Powerball:
03
Power Play:
2
The prize goes to an esti-mated $36 million forWednesday.Three Pennsylvania play-ers matched four of fivenumbers and the Power Ball,each receiving $10,000.Fifty-four Pennsylvaniaplayers matched four of fivenumbers and received $100each.
LOTTERY
MIDDAYDRAWING
DAILY NUMBER –
5-7-7
BIG 4 –
3-1-0-8
QUINTO –
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TREASURE HUNT
03-04-08-13-24NIGHTLYDRAWING
DAILY NUMBER –
2-9-2
BIG 4 –
2-6-3-8
QUINTO –
1-0-2-1-4
CASH 5
03-07-18-40-43
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Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.50 per weekMailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday$4.35 per week in PA$4.75 per week outside PAPublished daily by:Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company15 N. Main St.Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711Periodicals postage paid atWilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing officesPostmaster: Send address changesto Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
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Issue No. 2011-122
HARRISBURG Pennsylva-nia’sRepublicanPartyhasamess-ageforBobCasey:WewantyourU.S.Senateseat,badly.Energized by the 2010 GOP wave that elected Pat Toomey tothe Senate and restored Republi-can control of the state govern-ment after an eight-year hiatus,party leaders are hoping to oustoneofPennsylvania’sbest-knownpoliticians and make the state’sSenate seats a matched pair in2012.Several potential Casey chal-lengers are considering whethertorun,andoneRepublicanhasal-readyformedacommitteetoraisemoneyforhisSenatecampaign.But the elec-tionisstillmorethan18 monthsaway. AndCasey’s 2006landslide oust-er of conserva-tive Sen. RickSantorum,thenthe third-ranking Republican inthe Senate, cemented his statusasapoliticalforcetobereckoned with.One drawback for the GOP isthatthefewRepublicanswhoarehousehold names in Pennsylva-nia are either not interested inrunning — former Govs. TomRidge and Mark Schweiker — orare preoccupied with other en-deavors. Santorum recently setup a fundraising committee thatallows him to take the first stepstoward a presidential bid next year.At the other end of the spec-trum is Harrisburg lawyer MarkScaringi,aformerSantorumaide who is the only declared candi-date.Scaringi,whohasnotprevious-ly run for public office, has beentravelingacrossthestatetodrumup support from tea-party activ-ists and similar groups. His cam-paign committee reported a bal-ance of barely $300 at the end of March.“We haven’t focused on fun-draising at all’’ so far, said Scari-ngi’s campaign manager, JohnHaynes.“It’sallaboutthehustle.’’ ThatleavesanumberofRepub-lican congressmen and at leastonestatelawmakerwhohavenotruledoutaSenatecampaign.State Sen. Jake Corman, chair-manoftheSenateAppropriationsCommittee, acknowledged hehasbeenmakingtheroundswithpartyleadersaboutthepossibilityof challenging Casey’s expectedre-election but said Friday thatstate budget negotiations comefirst.“I won’t make any final deci-sionsuntilafterthebudget’’isap-proved, the Centre County law-makersaid.U.S. Rep. Charlie Dent, whosedistrict includes the Lehigh Val-ley, is undecided about whetherto run for Senate, a spokesmansaid.U.S. Rep. Jim Gerlach, whopublicly flirted with a run for theGOP gubernatorial nominationlastyearbeforehewaselectedtoafifth term in his suburban Phila-delphia district, sent wordthrough an aide that he has "noplanstorunfortheSenateatthistime.”Political observers said U.S.Rep.TimMurphyisweighinghisoptions, but his spokesman didnot return phone messages Fri-day.RobGleason,thestateRepubli-canPartychairman,citedaQuin-nipiac University poll releasedlast week showing President Ba-rack Obama’s Pennsylvania ap-proval rating dipping to 42 per-cent as evidence that Casey willbe vulnerable next year. Obamacarried the state when he waselected in 2008 and Casey hasbeenastrongsupporterofthead-ministration’spolicies.“It’s going to be fun,’’ Gleasonpredicted.Casey said the 2012 elections willbemainlyabouttheeconomyand jobs. He cited the tens of bil-lions of federal stimulus dollarsthatPennsylvaniareceivedandanarrayoffederaltaxcutsaskeystoaneconomicrecoverythatisstilltakinghold.Obama announced his re-elec-tioncampaignearlierthismonth.Casey, whose campaign commit-teehad$2.1milliononhandattheend of March, said he plans toseek another six-year term, but willprobablyholdoffanannoun-cementuntilnextyear.
