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Times Leader 10-24-2011

Times Leader 10-24-2011

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The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 10-24
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 10-24

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Published by: The Times Leader on Oct 24, 2011
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THINGSYOUNEEDTOKNOWTHISWEEK
in order to make a good choice. (Unless you’re a member ofthe Whig Party. In which case you’re voting19th-centurystyle.) For those of you in the 21st century, The Times Leaderis sponsoring a Mayoral Candidate Forum with the threecandidates for Wilkes-Barre mayor. The event is Wednesdayat 7 p.m. at the Stark Learning Center, Room101on thecampus of Wilkes University.
>>IGOTAROCK:
It’s a tale ofsingle-minded determination. Whileothers scoff, one boy fights brave-ly to keep alive the memory of atoy-distributing flying gourd-likesquash. Relive the drama. Relivethe tears. Relive the pathos!(Whatever that is.)Relive it allwhen ABCpresentsthe Hallo-ween classic,“It’s the GreatPumpkin, Charlie Brown,” this Thursday at 8 p.m.
>>BADMOODDAY:
When you’re at work, do you goout of your way to be nice to people – even though you’drather try out the latest in modern profanity on them? Well,bite your tongue no more. This Thursday has been desig-nated as “Cranky Co-Worker Day.” Which means it’s accept-able to delve into your crabby side around the office. Noanswering e-mails for you. Nope. Make coffee? Heh. Makeit yourself, caffeine boy. ... Of course, you may have tolook for a new job come Friday.
>>FIGHTONSTATE:
Don’t look now, but the PennState Nittany Lions are 7-1. Despite an offense that, attimes, plays like the Batley Townswomen’s Guild, PSU issitting atop the Leaders Division in the Big Ten. Now, it’stime for the Lions to earn it. On the schedule for theregular season’s last four games are some of theBig Ten’s best. The run starts this Saturday whenthe Lions host the Fighting Illini of Illinois. Game-time is 3:30 p.m. and you can catch the game onABC.
5
>>DANCEWITHME:
It’s Monday. And that can meanonly one thing. Actually it can mean a lot of things, but forour purposes,it means “Dancing With the Stars” night. Theremaining celebrities will be hoofing it to some Broadwaymelodies this evening, in the hopes of surviving anotherweek. If this is your thing, check it out at 8 p.m. on ABC.
>>DECISIONS,DECISIONS:
Your vote is valuable.And when it comes to spending your vote on a candidate,you want as much information as possible at your disposal
C M Y K
WILKES-BARRE, PA MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011 50¢
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 TRIPOLI, Libya — Libya’s interimrulersdeclaredthecountryliberatedonSunday after an 8-month civil war,launchingtheoil-richnationonwhatismeanttobeatwo-yeartransitiontode-mocracy.ButtheylaidoutplanswithanIslamist tone that could rattle their Western backers. The joyful ceremony formally mark-ing the end of Moammar Gadhafi’s 42- year tyranny was also clouded bymounting pressure from the leaders of theNATOcampaignthathelpedsecure victorytoinvestigatewhetherGadhafi,dragged wounded but alive out of adrainage ditch last week, was then exe-cuted by his captors. ThecircumstancesofGadhafi’sdeathremain unclear. In separate accountslate Sunday, two Libyan fighters saidGadhafi was hurt after being captured,but was able to stand. One said that when he and others placed Gadhafi inanambulance,theformerLibyanleaderhad not yet suffered what Libya’s chief pathologist said was a fatal gunshot tothe head.Critics said the gruesome spectacleof his blood-streaked body laid out as a
Libya declares its freedom
AP PHOTO
MilitarycommanderofTripoliAbdelHakimBelhajdeclaredLibyanliberationSundayinBenghazi.
