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Rutherford - Lesson Plan Five 1 APPENDIX F.

LESSON PREPARATION AND EVALUATION Lesson Preparation Teacher Candidate: Heather Rutherford Title of Lesson: Phonics: Sight Words Grade Level: Fifth Grade Subject Area: Reading Lesson Topic (What is the “big idea?”): The student will be able to read 10 common, high frequency words. What standard(s) and/or IEP goal(s) will it address? Colorado Academic Standards (2010): Reading for All Purposes, Fifth Grade 3. Knowledge of morphology and word relationships matters when reading Content Area: Reading, Writing, and Communicating Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes Prepared Graduates: Interpret how the structure of written English contributes to the pronunciation and meaning of complex vocabulary. Grade Level Expectation: Fifth Grade Concepts and skills students master: 3. Knowledge of morphology and word relationships matters when reading a. Students can use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context. (CCSS: RF.5.3a) Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten Standard: 1. Reading for All Purposes 3. Decoding words in print requires alphabet recognition and knowledge of letter sounds d. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. (CCSS: RF.K3) iii. Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does). (CCSS: RF.K.3c) This lesson will address the 5th grade standard by first targeting the sub-skill of building a foundation of sight words. Words that have irregular spellings, and are not easily “sounded out,” need to be memorized to increase the student’s reading fluency. Even though JJ is in the 5th grade, he will greatly benefit from targeted word-level instruction

Rutherford - Lesson Plan Five 2 (See Birsch, 2011, p. 489). Once JJ builds a foundation of sight words, he can then move onto syllabication patterns and morphology. This continuous progression will help JJ to move towards attaining his grade-level standard.

Main Objective of Instruction (What do you want the student to learn?): By the end of three lessons, the student will be able to read the following ten sight words: “do,” “for”, “help”, “here”, “I”, “is”, “it”, “see”, “us”, and “work” in the context of a Level C book from the Reading a-z.com program (See Appendix H.). The student will be able to accomplish this with 100% accuracy, as measured by a teacher-made data chart (See Appendix I.). Supporting Objectives: 1. For the student to read, orally, a Level C book from the Reading a-z.com program (Readinga-z.com, 2002).

Specific Strategies to be taught/modeled: 1. Use Exhibit 3.10: Steps for Teaching Sight Words (See Idol, 1997, p. 95) 2. Use Rapid Word-Recognition Chart (See Carreker, 2011, p. 149)

Planning for individual differences (mediated scaffolding): What are the accommodations/modifications you need to prepare? 1. Multisensory Teaching a. See the sight word in context. b. See the sight word highlighted on the page. c. Hear the teacher say the sight word. 2. The student has been identified with a moderate intellectual disability and will need extra processing time.

What background knowledge do the students have? 1. Student has received three lessons with a previous set of sight words. 2. Student has mastered the previous list of sight words: “and,” “are,” “come,” “get,” “grow,” “have,” “now,” “of,” “out,” and “the” with 100% accuracy. How will you assess students’ learning – pre, during and post? Pre: Student will read the sight words from the Rapid Word-Recognition Chart (See Carreker, 2011, p. 149). If the student can read the words with a 100% accuracy rate, the teacher will choose new sight words. During: Teacher will note which, and how many, sight words the student has difficulty reading.

Rutherford - Lesson Plan Five 3 After: Teacher will chart the percentage of correct sight words, and words the student had difficulty reading, and monitor progress each day the book is read. What management/grouping issues do you need to consider? 1. Find an area in the room away from distractions. 2. Provide specific positive praise. 3. Encourage the student to continue trying if/when he becomes frustrated.

Materials and Resources: 1. Level C book from Reading a-z.com (See Appendix F.) (Readinga-z.com, 2002) 2. Rapid Word-Recognition Chart (See Carreker, 2011, p. 149) with previously learned sight words, and new sight words, filled in. 3. Sentences for each sight word. 4. Teacher-Made Data Chart (See Appendix I.). (2002). Retrieved from http://www.readinga-z.com/ Birsh, J. R. (Ed.). ( 2011). Multisensory teaching of basic language skills (3rd ed.), (p. 489). Baltimore: Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co. Carreker, S., & Birsh, J. R. (2011). Multisensory teaching of basic language skills: Activity Book (Revised edition) (p. 149). Baltimore: Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co. Idol, L. (1987). Reading Success (p. 95). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

How/where will students be able to integrate (generalize) this learning? The student will be required to read in all areas of his life. Being able to easily recognize high frequency words will help the student to read at a more fluent rate. How will you evaluate the lesson (judicious review)? I will chart the student’s progress with the sight words on a teacher-made, data sheet after each lesson. This data sheet will show how the student is progressing with learning sight words.

Lesson Title: Phonics: Sight Words Main Objective of this lesson: By the end of three lessons, the student will be able to read the following ten sight words: “do,” “for”, “help”, “here”, “I”, “is”, “it”, “see”, “us”, and “work” in the context of a Level C book from the Reading a-z.com program (See

Rutherford - Lesson Plan Five 4 Appendix H.). The student will be able to accomplish this with 100% accuracy, as measured by a teacher-made data chart (See Appendix I.). (CONTENT-PROCESS) Opening: (SET – How will you get the student(s)’ attention?) Relate lesson to prior learning. Communicate the objective of the lesson. 1. Show the student the book he is going to read. 2. Ask the student: “What do you think this book might be about?” 3. Ask the student: “When you’re reading books like this, is it sometimes hard for you to read all the words?” 4. Say to the student: “Did you know that a lot of these books have the same words repeated throughout?” “These are words that we see a lot in reading and I’m going to help you learn these common words by sight, so you will know them when you see them.”

Procedure: (Is this an informal presentation, direct instruction, or structured discovery?) This is direct instruction to teach sight words. Strategies (I Do): 1. The teacher points to the word on the Rapid Word-Recognition Chart (See Carreker, 2011, p. 149) and pronounces the word. 2. The teacher finds the word in a sentence and reads the sentence. Check for Understanding- What will you ask? Student reads a Level C book from the Reading a-z.com program (Readinga-z.com, 2002), that contains the sight words. Differentiation: N/A The lesson is for one student and is, therefore, tailored to the student’s needs. (PRODUCT) Progress will be charted on a teacher-made data chart (See Appendix I.). Guided Practice (We Do): 1. The teacher and student pronounce the word together from the Rapid WordRecognition Chart (See Carreker, 2011, p. 149). 2. The teacher and student find the word in a sentence and read the sentence together.

Closure: Student(s) summarize, demonstrate learning of lesson. Independent Practice (You Do).

Rutherford - Lesson Plan Five 5 1. The teacher points to the word on the Rapid Word-Recognition Chart (See Carreker, 2011, p. 149) and the student pronounces the word alone. 2. The teacher finds the word in a sentence and student reads the sentence alone.

Formally END the lesson 1. Student reads a Level C book from the Reading a-z.com program (Readingaz.com, 2002), that contains the sight words. 2. The teacher charts on the teacher-made data sheet as the student is reading (See Appendix I.). 3. Praise student for participation and hard work.