With 18 months to go, GOP eyes Casey seat
One challenge for Republicansis finding a candidate with ahousehold name.
ByPETERJACKSON
 Associated Press
Casey
Just moments into Friday’sshow at the Mohegan SunArena at Casey Plaza,Avenged Sevenfold proved why it is one of the biggestnames in heavy metal andhard rock music at the mo-ment. With a scorching version of “Nightmare,” the band fromHuntington Beach, Calif. tookover the stage and ushered inits “Welcome to the Family”tour, complete with a manhanging from the rafters in anoose and enough flames tolight up the darkened arena.Granted, you wouldn’t ex-actly expect subtlety from abunch of guys with names likeSynyster Gates and ZackyVengeance, but if anyonedoubted the band’s powerbefore Friday, all shadows of that doubt were gone by thesecond song. The band showed its versa-tility a few songs later with atouching version of “So FarAway,” written about thegroup’s original drummer,James “The Rev” Sullivan, who died in December 2009. The “Nightmare” album, which was just in its begin-ning stages at the time of Sullivan’s death, became theband’s biggest release to date,debuting at No. 1 on the Bill-board chart.Opening the show with athrashing 45-minute set, Sev-endust warmed up the audi-ence in fine fashion with great versions of “Enemy,” “Drivenand “Forever.” Then came Three DaysGrace, the Canadian quartetthat was the most playedband on rock radio in 2007, with a 50-minute set filled with the standout tracks fromits three top-selling albums.Highlights included opener“Good Life,” a rousing sing-along “I Hate Everything About You,” “Never Too Late,”and “Riot.” The band thenclosed its set with “Animal IHave Become,” as lead singerAdam Gontier made his wayaround the large crowd.Not taking the stage untilaround 9:40 p.m., AvengedSevenfold came on strong.It was a very large, veryloud crowd. The 100- and 200-sections looked like they werenear capacity and the stand-ing-room-only floor was aboutthree-quarters full. The next concert at theMohegan Sun Arena is Cana-dian crooner Michael Bubleon June 8.
Avenged Sevenfold’s concert is a rock fan’s dream
Also joining the “Family”tour at the arena were ThreeDays Grace and Sevendust.
 
R E V I E W
ByBRADPATTON
 For The Times Leader 
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
MattSandersofAvengedSevenfoldperformswiththebandFridaynightattheMohegunSunArenaatCaseyPlaza.
SPRINGCLEANING
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
 A 
idan Fitzgibbon. 5, enjoys the seasonable weatherwhile sweeping his family’s walk along Carey Ave-nue in Wilkes-Barre Sunday afternoon. The boy and hisfather were spending the day getting the yard readyfor summer.
LUZERNE
– Luzerne Bor-ough Sewer Authority will holdits regular meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday.Borough Council will hold its work session at 7 p.m. Wednes-day. The meeting will take placeat the Luzerne Borough Build-ing,144 Academy St. The publicis invited.
DALLAS
– The Eastern StarBuilding Association will behosting an inside and outsidecraft and flea market from 9a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. It will be at15 Foster St., Dallas,behind CVS Drugstore. Lunched will be served and Welsh coo-kies will be sold.For vendor information, callDianne Corby at 675-4893.
SHEATOWN
– The NewportCemetery Association will meetat 7 p.m. on Wednesday, May11,at the Guardian Health Care. The meeting will concern thefuture of the cemetery. All offi-cers and lot owners are urged toattend. If planning to attend,call Jim Griffith Sr. at 735-3292, Thelma Blockus at 735-5489 orJim Griffith Jr. at 735-3506.