Gadhafi’s death is questioned
ByKARINLAUBandKIMGAMEL 
 Associated Press
SeeLIBYA,Page8A
 WILKES-BARRE – Two localpolitical science professors say it will be easier for Mayor TomLeighton to win a third term withtwo opposition candidates in therace.Leighton, 51, is running for athirdtermonNov.8.Heisopposedby RepublicanLisa Cope, 45,and LibertarianBetsySummers,54. Tom Baldinoof Wilkes Uni- versity and Da- vid Sosar of King’s Collegesay Leighton al-ready has sever-al advantages inthe race, but with two candi-dates vying forthe votes of dis-contented resi-dents, the two-term Democratbecomes anevensaferbet.“With the op-position frac-tured,itmakesiteasier forLeighton to winreelection,” Bal-dinosaid.“The two opponents split anyanti-Leighton vote, not evenly forsure, but each will have his/herblockofvotes,Sosarsaid.Speaking objectively, Baldinosaid Leighton must be consideredthefavoritetowininNovemberforseveralreasons.“First, he is the incumbent, andassuch,hehasalreadyestablishedname recognition with the voters,andhehasarecordofaccomplish-ments that both his opponentslack,” Baldino said. “Second, hehasbeenabletoraisemoremoneythaneitherofhisopponents,whichisanotherbenefitthatgenerallyac-cruestoincumbents.Withafinan-cial advantage, Leighton will beable to remind his constituents of his achievements in the weeksleadingtotheelection.“Third, he faces two lesser
Leightonseen asbenefitingfrom split
Political science professorssee two challengers dividingcity’s opposition vote.
ByBILLO’BOYLE 
boboyle@timesleader.com
CopeLeightonSummers
SeeMAYOR,Page8A
In an economy in which people may not haveextramoneytospend,somearestilldiggingdeeptomakesuretheygrabtheirtraditionalpumpkinspre-Halloween.Ben Duffy of Wilkes-Barre brings his boys, Ja-cob, 10, and Colin, 6, on a hunt for the perfectpumpkin every year.“Atmost,it’sgoingtocostme$10apumpkinforeach boy, which is absolutely worth it,” he said.“They look forward to taking them home andpainting or carving them every year.”“Azombie,” Colin said of what he’d like toturnhis orange gourd into this time around.“I’mthinkingabat,ormaybeamummy,”Jacobsaid of his.Family trips like these, which are fueled by tra-dition,arewhatMartyO’Maliaseesmostofwhenit comes to buying pumpkins at his business onMain Street in Plains Township.“It’sanoveltyforyoungerkids,”hesaid.“It’sfunto come by and pick your own pumpkin.”Otherwise, O’Malia said, pumpkin demand islow.Heattributesthistotheeconomyandthefactthat people have to watch what they’re spending.
BUSINESS, TRADITIONS OF HALLOWEEN
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
AhappyDominicCaparelli,7,andsisterValentinaCaparelli,9,ofWestPittston,stoppedintoMartinO’Malia’sproducestandonMainStreetinPlainsTownshiponSundayafternoonlookingfortheperfectpumpkin.
 A big orange treat
Pumpkinstill focalpoint for familiesthis timeof year 
BySARAPOKORNY 
 spokorny@timesleader.com
SeePUMPKINS,Page8A
INSIDE
ANEWS:
Obituaries 2A, 6ALocal 3ANation & World 5AEditorials 7A
BSPORTS:
1B
CCLICK:
1CCommunity News 2CBirthdays 3CTelevision 4CMovies 4CCrossword/Horoscope 5CComics 6C
DCLASSIFIED:
1D
 WEATHER
LauraMeiningerSun. An afternoon shower.High62,low41.
Details, Page 8B
 
K
PAGE 2A MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Baranowski,AdelineBaranowski,EdwardBellas,MaryBrannigan,RitaBuckley,SophieDavison,LouiseFritzen,DorothyHopkins,BonnieJones,RyanKarabinas,AgnesKistler,JunePuchalski,ChesterRedmond,HarryRoberts,ThomasSaukulyak,IreneVrabel,JohnJr.