PITTSTON
-- The Northeast-ern Pennsylvania Nonprofit andCommunity Assistance Center(NCAC) announces the 2011Community Awards finalistsrepresenting the seven-countyregion of Carbon, Lackawanna,Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, Schuyl-kill and Wayne counties.• Arts & Culture - First Fri-day Scranton, LackawannaCounty for First Friday Scran-ton; Crayons, LackawannaCounty for Carbondale’s MainStreet Gallery Art Walk.• Theodore “Ted” G. DanielsCommunity Development -Greater Carbondale YMCA,Lackawanna County for 21stCentury Capital Campaign;Luzerne County Flood Protec-tion Authority & River Com-mon.org, Luzerne County forRiver Common Park.• Children & Youth - Schuyl-kill United Way, SchuylkillCounty for Stuff the Bus AnnualSchool Supply Drive; Children’sService Center, Luzerne Countyfor Juvenile Fire Setters Pro-gram.• Education - The ScrantonSchool for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing, Lackawanna Countyfor The Scranton School for theDeaf & Hard of Hearing; Volun-tary Action Center of NEPA,Lackawanna County for RSVPLiteracy Project.• Environmental Action/Animal Welfare - PennsylvaniaEnvironmental Council (PEC),Luzerne County, for “An Eve-ning for Pennsylvania’s Envi-ronment”; Newport TownshipCommunity Organization, Lu-zerne County for Newport Township Beautification Pro-gram.• Health & Human Services -Neighborhood Housing Servicesof Lackawanna County, Lacka- wanna County for CarbondaleNeighborWorks Week; Schuyl-kill Alliance for Health CareAccess, Schuylkill County, forHealth Care for the Uninsured –For a Healthy Community. Winners will be announced atthe 2011Community AwardsDinner Program at 4:30 p.m.June 9 at the Woodlands Inn &Resort, Plains Township.
LOCAL BRIEFS
 WILKES-BARRE – During ameeting with teachers in amiddle school when she waschancellor of the District of Columbia school system, Mi-chelle Rhee learned something about the students there. They demanded to be taughtby their teachers who helpedturn around the school’s per-formance, said Rhee.She recalled the meetin while delivering the 30th an-nual Max Rosenn Lecture Sun-day night at the Arnaud C.Marts Center on the campus of  Wilkes University.Rhee had scheduled a meet-ing with the middle school’sstaff to inquire about the dras-tic improvement of the stu-dents on test scores and en-tered a room of what shethought were teachers anxiousabout sitting down with thechancellor. When Rhee tried to allaytheir concerns about repeating the double-digit increase inscores, they taught her a les-son about the change in stu-dents’ attitudes. The studentsno longer accepted mediocrityand instead wanted to be chal-lenged, she added.“The teachers weren’t afraidof me. They were trying to liveup to the expectations of thechildren,” said Rhee. The turnaround at theschool came after Rhee re-placed the principal with one who shared her vision of pro- viding the best education pos-sible for the students from thepoor, urbandistrict.It was one of the manychanges Rheemade in herbrief three- year tenure aschancellor af-ter taking the job in what shelabeled the “most dysfunction-al and lowest performing”school district in the country.She left last year after MayorAdrian Fenty, who appointedher for the job in 2007, lost hisre-election bid.Rhee, a graduate of CornellUniversity and Harvard Uni- versity’s Kennedy School of Government, subsequentlyformed StudentsFirst to con-tinue her quest to focus atten-tion and resources on where itmatters most in educating America’s youth.“I have a tremendous belief in the power of teachers,” saidRhee, 41, who taught thirdgrade in Baltimore.Good teachers can do somuch to affect a student andbad ones have just as much aneffect, she noted.She decried the nation’s lowranking in reading, math andscience skills when comparedto students of other nationsaround the world. If the UnitedStates performed poorly in theOlympics and lagged behind inthe medal count, Rhee said,there would be a national out-cry and call for a renewed ef-fort to do better. That kind of response is what is needed tochange the public school sys-tem, she added.“We need to regain our senseof competition in the nationbecause we have gone soft,”she said. “Let me repeat that; we have gone soft.”
Rhee touts impactteachers can have
At Wilkes, ex-D.C. chancellorstresses the good and bad thatteachers have on kids.