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 6A
BUILDINGTRUST
The Times Leader strives tocorrect errors, clarify storiesand update them promptly.Corrections will appear in thisspot. If you have informationto help us correct an inaccu-racy or cover an issue morethoroughly, call the newsroomat 829-7242.
No player matched all fivewinning numbers drawn inSunday’s “PennsylvaniaCash 5” game so the jackpotwill be worth $500,000.Lottery officials said 83players matched four num-bers and won $237.50 each;3,081players matched threenumbers and won $10.50each; and 36,800 playersmatched two numbers andwon $1each.
None of the tickets soldfor the Powerball gameSaturday evening matchedall six numbers drawn, whichwere:
03-08-23-30-58
Powerball:
13
Power Play:
4
Players matching all fivenumbers and the Powerballwould have won or sharedthe $148 million jackpot. Theprize goes to an estimated$173 million for Wednesday.Tickets that match thefirst five numbers, but missthe Powerball, win$200,000 each, and therewere nine of those. Theywere sold in: Florida(1), Ken-tucky(1), North Carolina(1),New Hampshire(1), NewYork(2), Rhode Island(1) andTexas(2).
LOTTERY
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BIG 4 -
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QUINTO -
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CASH 5
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DETAILS
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Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.50 per weekMailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday$4.35 per week in PA$4.75 per week outside PAPublished daily by:Impressions Media15 N. Main St.Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711Periodicals postage paid atWilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing officesPostmaster: Send address changesto Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
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MoreObituaries,Page6A
M
rs. Louise (Cheese) Davison,78,ofPlymouth,diedSaturdayafternoon, October 22, 2011, in Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.She was born in Wilkes-Barre,daughter of the late Joseph andDomicellaYachymiakOlexyandat-tended Plymouth High School.She had been employed by theEberhard Faber ManufacturinCompany, and as a hostess for the Top Hat Diner, Kingston.Mrs. Davison was a member of All Saints Parish Church, Ply-mouth, and was an avid bingo play-er.She was preceded in death by asister, Susan Kronick.Sheissurvivedbyherhusbandof 56years,RobertDavison;daughter,PamWothersandherhusband,Rob-ert,Plymouth;grandson,RobertJr.,Plymouth; sister Carol Smith andher husband, Wayne, Plymouth;brother-in-law,DonaldKronick,Ply-mouth;niecesandnephews,CherylKrushinski, Indianapolis, Ind.; Jac-queline Choman, Raleigh, N.C.;Kimberly Smith, West Nanticoke;Sandra Werts, Plymouth; WayneSmith, Plymouth; Scott Kronick,Plymouth; Kelly Lewis, Plymouth;severalgreat-nieces,great-nephews,and one great-great-nephew.
Amemorialservice
 willbeheldat All Saints Parish Church, Ply-mouth, at a time to be announced. There are no calling hours. The family would like to thankthestaffofManorCareNursingandRehabilitationCenter,Kingston,fortheir loving and compassionatecare.ArrangementsarebytheWilliamA. Reese Funeral Chapel, rear 56Gaylord Ave., Plymouth. MemorialdonationsmaybesenttotheAmer-ican Cancer Society,190 Welles St.,Suite118, Forty Fort, PA18704.
Louise Davison
October 22, 2011
J
ohn “Rick” Vrabel, Jr., 78, Plains Township,passedawaySaturdayafternoon,October22,2011,inGeis-ingerWyomingValleyMedicalCen-ter, Plains Township.BorninPlymouth,hewasasonof the late John & Mary (Gorko) Vra-bel Sr.Rick attended Plymouth HighSchool,andwasanU.S.Armyveter-an of the Korean Conflict.He was employed by the Wilkes-Barre Area School District for over29years,retiringasheadcustodian.RickwasamemberofSs.Peter&Paul Church, Plains Township, andthe Plains Township American Le-gion, Joseph E. Conlon, Post 558.OneofRick’sgreatestjoyswasplay-ing Santa Claus at Christmas timefor over 40 years.Heandhiswife,theformerCarolPurta, celebrated their 55th wed-ding anniversary on August 18,2011.Surviving him, in addition to his wife, Carol, are his brother, RobertVrabel, Northumberland, severalnieces and nephews, sisters-in-lawand a brother-in-law.
A Funeral
will be held at 9a.m. Tuesday in the CorcoranFuneral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St.,Plains Township, with a Mass of ChristianBurialheldat9:30a.m.inSs. Peter & Paul Church, Plains Township. The interment will beheld in the parish cemetery, Plains Township. Friends are invited tocall from 8 to 9 a.m. Tuesday in thefuneral home.Onlinecondolencesmaybemadeat www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.
John “Rick” Vrabel Jr.
October 22, 2011
M
rs. Dorothy Fritzen, 94, of Sha- vertown,formerlyofPlymouthand the Meadows Manor, Dallas,died Saturday evening October 22,2011, in the United MethodistHomes, Wesley Village Campus,Jenkins Township.She was born in Forty Fort,daughterofthelateJosephandMa-bel Lamoreaux Seely, and gradu-ated from Forty Fort High School,class of1936.Mrs.Fritzenwasamemberoftheformer United Methodist Church,Plymouth, Methodist Women’sGroup, Plymouth Junior Women’sSociety, Shawnee Senior Citizensand AARP.Shewasprecededindeathbyherhusband,Jerry,andasister,MarionCampbell.She is survived by a daughter,BarbaraStephens,andherhusband,Raymond,Shavertown;son,Jeffrey,and his wife, Rosalie, Shavertown;grandchildren, Jeffrey Fritzen Jr.and his wife, Jennifer, Pottstown;Michael Fritzen and his wife, Min-dy, Waverly, N.Y., and Kerri McKe-ownandherhusband,Mark,Wyom-ing; great grandchildren, Elizabeth,Joseph and Nicholas Fritzen; andsister Jeanne Rifendifer, Oakdale.
Afuneralservice
 willbeheldat11a.m.WednesdayintheWilliamA.Reese Funeral Chapel, rear 56 Gay-lord Ave., Plymouth, with the Rev.Anita J. Ambrose officiating.Friends may call from 10 a.m. untilthetimeofserviceonWednesdayatthe funeral home.Memorial contributions may besent to the charity of choice.
Dorothy Fritzen
October 22, 2011At6foot,2inches,290pounds,senior offensive and defensive li-neman Christian Stevenson, 17,Nanticoke, is easily recognizableon the football field.But this month Stevenson hasbeen recognized for his achieve-ments off of the field. Stevensonraised nearly $4,000 for the Na-tionalFootballLeagueandAmer-ican Cancer Society’s A CrucialCatch program.Heraisedthemoneybysellinpink and black T-shirts with the words “Tackle the Cause” print-edonthebackandafootballwitha ribbon on the front.Stevenson presented a checkto Tonyehn Verkitus, the Ameri-can Cancer Society’s communityincome development specialistatACS,duringhalftimeofthere-cent Greater Nanticoke AreaHigh School’s homecoming foot-ball game against Northwest Ar-ea.“I’ve had two people that I was very, very close with that diedfrom cancer,” Stevenson said.“My uncle passed from lung can-cer.…Hewasahugeinspiration.”AndinearlyOctober,whentheproject was in progress, Steven-son and his teammates lost an-other inspiration. AssistantCoach Hank Turoski lost histhree-year battle with cancer, re-inforcing the importance of awareness. Thedonationisbeinggivenal-so in memory of the coach, who was “a pillar of strength in ourcommunity,said Ann MarieCoughlin, president of the foot-ball team’s booster club“The project really hit home whenwelostCoachHankTuros-ki,saidRonBruza,GreaterNan-ticoke’sheadfootballcoach.“Ibe-lieveit(thefundraiser)hasgreatimportance on many levels.”Stevenson organized the fun-draiser with the help of Bruza’sfiancée,AmandaCoughlin,22,of Nanticoke, in the spring for Ste- venson’s senior project.“It was Christian’s idea,Coughlinsaid.“Westartedwork-ingonitinthespring.Ihelpedtodraw it (the design) up and getthe sponsors.”Since then, the pair have soldapproximately 650 pink andblack T-shirts promoting breastand general cancer awareness.Verkitus, of the ACS, believesit’simportantforyoungpeopletobe active in the fight against can-cer.“You can’t start early preven-tion too early,” Verkitus said.“Young people can be aware. They can inform their peers andtheir elders of things they can doaboutpreventionanddetection.”Stevenson has shown thatsomething as simple as sellinpink T-shirts can make an im-pact.Stevensonhasbecomeasignif-icant influence on other teenag-erswhowouldliketobeactiveinfundraising.“Christianisanall-roundgreatkid, and our community is luckyto have a young man like him init,said Bruza. “His heart isabout the same size as he is.”