ByJERRYLYNOTT 
 jlynott@timesleader.com
Rhee
NEW YORK — Mariah Ca-rey and Nick Cannon celebrat-edtheirthirdanniversarywithanother milestone — becom-ing parents to a baby girl andboy.Carey’s representative, Cin-diBerger,confirmedthebirthsto The Associated Press. The41-year-old singing superstargave birth Saturday at 12:07p.m. EDT at an undisclosedhospitalinLosAngeles.Bergersays the baby girl was bornfirst, weighing 5 pounds, 3ounces, and was 18 incheslong;herbrotherwasnext,at5pounds 6 ounces, and was 19inches.
Singer Carey gives birth to girl, boy
The Associated Press
 
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, MAY 2, 2011 PAGE 3A
L
OCAL
timesleader.com
 WILKES-BARRE
Woman facing 2 counts
A woman accused by city police of placing two young children in a taxi foran unsupervised fare to an address waived her right to a preliminary hear-ing in Wilkes-Barre Central Court.Holly Karpien, 37, of Wilkes-Barre, waived two counts of endangering the welfare of children to Luzerne CountyCourt on Thursday.According to the criminal complaint:A Burgit cab driver told police he was dispatched to the 500 block of South Main Street on March 30 totransport a10-year-old girl and an 8-month-old toddler to the100 block of Jones Street. The transport was notsupervised by an adult, police said. The driver took the children to theJones Street residence and found itunoccupied. The children were return-ed to Main Street, where Karpien alleg-edly called a second cab to take thechildren to Jones Street, the complaintsays.Police said in the complaint that thetemperature was in the mid-20s andthe two children were wearing light- weight pajamas. The toddler was notcovered in a blanket, jacket or headcovering, police allege.
 WILKES-BARRE
DUI charge goes forward
A man accused by city police of drunken driving and endangering apolice officer during a pursuit waivedhis right to a preliminary hearing in Wilkes-Barre Central Court on Thurs-day.Jeffery Narkewicz, 41, of Plainfield,Conn., waived two counts each of driv-ing under the influence of alcohol andfleeing or attempting to elude police,and one count each of reckless en-dangerment, resisting arrest, disorder-ly conduct, driving with a suspendedlicense, accidents involving injury andseveral traffic citations to LuzerneCounty Court.Police charged Narkewicz with flee-ing the scene after he struck a vehicleon Hazle Avenue on April 8. Policespotted Narkewicz in the area of WoodStreet, where he allegedly attempted toescape. An officer jumped on his vehi-cle when he turned onto SambourneStreet, where he was forced to stop byan oncoming vehicle, according to thecriminal complaint.Police said in the criminal complaintthat Narkewicz was intoxicated.
NANTICOKE
Armed robbery probed
Police are investigating an armedrobbery that took place at approximate-ly 3:29 a.m. Saturday at Turkey Hill,460 W. Main St.Police described the suspect as a white male, approximately 5 feet 9inches tall, with a thin build, and wear-ing a black shirt, gray pants, blackbaseball cap and black shoes.Police said the man entered the storeand asked the clerk for change for adollar bill. The clerk opened the cashregister, at which point the manshowed a knife and demanded themoney from the register, police said. The clerk gave him an undeterminedamount of money from the register,police said.Police said the suspect fled ontoMain Street in a small silver vehicle.Anyone with any information aboutthe incident is asked to call NanticokeCity Police at 735-2200.
HAZLETON
$7K grant helps seniors
 Thanks to a $7,000 grant from TheBlue Ribbon Foundation of Blue Crossof Northeastern Pennsylvania, SerentoGardens teamed with a nurse and apharmacist to educate more than 300residents at Med-Ed meetings at localsenior centers and housing complexesduring the past year. The free sessions covered topicssuch as throwing away expired med-icines, the hazards of interactionsamong drugs, the dangers of sharing prescriptions, and how to notice signsof alcoholism among the elderly. The need for such education is espe-cially great in the Hazleton area, where2010 Census figures indicate that near-ly half the population is age 45 or olderand one in four residents is older thanage 62.Across the country, poisoning byprescription medicines is currently thesecond-leading cause of unintentionaldeaths annually, according to the Cen-ters for Disease Control and Preven-tion.