Nanticoke football player ‘tackles’ cancer
Christian Stevenson raisesnearly $4,000 for CancerSociety by selling T-shirts.
ByJORDANRAMIRE
Times Leader Intern
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
GNAheadfootballcoachRonBruzaandseniorChristianSteven-sonwithoneofthe‘TackletheCause’T-shirts.
 WILKES-BARRE During her life, Claire Shadie had a realpassionforraisingautismaware-ness.Onthe10thanniversaryofherunexpected death, the organiza-tion she and her husband, Ge-orge, founded recognized twoGeisinger doctors for showing thatsamepassionandhavinganimpact on the realm of neurode- velopmental disabilities. The Shadies founded SAFE(Supporting Autism and Fam-ilies Everywhere) 16 years agoafter their son Alex was diag-nosed with autism when he was4 years old.“When Alex was first diag-nosed,weweretoldthatitwas1in 10,000 children that were af-fected,George Shadie said.“Now that number has changedto1in110.SAFEsupportsfamiliesaffect-ed by autism spectrum disor-ders,orASD.It’scomposedofin-dividuals with ASD, their fam-ilies, caretakers and profession-als who provide both supportandknowledgeofthelatestprac-tices,therapiesandprogramsforindividuals with ASD.It also provides opportunitiesfor those afflicted to overcomesocial barriers and enjoy activ-ities within the community. ThisyeartheAngelofAutismAward was given to Dr. ThomasChallman and Dr. Scott Myersfrom Geisinger Medical Centerin Danville, both of whom workin the realm of neurodevelop-mental disorders. They have worked with SAFE for about 12 years.“Geisingerisanabsoluteoasisin the desert of medical help,”Shadie said. “Before it was that, you could get a doctor at Her-shey Medical Center once amonth, or perhaps go to Phila-delphia or Pittsburgh, but withcities that large the waiting listcan get very long.”Myers established the Divi-sion of Neurodevelopmental Pe-diatricsintheDepartmentofPe-diatrics at Geisinger MedicalCenter, where he has practicedsince1999.Hehasauthoredandco-authored several pieces con-cerning neurodevelopmentaldisorders, as well as serving asassociate editor of American A-cademy of Pediatrics Develop-ment and Behavioral Pediatrics.He serves on the board of direc-tors of the Association for Sci-ence in Autism Treatment andtheadvisoryboardoftheAssoci-ation of Professional BehaviorAnalysts.Challmanisthedirectorofpe-diatric subspecialties at theGeisinger Medical Center andhas authored and co-authorednumerous papers and textbookchapters in the area of autismand developmental disabilities.HeisamemberoftheAmericanAcademy of Pediatrics Councilon Children with Disabilities as well as the Child Neurology So-ciety.ClaireShadiediedin2001ofabrain aneurysm.
Geisinger doctors hailed as angels
Two physicians receive annualangels award from local autismawareness and support group.