I N B R I E F
KINGSTONAschildrenarebeingre-moved froma home to enter foster care,theyaregiven10minutestofillagarbagebagwithpersonalbelongings,saidLindaCoolbaugh,founderofS.M.I.L.E.,achar-itybenefitingWyomingCountyChildrenandYouth. This is often the first experience chil-dren have when entering the foster caresystem.Inanefforttomakethistransitioneas-ier, S.M.I.L.E collects items such as per-sonal hygiene items along with clothing andotheritemsforfosterchildren,tobereceivedfromchildrenandyouthservic-es after the youths are removed fromtheirhomes.Recently, Holy Trinity LutheranChurchinKingstonheldafundraiserforproject S.M.I.L.E. during the 40 days of Lent, starting on Ash Wednesday andending on Easter Sunday. Coolbaughstarted S.M.I.L.E, which stands for Suit-casesMakeIndividualsLivesEasier,lastOctober.On Saturday, the church gave severalhundred items to Coolbaugh. Collecteditemsincludedfleeceblankets,undergar-ments, magazines, notebooks, pencils,puzzles, clothing, sippy cups, shampoosandsoaps.“Since I started this, I have collectedaboutfourcarloadsofitems,”Coolbaughsaid. “They (Wyoming County ChildrenandYouth)willcallothercountychildrenand youth agencies to see if they needanything.”Starting last October, Coolbaugh hastriedtogetthewordoutabouttheneedsof children entering foster care throughherlocalnewspaper,theWyomingCoun-tyPressExaminer.HardingresidentCandyFrye,formerlyof Tunkhannock, saw Coolbaugh’s letter
Reaching out to foster children
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
MatthewWhite, of Wilkes-Barre, loadsitems into a bag to be given to fosterchildren as part of Project S.M.I.L.E.
Church collects items for youth entering system 
ByEILEENGODIN
Times Leader Correspondent
See FOSTER, Page10A
To help out with project S.M.I.L.E, contactLinda Coolbaugh at 836-2765 or 905-5834.
FO R M O R E I N FO R M AT I O N
 WILKES-BARRE – After muchthought and effort, Don Miller an-swered one part of the question andlefttheotherpartunanswered.Miller,aWorldWarIIhistorian,au-thorandtheMcCrackenProfessorof HistoryatLafayetteCollege,wasthefeatured speaker Sunday at Holo-caustRemembranceDayattheJew-ishCommunityCenter.Hespoketoap-proximately 100peopleonthetop-ic, “Whether ornot the Alliescould have orshould havebombed Ausch- witzduringWorld War II.” Approxi-mately 6 millionJews were killedby the Nazi re-gime during the Holocaust, forcing them into concentration camps likeAuschwitzinPoland.“Idon’thaveanyeasyanswers,ac-knowledged Miller, who has servedasahistoricalconsultantfor“ThePa-cific” documentary on HBO, “World WarIIinHD”ontheHistoryChannelandason-cameraexpertinthePublicBroadcasting System’s program,“TheBombingofGermany.”Alliedforceswerebombinginthearea of Auschwitz in the summer of 1944anditcouldhavebeenatarget,hesaid.“Itwasfeasible.”However,thatwasbasedonhisre-search, Miller said, which showedtheAmericanaircommandneverun-dertookitsownfeasibilitystudy.Miller criticized a review done byJohnJ.McCloy,assistantsecretaryof the war, in 1944 who would not au-thorize the bombing. McCloy con-cluded the bomber flights wouldhavehadtooriginatefromEngland,approximately 2,000 miles awayfrom the camp, and the aircraft andcrews could not be diverted fromtheir critical missions of destroying 
 Whether Allies could have or should have bombed Auschwitz discussed
‘Tough issue’ mulled
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Mitchell Pisarz,14, lights one of six candles each representing1million people that diedin the Holocaust. Behind Mitchell are his father, Allan, and grandfather, Morris, a survi-vor of Auschwitz.
“I don’thave anyeasy an-swers.”