BySARAPOKORNY 
 spokorny@timesleader.com
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Dr.ThomasD.Challman,left,andDr.ScottM.Meyers,right,aregiventhe2011AngelofAutismAwardsbyGeorgeShadie.
WILKES-BARRE
– Citypolice reported the following:• Raymond McGrade, 50, of Northampton Street will becharged with harassment afterPatty London of High Streetsaid Sunday that he madethreatening and harassing state-ments to her.• Michael McCloe, 57, of New Market Street will becharged with possession of drug paraphernalia after a policeinvestigation Sunday on CharlesStreet.• Geraldine Ulichney of North Washington Street saidSunday that a window on her vehicle was smashed.• Stacey Clarke of LawrenceStreet said Sunday that a mirroron her vehicle was damaged while it was parked on GarnetLane.• Felicia Warman of North Washington Street said a win-dow was damaged at her proper-ty at1314 ½ N. Washington St.• Kenneth White of UpperDarby said Sunday he wasrobbed at gunpoint of his walletand cash near Lehigh Street andPark Avenue. The gunmandrove off in White’s Jeep GrandCherokee that was later reco- vered unoccupied in Newport Township.• Robert Neuman and JamesPost of North Welles Street saidSunday that the mirrors on their vehicles were damaged.• Rishawe Quarles, 31, of North Empire Court, wascharged with public drunk-enness Sunday after police saidhe was intoxicated on AcademyStreet.• Margaret Jo Massaker of Nanticoke told police she nod-ded off while driving west onHorton Street on Sunday morn-ing, causing her Subaru Legacyto crash into a utility pole. Shedid not report any injuries. Nocharges were filed.• William Kuchta, 27, of Not-tingham Street, Plymouth, wascharged with theft from a motor vehicle Sunday morning onSouth Main Street. Police saidthey responded to a report of Kuchta’s vehicle being brokeninto, but the evidence indicatedhe was the suspect. Kuchta washighly intoxicated and takeninto custody. He was held atpolice headquarters until he wassober.• Ezekiel Chuckquan Canty,29, of Sambourne Street, wasarrested on evidence of drunkendriving Saturday night afterpolice said he was stopped aftertraveling at a high rate of speedon South Franklin Street. Cantycould not complete field sobrie-ty tests and was taken into cus-tody, police said, and a breathtest administered at police head-quarters was positive. Driving under the influence charges arepending, police said.
HAZLETWP.
– A driver lostcontrol of her car Friday after-noon and struck a woman onSouth Church Street, statepolice said. The woman, Mary EllenStish, 63, was flown to LehighValley Hospital, state policesaid. She was listed in stablecondition on Sunday night. The driver, Ashley NicoleDonlin,17, of Hazleton, wastaken to Hazleton GeneralHospital for minor injuries,state police said. Donlin toldpolice she was southbound inthe left lane when she tried toavoid a car in the right lanechanging lanes. Donlinswerved and drove over thecurb, hitting Stish and thenstriking the front porch stepsof a residence on SouthChurch Street. The driver of the car thatchanged lanes, CatherineEstrella, 32, of Hazleton, wasnot injured. The investigation into thecrash is ongoing.
POLICE BLOTTER
 
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011 PAGE 3A
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OCAL
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ringyourHalloweencandytoouroffice
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 WILKES-BARRE
Veterans Parade is Nov. 6
T
he 66th annual Wyoming ValleyVeterans Day Parade will takeplace on Nov. 6. The parade begins at 2 p.m. atKingston Corners and proceeds onMarket Street to Public Square in Wilkes-Barre.Sponsored by the American Le-gion District12, the parade willinclude all branches of the military,floats, high school bands and variousorganizations.Maj. Gen. Randall A. Marchi, com-mander of the 28th Infantry Division,Pennsylvania National Guard, willserve as the parade’s reviewing offi-cer.A special addition to this year’sparade will be the fly-over of four vintage planes courtesy of Joe Scro-bola, pilot and owner of the manage-ment company for the Wyoming Valley Airport, Valley Aviation.
 WILKES-BARRE
Halloween Parade planned
 The Parsons Crime Watch and theParsons Lions Club will host theirannual Halloween Parade for thechildren of Parsons on Oct. 31at 4p.m. Participants are asked to line upat 3:30 p.m. at the park on ParkinStreet. The parade will proceed up Ge-orge Avenue to the park on ScottStreet, where candy and prizes willbe distributed.
 WILKES-BARRE
Film will be screened
 Wilkes University’s Women’s Stud-ies program will host a screening of the documentary “Miss Representa-tion” on Nov. 3 at 6 p.m. in the Hen-ry Student Center Ballroom.“Miss Representation,” writtenand directed by Jennifer SiebelNewsom, exposes how mainstreammedia contribute to the under-repre-sentation of women in positions of power and influence in America,according to a release from the uni- versity.Discussion of the film will followand light refreshments will be pro- vided.For more information, contactJennifer J. Thomas, director of the Women’s Studies program, at 408-4567.
BEAR CREEK TWP.
Children invited to party
 The Community Halloween Partyis set for Friday from 5 p.m. to 6:30p.m. at St. Christopher CommunityCenter,1255 Bear Creek Blvd. The public is invited for crafts,games, prizes and lots of candy andreminded to visit the Spooky Base-ment.Organizers said the activity isappropriate and open to children inkindergarten through fourth grade.A donation of $2 family is appre-ciated.For more information, clickhttp://www.bearcreekschool.com/downloads/halloween.pdf 
N E W S I N B R I E F
DALLASTWP.–ResidentsonSunday spoke out against anamendment to the zoning codethat would allow for natural gasactivitiesin“70to80percent”of thetownship. Theamendmentwillbevotedupon by supervisors at a specialmeetingtonight.MembersoftheDallasParents-TaxpayersGroup, which organized the Sundaypress conference, believe the or-dinance addition will result inmoreharmtothetownshipthangood. The proposed amendment would put stipulations in placefor natural gas companies look-ing to develop in the area. It re-stricts gas activities to the agri-culturaldistrict,whichresidentssaid consists of about 70 to 80percentofthetownship,underaconditional use.SolicitorThomasBrennanhassaid making certain natural gasactivities a conditional use willplacethedecisioninthehandsof thesupervisors.Dozens of residents showedupatthepressconferenceinclud-ingDuke Barrett andhis CockerSpaniel, Dupont.“The curative amendment, whethertheypassitortheydon’tpass it, is akin to saying, ‘Well, we’re going to not open Pando-ra’sBoxallthewaywidely;we’re justgoingtoopenitalittle,’hesaid. “In either case, this is yourfuture, theboxis open.”“EverytimeIleavemyhome,Ihavetoworry.EverytimeIcomeinto my home, I have to worry,”said Fairgrounds Road residentJaneTolomelloaboutlivingnextto the Transco interstate pipe-line. WilliamsFieldServicesLLCis working on installing a pipelinethroughthetownshiptoconnecttotheTranscoline.ChiefGather-ing LLC also received permis-sion through the township plan-ning commission for a pipelinethat would tap into the Transcoline.Both sites are between 1,200and 1,800 feet from the nearbyDallas School District campus.
Change allowing gas projects opposed
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Duke Barrett, Dallas, was among those opposing Dallas Town-ship’s gas zoning amendment.
Dallas Twp. supervisors willvote on code adjustment toallow for gas activities.
BySARAHHIT
 shite@timesleader.com
The Dallas Township Board ofSupervisors will vote on thecurative amendment at 7:30 p.m.tonight at the municipal building.The amendment can be viewedby calling the township at 674-2008 or visiting www.dallas-township.com.