Don Miller
HolocaustRemembranceDay speaker
ByJERRYLYNOTT 
 jlynott@timesleader.com
See HOLOCAUST, Page10A
HAZLE TWP. – The HazletonArea School Board will hold abudget meeting Wednesday anda finance committee meetin Thursday to try to come up with ways to balance the school dis-trict’s budget. TheboardlastThursdayvotedto rescind a previous vote that would have eliminated all socialclubs and all middle schoolsports. That was after a gymnasiumfull of concerned parents, teach-ersandstudentspleadedwiththeboardatthemeetingatMcAdoo-Kelayres Elementary School tosave the programs.Board members listened asparents, teachers and studentstook turns stepping to the podi-um to speak in favor of not cut-ting the programs.After deciding to keep thesports and clubs, they unani-mously approved board memberSteveHahn’smotiontoaskallde-partment heads to cut 5.5 per-cent more off their alreadyslashed budgets.Another heated agenda item wasthepurchaseofa$4.4millionmagnet school that will be usedto solve the overcrowding in theclassroomsinthedistrict.Amag-netpublicschoolhasspecificpro-grams and instruction that arenot available elsewhere in aschool district and that are spe-cially designed to draw studentsfrom throughout the district. Ac-ceptance in the school would re-quire good grades, interest in aspecific curriculum and teacherrecommendations. The building is located inDrumsandisownedbyCANDOCorp. The board voted against a mo-tion to postpone the purchase of thebuildingbecausethebuildin would provide the 1,500 seatsneeded to alleviate the over-crowding issue in the district.Business Manager Tony Rybaexplained that although the ini-tial cost for the magnet school is$4.4 million, the district wouldbe reimbursed 66 percent for thebuildingandanadditional25per-cent would be reimbursed fromconstruction. Final net cost would only be $1.5 million. The meeting Wednesday be-gins at 5 p.m. in the Administra-tion Building’s second-floor con-ference room. The finance com-mitteemeetingonThursdayisat7 p.m. in the Hazleton Area Ca-reer Center, large group instruc-tion room.
Hazletonschoolstacklingbudget
School board rescinds vote toeliminate all social clubs,middle school sports.
ByJIMMORRISSEY 
Time Leader Correspondent
 The mother of a teenager who took his own life several years ago has formed a sup-port group in Hazleton forfamilymembersandfriendsof people who have committedsuicide.SamanthaNeaman,40,saidshe formed the Suicide Be-reavement Support Group tohelp others who have lostlovedonestosuicidedealwiththe special issues in the griev-ing process.In addition to their grief,survivingfamilymembersandfriends are often plagued byguilt that they did not see orrecognize signs that the per-son was in distress. Thatmakes the grieving processthat much more difficult, shesaid.“It’s a whole different proc-ess in addition to the normalgrieving process,” Neamansaid. “It’s so beneficial for sur- vivorstowalkintoaroomandbe with people who are going through the same thing.”Neaman’s 13-year-old son,Kyle Koslop, killed himself onFeb.10,2007.Neamansaidhersonwaspopular,outgoingandan excellent student. He gaveno indication he was suicidal.“He was very bright, funny,popular,” she said. “He was just a fantastic kid. I had noreason for concern.” The formation of the groupcomesatatimewhensuicidesareontheincreaseinthecoun-ty.In 2010, 50 people commit-ted suicide, up from 35 in2009, according to the Lu-zerne County Cororner’s Of-fice. This year, 14 have com-mitted suicide, the coroner’soffice said.Neaman said she was moti- vated in part to start a Hazle-tonareagroupbecausenineof the 50 suicides in 2010 in- volved people from the Free-land/Hazleton area. The group has been formed with the help of Catholic So-cial Services, which has spon-sored a suicide bereavementgroup in Wilkes-Barre forroughlythepast25years,saidDenise Rowinski-Mengak, su-pervisor of the adult and fam-ily services counseling pro-gramfor CSS.Neaman said she had beenattending the Wilkes-Barregroup for a number of years.Having a second group in thesouthern part of the county will help reach more people. Thegroupwillmeetthesec-ondandfourthThursdayofev-ery month from 6 to 7:30 p.m.at Catholic Social Services,214 W. Walnut St., Hazleton.
New group helps family of suicide victims
Surviving members andfriends are often plaguedby feelings of guilt.
ByTERRIEMORGAN-BESECKER 
tmorgan@timesleader.com

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