W H AT ’S N E XT
 WYOMING–SomelocalvictimsoftheSep-temberfloodreceivedahelpinghandandafullstomach on Sunday at a dinner and free shop-pingeventsponsoredbytheNewStorySchool. The school works with children with severelearningandbehavioralproblems.NewStory’sDirector of Development Tara Koretz said theorganization has 11 campuses throughout thestate and they collected donated merchandisefrom each location for the event.“Our schools from throughout the state do-nated household items, money and gift cardsfor the people who lost so much in the flood,”said Koretz.“Some of the merchandise came from as faraway as Pittsburgh,” she said.Attendees were able to choose from a wideselection of canned goods, sundries, clothing, winter coats and household merchandise.Peoplealsocamefromacrosstheareatoen- joyahotmealfeaturingcutzitiwithmeatballsin a homemade Sicilian sauce, prepared byNew School staffer Michelle Klaproth of Exe-ter.“Ihadalotoffamilymembersaffectedbytheflood,” said Klaproth. “I wanted to do some-thing personal to help them out.”Participating businesses Lavender Linens,AnnsBudsandBows,andAmoreJewelryandGifts also gave donations of goods.School officials said any merchandise re-maining from the event will be re-donated tootherareaorganizationsthatarehelpingflood victims.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Jennifer Confletti and Gregory, 9months, ofWest Pittston, look over donated clothingSunday at NewStory School in Wyoming.
Benefit helpsflood victimsstart new story
BySTEVENFONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
KINGSTON – The levee systemgets credit for protecting most of the Wyoming Valley from a devastating flood in September, and that’s allright with the Rev. Joseph Bertha. The pastor of St. Michael’s Byzan-tine Catholic Church in Pittston be-lievestheprayersheandmanyotherssaid helped as well.“I specifically think of Forty Fort,”he said.Heavy equipment and tons of dirtand rock were brought in to stabilizea section of the levee that cracked inthe Forty Fort cemetery due to theimmensepressureexertedbytheSus-quehanna River as it rose to a recordlevel of 42.66 feet.On Sunday, Bertha, other clergyand approximately 100 people gavethanks for deliverance from a flood. Theyveneratedareplicaoftheiconof the Blessed Virgin Mary and her son,Jesus Christ, whom they believed in-terceded and answered their prayersto prevent a disaster that could haverivaled the flooding caused by Trop-ical Storm Agnes 39 years ago.Bertha led a Paraklis service of sung prayer and scripture at St. Ma-ry’s Byzantine Catholic Church onChestnut Street, Kingston. The church, he noted, was floodedon June 24, 1972 and water reachedthealtarwherehestoodforthehour-longservice.Aplaquenearly8feetoff thegroundnearthechurch’sentranceshowed the high-water mark. The icon, a copy of the originalpainting that is more than 300 yearsoldandlocatedinOurLadyofMaria-pocs in Hungary, played a significantrole in the service and was displayedatthefrontofthechurch.Hebroughtbackthecopyfromavisittorelatives wholivenearthechurchhousingtheoriginal. Prayers were offered to theBlessed Mother as “thanksgiving fordeliverance from the flood that tookplace on (her) birthday on Sept. 8,”said Bertha.He explained the “salient points inthe iconography that are very apro-pos to our intercessions here today,”he said. Some of them refer to water,he added. The icon wept three times since it waspainted.“Theflowingoftearsisasign of our contrition, our sorrow forsins,” said Bertha. The Blessed Mother points herright arm toward Jesus showing the wayto“asafeharbor”inlifesstorms,he said.Included in the prayers were thecivil leaders who worked to protectthousands from flooding and those whosehomes,businessesandposses-sions were damaged in the flood.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
TheRev. JosephBerthaof theSt. Mary’sByzantineCatholicChurchdiscussesareplica of an icon he broughtback fromHungary. Sunday’s service was a thanksgiving for deliverance froman Agnes-like flood.
Prayers of thanks
Gratitude expressed for deliveranceof most of Valley from flooding.
ByJERRYLYNOTT 
 jlynott@timesleader.com

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